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American University of Science and Technology

Department of Mathematics STA 210 Statistics & Probability for Business I (Required Course) Fall 2011 - 2012
Catalog Description This course is an introduction to statistics. Contents include methods used in collection, organization, presentation and analysis of data for the purpose of better business decisions. It introduces deductive and inferential statistics and probability. The course includes applications using computerized software such as Mega-Stat. 3 hours ENG 100 and MAT 100 or placement Bluman. Elementary Statistics, A Step By Step Approach, 7th ed, McGraw Hill Lecture notes and handouts Satistics Made Easy - Schaum Series Section B:

Credits Prerequisites By Course Textbook References/ Supportive Material

Course instructor Ms. Hala Khalil Office Hours: 12:00 1:00 MWF or by appointment

Block B - 4th floor - Department of Mathematics Office e-mail: hkhalil@aust.edu.lb Course Objectives To deliver a broad perspective of essential principles and practices in statistics and develop knowledge for the effective use of these tools in business and economics. By the end of the term, you should be able to: 1. Read, interpret and vocabulary and symbols. understand the statistical

Course Outcomes

2. Organize data and construct appropriate graphs to represent the data in a concise, easy-to-understand visual form. 3. Apply statistical methods to summarize data: measures of central tendencies, measures of position and measures of variation. 4. Analyze the outcomes of a certain event using counting techniques.

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5. Learn about probability; its meaning, how it is computed, and how to evaluate it in terms of the likelihood of an event actually happening. 6. Understand the Poisson Distribution, as well as the concepts of a probability distribution. 7. Use the concept of normal distribution to determine probabilities. 8. Perform statistical analysis using computer software such as Excel, Mega-Stat, Minitab Academic Honesty Submitting someone elses work as your own is not tolerated. The assignments are scaled to be small enough in size that they may be completed by the individual student. The instructor realizes that homework is frequently a collaborative task, and understands that some students may require some help. Students who collaborate with others are expected to write their homework by themselves on clean A4 sheets. Students are not expected to collaborate on examinations. If the instructor determines that academic dishonesty has occurred, the student(s) involved will normally be given an immediate grade of F and dropped from the course. Class participation is expected and will form a part of the final grade. Students are expected to attend all class sessions and to be on time. Roll will be called each class meeting. Classes missed for legitimate reasons, such as illness or temporary duty assignments are excusable. The student is expected to make up the missed work by making arrangements with the instructor. The student is responsible for providing the instructor with justification for an excused absence either prior to or immediately after the absence. Five unexcused absences are excessive and six are ground for an involuntary withdrawal from the course. Students who come late to class will not be allowed to attend the session unless they get written permission from the office of the dean of students.

Class Policies

Course Topics (approximate number of lecture hours) Course program: Hours 3 6 7 14 7 8 Material The Nature of Probability and Statistics Frequency Distribution and Graphs Data Description Probability and Counting Techniques Discrete Probability Distribution The Normal Distribution Chapters 1 2 3 4 5 6

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Grading Policy Homework and Class Participation Project Quizzes Exam I Exam II Midterm Final Exam A grade of zero will be assigned for any missed exam submitted. There will be no make up exams. 5% 5% 10% 15% 15% 20% 30% unless a valid excuse is

Contribution of Course to Meeting the Professional Component Mathematical skills: Real life applications: Examination Dates Exam I: 3 Exam II: Midterm: Final Exam: Homework Format Saturday, January 7, 2012 Nov. 28 to Dec. 5 Jan. 27 to Feb. 6 Chapters 4 & 5 Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4 Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 Saturday, October 29, 2011 Chapters 1, 2 & 60% 40%

All homework should be submitted on the due date. Homework will be graded and returned by the next week for the appropriate solution. Late homework will be penalized 50% per class period. No homework or projects will be accepted after the last day of classes. Your homework should be written on clean A4 sheets (notebook sheets are not accepted). The sheets should be stapled. Each homework problem should be clearly written before presenting the solution. Dirty and unordered homework will be rejected.

Expanded Description, Content and Form October 3: The Nature of Probability and Statistics Reading: Chapter 1 Homework #1 (Due October 10) Problems: Review Exercises #1-17 October 10: Frequency Distribution and Graphs Reading: Chapter 2 section 2.1 Homework #2 (Due October 17) Problems: p.46 #5, 7, 9, 11 Frequency Distribution and Graphs Reading: Chapter 2 section 2.2, 2.3 Homework #3 (Due October 24) Problems: p.61 #1, 2, 4, 8 & p.84 #3, 5,6,10

October 17:

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October 24:

Data Description Reading: Chapter 3, section 3.1 Homework #4 (Due October 31) Problems: p.118 #1, 7, 12, 20, 26, 31, 32

Exam I: Saturday, October 29, 2011 October 31: Data Description Reading: Chapter 3, section 3.2, 3.3 Homework #5 (Due November 8) Problems: p.137 #6, 9, 22, 24, 31,32 ,36, 42 & p.153 #9, 11, 14, 22, 28, 30

November 8: Data Description & Counting Techniques & Probability Reading: Chapter 3, section 3.4, & Chapter 4, section 4.1 Homework #6 (Due November 14) Problems: p.166 # 1, 11, 12, 14, 17 & p.196 #12, 17, 19, 24, 25, 30 November 14: Counting Techniques & Probability Reading: Chapter 4, section 4.2 Homework #7 (Due November 21) Problems: p.204 #3, 7, 9, 15, 17, 22-24 November 21: Counting Techniques & Probability Reading: Chapter 4, section 4.3 Homework #8 (Due November 25) Problems: p.220 #3, 6, 10, 11, 15, 16, 24, 28, 32, 35, 42, 48, 52 November 28 to December 5: Midterm Week December 7: Counting Techniques & Probability Reading: Chapter 4, section 4.4 Homework #9 (Due December 12) Problems: p.223 #1, 5, 8, 14, 16, 21, 25, 32, 36, 41, 45, 48, 51, 52, 55, 59 December 12: Counting Techniques & Probability Reading: Chapter 4, section 4.5 Homework #10 (Due December 19) Problems: p.240 #1-3, 6, 7, 9, 11, 14 December 19: Probability Distribution Reading: Chapter 5, section 5.1, 5.2 Homework #11 (Due January 2) Problems: p.258 #6, 8, 10, 12, 19, 26, 27, 30 and p.267 #2,3,5,9,14,17 January 2: Probability Distribution Reading: Chapter 5 , section 5.3, 5.4 Homework #12 (Due January 9) Page 4 of 5

Problems: p.277 #2, 5, 9, 13, 17, 18 & p.290 #8, 13 Exam II: Saturday, January 7, 2012 January 9: Normal Distribution Reading: Chapter 6, section 6.1 Homework #13 (Due January 16) Problems: p.311 #7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 21, 24, 29, 35, 37, 42-44, 48 Normal Distribution Reading: Chapter 6, section 6.2, 6.3 Homework #14 (Due January 23) Problems: p.325#11, 15, 19, 25, 26, 30, 36, 38 & p.338 #8, 10, 16, 22, 24, 25

January 16:

January 23-24: Revision January 27 to February 6: Final week.

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