Service Level Management Best Practice Handbook:
Building, Running and Managing Effective Service Level Management SLAs - Ready to use supporting documents bringing ITIL Theory into Practice

Notice of Rights: Copyright © The Art of Service. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Notice of Liability: The information in this book is distributed on an “As Is” basis without warranty. While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of the book, neither the author nor the publisher shall have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the instructions contained in this book or by the products described in it. Trademarks: Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and the publisher was aware of a trademark claim, the designations appear as requested by the owner of the trademark. All other product names and services identified throughout this book are used in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of such companies with no intention of infringement of the trademark. No such use, or the use of any trade name, is intended to convey endorsement or other affiliation with this book. ITIL® is a Registered Community Trade Mark of OGC (Office of Government Commerce, London, UK), and is Registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

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Service Level Management

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION ROADMAP........................................................................................ 5 SERVICE LEVEL MANGEMENT PRESENTATION........................................................... 9 SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS....................................................................................... 69 OBJECTIVES AND GOALS...................................................................................... 71 BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION DOCUMENTS ................................................................ 75 SLM SCOPE ............................................................................................................. 81 POLICIES OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE ....................................................................... 89 SERVICE LEVEL REQUIREMENTS............................................................................. 93 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS .............................................................................. 101 FUNCTIONAL SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................... 110 MULTI LEVEL BASED SLA....................................................................................... 119 SERVICE BASED SLA ............................................................................................. 127 CUSTOMER BASED SLA ........................................................................................ 135 UNDERPINNING CONTRACTS ............................................................................. 141 SERVICE OPTIONS ................................................................................................ 145 PRICE LIST .............................................................................................................. 151 SERVICE CATALOG.............................................................................................. 155 COMMUNICATION PLAN .................................................................................... 168 BUSINESS AND IT SERVICE MAPPING.................................................................. 176 REPORTS KPI’s AND METRICS .............................................................................. 192 BUSINESS AND IT FLYERS ...................................................................................... 198 EMAIL TEXT ............................................................................................................ 202 SLM PROCESS MANAGER ................................................................................... 208 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN AND PROJECT PLAN...................................................... 212 FURTHER INFORMATION .......................................................................................... 220

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Service Level Management Page 4 .

Saves you time. but simple assessments. The supporting documents and assessments will help you identify the areas within your organization that require the most activity in terms of change and improvement.Service Level Management INTRODUCTION ROADMAP Many organizations are looking to implement Service Level Management as a way to improve the structure and quality of the business. This document describes the contents of the Service Level Management Guide. Provides presentations. specifically the Service Level Management process within the Service Delivery phase. The guide is designed to answer a lot of the questions about Service Level Management and provide you with useful guides. templates and essential. The additional information will enable you to improve your organizations methodology knowledge base. Is scalable. templates and documents. Presentations can be used to educate or be used as the basis for management presentations or when making business cases for Service Level Management implementation. The Service Level Management Guide: Flows logically. The guide serves to act as a starting point. Page 5 . The information found within the book is based on the ITIL Version 2 framework. It will give you a clear path to travel. It is designed to be a valuable source of information and activities.

activities and concepts required within Service Level Management. as well as the slides. Page 6 . Service Level Management ITIL V2– This presentation provides a detailed and comprehensive overview of Service Level Management in the specialist areas of ITIL Version 2 and in particular. within the Service Level Management process as part of the Service Delivery phase. Make sure you pay close attention to the notes. as references to further documents and resources are highlighted here. These presentations will give you a good knowledge and understanding of all the terms. They can also be used as the basis for management presentations or when making a formal business case for Service Level Management implementation.Service Level Management Step 1 Start by reviewing the PowerPoint presentation.

Service Level Management Step 2 If you did not look at the supporting documents and resources when prompted during the PowerPoint presentations. You can use these documents and resources within your own organization or as a template to help you in prepare your own bespoke documentation. Service Level Management ITIL V2: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Objectives and Goals Business Justification Document SLM Scope Policies Objective and Scope Service Level Requirements Technical Specifications Functional Specifications Multi Level Based SLA Service Based SLA Customer Based SLA Underpinning Contracts Service Options Price List Service Catalog Communication Plan Business and IT Service Mapping Reports KPI’s and Metrics Business and IT Flyers Email Text SLM Process Manager Page 7 . do this now. Below is an itemized list of the supporting documents and resources for easy reference.

Page 8 . continue by working through the Implementation Plan with the focus on your organization. The supporting documents and resources found within the book will help you fill these gaps by giving you a focused. practical and user-friendly approach to Service Level Management. You will able to identify gaps and areas of attention and/or improvement. This will help you ascertain the Service Level Management maturity for your organization.Service Level Management Step 3 Alternatively.

Page 9 .Service Level Management SERVICE LEVEL MANGEMENT PRESENTATION Please refer to Objectives and Goals on page 71 within this workbook for more information.

Page 10 .Service Level Management Please refer to Business Justification Document on page 75 within this workbook for more information.

you can of course add or delete points according to your own situation. Page 11 .Service Level Management These bullet points help to illustrate why it is that we need to introduce the disciplines of effective and efficient Process management into our IT environments. Briefly discuss each.

CRM application.g. the organization has business processes in place. Page 12 . Explain difference between ‘effective’ (doing the right thing) and ‘efficient’ (doing the right thing the right way). To meet organizational objectives. Examples of business processes are sales.Service Level Management ITSM is not something on its own. financial tools). The objective tree is a useful way to help explain the importance of IT being a supporting department to the business. customer service and freight (who have a “customer returns process”). e-mail. Each of the units involved in these business processes needs IT Services (e. admin and financial (who have a “sales process”) or logistics. but closely linked to the business. word processing.

policies. procedures. IT Infrastructure includes hardware. etc. software. documentation. Page 13 .Service Level Management Continued… Each of these services runs on IT infrastructure that has to be properly managed (Service Management). ITIL provides a framework for the management of IT Infrastructure.

Page 14 .Service Level Management Traditionally we look at the IT department as a collection of specialists with specialist skills. This is a functional way to look at IT and it puts people into departmental SILO’s.

A process will link these measurements to targets. output and activities. Other points to explain: • • • A process is a set of activities with a common goal.Service Level Management Best practice processes will transverse functional departments and help to break down the silo’s/walls/barriers to communication between them. A process can measure the input. Page 15 . Explain the benefits of processes in general.

Page 16 . More and more people see the importance of processes (which is why ITIL is getting so popular). Generally. do they have the right skills. strategy and goals with the day to day activities in IT. budget. There is also an organization perspective: the alignment of vision. if it is not communicated (which is virtually always the case and finally. are you managing them effectively etc. which looks at the ‘soft side’: is your staff happy. the technology perspective gets a lot of attention (time.Service Level Management An IT organization needs to focus on all these aspects to deliver the right IT services (effective) in the right way (efficient). This is useless. there is the people perspective. people etc).

g.etc. trending information. Security Management can be included as well. due to its critical importance. reports on performance.g. Page 17 . customer satisfaction ratings) etc. financial information. Service Level Management is not an isolated process. but: • • • • • Is a process that is based around communication and monitoring Is a process that requires high client/customer liaison Provides information to all other processes (e. customer expectations.Service Level Management Service Level Management is one of 10 ITIL processes.) Requires information from other processes (e. Here we get to see the others and the one function (Service Desk).

Service Level Management Please refer to SLM Scope on page 81 within this workbook for more information. Page 18 .

Service Level Management Please refer to Policies Objectives and Goals on page 89 within this workbook for more information. Page 19 .

Also the higher level processes with the lower level etc. Page 20 . In reality organizations have typically revamped the SLA’s every 12-18 months.Service Level Management Explain the relationship between the customer – IT and Suppliers. The problem has been that the information used to update the SLA is often incomplete or disparate. Having the other processes in place provides a common focus for the SLA to draw accurate information from which allows SLM to act as the interface between the possibilities (IT) and needs (customer).

What generic benefits does IT get from having the process in place? What does the business get? The acronyms in this slide are covered later: UC = Underpinning contract (the agreement in place between Service Level Management and external providers) OLA = Operation Level Agreement (the agreement in place between Service Level Management and internal providers) SLA = Service Level Agreements (agreements that document customer expectations regarding IT Service Delivery) Page 21 .Service Level Management Talk about how SLM fits in with the rest of IT.

com Page 22 . Note: you can gain more understanding on these terms from later slides or supplemental information from www. An understanding of these are necessary as we move into the six real activities in the coming slides.Service Level Management Explain that each of these are either inputs to the process.theartofservice. outputs to the process and in some cases both.

Page 23 .Service Level Management Please refer to Level Requirement on page 93. Technical Specifications on page 101 and Functional Specifications on page 109 within this workbook for more information.

Service Level Management Please refer to Multi Level Based SLA on page 117 and Service Level Based SLA on page 125 and Customer Based SLA on page 133 within this workbook for more information. Page 24 .

Service Level Management Please refer to Underpinning Contracts on page 139 within this workbook for more information. Page 25 .

Service Level Management This is a summary slide regarding the core activities of Service Level Management. Following pages expand on this one. Page 26 .

Page 27 .Service Level Management This diagram has been split up over the following slides to allow for more detailed explanation on each component.

a first SLA must be drafted. Please refer to Service Level Requirements on page 93 within this workbook for more information.Service Level Management Once the first SLA structure has been agreed. but rather than going along with a blank sheet to commence with. it may be better to produce a first outline draft as a starting point for more detailed and in-depth discussion. It is advisable to involve Customers from the outset. Page 28 . Be careful though no to go too far and appear to be presenting the Customer with a fait accompli.

Service Level Management Please refer to Multi Level Based SLA on page 117. Service Level Based SLA on page 125 and Customer Based SLA on page 133 within this workbook for more information. Page 29 .

If a CMDB or any sort of asset database exists. A dress of ‘detective work’ may be needed to compile this list an agree it with the Customers (sifting through old documentation. Such a catalog should list all of the services being provided. Page 30 . talking with IT staff and Customers. it is recommended that an IT Service Catalog is produced. a summary or their characteristics and details of the Customers and maintainer or each. looking at procurement records and talking with suppliers and contractor etc). searching program libraries. and there may not be a clear picture of all the services currently being provided and the Customers of each. these may be a valuable source of information. In order to establish an accurate picture. organizations’ IT Infrastructures have grown and developed.Service Level Management Over the years.

A lot of organizations have discovered this the ‘hard way’ and as a consequence. have absorbed heavy costs both in financial sense as well as in terms of negative impacts on their culture. the drafting of SLA’s.Service Level Management Nothing should be included in an SLA unless it can be effectively monitored and measured at a commonly agreed point. Page 31 . so that monitoring can be in place to assist with the validation of proposed targets. or in parallel with. Existing monitoring of capabilities should be received and upgraded as necessary. The importance of this cannot be overstressed. Ideally this should be done ahead of. as inclusions of items that cannot be effectively monitored almost always result in disputes and eventual loss of faith in the SLM process.

Without monitoring all components in the end-to-end service (which may be very difficult and costly to achieve) a true picture cannot be gained. it is probably more effective to record only down time against the service the User was trying to access at the time (though this needs to be agreed with the Customer). especially if performance related. Unfortunately this is often very difficult to achieve. so caution is needed. monitoring or individual components. Customer perception is often that although a failure might affect more than one service all they are bothered about the service they cannot access at the time of the reported Incident – though this is not always true. Where multiple services are delivered to a single workstation. Users must be aware that they should report Incidents immediately to aid diagnostics. Similarly. such as the network or server.Service Level Management It is essential that monitoring matches’ the Customers true perception of service. Page 32 . does not guarantee that the service will be available so far as the Customer is concerned – a desktop or application failure may mean that the service cannot be used by the Customer. For example.

Service Level Management When completed. Page 33 . the catalog may initially consist of a matrix. Some organizations integrate and maintain their Service Catalog as part of the Configuration Management Data Base(CMBD). table or spreadsheet.

This slide can also be an invaluable check list for completion of SLM plans. reports. contracts. Page 34 .Service Level Management Here are all six activities and the relevant outputs. etc.

Service Level Management Page 35 .

Create some examples for the group using your own experience. If you can start the discussion with one example. Page 36 . How can we make this as streamlined as possible? It does portray the complexity and myriad of information flows however. others will quickly recount their own experiences. can be very confusing.Service Level Management This is a very busy slide and when you think about it like this that all these things are constantly taking place.

exception reports should be produced whenever an SLA has been broken (or threatened if appropriate thresholds have been set to give an early warning). Operational reports must be produced frequently (daily – perhaps even more frequently). and where possible.Service Level Management Immediately the SLA is agreed. Page 37 . and service achievement reports must be produced. monitoring must be instigated.

as each situation is unique. but there are a number of common features that often occur within the SLA’s. and content varies depending up the type of SLA. It is difficult to be prescriptive.Service Level Management The specific content and the initial targets to be included in SLA’s must be agreed. Page 38 .

Service Level Management Notes: Page 39 .

Service Option on page 143 and Price Lists on page 149 within this workbook for more information. Page 40 .Service Level Management So what should be in this thing called an SLA? What else could be or should be included in the SLA? Please refer to Technical Specifications on page101. Functional Specifications on page 109.

Page 41 .Service Level Management Please refer to Service Catalog on page 153 within this workbook for more information.

theartofservice. Page 42 .Service Level Management More information on Configuration Management at www.com Please refer to Service Catalog on page 153 within this workbook for more information.

from the very outset. form part of the testing/trialing criteria as the service progresses through the stages of design and development or procurement. They should. The SLR’s should be integral part of the service design criteria.Service Level Management While many organizations have to give initial priority to introducing SLA’s for existing services. A draft SLA should be developed alongside the service itself. of which the functional specifications is a part. Page 43 . and should be signed and formalized before the service is introduced in to live use. it is also important to establish procedures for agreeing Service Level Requirements (SLR’s) for new services being developed or procured.

itil.Service Level Management An IT Service Management self-assessment scan can be downloaded from www.uk. For information regarding an independent scan send an e-mail to service@theartofservice. This is a self assessment scan and is therefore more prone to inaccurate results as there is a lack of objectivity and an exposure to organizational politics.com Page 44 .co.

Page 45 . Please refer to Communication Plan on page 165 and Business IT Service Mapping on page 173 within this workbook for more information.Service Level Management Strategic alignment workshops should be conducted as part of an IT Service Management SCAN to gain insight into what the IT Managers see as high priority issues.

Page 46 .Service Level Management Please refer to Communication Plan on page 165 and Business IT Service Mapping on page 173 within this workbook for more information.

Service Level Management Page 47 .

For example. a three layer structure as follows: • • • Corporate Level Customer Level Service Level Such structure allows SLA’s to be kept to a manageable size. Page 48 . avoids unnecessary duplication. and reduces the need for frequent update.Service Level Management Some organizations have chosen to adopt a multi-level SLA structure.

and with the service providers to ensure that these are achievable. negotiations must be held with the Customer(s). Guide on general negotiation techniques is included in the ITIL Business and Management Skills book. or Customer representatives to finalize the content of the SLA and the initial service level targets. Page 49 .Service Level Management Using a draft agreement as a basis.

maintaining ongoing contact with the other party. conducting service reviews. coordinating and implementing modifications to the SLA. Page 50 .Service Level Management Management responsibilities include providing a point of contact for problems related to the agreement. and assessing and reporting on how the parties can further enhance their working relationship.

E. SLA structure should make it possible to offer integrated services in one SLA.g.Service Level Management The subjects and language in the service catalogue and SLAs should be clear to the customers. unite services from various business units into one SLA. The guidelines to be developed should be applicable for all sorts of services. Page 51 . IT services and other facilitating services.

Service Level Management Page 52 .

g. Page 53 . via an SIP)? Please refer to Reports KPI’s and Metrics on page 187 within this workbook for more information.Service Level Management How are KPI’s and Metrics used? How can we improve this? KPI’s • • • • • % of services covered by SLAs? % of service targets being met? Are customer satisfaction ratings increasing? Are IT costs decreasing for services with stable service level agreements? Is there documentary evidence that issues raised at reviews are being followed up and resolved (e.

benefits and opportunities to be realized. Page 54 . The result of a gap analysis is a list of issues that exist. actions to be taken.Service Level Management Service Improvement program is usually instigated where an underlying difficulty has been identified which is adversely impacting upon service quality. A Service Level Scan and the SLAs and Service Catalogue are important inputs into the SIP. consequences. Do they still align with each other? These two inputs will help provide an understanding of the gap that will exist between services being delivered and services that need to be delivered (Service Level Scan) and current description of services and service level agreements. They provide a clear definition of the services being offered and at what level they are being offered to allow comparison with the current service levels being achieved.

IT departments measure the availability of individual components rather than an end to end service.Service Level Management Typically. This does not align IT to the business Page 55 .

Service Level Management Notes: Page 56 .

Service Level Management Typically. Page 57 . Please refer to Reports KPI’s and Metrics on page 187 within this workbook for more information. This does not align IT to the business. IT departments measure the availability of individual components rather than an end to end service.

Service Level Management These are documents that are handy to have as templates.theartofservice. See www. Page 58 .com for a range of documents and templates that are available.

What we can do is take ideas from all templates then do what is right for the organization.Service Level Management These templates on screen give a very high level view. The point needs to be made here that there is not one solution of a template that fits all organizations because of the diversity of them. Page 59 .

Service Level Management Page 60 .

Page 61 .Service Level Management Please refer to Service Catalogue on page 153 within this workbook for more information.

Service Level Management SLA •is a formal contractual arrangement specifying the required service levels and the expected quality of service to be delivered. Page 62 . •It must state the mutual responsibilities of the customer and provider ensuring that both parties are responsible for monitoring. improving services to ensure that end users are satisfied with the service they receive. revising and evaluating existing SLAs. •Agreements with internal and external service suppliers should be reviewed when significant changes to SLAs take place and at least annually to ensure that they continue to underpin SLAs. SLM •Puts in place Service Level Agreements with providers in order to monitor and manage service levels.

Service Level Management Continued… THE LEVEL OF SERVICE •Should be captured and base-lined. •The foundations for service management must be put in place very early during the acquisition process. This enables relevant and realistic contract management and management of the relationship with the provider following service implementation. Page 63 . This provides a basis for measuring service improvement and achievements using defined metrics for each service provided. at least annually. All service level targets and results together with their history should be maintained in an annual report. •The service improvement program should be monitored regularly and appropriate action taken to correct any underachievements.

consultancy – if needed).Service Level Management The costs associated with Implementing and executing SLM included: • Staff Costs (salaries. training. plus some element of integrated Service Management tools) • Hardware on which run these tools • Marketing costs e. • • Accommodation Costs Support Tools (monitoring and reporting. both initial and ongoing. Production of Service Catalog Page 64 .g. recruitment costs.

Page 65 .Service Level Management Please refer to Business and IT Flyers on page 193 and Email Text on page 197 within this workbook for more information.

Service Level Management Please refer to Communication Plan on page 165 within this workbook for more information. Page 66 .

Service Level Management Please refer to SLM Process Manager on page 203 within this workbook for more information. Page 67 .

Service Level Management Page 68 .

look for text surrounded by << and >> these are indicators for you to create some specific text. Page 69 . Watch also for highlighted text which provides further guidance and instructions.Service Level Management SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS Through the documents.

Service Level Management Page 70 .

Service Level Management OBJECTIVES AND GOALS IT Services Detailed Objectives/Goals Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<organization name>> Page 71 .

Arranging the logistics of bringing the involved parties together (at intervals that are not considered to be a “nuisance” but will allow the process objective to be upheld. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. manage and implement an awareness/communication plan appropriate for this process. Notes Met/Exceeded/Shortfall ☺ Dates/names/role titles Use these objectives to generate discussion about others that may be more appropriate to list than those provided. but affected personnel. This is an activity that is often forgotten over time or simply not done from the out-set. Failure to meet objectives (or when service breaches are detected) should trigger a process for improvement. Design. Appoint/Recruit the SLM team and provide ongoing awareness. Setting schedules for reviews of Service Level Agreements and associated supporting documentation. Page 72 .Service Level Management Detailed Objectives/Goals for Service Level Management The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. we refer to this as a Service Improvement Plan (SIP). Monitor customer and end-user satisfaction levels. education and training for staff involved with the process and communication to non-involved. Monitor the marketplace for appropriate process tools and make recommendations. The detailed objectives for Service Level Management should include the following salient points: Objective After they have been agreed upon a specific objective for the process is to continue reporting metrics. Under the Service Level Management process. However.

with 2Gb RAM and 500Gb of disk storage” – we would say “large central server designed for all customers to use and share information from”) The SIP will generally be based on broken SLAs.com for more details on the Configuration Management process) Functional role description of who is responsible for this SIP (who would participate in a review of this document). (e. Preferably use a name that is common language in the organization (not a technical name).theartofservice. Use language that is business user friendly. The SIP must be drawn together with input from other processes (in particular Problem Management) so that the action steps in the SIP do in fact contribute to improvements and eradication of poor performance. Use this section to briefly detail in generic terms why this SIP is required. instead of “NT Server.g. Representatives from customer and IT. It is likely that there have been continuing Problems that have led to the service degradation. Problem Management details Page 73 . Owner Service Name Service Description (Business) (refer to Technical Considerations later in this table) Service Breach(s) details (refer to Problem & Availability Management issues). From Problem Management we can gain a better understanding of the background to the SIP.Service Level Management Service Improvement Plan (SIP) Where an underlying difficulty has been identified that has lead to a degradation in service quality it is necessary for the Service Level Management process to start a Service Improvement Plan (SIP). The SIP will be driven as a result of the need to improve degraded performance. Briefly describe the primary function of the service. Areas to address Comments/Examples Time Frame/Notes/ Who SIP Reference number Unique identifying number for the SLA (for inclusion in the Configuration Management Data Base – CMDB) (see www.

documentation (new and updates to existing). It is more likely however. communications. is the life of the SIP time based or driven by activities only? This part of the SIP will outline actual steps to be taken to improve availability and eradicate poor performance. (Note: don’t forget to track changes and ensure the Configuration Management database is updated). testing. SIP Creation Date SIP Last Modify Date In this section you can describe any technical considerations that are essential to document. Briefly list any considerations regarding security considerations for this SIP. current and future availability metrics for this service. that you will include here a link to the Service Catalog or Technical Specification. Service Security Considerations SIP Validity period SPECIFIC SIP ACTIONS Version Control Information Technical considerations Notes & Comments Page 74 . This section of the SIP can be run as a Project if large enough. or as a simple list of action items. training/education and reworking current procedures and work practices.Service Level Management Availability Management details After the SIP is instigated the end users and customers should expect a higher level of service availability than they have in the past. responsible person and timeframe. The SIP must directly address the issue of availability by reviewing the past. Is there a life-span for this SIP. Action items will centre on discussions. reviews. negotiations.

Service Level Management BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION DOCUMENTS IT Services Business Justification Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 75 .

This document was. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 76 . However.Service Level Management Business Justification Document for Service Level Management The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. This document serves as a reference for HOW TO APPROACH THE TASK OF SEEKING FUNDS for the implementation of the Service Level Management process. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization.

who cares – does it make things cold?” Page 77 . However. The network bandwidth is our biggest bottleneck and we have to go to a switched local environment. the problem is not with them. For example: We say We have to increase IT security controls. We are making the changes on Sunday afternoon. There will be less people working then. consider the situation of buying a new fridge. Human resources and other shared services) seem to get all that they want.g. which flow in an anti-clockwise direction in the Southern hemisphere”. with the implementation of a new firewall. We are typically poor salespeople when it comes to putting our case forward. Changes to the environment are scheduled for a period of time when we expect there to be minimal business impact. What if the technically savvy sales person wants to explain “the intricacies of the tubing structure used to super cool the high pressure gases. rather than talking in a language that a business person understands. We should say Two weeks ago our biggest competitor lost information that is now rumored to be available on the internet. This may sound like a bold statement but it is true. We try to impress with technical descriptions. but we are now using our computers for many more tasks. The e-mail you send to the other national managers will take 4 to 6 hours to be delivered. Wouldn’t you say “too much information. Doesn’t that sound familiar? To help reinforce this point even further. it’s with US. As IT professionals we have (for too long) assumed that we miss out on funds while other functional areas (e. It used to be 2 to 3 minutes.Service Level Management Service Level Management Business Justification A strong enough business case will ensure progress and funds are made available for any IT initiative.

Service Level Management Well IT managers need to stop trying to tell business managers about the tubing structure and just tell them what they are interested in. (Note in ITIL terms the Customer is the person who “pays” for the IT Service) With Service Level Management we focus on meeting the Service Level Requirements specified to us by customers. escalations. If you need assistance in writing business benefits for your organization please e-mail service@theartofservice. Even if one person performs many different roles within the process we can clearly articulate what these are. monitoring and reporting. IT Services delivered that have no corresponding SLR may in fact be surplus to business requirements. If it can’t be measured it can’t be managed. So let’s know look at some benefits of Service Level Management. The SLR gives us a blueprint to check our own Service Delivery against. Notes/Comments/ Relevance The most important aspect of Service Level Management is the monitoring and delivery of services that lead to increasing satisfaction levels of customers. Page 78 . Remember that the comments here are generic. Through the process of Service Level Management we can develop a common language of understanding between IT and Customers. Service Level Management also ensures that we have clearly defined roles and responsibilities. This is a clear benefit in that we can easily identify those involved with negotiations. as they have to apply to any organization. The process of establishing and monitoring performance levels means that when IT and business people discuss IT related issues they are in fact talking about the same thing (and not – as often happens – talking at odds with each other. Service Level Management forces us into the creation of targets and metrics against which we can measure performance. For example if a meeting is held to discuss the Service Level Agreement for the provision of E-mail services then there is common ground for discussion.com for a quotation.

The SLA then becomes the basis of charging for IT Services (for more information on Financial Management for IT Services refer to www.in cases where services are outsourced the SLAs are a key part of managing the relationship with the third-party . An important. Monitoring the nature of calls for support and general communication can help us to identify such weaknesses and therefore suggest education programs that will address the lack of knowledge and skill. value is a discussion regarding potential business impact).in other cases service monitoring allows the performance of suppliers (internal and external) to be evaluated and managed When we create Service Level Agreements – the most widely known single activity of Service Level Management . Ideally. identified in advance so that remedial action can be taken (e. Service Improvement Plan – SIP) SLM underpins supplier management (and vice versa) . Page 79 .com) (Note that IT Service Managers must be able to clearly articulate the difference between cost and value – cost is discussed in absolute monetary terms. the process also allows us to document customer responsibilities as well as IT) The monitoring aspect of SLM is the perfect way to discover weak or potentially weak areas of Service Delivery.g.theartofservice.we generally include a section on Pricing. but often overlooked part of this process is the identification of weaknesses in the use of IT Services from the organization end-user population.Service Level Management (importantly. Having a continuous improvement philosophy regarding IT Service delivery ensures that the IT Department is (a) looking to reduce service disruptions and (b) decrease the overall cost of service delivery (without compromising the quality).

Service Level Management

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Service Level Management

SLM SCOPE

IT Services
Scope Document Process: Service Level Management

Status:

In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>>

Version: Release Date:

Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text

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Service Level Management

Document Control
Author Prepared by <<name and / or department>>

Document Source This document is located on the LAN under the path: I:/IT Services/Service Delivery/Service Level Management/Scope

Document Approval This document has been approved for use by the following: • • • <<first name, last name>>, IT Services Manager <<first name, last name>>, IT Service Delivery Manager <<first name, last name>>, National IT Help Desk Manager

Amendment History
Issue Date Amendments Completed By

Distribution List When this procedure is updated the following copyholders must be advised through email that an updated copy is available on the intranet site:
<<Organization Name>> Business Unit IT Stakeholders

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Service Level Management

Introduction
Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide the IT Organization with the specifications of the IT Services that will be included within the scope of the Service Level Management Process.

Scope This document describes the following: • • Scope of Service Level Management <<any additional items that you want>>

Audience This document is relevant to all staff in <<Organization name>>

Ownership IT Services has ownership of this document.

Related Documentation Include in this section any related Service Level Management reference numbers and other associated documentation: • • • •

SLM1200 SLM Implementation Plan / Project Plan SLM1300 SLM Policies, Guidelines and Scope Document SLM1700 SLM Process Template SLM2200 Service Catalogue

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Definition This activity helps define the services that you already deliver and can deliver. scope and organization of the document. Page 84 .Service Level Management Executive Overview Describe the purpose. The output from this activity is the Service Catalogue. The definition of an SLA is: << Insert your organizations definition here >> The definition of an OLA is: << Insert your organizations definition here >> The definition of a UC is: << Insert your organizations definition here >> Process Scope The process scope details the scope of the activities that need to occur within the Service Level Management Process. Service Level Management Overview The document’s intent is to provide a scope for the Service Level Management Process. In this section determine the scope of the Service Catalogue.

we can now set the scope for the SLA. This will be done by a series of interviews with department managers and senior executives. In this section determine the scope of the Requirements gathering. In conjunction with the above table. OLAs and UCs necessary to support the agreed services. In this manner we need to determine what will be included in the SLA. Department Services Business Owner IT Owner << Department: Services: The department to be interviewed The services being provided to that department Business Owner: The department manager or other IT Owner: The IT personnel who will be responsible for providing the service >> Negotiate and Agree In this activity we create the necessary SLAs. Page 85 .Service Level Management Specify This activity is about gathering the Service Level Requirements.

Service Level Management For example: Customer IT Service Service Level Agreements Availability Capacity Disaster Recovery Marketing Sales and Support Email Logistics Monitor In this section we need to set the scope for which aspects of the services we are going to monitor. As such the reports should be written in Business English as well as Technical English. The below table provides an example. and what tools we are going to use to monitor the services with. In this section. provide a list of reports necessary for each customer based on each service. This will be done in conjunction with the above table. Page 86 . Reports Reports are an integral way of spreading information about IT Services back to the business as well as to IT Departments for process improvement.

Service Level Management Reports Customer Service Business Reports Productivity Marketing Marketing Sales Sales Transport Email Internet Logistics Accounts Logistics IT Reports No. Page 87 . Terminology Make sure that all terminology is captured and documented correctly. of % of CPU Transaction Bandwidth Incidents Availability Seconds Rates Appendices Include any applicable appendixes that are needed.

Service Level Management Page 88 .

Service Level Management POLICIES OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE IT Services Policies. Objectives and Scope Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Page 89 .

The reason has to be based in business benefits. may be too lengthy to read. That won’t do. Objectives and Scope for Service Level Management The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. or advantageous Use this text box to answer the “SENSE OF URGENCY” question regarding this process. Why is effort being put into this process? Not simply because someone thinks it’s a good idea. not be clearly focused on answering the WHY question for this process. A policy statement any bigger than this text box. Is it because of legal requirements or competitive advantage? Perhaps the business has suffered major problems or user satisfaction ratings are at the point where outsourcing is being considered. guiding principle.Service Level Management Policies. prudent. or procedure considered expedient. However. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 90 . Policy Statement A course of action. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. The above Policy Statement was. lose the intended audience with detail. You must be able to concisely document the reason behind starting or improving this process.

based on instinct? A generic sample statement on the “objective” for Service Level Management is: The Service Level Management process aims to improve. while maintaining. What will be the end result of this process and how will we know when we have reached the end result? Will we know because we will establish a few key metrics or measurements or will it be a more subjective decision. may be too lengthy to read. Use this text box to answer the “WHERE ARE WE GOING” question regarding this process. These are definite areas that we can set metrics for and therefore measure progress. IT Service delivery quality. An objective statement any bigger than this text box. Note the keywords in the statement. For the statement on Service Level Management they are “report. agree and monitor”. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 91 .Service Level Management Objectives Statement Something worked toward or striven for. not be clearly focused on answering the WHERE question for this process. The process must review Service Achievements against customer expectations and take steps to improve or modify Service Delivery accordingly. Actions to achieve this include the requirement to conduct repetitive actions that include reporting. lose the intended audience with detail. agreeing and monitoring. The above Objective Statement was. a goal.

An scope statement any bigger than this text box. What are the boundaries for this process? What does the information flow look like into this process and from this process to other processes and functional areas? A generic sample statement on the “scope” for Service Level Management is: Through the use of agreements written in the form of documents the SLM process will manage relationships between providers of IT services that are both external to the organization and internal to the organization. not be clearly focused on answering the WHAT question for this process. lose the intended audience with detail. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 92 .Service Level Management Scope Statement The area covered by a given activity or subject Use this text box to answer the “WHAT” question regarding this process. These external agreements shall be referred to as Underpinning contracts and the internal agreements will be called Operational Level Agreements. The above Scope Statement was. may be too lengthy to read.

Service Level Management SERVICE LEVEL REQUIREMENTS IT Services Service Level Requirements Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected Version: <<your version>> Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 93 .

The first section allows you to briefly describe the service. The second section is where you capture user specific requirements (duplicate this section the number of times required). However. The third section allows you to cross reference the requirements uncovered in this study with other agreements/documents that may already exist. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 94 . This document serves as a GUIDE FOR ESTABLISHING THE NEEDS OF CUSTOMERS WITH REGARD TO IT SERVICES. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization. This document was. The document is made up of 3 sections. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered.Service Level Management Service Level Requirements (SLR) The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization.

instead of “NT Server. (e. Briefly describe the primary function of the service. with only salient details) With regard to understanding SERVICE LEVEL REQUIREMENTS (SLR’s) the following points should be addressed: Service Information Areas to address Unique SLR Reference # Comments/Examples Useful to cross reference to related Service Level Agreements. Use language that is business user friendly. OLAs or Underpinning Contracts For cross referencing to the created Service Level Agreement (filled in after the SLA is created). The SLR document does not have to be in a lengthy written format and in fact it is more likely to be adopted if it is kept concise.Service Level Management (The following form can be used as an SLR interview or data gathering document.g. with 2Gb RAM and 500Gb of disk storage” – we would say “large central server designed for all customers to use and share information”) Time Frame/Notes/Who Related SLA Reference # Service Name Service Description (Business) (refer to end of table for technical considerations) Page 95 . Preferably use a name that is common language in the organization (not a technical name).

However. The date is an important consideration as requirements will definitely change over time. If you feel that there could be some interruptions to service delivery. Should there be differences in the level of accessibility for different people/roles for this Time Frame/Notes/Who Customer Expectations Service Security Considerations Page 96 .Service Level Management Customer Information (Duplicate the following table for as many services to be covered in this SLR). These clinical descriptions set an expectation for the customer/end-user about the IT Service. because the service is relatively new. Far too often we write descriptions of IT Services in a clinical fashion. then document that here. Areas to address Customer Definition and date of discussion Comments/Examples Whether the customer is an. It should be documented here. Individual Individual representing a group of users A group meeting to discuss service requirements. remember that using the reason “new service” has only a limited life-span. You can use this form or the SLA that will be derived from it as a starting point for the next review. Briefly list any considerations regarding security considerations that the representative has for this service. Use this section to set the expectations of the reader. Quite often the description is interpreted by the reader in a way not intended by the writer. This is a unique concept to this SLA design template.

in a given time period? What would be an acceptable number of errors or reruns? Is after hours support required? To what degree is the support needed (full support. Group A needs immediate response. Confidential to the individual or for the functional group or for a peer group). Be careful of using generic terms like “confidential”.g. Confidential can be interpreted different ways (e. partial.Service Level Management service? (try to use role descriptions – instead of names). Service Target Response priorities What sort of priority levels of support need to be in place for this service? Are there categories of end user for the service that require differing levels of support? (Eg. after they have gone home!! Get numbers: What is the maximum number of accepted outages. best effort)? Service Target Response time Service Support Hours (Availability) Service Out of Hours support procedure Page 97 . Group B needs face-to-face support) Against the levels/priorities defined are there corresponding response times for the different priorities? (Eg. Group A requires phone support only. Group B needs a 2 hour response) What are the REALISTIC support hours required for this service? Impress upon the representatives understand that IT staff also have day jobs and do not automatically start work.

Per user.g.g. 2 hours. per transaction) What is the customer budget with regard to this service? Can the representative help you to define metrics for this service? Does the representative have a way that they classify the service? (that we may have missed – as our focus tends to be more on technical issues) Does the representative have any thoughts regarding penalties that should be imposed if the service cannot be delivered according to agreed expectations? (Realistic!) Does the representative have any expectations regarding how the service should be recovered in the event of an extended outage? Do they require immediate recovery.Service Level Management Service Charging policy Does the representative have any expectation regarding charges for Service Delivery? Be careful with this question as it may create some defensive reaction from the representative (what do you mean I have to pay for the service? I never have in the past!!) The question of charging is generally a more strategic decision made by business managers. 1 day. 1 week)? Service Metrics for performance Service Breach Clause Continuity Considerations Page 98 . what is the roll back point (e. How is charging to be implemented? (e. or can they work in a paper based mode for a period of time? Can the customer accept any loss of data? If yes.

THIS TEMPLATE HOWEVER. (Duplicate the above table for the number of Services that requirements are to be gathered for) Page 99 .Service Level Management Non-representative Information (Duplicate the following table for the number of services that data is being gathered on). It is more likely however. that you will include here a link to the Service Catalog or Technical Specification. DOES PROMPT THE READER TO CONSIDER THE MOST CRITICAL AREAS OF DATA GATHERING and IT PROVOKES THOUGHT ABOUT OTHER AREAS THAT COULD BE INCLUDED BASED ON INDIVIDUAL NEEDS. Areas to address SLA Cross Reference Comments/Examples Make a reference to any existing SLAs that may be able to be adapted or modified to meet this requirement. You can use this section as a check that the service is in fact documented in the Service Catalog. In this section you can describe any technical considerations that are essential to document. Time Frame/Notes/Who Technical considerations Notes & Comments NOTE: THERE CAN BE NO SINGLE CORRECT DEFINITION OF A DATA GATHERING EXERCISE FOR IT SERVICE DELIVERY REQUIREMENTS THAT WILL COVER ALL SITUATIONS FOR ALL ORGANIZATIONS.

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Service Level Management TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS IT Services Technical Specification Process: Service Level Management Service: <service name> Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 101 .

last name>. last name>. IT Service Delivery Manager <first name. National IT Help Desk Manager Amendment History Issue Date Amendments Completed By Distribution List When this procedure is updated the following copyholders must be advised through email that an updated copy is available on the intranet site: <<Organization name>> Business Unit IT Stakeholders Page 102 .Service Level Management Document Control Author Prepared by <name and / or department> Document Source This document is located on the LAN under the path: I:/IT Services/Service Delivery/Technical Specifications/ Document Approval This document has been approved for use by the following: • • • <first name. IT Services Manager <first name. last name>.

Audience This document is relevant to IT staff in <<Organization name>> Ownership IT Services has ownership of this document.Service Level Management Introduction Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide relevant IT Units with the technical specifications for the range of services provided by IT Services to the <<Organization name>> community. Related Documentation Include in this section any related Service Level Agreement reference numbers and other associated documentation: • • • • Relevant SLA and procedural documents Relevant IT Services Catalogue Relevant Technical Specification documentation Relevant User Guides and Procedures Page 103 . Scope This document describes the following: • • • • • • • • details of each service provided by IT Services including: description of service functional capabilities of the service user characteristics user operations and practices software and hardware interfaces service contacts details of procedures for the service Note: It is assumed for each service described in this document that the supporting functional awareness of the service is already known.

scope and organization of the Technical Specification document. Consider using a formal “Use Case” to specify the end-users' expected use of the service. Service technical capabilities This section presents a list of the technical aspects that the service will be required to perform. Page 104 . This section should consider various user classes or profiles such as managers. Also include the services relationship to the business processes. User characteristics This section describes the intended users of the service in terms of job function. equipment operators. Where the service comprises of technical aspects. Service Overview Service Description Describes briefly the reason for the service. This may also be derived from the Service Level Requirements. and the tasks they will most frequently perform. and lists the most important features and capabilities. a table may be developed to illustrate these relationships. Also covers how users might use the service on an occasional basis. or skill levels required. engineers. User operations and practices Describes how persons will normally use the service. and network or database administrators.Service Level Management Executive Overview Describe the purpose. specialized knowledge. IT support staff.

Service Level Management Assumptions This section lists any assumptions that were made in specifying the technical requirements of this service. units of measure. display formats and Page 105 . Some examples of technical aspects are: Processing. if we are describing the archive activity we would expect to end up with a media storage device that would be stored in a secure location. accuracy and tolerances. Inputs Describe the inputs to the aspect. Other technical considerations The interfaces in this section are specified by documenting: the name and description of each item. source or input. Data feeds from other systems. Reports generated are also defined. Archive. For example with regard to backups we would describe the database close. Processing Describes what is done. timing. Backup. backup and database restart activities. ranges. For example. Outputs This section describes the outputs. Other services How does the service technically interact with other services? Specific Technical Descriptions This section is repeated for each technical aspect of the service. human input or automated timed activities are examples of inputs. Restores. Description The description describes the Technical aspect and its role in the service. destination or output.

client server details). querying data files and databases. data volume requirements. Performance Discusses items such as response times. and limitations arising from hardware. Software details Describes the technical aspects of the software used to provide the service (e. email. other supporting services and applications that contribute to the service availability. Hardware details Describes the technical components needed to provide the service. including items such as networking. software or communications standards. intranet. maximum data file size or problem complexity. maximum number of concurrent uses. performing calculations of various complexities. and importing/exporting data. operating system levels. Communication details Describes how the service will communicate with itself (for multi-platform applications) or other software applications or hardware. and peak load requirements (for webbased applications). virus protection details.g. PABX. backup software used. IP telephony etc.Service Level Management organization. throughput requirements. and also other output or input devices such as printers or handheld devices. Technical Design Constraints Examples of technical constraints that affect service design choices are items such as memory constraints involving minimum and maximum RAM and hard disk space. Includes expected response times for entering information. Additional Requirements Page 106 . availability and capacity requirements and any relevant agreements that may impact on the service. and Internet communications.

Service Level Management Describes other characteristics the service must have. that were not covered in the prior sections. Page 107 .

including both hard copy and online requirements. • Other requirements: Describes any other requirements not already covered above that need to be considered during the design of the service.Service Level Management Administration Includes any periodic updating or data management needed for the service. • User documentation: Describes the user documentation to be delivered in conjunction with the service. Page 108 .

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Service Level Management FUNCTIONAL SPECIFICATIONS IT Services Functional Specification Process: Service Level Management Service: <service name> Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected Version: <<your version>> Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 110 .

last name>>. IT Service Delivery Manager <<first name.Service Level Management Document Control Author Prepared by <<name and / or department>> Document Source This document is located on the LAN under the path: I:/IT Services/Service Delivery/Functional Specifications/ Document Approval This document has been approved for use by the following: • • • <<first name. National IT Help Desk Manager Amendment History Issue Date Amendments Completed By Distribution List When this procedure is updated the following copyholders must be advised through email that an updated copy is available on the intranet site: <<Organization name>> Business Unit IT Stakeholders Page 111 . last name>>. IT Services Manager <<first name. last name>>.

Scope This document describes the following: details of each service provided by IT Services including: • • • • • • • description of service functional capabilities of the service user characteristics user operations and practices software and hardware interfaces service contacts details of procedures for the service Note: It is assumed for each service described in this document that the supporting back-end technology is already in place and operational. Audience This document is relevant to all staff in <<Organization name>> Ownership IT Services has ownership of this document.Service Level Management Introduction Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide relevant Business Units with the functional specifications of the range of services provided by IT Services to the <<Organization name>> community. Related Documentation Include in this section any related Service Level Agreement reference numbers and other associated documentation: • • • • Relevant SLA and procedural documents Relevant IT Services Catalogue Relevant Technical Specification documentation Relevant User Guides and Procedures Page 112 .

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The list of functional capabilities may be an updated version of the capabilities listed in the original “Service Level Requirements” for this service.Service Level Management Executive Overview Describe the purpose. Where the service comprises of several functional capabilities. engineers. and the tasks they will most frequently perform. This section should consider various user classes or profiles such as managers. Service Overview Service Description Describes briefly the reason for the service. Consider using a formal “Use Case” to specify the end-users' expected use of the service. Also include the services relationship to the business processes. specialized knowledge. IT support staff. User operations and practices Describes how persons will normally use the service. or skill levels required. Service functional capabilities This section presents a list of the functions that the service will be required to perform. User characteristics This section describes the intended users of the service in terms of job function. and network or database administrators. Also covers how users might use the service on an occasional basis. and lists the most important features and capabilities. Page 114 . equipment operators. scope and organization of the Functional Specification document. a table may be developed to illustrate these relationships. This may also be derived from the Service Level Requirements.

Cited here would be database definitions where relevant. and recovery of email services. Page 115 . user interface limitations. Input validation strategy. Other services How does the service interact with other services? Specific Function Descriptions This section is repeated for each function of the service. capacity. virus checking and scanning of email. Some examples of functions are: email sending or receiving. Includes items such as minimum availability. Inputs Describe the inputs to the function. states if training is required for use of the system. It should also include maintenance requirements. flow of information etc. allowed email types and values are specified for each input. Also. Description The description describes the function and its role in the service. Processing Describes what is done by the function. transaction algorithms or functions. sorting or archiving email. Assumptions This section lists any assumptions that were made in specifying the functional requirements of this service.Service Level Management General constraints This section will list the limitations. and data limitations of the service. security needed by the service to function. more specifically the amount of time and frequency the service will be unavailable due to maintenance and service.

and options is described. along with the expected content of each window. nonfunctioning screen shots (such as PowerPoint slides). and may take the form of a separate document. The navigation flow of the windows. Examples of items that could be included are screen resolutions. Software Interfaces Page 116 . menus. External Interfaces The interfaces in this section are specified by documenting: the name and description of each item. This is usually best done via simulated. email interface available etc. availability and capacity requirements and any relevant agreements that may impact on the service. User Interfaces Where necessary. it is included. web interface available. Where a user interface description is relevant. accuracy and tolerances. destination or output. ranges. source or input.Service Level Management Outputs This section describes the outputs of the function. This section can be generic enough to describe simply the User Interfaces to the functions of the service. and also other output or input devices such as printers or handheld devices. timing. including any complex dialog boxes. This section describes all major forms. or web pages. Examples of items here would be client interface available. and how the service will be protected from security issues. Hardware Interfaces Describes the components needed to provide the service. units of measure. primary font type and size. Reports generated are also defined. color scheme. screens. display formats and organization. Discussion also includes how input validation will be done.

or scripting. networking. manager. any password-protected access levels such as operator. email. For example. automation. Includes any developed software or commercial applications that customers will be utilizing together with the planned service. firewall requirements and virus software. Communication Interfaces Describes how the service will communicate with itself (for multi-platform applications) or other software applications or hardware. intranet. Also describes any software that the service will interact with such as operating system platforms supported. including items such as networking. Functional Design Constraints Any examples of constraints that will prevent or influence the ability of the system to deliver the expected functionality will be listed here.Service Level Management This section describes any software that will be required in order for the service to operate fully. Reliability. Attributes Security Describes where necessary the technical security requirements for the service. file import and export. engineer/modeler. PABX. Maintainability Page 117 . This section should also describe all physical. database administrator and which functionality will be accessible to each access level. organizational and procedural security requirements for the service. and Internet communications. This section will also specify whether the users must provide the interface software and any special licensing requirements. IP telephony etc. Availability.

Service Level Management

This section describes requirement items such as days or weeks of continuous operation, strategy for data recovery, structuring of service for ease of future modification.

Installation and Distribution This section describes the planned method for installation and distribution of releases for the service: done by the user independently, done by customer company internal IT services, done by an external contractor. The section should specify the handling of such items as data transfer from prior releases, the physical storage of hardware and software in conjunction with releases and the presence of software or hardware elements from prior releases.

Usability It is important to describe items that will ensure the user-friendliness of the service. Examples include error messages that direct the user to a solution, user documentation, online help etc.

Additional Requirements Describes other characteristics the service must have, that were not covered in the prior sections.

Administration Includes any periodic updating or data management needed for the service.

User documentation: Describes the user documentation to be delivered in conjunction with the service, including both hard copy and online requirements.

Other requirements: Describes any other requirements not already covered above that need to be considered during the design of the service.

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Service Level Management

MULTI LEVEL BASED SLA

IT Services
Multi-Level Based SLA Process: Service Level Management
Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>>

Version: Release Date:

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Service Level Management

Multi-Level Based Service Level Agreement (SLA) The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. However, the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. This document serves as a GUIDE FOR THE CREATION OF AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT PROCESS OWNER AND THE CUSTOMER OF IT SERVICES, FOR MULTIPLE SERVICES. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization.

The multi-level based SLA is usually preferred by IT as it allows a single document to cover a single service for all end-users of that service. It means less administration time spent in negotiating different documents with different customers and less time spent on worrying about accommodating different requirements amongst users.
This structure allows SLAs to be kept to a manageable size, avoids unnecessary duplication, and reduces the need for frequent updates. It requires more time to negotiate and obtain agreement than other structures.

Multi-Level based SLA

Advantage

Disadvantage

SERVICE D Customer Customer

Service A Service B Service C

This document was; Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On:

<<date>>

<<date>>

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Service Level Management

(The following form can be used as the Multi-Level Based SLA document. The SLA does not have to be in a lengthy written format and in fact it is more likely to be adopted if it is kept concise, with only salient details)

SLA Information
Areas to address Description of the “agreement” Comments/Examples Brief description of the contents of this SLA Note: the SLA will cover only ONE IT Service, but end users from many areas. Use this section simply as an Executive summary. Unique identifying number for the SLA (for inclusion in the Configuration Management Data Base – CMDB) (see www.theartofservice.com for more details on the Configuration Management process) Functional role description of who is responsible for this SLA (who would participate in a review of this document?). Representatives from customer and IT. (Special tip: Avoid using names as it dates the document quickly) Time Frame/Notes/Who

Reference number

Owner

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instead of “NT Server. with 2Gb RAM and 500Gb of disk storage” – we would say “large central server designed for all customers to use and share information”) This is a unique concept to this SLA design template. Quite often the description is interpreted by the reader in a way not intended by the writer. If you feel that there could be some interruptions to service delivery. (e. Areas to address Service Identification Code (this code can be crossreferenced in the Customer information table). Use this section to set the expectations of the reader. then document that here. Use language that is business user friendly. Service Name Comments/Examples A unique reference number for this service. Briefly describe the primary function of the service.g. because the service is relatively new.Service Level Management Specific Service Information (Duplicate the following table for as many services to be covered). Page 122 . These clinical descriptions set an expectation for the customer/enduser about the IT Service. However. Time Frame/Notes/Who Service Description (Business) (refer to Technical Considerations later in this table) Service Expectation Level Preferably use a name that is common language in the organization (not a technical name). remember that using the reason “new service” has only a limited life-span. Far too often we write descriptions of IT Services in a clinical fashion.

with a description on the type of service that each priority level should receive. What does the user do if the nominated person is not available? Do we require external staff to only act if they have a validated cost code for work? Are there any special aspects of the work that has to be recorded for later charging? What will be the performance numbers for the work performed under this UC? Will the expected performance be higher than negotiated in the SLA to allow a safety margin? Perhaps your organizational culture is built upon imposing penalties for poor performance. If this is the case. Maximum number of errors or reruns. Consider marginally longer support hours (if less than 24) Maximum number of accepted outages. Here we document the agreed response time for the different priority levels set. Are there any differences in the level of accessibility for different people/roles for this service? (try to use role descriptions – instead of names)? If the SLA accommodates different priorities they must be listed here. Minimum percentage availability.Service Level Management Service Security Considerations Service Target Response priorities Service Target Response time Service Support Hours (Availability) Service Out of Hours support procedure Service Charging policy Service Metrics for performance Service Breach Clause Briefly list any considerations regarding security considerations for this service. then the penalties for failing to meet the Page 123 . Are the in hours support staff the same as out of hours? Phone numbers and what information will be required when support is called.

The process for reviewing the SLA and who is involved.Service Level Management Continuity Considerations (should be linked to the IT Service Continuity Plan) SLA Validity period SLA Review Procedure Version Control Information UC Cross references OLA Cross references Technical considerations stated metrics must be listed here. then simply remove this line. Duration that this SLA is expected to remain in place before it is reviewed. It is more likely however. The definition of when this invocation should occur will be listed here. Notes & Comments Page 124 . SLA Creation Date SLA Last Modify Date Reference number to related and closely coupled UCs Reference number to any closely coupled agreements with internal IT department In this section you can describe any technical considerations that are essential to document. Special Tip: Avoid using people’s names and use role descriptions to avoid dating the document. If the agreed support hours cannot be met. then it is necessary to invoke a continuity option for this service. If the SLA is not to have a penalty focus. that you will include here a link to the Service Catalog or Technical Specification. Cross-referencing to the IT Service Continuity Plan is also required.

the SLA for this service may be only for particular function holders that are spread throughout the organization).Service Level Management Customer Information (Duplicate the following table for as many customers to be covered). However. Areas to address Customer definition Comments/Examples List and/or describe the customers that are included in this SLA. Description of Service and/or Service identification code/s Time Frame/Notes/Who Applicable Services NOTE: THERE CAN BE NO SINGLE CORRECT DEFINITION OF AN SLA THAT WILL COVER ALL SITUATIONS FOR ALL ORGANIZATIONS. DOES PROMPT THE READER TO CONSIDER THE MOST CRITICAL AREAS OF AN SLA and IT PROVOKES THOUGHT ABOUT OTHER AREAS THAT COULD BE INCLUDED BASED ON INDIVIDUAL NEEDS. Page 125 . THIS TEMPLATE HOWEVER. It is most likely that the customers will be all endusers of IT services in the organization.

Service Level Management Page 126 .

Service Level Management SERVICE BASED SLA IT Services Service Based SLA Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Page 127 .

Inability to satisfy the customers that have differing requirements of the service being addressed. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 128 . The service based SLA is usually preferred by IT as it allows a single document to cover a single service for all end-users of that service. Customer A Advantage Service based SLA Disadvantage Service Customer B Customer C This document was. FOR A SINGLE SERVICE. However. It means less administration time spent in negotiating different documents with different customers and less time spent on worrying about accommodating different requirements amongst users. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization. Just one SLA document could be agreed for all Customers/end users of a single service. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered.Service Level Management Service Based Service Level Agreement (SLA) The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. This document serves as a GUIDE FOR THE CREATION OF AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT PROCESS OWNER AND THE CUSTOMER OF IT SERVICES.

with only salient details. The SLA does not have to be in a lengthy written format and in fact it is more likely to be adopted if it is kept concise.theartofservice.Service Level Management The following form can be used as the Service Based SLA document. Unique identifying number for the SLA (for inclusion in the Configuration Management Data Base – CMDB) (see www. Representatives from customer and IT. Areas to address Description of the “agreement” Comments/Examples Brief description of the contents of this SLA Note: the SLA will cover only ONE IT Service. With regard to Service Based SLA the following points should be addressed: Specific Service Information (Duplicate the following table for as many services to be covered in this SLA). but end users from many areas.com for more details on the Configuration Management process) Functional role description of who is responsible for this SLA (who would participate in a review of this document?). (Special tip: Avoid using names as it dates the document quickly) Preferably use a name that is common language in the organization (not a technical name). Time Frame/Notes/Who Reference number Owner Service Name Page 129 . Use this section simply as an Executive summary.

remember that using the reason “new service” has only a limited life-span.Service Level Management Service Description (Business) (refer to Technical Considerations later in this table) Briefly describe the primary function of the service. with a description on the type of service that each priority level should receive. then document that here. with 2Gb RAM and 500Gb of disk storage” – we would say “large central server designed for all customers to use and share information”) This is a unique concept to this SLA design template. However. Service Expectation Level Service Security Considerations Service Target Response priorities Page 130 . Are there any differences in the level of accessibility for different people/roles for this service? (try to use role descriptions – instead of names)? If the SLA accommodates different priorities they must be listed here. Far too often we write descriptions of IT Services in a clinical fashion. because the service is relatively new. Use language that is business user friendly. Quite often the description is interpreted by the reader in a way not intended by the writer. instead of “NT Server. Use this section to set the expectations of the reader.g. (e. If you feel that there could be some interruptions to service delivery. Briefly list any considerations regarding security considerations for this service. These clinical descriptions set an expectation for the customer/end-user about the IT Service.

Minimum percentage availability. If the SLA is not to have a penalty focus. Maximum number of errors or reruns. then the penalties for failing to meet the stated metrics must be listed here. Service Out of Hours support procedure Service Charging policy Service Metrics for performance Service Breach Clause Page 131 . Are the in hours support staff the same as out of hours? Phone numbers and what information will be required when support is called. Consider marginally longer support hours (if less than 24) Maximum number of accepted outages. What does the user do if the nominated person is not available? Do we require external staff to only act if they have a validated cost code for work? Are there any special aspects of the work that has to be recorded for later charging? What will be the performance numbers for the work performed under this UC? Will the expected performance be higher than negotiated in the SLA to allow a safety margin? Perhaps your organizational culture is built upon imposing penalties for poor performance. then simply remove this line.Service Level Management Service Target Response time Service Support Hours (Availability) Here we document the agreed response time for the different priority levels set. If this is the case.

Service Level Management Continuity Considerations (should be linked to the IT Service Continuity Plan) If the agreed support hours cannot be met. The process for reviewing the SLA and who is involved. Duration that this SLA is expected to remain in place before it is reviewed. It is more likely however. SLA Validity period SLA Review Procedure Version Control Information UC Cross references OLA Cross references Technical considerations Notes & Comments Page 132 . that you will include here a link to the Service Catalog or Technical Specification. SLA Creation Date SLA Last Modify Date Reference number to related and closely coupled UCs Reference number to any closely coupled agreements with internal IT department In this section you can describe any technical considerations that are essential to document. Cross-referencing to the IT Service Continuity Plan is also required. The definition of when this invocation should occur will be listed here. Special Tip: Avoid using people’s names and use role descriptions to avoid dating the document. then it is necessary to invoke a continuity option for this service.

However. Page 133 . DOES PROMPT THE READER TO CONSIDER THE MOST CRITICAL AREAS OF AN SLA and IT PROVOKES THOUGHT ABOUT OTHER AREAS THAT COULD BE INCLUDED BASED ON INDIVIDUAL NEEDS. Time Frame/Notes/Who NOTE: THERE CAN BE NO SINGLE CORRECT DEFINITION OF AN SLA THAT WILL COVER ALL SITUATIONS FOR ALL ORGANIZATIONS. It is most likely that the customers will be all endusers of IT services in the organization. the SLA for this service may be only for particular function holders that are spread throughout the organization).Service Level Management Customer Information Areas to address Customer definition Comments/Examples List and/or describe the customers that are included in this SLA. THIS TEMPLATE HOWEVER.

Service Level Management Page 134 .

Service Level Management CUSTOMER BASED SLA IT Services Customer Based SLA Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Page 135 .

However. An agreement with an individual Customer groups could cover all of the services they use. say. the Finance System. Service A Customer Service B Service C This document was. the Billing System. the Payroll System. It means less administration time spent in negotiating different documents and generally only requires a single representative to participate on behalf of the business. An inability to deal with differing requirements amongst users in the same customer group. the Accounting System. the Procurement System and any other IT systems that they use. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization. The customer based SLA is usually preferred by customers as it allows a single document to cover all the IT Services that they use. agreements may be reached with an organization’s Finance Department covering. covering all the services they use. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: Advantage Customer based SLA Disadvantage <<date>> <<date>> Page 136 . This document serves as a GUIDE FOR THE CREATION OF AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT PROCESS OWNER AND THE CUSTOMER OF IT SERVICES (Covering all the IT Services they use).Service Level Management Customer Based Service Level Agreement (SLA) The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. An agreement with an individual Customer group. For example.

with only salient details. Use this section simply as an Executive summary.Service Level Management The following form can be used as the Customer Based SLA document.com for more details on the Configuration Management process) Functional role description of who is responsible for this SLA (who would participate in a review of this document?) Representatives from customer and IT. (Special tip: Avoid using names as it dates the document quickly) List and/or describe the customers that are considered for in this SLA. Unique identifying number for the SLA (for inclusion in the Configuration Management Data Base – CMDB) (see www. Time Frame/Notes/Who Reference number Owner Customer definition Page 137 . With regard to Customer Based SLA the following points should be addressed: Overall SLA Information Areas to address Description of the “agreement” Comments/Examples Brief description of the contents of this SLA Note: the SLA may cover several IT Services. The SLA does not have to be in a lengthy written format and in fact it is more likely to be adopted if it is kept concise.theartofservice. Do not try to describe each service here.

SLA Creation Date SLA Last Modify Date SLA Review Procedure Version Control Information Specific Service Information (Duplicate the following table for each service to be covered in this SLA).g. instead of “NT Server. (e. with 2Gb RAM and 500Gb of disk storage” – we would say “large central server designed for all customers to use and share information”) This is a unique concept to this SLA design template.Service Level Management SLA Validity period Duration that this SLA is expected to remain in place before it is reviewed. The process for reviewing the SLA and who is involved. Briefly describe the primary function of the service. These clinical descriptions set an expectation for the customer/end-user about the IT Service. Far too often we write descriptions of IT Services in a clinical fashion. Use language that is business user friendly. Time Frame/Notes/Who Service Description (Business) (refer to end of table for technical considerations) Service Expectation Level Page 138 . Quite often the description is interpreted by the reader in a way not intended by the writer. Special Tip: Avoid using people’s names and use role descriptions to avoid dating the document. Areas to address Service Name Comments/Examples Preferably use a name that is common language in the organization (not a technical name).

Service Level Management Use this section to set the expectations of the reader. Are the in hours support staff the same as out of hours? Phone numbers and what information will be required when support is called. However. Are there any differences in the level of accessibility for different people/roles for this service? (try to use role descriptions – instead of names)? If the SLA accommodates different priorities they must be listed here. with a description on the type of service that each priority level should receive. Maximum number of errors or reruns. What does the user do if the nominated person is not available? Do we require external staff to only act if they have a validated cost code for work? Are there any special aspects of the work that has to be recorded for later charging? Service Target Response priorities Service Target Response time Service Support Hours (Availability) Service Out of Hours support procedure Service Charging policy Page 139 . Here we document the agreed response time for the different priority levels. then document that here. Minimum percentage availability. Service Security Considerations Briefly list any considerations regarding security considerations for this service. Consider marginally longer support hours (if less than 24) Maximum number of accepted outages. because the service is relatively new. If you feel that there could be some interruptions to service delivery. remember that using the reason “new service” has only a limited lifespan.

If the SLA is not to have a penalty focus. Reference number to related and closely coupled UCs Reference number to any closely coupled agreements with internal IT department In this section you can describe any technical considerations that are essential to document. Cross-referencing to the IT Service Continuity Plan is also required. If the agreed support hours cannot be met. Page 140 . then simply remove this line. It is more likely however. THIS TEMPLATE HOWEVER. The definition of when this invocation should occur will be listed here. DOES PROMPT THE READER TO CONSIDER THE MOST CRITICAL AREAS OF AN SLA and IT PROVOKES THOUGHT ABOUT OTHER AREAS THAT COULD BE INCLUDED BASED ON INDIVIDUAL NEEDS. Continuity Considerations (should be linked to the IT Service Continuity Plan) UC Cross references OLA Cross references Technical considerations Notes & Comments NOTE: THERE CAN BE NO SINGLE CORRECT DEFINITION OF AN SLA THAT WILL COVER ALL SITUATIONS FOR ALL ORGANIZATIONS. that you will include here a link to the Service Catalog or Technical Specification. then the penalties for failing to meet the stated metrics must be listed here.Service Level Management Service Metrics for performance Service Breach Clause What will be the performance numbers for the work performed under this UC? Will the expected performance be higher than negotiated in the SLA to allow a safety margin? Perhaps your organizational culture is built upon imposing penalties for poor performance. then it is necessary to invoke a continuity option for this service. If this is the case.

Service Level Management

UNDERPINNING CONTRACTS

IT Services
Underpinning Contracts Process: Service Level Management
Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>>

Version: Release Date:

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Underpinning Contract (UC) The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. However, the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered.

This document serves as a GUIDE FOR THE CREATION OF AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT PROCESS OWNER AND AN EXTERNAL PROVIDER (THIRD PARTY) OF IT SERVICES. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization.

There is a common misconception that the Service Level Management Process owner must be a member of the IT Department. This is not the case and quite often the best person for the role is someone with no bias towards IT. For example, a Human Resource Manager would do well in a role that has such a high degree of communication required.
This document was; Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>>

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(The following form can be used as the UC document. The UC does not have to be in a lengthy written format and in fact it is more likely to be adopted if it is kept concise, with only salient details)

With regard to UNDERPINNING CONTRACTS (UCs) the following points should be addressed:
Areas to address Link to parent Service Level Agreement Description of Service UC Reference number Comments/Examples Cross reference to the “parent” SLA. Brief description (should be taken from SLA) Unique identifying number for the UC (for inclusion in the Configuration Management Data Base – CMDB) (see www.theartofservice.com for more details on the Configuration Management process) Functional role description of who is responsible for this UC (who would participate in a review of this document?) (Special tip: Avoid using names as it dates the document quickly) Within the external provider there may be different functional parties involved. List them here with a brief description of their involvement. If the UC accommodates different priorities they must be listed here, with a description of the type of service that each priority level should receive. Consider quicker response time to allow for delays Time Frame/Notes/Who

UC Owner

UC Parties involved

UC Target Response priorities (reflected in parent SLA)

UC Target Response time (reflected in parent SLA)

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UC Support Hours (reflected in parent SLA) UC Out of Hours support procedure (reflected in parent SLA)

UC Charging policy (reflected in parent SLA)

UC Metrics for performance (reflected in parent SLA)

UC Cross references

OLA Cross references

UC Validity period

UC Review Procedure

Version Control Information Notes & Comments

Consider marginally longer support hours (if less than 24) Are the in hours support staff the same as out of hours? Phone numbers and what information will be required when support is called. What does the user do if the nominated person is not available? Do we require external staff to only act if they have a validated cost code for work? Are there any special aspects of the work that has to be recorded for later charging? What will be the performance numbers for the work performed under this UC? Will the expected performance be higher than negotiated in the SLA to allow a safety margin? Reference number to other closely coupled UCs Reference number to any closely coupled agreements with internal IT department Duration that this UC is expected to remain in place before it is reviewed. The process for reviewing the UC and who is involved. Special Tip: Avoid using people’s names and use role descriptions to avoid dating the document. UC Creation Date UC Last Modify Date

(Duplicate the above table for the number of UCs to be created) Page 144

Service Level Management SERVICE OPTIONS IT Services Process: Service Level Management Service Options Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Page 145 .

last name>. last name>. last name>.Service Level Management Document Control Author Prepared by <name and / or department> Document Source This document is located on the LAN under the path: I:/IT Services/Service Delivery/Service Level Management/Service Options Document Approval This document has been approved for use by the following: • • • <first name. IT Services Manager <first name. IT Service Delivery Manager <first name. National IT Help Desk Manager Amendment History Issue Date Amendments Completed By Distribution List When this procedure is updated the following copyholders must be advised through email that an updated copy is available on the intranet site: <Company Name> Business Unit IT Stakeholders Page 146 .

Guidelines and Scope Document SLM1700 SLM Process Template SLM2200 Service Catalogue Page 147 . Related Documentation Include in this section any related Service Level Management reference numbers and other associated documentation: • • • • SLM1200 SLM Implementation Plan / Project Plan SLM1300 SLM Policies.Service Level Management Introduction Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide the IT Organization with a breakdown of options for the Services listed in the Service Catalog Scope This document describes the following: • • Service Options <<any additional items that you want>> Audience This document is relevant to all staff in <company name> Ownership IT Services has ownership of this document.

The below table should be created for each individual service offered in the SLM220 Service Catalogue Page 148 .Service Level Management Executive Overview Note: The intent of this document is to provide a simple break down of options available for IT Services. Service Level Management Overview Summarize the organization definition for crucial Service Level Management components here. This document is to be used in conjunction with SLM2200 Service Catalogue. The definition of an SLA is: << insert your company’s definition here >> The definition of an OLA is: << insert your company’s definition here >> The definition of a UC is: << insert your company’s definition here >> The definition of a service is: << insert your company’s definition here >> Service Options The following table breaks down each service and the available options. This is a template and is used to illustrate for the user of this document the available options and structure to use when creating service options.

Terminology Make sure that all terminology is captured and documented correctly.Service Level Management IT Service: Business Process: Business Owner: Business Process Criticality: IT Owner: Service Criticality: Service Components Platinum Availability Capacity Response SLA Recovery SLA Service Hours Recovery Options Security Pricing Gold Service Options Silver Bronze Default Appendices Include any applicable appendixes that are needed. Page 149 .

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Service Level Management PRICE LIST IT Services Price List Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 151 .

This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization. This document can be read in conjunction with: Service Catalog (which is where summary pricing information is presented).Service Level Management Price List Considerations for Service Level Management The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. This document was. However. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 152 . the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. This document serves as a GUIDE FOR DETERMINING THE PRICE OF IT SERVICE DELIVERY TO CUSTOMERS.

These considerations are: 1) The degree of IT costs that are expected to be recovered. Of course. 2) The degree that IT wants to change consumption patterns of Customers and Users There is no surer thing. It is the combination of these areas that will help the Service Level Manager (along with the process owner for Financial Management for IT Services) set and negotiate pricing for IT Service delivery. For example if Human Resources aim to recover all costs from the departments or user groups it supports. Once services start to cost. Use the following table with examples to help determine which IT Services will be charged for in your organization and the basis upon which you will levy that charge. when budget funds cannot support requirements. then behaviours will change and demand will decrease. it is likely that this will also apply to IT.Service Level Management There are three considerations to review when looking to establish the prices for IT Services that are delivered. Such a decision will generally come from a business policy regarding cost recovery for other shared services. 3) Budget influence Careful and well articulated pricing for IT Services allows better predictions regarding the expected budget required for a future time period. Page 153 . This positive influence helps to reduce the number of unexpected surprises that can often happen. the major challenge of looking to use pricing to influence (drive down) consumption is the major resistance that can be expected.

or. Cost per size of transaction Per unit. Mail items in the “in-box” E-mail sent Network connection to mail server Personal Computer Internet connection An important point to consider regarding the pricing of services is the case when a customer claims that they can buy the service cheaper from an external provider. or.Service Level Management Chargeable Item (examples) Sales transaction Ancillary Services Network connection Personal Computer File server processing Cost basis Simple cost per transaction. Nominal charging allows customers to see the costs of the IT Services they consume. While this may be the case. Cost per speed of processing. or. the overall impact on the organization may be negative – so it may be necessary to impose restrictions regarding purchase of external services when suitable internal services are available. or. in that without transferring funds. Page 154 . The final point to consider regarding the price of IT Services is whether actual funds transfer will take place or if charges are just imaginary (or “nominal”). but they are not expected to transfer funds from their cost centers to the IT department. Once the pricing differential is identified a controlled process of (a) reducing costs or (b) outsourcing to an external provider can be carried out. the affect on behavior may be negligible. This method can have a low impact. Stored limit.

Service Level Management SERVICE CATALOG IT Service Management Service Catalogue <<YOUR LOGO HERE>> Prepared by: <<PREPARATION NAME>> Prepared for: <<RECEIPIENT NAME. indicate that here. GROUP.g. COMPANY>> Date: <<DATE OF VALIDITY>> Special notes: e. Search for any instance of << or >> as your input will be required. Page 155 . if so. Does the Service Catalog have a limited life span.

Service Level Management Version number Owner Location Date <<Any industry associated logos or ISO stamp or other Quality system related indicators (e. is it because Service Level Agreements are to be developed based on the service catalog?. The Service Catalog must be developed in conjunction with customers.g. <<The specific reason for you to develop this document should be written in this section. Therefore it has become imperative for the IT department to establish an accurate picture of the services it provides. Was it a result of a customer enquiry?. ISO Accreditation>> Executive Overview In the past organization’s IT Services have generally grown and developed into large complex environments. who are better able to describe what they see as “services” than an IT person. This can be done through a comprehensive IT Service Catalogue. If there is an asset register or configuration management database (a concept from the ITIL Configuration Management process) these are good sources of information. This has resulted in the IT department not having a very clear picture of all the services they currently provide with no accurate profile of the actual customers for each of these services. is it seen as a competitive advantage?>> Page 156 . Unfortunately this growth has not always been as structured and pre-planned as it needs to be.

The Service Catalogue will provide a summary of the service characteristics. <<Restrictions & Assumption – you may only be documenting services for a specific business unit. and details of the users and those responsible for ongoing maintenance of each service. It is also advisable to establish a common understanding of some of the terminology used throughout the document. or group of users. Scope It is imperative to determine the scope of the document. the scope section should determine the definition of a Service. List these sort of things in bullet points for easier readability>> Restriction 1 Text description Restriction 2 Text description Page 157 . The Service Catalogue will list all of the IT services currently being provided to our organization. Don’t think that everyone will be able to clearly understand what you see as the scope of the document. The above words are generic and can be tailored to suit your organization.Service Level Management The Executive Overview should establish the reason for this documents existence and its benefit back to the business. perhaps you have been advised to write a service catalog on all services except those in a mainframe environment. and what will not be included in the document and why. Any restrictions and assumptions you make in developing the document should be listed here. What will be included in the document and why. For example.

This page/s is a useful check list to take to negotiations regarding service delivery. Page 158 .com>> Service Summary Sheet In this section list all Service and the customers that they apply to. a service will be defined as the following: One or more IT Systems which enable a business process <<To learn more about Business Processes SLM1400 . Configuration Management is an ITIL process – refer to the Product set CONMGT @ www.theartofservice. This section of the Service Catalog indicates the names of the services that will be expanded in later sections and the end users of these services.Service Level Management Restriction x Text description Assumption 1 Text description Assumption 2 Text description Assumption x Text description For the purpose of this document.Business and IT Service Mapping>> <<Important note: This is a crucial document and information regarding this document should be held in the company Configuration Management database.

Don’t expand on the description of the services here. Intranet Eg. Customers Service SERVICE A Eg. as that comes in the following sections>> Remember for each service listed here you need to duplicate the following section (section 5) that number of times. This description should be easy to read and written in a non-technical manner.Service Level Management to determine if there are new services or others that should be renamed to more accurately reflect their purpose.The “customers” are generally described as functional groups. Email Eg. Accounts System Eg. Internet Service x Service x Service x Accounts Sales Marketing Legal Production Retail Service A Description In this section provide a detailed description of the Service being provided. but you may have alternative names for the user groups. Page 159 . <<Description of Customers .

A dependency can be either another Service that is reliant on this service OR it can be the fact that THIS service is Page 160 . <<List the dependencies for this service.>> Dependencies & Contributors List all other services that may depend on this particular service. <<Important note. pricing can have some very powerful behavioral change benefits.com. Options Option Type Gold Silver Bronze Availability Response Capacity Recovery Options Service Times Price List In this section you should list all charging and cost information that makes up this service. Pricing is an area that most organizations try to avoid when it comes to provision of IT Services.theartofservice.Service Level Management Customers In this section provide a list of customers that currently use this service. However. Have a look at the Financial Management for IT Services (FINMGT) at www. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE FOLLOWING TABLE CAN BE MODIFIED BY YOU OR PUT ONTO A SEPARATE PAGE/SECTION AND PUT INTO A LANDSCAPE VIEW FOR EASIER READABILITY.

(Note the SLA.>> <<In the table below you can describe the dependencies (note that there should always be a corresponding dependency relationship described in another service description (e. if you are describing the accounts payable system/service. in our example – the Customer relationship database would describe how it is a contributor to the Accounts Payable system). The final three columns of this table allow you to cross reference to any other agreements that support the dependency or contributor relationship.Service Level Management reliant on another service. and SLM2100 at www. SLM2000. In whole or in part the different dependencies should be listed in this section>> <<For example. OLA and Underpinning contracts are all elements of the Service Level Management ITIL process – refer to products SLM1901/2/3.theartofservice. In this case the Accounts payable service is dependent on the customer relationship database – it is dependent on it for billing address details). then it may be likely that the Customer relationship database is used to provide billing details for invoices. In such a case we may create an Operational level Agreement (OLA) with them so that they can understand the importance of the relationship). it may be that the Customer relationship database is supported by a specialized group of IT staff. It is a contributor.g. Using our Customer relationship database to Accounts Payable system.com>> Dependant Description Service Impact on Service A Dependant or contributor Service Operational Underpinning Level Level Contracts Agreement Agreement # # Page 161 .

Service Level Management Page 162 .

<<Be cautious about the level of detail you include on the technical details of the service. It may also be used as a source of names for the local blood bank to contact for support.Service Level Management Functional Specification Include in this section any references to additional Functional Specifications for this service. for more complicated relationships you would use the Functional Specification template (ref: SLM2201 @ www. With this example. This section may point to additional documentation. tax codes and other information. This should be simple to read and understandable by non-IT literate people <<For relatively simple processes you can describe how different services connect and work together.>> Technical Specification Include in this section any technical information that is pertinent to the Service. It may have names. For example: Instead of WAN distances Server You might use Computers connected together over long Central computer that holds information that can be accessed by many people RAM The ability of the computer to perform many different functions at the same time Page 163 . Think of describing the technical specification of the service to a person who does not have a very good understanding of IT. payroll numbers.com)>> <<For instance you may have a system that holds information about employees. addresses. it is easy to see what the primary and secondary functions of the service are.itilsurvival.

The FSC is a concept described under the ITIL Change Management process (see product CHG7700 Forward Schedule of Changes Template). This is because if the number changes this document is out of date. etc. Customizations or Variants Within any organization there MAY BE scenarios where a particular service will be delivered at different levels for different customers. other marketing. Page 164 .g. If there are major scheduled outages for this service.Service Level Management MHZ The speed at which the computer should be expected to perform different tasks. etc. then they should also be referenced in the Forward Schedule of Changes (FSC). Perhaps the service will be unavailable at certain times of the time or days of the week. For instance. You are best of simply describing the number to call (e. to promote what that actual number is). Call the IT Service Desk) and then rely on wall posters. in some cases there may be an extension of functionality that other customers do not require or use. Can they e-mail and phone? Is there a set Service Desk or Call Centre phone number? Be cautious about putting an actual phone number in this document. Support Activities Included in this section any supporting activities that need to occur to maintain the service. This would include scheduled maintenance times etc. <<You can simply list known times of outage or insert a table>> <<You also need to list how the end-user receives support for this service.

Descriptions are provided below. REMEMBER HOWEVER THAT THIS SECTION CAN BE OPTIONAL. Page 165 .Service Level Management In these instances it is best to capture all variants for all customers under the original service. Contract SLA # SLA Type Corporate Based Customer Based Service Based Customer <<The type of SLA can be generally categorized in to one of these three types. Service Version Customer Description Availability Response Capacity Recovery Options Service Times Existing SLAs Cross reference to any existing Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and contracts associated with this particular service. Whether you leave these descriptions in the document is optional>> Corporate Based: covering all the generic Service Level Management (SLM) issues appropriate to every customer throughout the organization. This service has some variants from what could be considered as the baseline. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE FOLLOWING TABLE CAN BE MODIFIED BY YOU OR PUT ONTO A SEPARATE PAGE/SECTION AND PUT INTO A LANDSCAPE VIEW FOR EASIER READABILITY.

month. Page 166 . Restrictions If this service is restricted to a certain group or for use at certain periods of time. week. Appendices Include any applicable appendixes that are needed. Terminology Make sure that all terminology is captured and documented correctly. then you would detail those restrictions here.Service Level Management Customer Based: covering all SLM issues relevant to the particular Customer group. in relation to this specific Customer group (one for each service covered by the SLA). Service Based: cover all SLM issues relevant to the specific service. regardless of the service being used. etc. Remember to keep the description brief.

Service Level Management Page 167 .

Service Level Management COMMUNICATION PLAN IT Services Communication Plan Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Page 168 .

This document contains suggestions regarding information to share with others. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization. This document was.Service Level Management Communication Plan for Service Level Management The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. The document is deliberately concise and broken into communication modules. However. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. This document serves as a GUIDE FOR COMMUNICATIONS REQUIRED for the Service Level Management process. etc. flyers. This will allow the reader to pick and choose information for e-mails. from one or more modules if and when appropriate. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 169 .

the IT department in recent times has… A recent example of … saw the individual and the company face severe penalties.com for competitive quotation). To: On: By: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 170 . a new way of working.Service Level Management Initial Communication Sell the Benefits. This is important because… In recent times our control on IT has… Apart from the obvious benefits. be cautious of using generic words. Helps us to more effectively manage our expenditure on IT. The above Communication module (or elements of) was/were distributed. Assists with protecting against illegal or unauthorized software. WHY? It is here that we need to promote and sell the benefits. Allows us to more carefully control the valuable IT infrastructure. Cite specific examples from your own organization that the reader will be able to relate to (to help develop specific examples contact service@theartofservice. Generic Benefit statements Specific Organizational example CM provides accurate information on our IT components. However. First steps in communication require the need to answer the question that most people (quite rightly) ask when the IT department suggests a new system.

discussion. Provide relevant reports to nominated personnel. The above Service Level Management Goals module was distributed. • (Special Tip: Beware of reporting only to Managers. To: On: By: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 171 . Official Goal Statement: Through a process of continual negotiation. If you speak to a lot of people regarding Service Delivery then you need to establish ways to report to these people the outcomes and progress of the discussions). If you cannot honestly and sensibly answer the question “so what” – then you are not selling the message in a way that is personal to the listener and gets their “buy-in”. Always bear in mind the “so what” factor when discussing areas like goals and objectives. monitoring and reporting the Service Level Management process aims to ensure the delivery of IT Services that meet the requirements and expectations of our customers and end-users.Service Level Management Service Level Management Goals The Goals of Service Level Management. • Seek agreement on expected delivery of IT service by gaining an understanding of the Service Level Requirements from nominated personnel (Special Tip: Beware of using only Managers to gain information from. The Goals of Service Level Management can be promoted in the following manner. as the resistance factor will be high) • Oversee the monitoring of service delivery to ensure that the negotiations regarding the service requirements are not ignored and treated as a once off exercise.

They will be curious as to why staff have a sudden interest in trying to develop an understanding regarding what they need from IT. SQP) • Match & customize: adjust SLA if required? Information regarding activities was distributed. so consider different strategies to overcome this initial skepticism. There could be an element of suspicion. Definition Matching & customizing (with the customer) of the right service provision against the right costs: • Service Catalogue • Demands of the customer (Service Level Requirements). To: On: By: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 172 . Agreement (Defining and signing SLA/s) • Service Level Agreements.Service Level Management Service Level Management Activities Intrusive & Hidden Activities The list of actions in this module may have a direct impact on end users. Identification • Analyzing current services and Service Level Requirements • Recording the current service provision in a Service Catalogue. supported by: Operational Level Agreements (OLAs) and Underpinning Contracts Monitoring Measuring the actual service levels against the agreed service levels Reporting Reporting on the service provision (to the customer and the IT organization) Evaluation (review) • Evaluate the service provision with the customer • Match & customize: adjust service provision if required? (SIP.

but written in “customer terminology” SLA = Service Level Agreement The written agreement between the provider and the customer (business representative) Service Level Achievements = the Service Levels that are realized SIP = Service Improvement Programme / Plan Actions. Service Provisioning Agreement) A written agreement with another internal IT department to support the SLA UC = Underpinning Contract (=a written agreement with an external IT supplier) News about the Service Level Management deliverables was distributed. phases and delivery dates for improvement of a service OLA = Operational Level Agreement (or SPA. SLR = Service Level Requirements Detailed recording of the customers’ needs Blueprint for defining. Outlining these will allow the use of common terms – which enhances the overall communication process. adapting and revising of services Service Spec Sheets = Service Specifications Connection between functionality (externally / customer focused) and technicalities (internally / IT organization focused) Service Catalogue Detailed survey of available services Detailed survey of available service levels Derived from the Service Spec Sheets.Service Level Management Service Level Management Deliverables Outputs of the Process There are a variety of output documents that should be visible to the customer and end-user. To: On: By: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 173 .

many organizations have a negative perception of the function of the IT Department. Failure to deliver acceptable services will only add to any poor perceptions and start business people questioning the value of IT. database management team (Set-up and ongoing) • Accommodation – Physical location (Set-up and ongoing) • Software – Tools (Set-up and ongoing) • Hardware – Infrastructure (Set-up) • Education – Training (Set-up and ongoing) • Procedures – external consultants etc. A well run Service Level Management process will make major inroads into altering that perception. (Set-up) The costs of implementing Service Level Management will be outweighed by the benefits. If required. Failure to convince people of the benefits will mean total rejection of associated costs. Details regarding the cost of Service Level management were distributed. To: On: By: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 174 .Service Level Management Service Level Management Planning Costs Information relating to costs may be a topic that would be held back from general communication. For example. costs fall under several categories: • Personnel – audit verification staff.

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Service Level Management BUSINESS AND IT SERVICE MAPPING IT Services Business and IT Service Mapping Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 176 .

last name>. last name>. National IT Help Desk Manager Amendment History Issue  Date Amendments Completed By Distribution List When this procedure is updated the following copyholders must be advised through email that an updated copy is available on the intranet site: <<organization name>> Business Unit IT Stakeholders Page 177 . last name>.Service Level Management Document Control Author Prepared by <name and / or department> Document Source This document is located on the LAN under the path: I:/IT Services/Service Delivery/Business and IT Service Mapping/ Document Approval This document has been approved for use by the following: • • • <first name. IT Services Manager <first name. IT Service Delivery Manager <first name.

Audience This document is relevant to all staff in <<organization name>> Ownership IT Services has ownership of this document in conjunction with nominated Business Representatives. Related Documentation The following documents may help you to complete or understand the purpose of this document: • • • Relevant SLA and procedural documents Relevant IT Services Catalogue Relevant Technical Specification documentation Page 178 .Service Level Management Introduction Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide IT departments with an understanding of how the IT Services provided map to the organization’s business processes. Scope This document describes the following: • • • • • details of each Business Process and the corresponding IT Service provided by the IT departments within the organization: description of business process description of service business contacts service contacts Note: It is assumed for each Business Process and IT Service described in this document that the supporting back-end technology is already in place and operational.

Few realize the potential of truly aligning the IT department’s objectives with the business objectives. Mapping Business Process and IT Service: An approach Most organizations now understand the benefits of having Information Technology (IT) throughout their structure. steps must be in place to ensure that the IT group adds value and delivers consistently. In line with this concept. Page 179 . mapping what services are provided by IT to the business areas that use them. The result has been an IT department not having a very clear picture of all the services they currently provide. Unfortunately this growth has not always been as structured and pre-planned as it should have been. This document describes an approach for mapping IT Services to the Business Process. When the IT services are so critical. the first step in mapping IT Services to the needs of the business is to understand the organization. That is. and with no accurate profile of the actual customers for each of these services. more and more organizations are beginning to recognize IT as being a crucial delivery mechanism of services to their customers.Service Level Management • • Relevant Functional Specification documentation Relevant User Guides and Procedures Executive Overview In the past organization’s IT Services functions have generally grown and developed into large complex environments. However. With increasing demands being placed on IT services and increasing reliance on IT systems. it has become imperative for the IT department to establish an accurate picture of the services it provides and to whom it provides them.

we need to understand how these map to current business process. By having this information. Page 180 . then we can start looking at how its short term and long term objectives align with this. and being flexible enough to meet these demands. The direct impact on IT departments would be the successful planning of capacity of new IT Services. Administration staff may need additional resources. The Vision Statement defines where it is that the organization wants to go. This is where the IT departments need to capture the Business Processes being used by the organization. By understanding where the organization wishes to position itself within its market space. The organization will meet these objectives by changing. At this point we need to see the “objectives and strategy” of the organization. IT departments are more likely to be aware of the pressing business issues and needs that may impact on the services that they provide. However. requiring additional offices and staff. the successful planning of how to change our current services to meet the demands of the business. enhancing or creating new business processes. an objective is not sufficient enough to determine how IT departments should be delivering its services. Once we capture the Mission Statement.Service Level Management An organization starts with a Mission Statement. For example. or perhaps a new billing process needs to be implemented to meet these objectives. if the current business processes are changing or if they are becoming obsolete and if there will be any new business processes. a new ordering package may be required. The Mission Statement for an organization defines its reason for being. after capturing the organizational objectives. the organization may have an objective of expanding its business into new markets within the next 12 months. For example. Therefore. the next thing to look at is the Vision Statement.

Page 181 .g. • • • What are the Objectives of the organization? What is its Mission and Vision? What Business Processes are in place or will be in place to meet these needs? What IT Services are needed or in place to service the Business Processes? Mission Statement A mission statement describes the reason for the organization’s being. With this information IT Departments will now be able to clearly see how their IT Infrastructure / IT Services supports the business. we need to capture the fact that the business processes need one or more IT services (e. A simple model for this approach is illustrated below. It is important to show that the IT department is aware of the business. In this section of the document capture the mission statement of the organization.Service Level Management Once the IT departments have a clear view of each of the business units involved in the business process. word processing. This allows IT to better deliver IT aligned Services to the organization. This is where IT departments now map the IT Services to those Business Processes listed above. it becomes hard to define what it is that the organization is trying to achieve. financial tools) to function. Without an understanding of the mission statement of an organization. CRM application. Each of these IT services runs on IT infrastructure. email.

<< Business Process Name: The name of the process if available Process Owner: The name of the Department head or Business Representative for the process Description: Department(s): A brief description of the process The Department(s) that is involved or uses this process Parent Process: Any process that may be considered a lead into this process or is seen has having a higher business criticality Triggers: What causes the process to start? This is important as IT can then determine if and how their Page 182 . A more detailed breakdown of each process name is provided in the following pages. document the Vision statement for the organization. With over xxx services and xxx staff. we constantly strive to provide the highest-quality service throughout the xxxxxxxx. Columns and Rows can be added as needed. Below is a text example of what may be included in this section. Listed below is the Vision Statement for <<organization name>>: • • • • • Quality Care Convenient Service Good Experiences Care at Competitive Prices Service You'll Recommend to Friends and Family These are the major goals of the staff at <<organization name>>.Service Level Management Vision Statement In this section. >> Business Process Summary The below table is an example of a Business Process Summary Table.

and official abbreviation. Description Briefly explain the purpose of the business process. >>BUSINESS Process Name Process Owner Description Department(s) Parent Process Triggers Business Process A This section of the document should be repeated for each Business Process. Identify the customer for each primary product.Service Level Management Services interact with other business process or external organizations. Parent Business Activity/Process Name of the parent business activity or process. if any Process Owner Name of the Department head or person responsible for ensuring the effectiveness and efficiency of the process. Department Name of the department Process Name of the process. Page 183 . if any Primary Product(s) List the primary product(s). and explain if necessary.

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Trigger(s) List the event(s) that trigger the process. (Triggers can be a calendar date, as well as an actual event.)

Sub-processes If the process is subdivided, list the sub-processes here.

Standard Path Events/Activities List the important activities and/or events that occur as part of the standard path for this process. If an activity or event occurs in a specific sub-process, identify the sub-process that includes the activity/event. Note any locations where an alternative path breaks off from the standard path.

Alternative Path Events/Activities List the important activities and/or events that occur as part of the alternative path for this process, beginning with a note on where the alternative path breaks off from the standard path, and ending with a note on where the alternative path rejoins the standard path, if it does. If an activity or event occurs in a specific sub-process, identify the sub-process that includes the activity/event.

Inputs List the inputs to the process, and explain if necessary. Identify the source of the input. If the input is specific to a sub-process, identify the sub-process.

Secondary Products List the by-products, or minor outputs that result from the process. Identify the customer for each output. If the secondary product is specific to a subprocess, identify the sub-process.

Participants

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List the participants (actors) in the process, and explain their function briefly. If the participant is active only in a specific sub-process, identify the subprocess. IT Services The following section provides a table for capturing those IT Services that help support the business process described in this section. << Fields: •

IT Service:

In this field capture the name of the IT Service. A likely source of for this information would be the IT Service Catalogue.

• •

Description: IT Service Owner:

Write a brief description about the service. List any responsibilities for this IT Service. This would include the owner of the IT Service and any additional support personnel that are involved in the delivery of the IT Service.

Hours of Availability:

List the hours of support for the particular IT Service. Eg. 24 hours x 7 Days per week, Monday – Friday: 8.00am – 6.00pm, etc.

Contract:

Is the IT Service provided under the agreement of a contract? If so, it is important to capture any contracts that may be in place for the IT Service. Contracts will have a direct impact on how the IT Service is delivered.

• •

Service Level Agreements:List any applicable SLAs for the IT Service. Impact: If the particular IT Service was unavailable, how would this impact on the Business Process.

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This table should be used on a landscape page layout.

IT Service

Description

IT Service Owner

Hours of Availability

Contract

Service Level Agreements

Impact

Business Process B
Department Process Process Owner Description Parent Business Activity/Process Primary Product(s) Trigger(s) Sub-processes Standard Path Events/Activities Alternative Path Events/Activities Inputs Secondary Products Participants IT Services

IT Service

Description

IT Service Owner

Hours of Availability

Contract

Service Level Agreements

Impact

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These values may be defined within the Service Catalogue or the Service Level Agreements.Service Level Management Business Process and IT Service Summary This section provides a summary matrix table of the business processes and their corresponding IT Services. Page 189 . The easy way to determine the Business Rating of the process would be to ascertain if the business could still deliver its services if that business process was unavailable for a period of time. The table also breaks down the Business Processes and offers you the ability to capture the department(s) that are involved in that particular business process. If necessary add or remove rows and columns as needed. The impact is an arbitrary value that IT and the business need to agree upon. This is a comprehensive summary table designed to be tailored for your needs. the business owner of the process. The table breaks down the IT Services and offers you the ability to capture the owner of the IT Service. the impact of the service on the business process and the agreed service hours. A simpler matrix may be just as effective for your needs. The Business Rating is also an arbitrary value that the business needs to agree upon. in this instance there maybe a number of owners of the process which would generally be made up of the Department heads. In most instances each department will rate their business processes Critical or Very High. The Business Owner may be hard to define in an organization. and the business rating.

software.Service Level Management IT Services Business Process A Business Process B Department Owner Business Department Owner Business Rating Rating Admin <<Business Medium Accounting <<Business Very High Process Process Owner>> Owner>> Owner Service A Service B Service C Service D <<IT Service Owner>> Impact Very High Service 24 x 7 Hours Owner <<IT Service Owner>> Impact High Service Mon-Fri: Hours 8am 6pm Owner <<IT Service Owner>> Impact Medium Service Mon-Sat: Hours 6am 6pm Owner <<IT Service Owner>> Impact Low Service Mon-Fri: Hours 6am 10pm Appendices List any appendices needed in conjunction with this document. Terminology IT Infrastructure: includes hardware. etc. documentation. policies. procedures. Page 190 .

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Service Level Management REPORTS KPI’s AND METRICS IT Services Reports and KPI Targets Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Page 192 .

However.Service Level Management Reports and KPI Targets for Service Level Management The document is not to be considered an extensive statement as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. Prepared by: On: And accepted by: On: <<date>> <<date>> Page 193 . the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered. This document contains suggestions regarding the measures that would be meaningful for this process. This document provides a basis for completion within your own organization. This document serves as a GUIDE ON SUITABLE KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (KPIs) and REPORTS FOR MANAGEMENT for the Service Level Management process. The metrics demonstrated are intended to show the reader the range of metrics that can be used. The message must also be clear that technology metrics must be heavily supplemented with non-technical and business focused metrics/KPI’s/measures. This document was.

If the process manager feels that reviews are too seldom or too often then the schedule should be changed to reflect that. Page 194 . Establishing SMART targets is a key part of good process management. Many initiatives begin with good intentions to do regular reviews. cost and “nuisance factor” need to be accounted for. With regard to timing of reviews then factors such as resource availability. the “how” question can be answered with metrics and measurements. but these fall away very rapidly. etc. This is why the process owner must have the conviction to follow through on assessments and meetings and reviews. SMART is an acronym for: Simple Measurable Achievable Realistic Time Driven Metrics help to ensure that the process in question is running effectively. While there can be no set guidelines presented for the timing/when of these reviews.Service Level Management Key performance indicators (KPI’s) Continuous improvement requires that each process needs to have a plan about “how” and “when” to measure its own performance.

A reducing number here may be a good indication or at least the number should be stable. it indicates that SLAs are more than just a document. It may even be better to use absolute values when the potential number of maximum failures is less than 100. Page 195 . The number of Service breaches recorded Improvements in salient points from Customer feedback forms Others Special Tip: Beware of using percentages in too many cases. but have been extended into related agreements with internal and external providers.Service Level Management With regard to SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT the following metrics and associated targets should be considered: Key Performance Indicator Target Value (some examples) The percentage of Underpinning contracts and OLAs in place that are supporting Service Level Agreements. Expressed as a percentage. Time Frame/Notes/Who Meetings held (on time) to review performance Costs of Service Delivery decreasing. The percentage of targets relating to Service delivery being met.

Analysis and results of meetings completed The situation regarding the process staffing levels and any suggestions regarding redistribution. Operational or Tactical. “What decisions is this report helping management to make?” Management reports for Service Level Management should include: Report Expected growth in demand for the service (will generally be high at start-up. Human resource reporting including hours worked against project/activity (including weekend/after hours work). Simple breakdown of new SLA/OLA/UCs created. simple notes on reviews of same completed.Service Level Management Reports for Management Management reports help identify future trends and allow review of the “health” of the process. recruitment and training required. Setting a security level on certain reports may be appropriate as well as categorizing the report as Strategic. but then plateau) Serious Service breaches and remedy steps taken Backlog details of process activities outstanding (along with potential negative impact regarding failure to complete the work in a timely manner) – but also provide solutions on how the backlog can be cleared. The acid test for a relevant report is to have a sound answer to the question. Relevant Financial information– to be provided in conjunction with Financial Management for IT Services Time Frame/Notes/Who Page 196 .

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Service Level Management BUSINESS AND IT FLYERS IT Services Process: Problem Management Business and IT Flyers Stat us: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Ver sion : Rel eas e Dat e: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 198 .

and your input is required to complete the flyers. they are examples. Page 199 . Note. the important thing is to ensure that the message delivered in the flyer is appropriate to the audience that will be reading it. So think about how and where you will be distributing the flyers.Service Level Management Introduction The following pages provide 2 examples of flyers that can printed and distributed throughout your organization. Remember. They are designed to be displayed in staff rooms.

Service Level Management               Problem Management  IT Services Department  Key Points: Wanted: Long Term Stability The IT Department is embarking on a Problem Management implementation Program. IT employees or business staff. Problem Management is a set of activities designed to remove errors from the IT infrastructure. As of <<mm-dd-yyyy>> that will change. designed to prevent errors even before they occur. Provide contact lists for the IT Department as well as the business managers that they can contact. <<First. • Few er incidents     • Increased confidence           • <<other   points>>           THE BENEFITS List the benefits to the intended audience. This could be anyone who might benefit from the information it contains. Error Control To identify the cause Proactive activities To prevent potential issues CONTACTS List the contacts Input any graphics in here Page 200   . New processes will be in place to head off potentially damaging.>>   • Proactive Approach   • Removal of Known   Errors. The most exciting element of the program is the Proactive activities. for example. Traditionally our focus has been on fixing errors as they occur. costly and time consuming errors in advance. Keep it Simple   Use Bullet Points THE PROCESS Problem Control To understand the issue. determine the audience of this flyer.

Service Level Management Problem Management IT SERVICE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM <<Corporate Logo or image of choice>> HELP US HELP YOU Contact your immediate Manager to let them know what you need to do your job better INCREASED SERVICE AVAILABILITY THROUGH FEWER PROBLEMS IS OUR GOAL KNOW YOUR SERVICE RIGHTS Sponsored by IT SERVICES “Constantly improving and aligning to your needs” Page 201 .

Service Level Management EMAIL TEXT IT Services Process: Service Level Management Email Text Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected Version: <<your version>> Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 202 .

that this is just one piece of text for one email. Note. which you can store in this document. it is advisable to create a few different versions of the below text. for future use. This is very important. and to keep in focus the promises that have been made regarding this process. as each time you send an email regarding your Service Level Management process it should be different and targeted to the correct audience. This document provides a method for also keeping track of your communication that you have made to the rest of the organization.Service Level Management Introduction In the next section of this document is an example email text that can be distributed across your organization. Page 203 . However.

Marketing Dept etc. agreeing and improving IT Services. What is Service Level Management? This process is responsible for defining. we have decided to embark on a service improvement programme. This programme will result in the implementation of a process called Service Level Management. This will be captured in a Service Catalogue (SC). Customer. >> Service Level Management and Agreements The IT Department <<give a specific name here if appropriate>> is embarking on a Service Improvement Programme. It is a process that is there to ensure that service quality is kept to a maximum. The list of services will then be Page 204 . IT Staff. In order to improve the IT Services and ensure that they are aligned with the needs of the organization. for example. recording.g. The IT Services department provides internal support for <<e. We have defined the Goal for Service Level Management as follows: << INSERT YOUR GOAL FOR SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT HERE >> What is your involvement? The IT Department will be creating a list of IT Services that it delivers. What does this mean to you? The IT Department continually strives to improve the service it delivers to its customers. Business applications and equipment: Enter any appropriate details here>>.Service Level Management Dear << insert audience here.

Service Level Management presented to the different departments within <<organization name>>. We have appointed a Service Level Manager to help drive this process. set expectations of the services being delivered. provide a way to measure the services. the better the information. From this. we will be able to then formulate agreements on the services being provided. make appropriate changes to meet the specific needs of the department. each department will be able to pick the service(s) that they use. The Service Level Manager will be the interface between the IT Department and the Department heads within the organization. and more importantly provide an avenue for discovery in service improvement. However. as statistics regarding unavailability of IT Services will still be gathered from the Service Desk. The following can be considered a list of benefits to be derived from the process: << • • List benefits applicable to your audience. For example: Benefits to the Business: Page 205 . From this list. The Service Level Manager will work closely with the business in defining the necessary services and agreeing their level of availability. and therefore a better ability to discover service improvements. These will be called Service Level Agreements. This is vitally important. This will help ensure that the IT Department is aligning its Services with the business needs. the process will still require users of the IT Service to call/contact the Service Desk for support issues. The more people that use the Service Desk. and through our requirements gathering.

please do not hesitate to contact me at << phone number >> << Your Name and Titles >> Page 206 . I am sure we can provide an extremely beneficial process to both the Business / <<organization name>> and IT. If you have any questions regarding this.Service Level Management o Improved relationship with customers o IT and Customers have a clear and consistent expectation of service • For example: Benefits to the IT Department o Better understanding of the level of service to be provided o Reacting appropriately due to Service Level Agreements o Operation Level Agreements reinforce communications >> The commencement date of the new process is scheduled for: << insert date >> OR Completion of the process will be: << insert date >> This is a detailed process and there may be some operational difficulties to overcome. but with your support.

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Responsibilities Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected Version: <<your version>> Release Date: Note: SEARCH AND REPLACE <<Organization name>> Search for any << or >> as your input will be required Also review any yellow highlighted text Page 208 .Service Level Management SLM PROCESS MANAGER IT Services Roles.

If you are looking to apply for a process role. If you are looking to appoint a process manager or promote someone from within the organization you can make notes about their abilities in the particular area. Description Will design. 4. OLAs and UCs Make available relevant.. maintain and review a structure for the process that covers the interactions of the people involved and the expected content of Service Level Management related documents (involving IT and Customers) AND Coordinates any required Service Improvement Plans/Programmes to eradicate falling Service Delivery performance Will coordinate process reviews utilizing independent parties to provide an objective view on the simplicity of the process and areas for improvement. 6. marketing and distribution of the Service Catalog (which documents the IT Services offered by the organization) Will control and review: Any outstanding process related actions Current targets for service performance Performance against SLAs. 3. concise reports that are both timely and readable for Customers and IT providers. maintain and review: Service Level Agreements with the business Customer (including a decision on SLA Structure). Will be responsible for implementing any design improvements identified. 2. Operational Level Agreements with the IT provider Underpinning Contracts with third party providers. Notes/Comments Use the notes/Comment s column in different ways. Is responsible for the creation. maintenance. then you can check yourself against the list (with ticks or look to update your resume). Will establish. Page 209 .Service Level Management Detailed responsibilities of the Service Level Management process owner The Service Level Manager…. 5. 1.

this is one contributing factor that also will require a high degree of understanding of human emotion and resistance. Although not a highly numeric role. Ability to use and apply valuable information gained from customers. the selected person must be able to understand the basics of supply and demand. The Service Level Manager must be able to communicate with people at all levels of the organization. 2. Notes/Comments Use the notes/Comment s column in different ways. 8. rather than just accepting a marketing statement. They must not be risk adverse. They are a “champion” for this process and must display an air of confidence. The process manager will need to be able to engage in technical discussions with technical people (to ensure credibility) and to engage in business discussions with business people. 7.Service Level Management Detailed skills of the Service Level Management process owner The Service Level Manager…. If you are looking to appoint a process manager or promote someone from within the organization you can make notes about their abilities in the particular area. 3. without arrogance. The Service Level Manager must have good oral and presentation skills. Description The Service Level Manager will display a communication style based around listening and demonstrable genuine interest. High degree of people/relationship management focus and an ability to deal with an administrative workload. then you can check yourself against the list (with ticks or look to update your resume). The Service Level Manager will take an active interest in learning about services offered by external and internal providers. The process manager must be able to demonstrate ways to “do things differently” that will improve the process. If you are looking to apply for a process role. but must be very risk conscious. 5. 1. Page 210 . The manager will be interested in understanding how services are provided. with a commonsense attitude to service charging and a grip on basic statistical analysis.. 4. 6. Will also tend to be balanced in negotiations – almost to the point of neutrality during discussions between the customer and the IT Service Provider. about those technical issues (of course in non-technical terms).

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Service Level Management IMPLEMENTATION PLAN AND PROJECT PLAN IT Services Implementation Plan/Project Plan Skeleton Outline Process: Service Level Management Status: In draft Under Review Sent for Approval Approved Rejected <<your version>> Version: Release Date: Page 212 .

Agree to the policy regarding this process DESCRIPTION Page 213 . Too many initiatives get caught up in too much detail in the planning phase. Internal. software. However. hardware. This person is responsible for the process and all associated systems. Conduct a review of activities that would currently be considered as an activity associated with this process. accommodation). Assign a person to the key role of process manager/owner.g. purpose. outsourced. and implementation approach (e. the reader will certainly be reminded of the key topics that have to be considered for planning and implementation of this process. Review the finances required for the process as a whole and any associated systems (expenditure including people. KEEP THE MOMENTUM GOING. NOTE: the plan need not be detailed. The document is not to be considered an extensive plan as its topics have to be generic enough to suit any reader for any organization. Create and gain agreement on a high-level process plan and a design for any associated process systems. Don’t forget that the initial expenditure may be higher than the ongoing costs. Don’t forget annual allowances for systems maintenance or customizations to systems by development staff.Service Level Management Planning and implementation for Service Level Management This document as described provides guidance for the planning and implementation of the Service Level Management ITIL process. scope. Make notes and discuss the “re-usability” of that activity. hybrid) for the process. Initial planning When beginning the process planning the following items must be completed: CHECK ☺ or or date Get agreement on the objective (use the ITIL definition).

Reasons like to make our IT department more efficient are far too generic and don’t focus on the real issue behind why this process is needed. An inability to answer this seemingly simple. Objective Statement When you are describing the end or ultimate goal for a unit of activity that is about to be undertaken you are outlining the OBJECTIVE for that unit of activity.Service Level Management Create Strategic statements. In either case. then continually referring to it. Policy Statement The policy establishes the “SENSE OF URGENCY” for the process. Of course the activity may be some actions for just you or a team of people. but actually complex question is a major stepping stone towards successful implementation The most common mistake made is that reasons regarding IT are given as the WHY we should do this. The statement must leave the reader in no doubt that the benefits of this process will be far reaching and contribute to the business in a clearly recognizable way. Page 214 . It helps us to think clearly about and agree on the reasons WHY effort is put into this process. writing down the answer to WHERE will this activity lead me/us/the organization is a powerful exercise. makes achieving that end result realistic. There are many studies that indicate the simple act of putting a statement about the end result expected onto a piece of paper.

What is important is that others realize that information does in fact flow. Don’t get caught up in trying to be too detailed about the information flow into and out of this process. 2 rings) Details of irate callers ServiceDesk to SLMMgt Page 215 . don’t get caught up in spending hours on this. Do it quickly and go with your instincts or first thoughts – BUT THEN.g. Scope Statement In defining the scope of this process we are answering what activities and what “information interfaces” does this process have. with regard to the SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT process we can create a simple table such as: Service Level Management Information flows Process SLMMgt FinancialMgt to to Process FinancialMgt SLMMgt Information Customer budget details Expected ROI calculations for new service SLMMgt to ReleaseMgt Details regarding mandatory times for service availability Expected impact (+ve or –ve) of release ReleaseMgt to SLMMgt SLMMgt to ServiceDesk Client expectations regarding call pick up times (e. wait a few days and review what you did for another short period of time and THEN commit to the outcome of the second review as your statement.Service Level Management As a tip regarding the development of an objective statement. For example.

The following points and table helps to frame these considerations: (A variety of symbols have been provided to help you indicate required expenditure. Consider the following options and then apply a suitable model to your own organization or case study. during and after the implementation initiative. For a lot of organizations a staged implementation may be suitable. we usually look at implementation according to pre-defined priorities. For others a “big bang” implementation – due to absolute equality may be appropriate. level of satisfaction regarding costs in a particular area. STEPS NOTES/ /RELEVANCE/DATES/ WHO Produce the Service Catalog Plan the SLA Structure Establish the Service Level Requirements Draft SLA and seek initial approval Establish monitoring levels Review agreements with internal and external suppliers Define reporting standards Publicize and market The priority selection has to be made with other factors in mind. any legal requirements. etc.Service Level Management Based on ITIL Version 2 Steps for Implementation. rising or falling expenditure. In reality however. Costs The cost of process implementation is something that must be considered before. and desires of “politically powerful influencers”. There can be a variety of ways to implement this process.) Page 216 . such as competitive analysis.

Education Re-education of existing staff to learn new techniques and/or learn to operate new systems. Procedures Development costs associated with filling in the detail of a process activity. Build the team Each process requires a process owner and in most situations a team of people to assist. Of course a lot will be dependent on the timing of the implementation and whether it is to be staged or implemented as one exercise. The team size may or may not reflect this. The Service Level Management process is perhaps the process in the Service Delivery set that has the largest amount of initial and on-going activity. During Ongoing ☺ In most cases.Service Level Management Based on ITIL Version 2 Initial Personnel Costs of people for initial design of process. implementation and ongoing support Accommodation Costs of housing new staff and any associated new equipment and space for documents or process related concepts. Maintenance costs Hardware New hardware required to support the process activities. Part of this step involves deciding on a charging mechanism (if any) for the new services to be offered. Page 217 . costs for process implementation have to be budgeted for (or allocated) well in advance of expenditure. Software New tools required to support the process and/or the costs of migration from an existing tool or system to the new one. The step-by-step recipe guides for all involved and even indirectly involved personnel. IT hardware and even new desks for staff.

As part of this step if any information is credible document the transition from the current format to any new format that is selected. Examples of areas to review are: Area Power teams Current formal procedures Current informal procedures Current role descriptions Existing organizational structure Spreadsheets. It is critical to identify these systems and consider their future role as part of the new process definition. It is unlikely that there will not be some current activity or work being performed that would fit under the banner of this process. external consultancy or assistance to help with initial high workload during process implementation). Review the ability of existing functions and staff.Service Level Management Based on ITIL Version 2 Analyze current situation and FLAG Naturally there are many organizations that have many existing procedures/processes and people in place that feel that the activities of SLM are already being done. However. Can we “reuse” some of the skills to minimize training. education and time required for implementation? Establish the accuracy and relevance of current processes. Implementation activities for Service Level Management Activity Notes/Commen ts/Time Frame/Who Review current and existing Service Level Management practices in greater detail. we can provide a comprehensive checklist of points that must be reviewed and done. databases and other repositories Other… Notes Implementation Planning After base decisions regarding the scope of the process and the overall planning activities are complete we need to address the actual implementation of the process. Make sure you also review current process connections from these practices to other areas of IT Service Delivery. procedures and meetings. Decide how best to select any vendor that will provide assistance in this process area (including tools. Page 218 .

Cutover to new processes The question of when a new process actually starts is one that is not easy to answer. Create any required business processes interfaces for this process that can be provided by the automated tools (e. so it may even be best not to set specific launch dates. Ultimately we do want the new process to become the way things are done around here. as this will set the expectation that from the given date all issues relating to the process will disappear (not a realistic expectation). SLA Management tools). SLA Management tool). Page 219 . reporting – frequency. content). Most process activity evolves without rigid starting dates and this is what we mean when we answer a question with “that’s just the way it’s done around here”. An important point to remember is that if this process is to be implemented at the same time as other processes that it is crucial that both implementation plans and importantly timing of work is complementary. responsibilities and training plans.e. Document and get agreement on roles. Communicate with and provide necessary education and training for staff that covers the actual importance of the process and the intricacies of the process itself. Purchase and install tools required to support this process (i.g.Service Level Management Based on ITIL Version 2 Establish a selection guideline for the evaluation and selection of tools required to support this process area (i. Ensure adequate skills transfer and on-going support is considered if external systems are selected.e.

amazon.Service Level Management Based on ITIL Version 2 FURTHER INFORMATION For more information on other products available from The Art of Service. you can visit our website: http://www.com Page 220 . you can find more publications from The Art of Service at: http://www.com If you found this guide helpful.theartofservice.

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