Fall Protection Competent Inspector

A Student Guide to Basic Fall Protection Application

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FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT INSPECION GUIDE

TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Appendix Appendix 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 Introduction Body Supports Lanyards Connection Devices Anchorage Connectors Self-Retracting Lifelines Lifelines & Rope Grabs Detailed Inspection Logs DBI-SALA Technical Bulletins

© Capital Safety 2008

1-800-328-6146

DBI/SALA Equipment Inspection

MHB122807

It is extremely important to follow the laws. This equipment is designed to arrest and protect a worker in case of a fall. and manufacturer’s recommendations for inspections How important is the inspection process? …VERY! In this chapter you will learn about the CSA and ANSI standards. and employers regarding equipment inspection. and the laws that pertain to workers. In Canada. and Manufacturer’s (i.e. ANSI (American National Standards Institute). standards. the ANSI consensus standards may be applied for fall protection equipment inspection. DBI-SALA) requirements for inspection. OHSA The Laws regarding Fall Protection equipment in the United States are covered under OSHA and State OSHA legislation. 1 General roperly functioning fall protection equipment is vital for every person that works at heights. as well as CSA standards. Each State. students should be able to explain the how the following apply to equipment inspection: State.Chapter Introduction Objectives By the end of this chapter. supervisors. or CSA (Canadian Standards Association) Standards for equipment inspection. so it is important to know how to properly inspect and care for your equipment. Provincial and Federal laws and legislation applicable to inspection. In addition to OSHA. applying to employers and employees. dictate the need and frequency of inspections for fall protection equipment. and Province may have different legislation. the typical for each are listed below: P © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB122807 1-1 . manufacturer’s recommendations. Provincial and Federal regulation.

which state that the user must comply with the manufacturer and ANSI. There are newer regulations in some States and Provinces.1-98 Fall Arrester & Vertical Lifelines Z259. however. most regulations state that the user of the fall arrest equipment shall inspect each component of the system prior to use. state that each part of a fall arrest system must be inspected prior to use.2.2.502 Construction Standard  OSHA 1910. it shall be removed from service and discarded. Standards: United States . If the equipment has been subject to a fall. ANSI. labeled and stored.12 Connecting Components PFAS © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB122807 1-2 . and most manufacturers.2 -2007 Canada . at least annually by a competent person other than the user.10 M90/98 Full Body Harness Z259.CSA Z259. or returned to service if it has been authorized for reuse by a competent or qualified person according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. companies that work across states and provinces should ensure that they know these differences.66 General Industry Standard In North America there are only minor differences in regulations. CSA.2-98 Self retracting Devices PFAS Z259.1 Safety Belts & Lanyards Z259. As an employer or user of fall protection equipment. Generally. or CSA requirements. it is a requirement to understand and follow these regulations and standards. and in addition to this. or removed from service.ANSI A10.Canada  Construction Regulation.14-1991 Z359. and/or  Industrial or General regulation United States  OSHA 1926.11-92 Shock Absorber Z259.

Students must make an effort after this session to read and understand the requirements pertaining to their specific local in further detail.Summary This module has been a brief overview of the Legislation. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB122807 1-3 . Standards. and manufacture’s recommendation of fall protection inspection requirements.

cleaning. all of the rules and regulations are there to make sure that if you were ever to fall. Recommend criteria for harnesses storage.Chapter Full Body Harnesses Objectives By the end of this chapter. and maintenance. Explain the difference between a prior-to-use inspection vs. Further. and manufacturer’s recommended inspection Use an inspection log sheet to record a harness inspection. there may be legislative requirements in some locations that require more frequent inspections than the CSA and ANSI standards dictate. your harness is going to work. In the end. General T he full body harness is an integral part of the fall arrest system. The four key components of the full body harness requiring inspection are: • • • • Hardware Webbing Labels Stitching © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123007 2-1 . the harness requires daily and annual inspections. students should be able to: 2 Perform a full body harness inspection and name the four key inspection components. Though designed ruggedly for practical use in the construction industry. a CSA/ANSI.

IMPORTANT: Extreme working conditions (harsh environments. E.FREQUENCY • • • Before each use. at least annually The results of the inspection should be recorded IMPORTANT: If the full body harness has been subjected to fall arrest or impact forces it must be immediately removed from service. etc. prolonged use. P. positioning rings Webbing: is the synthetic fiber straps that makeup the harness.) may require increasing the frequency of inspections. other than the user. by the user By a competent person. L. all stitch patterns and webbing must be checked for: • Frays • Cuts • Broken fibers • Tears • Abrasions • Mold • Burns • Discoloration • Holes • Or any other damage © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123007 2-2 . Inspection Criteria Hardware: is any integral metal and plastic component on the harness: • • • • • • Dorsal D ring Dorsal back pad Buckles Keepers D.

mold. these items must not be damaged. worn parts. broken. burrs. all labels should be present and fully legible. and must be free of sharp edges. tears. abrasions. Tongue Buckle: Pass webbing through buckle and then tongue through grommet. Pull web to tighten. PVC coated hardware must be free of cuts. distorted. Ensure buckles work freely. Pull free end of web to tighten. holes. back pad. Inspect all buckle springs. Step 2 Inspect webbing material it must be free of all: • frays • cuts • broken fibers Also check for discoloration. Parachute Buckle: Pass web up through center slot of buckle. Step 3 Inspect labels. D-rings. to ensure non-conductivity. burns. or Inspect stitching. loop keepers). © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123007 2-3 .INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1 Inspect harness hardware (buckles. Quick-Connect Buckle: Insert male portion into receptor until click is heard. tears. rips. Broken stitches may be an indication that the harness has been impact loaded and must be removed from service. or corrosion. Pass-Thru Buckle: Pass male buckle through female buckle and pull free end of webbing to tighten. over knurled bar and back under frame. Secure web through keeper. check for pulled or cut stitches. cracks. Step 4 Inspect each system component or subsystem according to manufacturer's instructions. etc.

Thoroughly inspect the full body harness after extended storage. paint. Avoid areas where chemical vapors may exist. Record the inspection date and results in the company inspection and maintenance log. and check off the inspection box on the label attached to the harness. Do not uses bleach or bleach solutions. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123007 2-4 . More information on cleaning is available from DBI-SALA. etc. If inspection reveals a defective condition. SERVICING. may prevent the full body harness from working properly. Do not force dry with heat. MAINTENANCE.Step 5. Store full body harnesses in a cool. and hang to air dry. STORAGE Clean full body harness with water and a mild soap solution. or have any doubt about putting it into service contact DBI-SALA. and in severe cases degrade the webbing to a point where it should be removed from service. dry cloth. Wipe off hardware with a clean. remove unit from service immediately and destroy. clean environment out of direct sunlight. NOTE: Only DBI-SALA or parties authorized in writing may make repairs to this equipment. An excessive buildup of dirt. dry. If you have questions concerning the condition of your harness.

flames. within the same stitch pattern.Supplemental Inspection Information Life Expectancy: DBI-SALA does not have a cut-off date for service life for its equipment. Large concentrations of damage are grounds for rejection. In areas near the dorsal d-ring. More than two through holes on the same strap.e. Paint on webbing can cause web fiber rupture when the part is flexed therefore. Stitching: More than two ripped or cut stitches. Product MSD sheets should be reviewed to determine possible effects on products. larger than 1/16 inch diameter. Holes on less critical components. shall be grounds for rejection. shall be grounds for rejection. shoulder or leg straps on full body harnesses. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123007 2-5 . the item can continue to be used. or wear pads on products. Holes/Burns: In critical areas of the product such as lanyards. See "Heat Damage" section. a hole or burn. Web soaked with oils or other fluids should be inspected closely. As long as the product continues to pass the inspection. cuts in webbing exceeding 1/8 inch in length shall be grounds for rejections. unless the buckles and other moving parts of the product are not able to function properly.DBI-SALA . or on strength members of a product. web coated with paint shall be rejected. The Owner's User Manual should be consulted regarding inspection frequency. weld slag. such as chest straps of full body harnesses. can be up to 1/4 inch diameter before the part is rejected. and details on inspections. cuts of any length are grounds for rejection.. Cleanliness: General dirtiness normally will not be grounds for rejection. Heat Damage: Areas damaged by heat (brown. In most areas. shall be grounds for rejection. etc) shall be closely reviewed. hard areas) sources (i. Ripped or cut stitches may be an indication that the product has been impact loaded.

List the legal requirements for inspection as well as CSA/ANSI consensus standards and a manufacturer’s inspection requirements Use an inspection log sheet to record a lanyard inspection.Chapter 3 Lanyards Objectives By the end of this chapter students should be able to: Identify different types of lanyards. EZ Stop II Web Lanyard Stitching EZ Stop II Shockwave Lanyard EZ Stop II Wire Rope Lanyard Label EZ Stop II Tie-Back Lanyard EZ Stop III Web Lanyard EZ Stop II Energy Absorber Component EZ Stop III Shock Wave Lanyard Lanyard Nylon or Polyester Web Self Locking Snap hook Lanyard Nylon or Polyester Rope Self Locking Snap hook Label © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-1 . Perform inspections on various lanyards.

Step 2. cracks. etc. These items must not be damaged.INSPECTION FREQUENCY: • Before each use. at least annually. Ensure adjusters. adjusters. Ensure the connecting hooks work properly. or have any sharp edges. prolonged use. etc. • The results of the inspection should be recorded. it must be immediately removed from service and destroyed. or corrosion. burrs. IMPORTANT: Extreme working conditions (harsh environment. if present.). by the user. broken. Hook gates must move freely and lock upon closing. S INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1. distorted. spreader bar. • By a competent person. Inspect the lanyard per the following as applicable: WEBBING AND STITCHING:  Inspect webbing o Material must be free of  Frays  Cuts  Broken fibers.) may require increasing the frequency of inspections I I IMPORTANT: If this equipment has been subjected to forces resulting from the arrest N of a fall. work properly. o Check for  Tears  Abrasions  Mold  Burns  Discoloration © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-2 . worn parts. thimbles. other than the user. Inspect lanyard hardware (snap hooks.

 Inspect stitching o Check for pulled or cut stitches o The webbing must be free of  Knots  Excessive soiling  Heavy paint buildup  Rust staining o Check for chemical or heat damage indicated by  Brown patches  Discolored areas  Brittle areas o Check for ultraviolet damage indicated by  Discoloration and the presence of splinters or slivers on the webbing surface (Chalking). indicated by  Discoloration and the presence of splinters and slivers on the rope surface All of the above factors are known to reduce rope strength © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-3 . Damaged or questionable webbing should be taken out of service SYNTHETIC ROPE:  Inspect rope for concentrated wear o Material must be free of  Frayed strands  Broken yarns  Cuts  Abrasions  Burns  Discoloration o The rope must be free of  Knots  Excessive soiling  Heavy paint buildup  Rust staining o Rope splices must be tight. and thimbles must be held by the splice o Check for chemical or heat damage indicated by  Brown marks  Discolored. or brittle areas o Check for ultraviolet damage. All of these above factors are known to reduce webbing strength. with at least five (5) full tucks.

or  Contact a factory authorized service center for repair. contact DBI-SALA. If you have any questions concerning the condition of your lanyard.STORAGE  Clean lanyard with water and a mild detergent solution. may prevent the lanyard from working properly. and in severe cases degrade the webbing or rope to a point where it has become weakened and should be removed from service. dry cloth..  Additional maintenance and servicing procedures (i. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-4 . or have any doubt about putting it into service. o Avoid areas where chemical vapors may exist. remove unit from service immediately and destroy. o Thoroughly inspect the lanyard after extended storage. An excessive buildup of dirt. etc. Authorization must be in writing  Store the lanyard in a cool. All labels must be present and fully legible.SERVICING . IMPORTANT: Only DBI-SALA or parties authorized in writing may make repairs to this equipment.e. or require more information contact DBI-SALA. dry. paint. Step 4 Inspect each system component or subsystem according to associated manufacturer’s instructions.  If inspection reveals a defective condition.Step 3 Inspect labels. o Wipe off hardware with clean. and hang to air dry o Do not force dry with heat If you have any questions regarding cleaning of this equipment. clean environment out of direct sunlight. replacement parts) must be completed by a factory authorized service center only. MAINTENANCE . Step 5 Record the inspection date and results on the inspection log.

and should be removed from service Torn Webbing Torn or Broken Cover Open end or ripped out stitching Measured Length more than six (6) inches longer than length marked on label FREQUENCY • • • Before each use. prolonged use. it must be immediately removed from service. has been activated. by the user By a competent person.) may require increasing the frequency of inspections. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-5 . at least annually The results of the inspection should be recorded IMPORTANT: Extreme working conditions (harsh environment. other than the user.Inspecting the Energy Absorber for Activation The following inspection items are indications that the energy absorber has been subjected to impact loading. IMPORTANT: If the energy absorbing lanyard or energy absorber component has been subjected to fall arrest or impact forces. etc.

mold. abrasions. o Broken stitches may be an indication the energy-absorbing lanyard or energy absorber component has been impact loaded and must be removed from service © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-6 . or discoloration. cuts. etc.Inspection Steps: Energy Absorbing Lanyard Step 1 Inspect energy absorbing lanyard or energy absorber component hardware • Snap hooks • Adjusters • Swages • Thimbles. burns. or broken fibers  Check for tears. cracks. or have any sharp edges.  Inspect stitching for pulled or cut stitches. Damaged or questionable webbing should be replaced. worn parts. and/or o Brittle areas  Check for ultraviolet damage indicated by o Discoloration o The presence of splinters or slivers on the webbing surface. Step 2 Inspect the energy absorbing lanyard or energy absorber component per the following as applicable: WEBBING AND STITCHING:  The webbing material must be free of o Frays. etc These items must not be damaged.  The webbing must be free of knots o Excessive soiling o Heavy paint buildup o Rust staining  Check for chemical or heat damage indicated by o Brown o Discolored. or corrosion. Hook gates must move freely and lock upon closing. broken. Ensure adjusters (if present) work properly. burrs. All of the above factors are known to reduce webbing strength. distorted. Ensure the connecting hooks work properly.

On the EZ Stop® III Shockwave™ Lanyard models.  Remove the energy-absorbing lanyard from service immediately and destroy if there are six or more randomly distributed broken wires in one lay or three or more broken wires in one strand in one lay. the lanyard webbing will stretch out to reveal the warning on the impact indicator label. Step 6 Record the inspection date and results in the inspection log If inspection reveals an unsafe condition. NOTE: Only DBI-SALA or parties authorized in writing may make repairs to this equipment.  Inspect for broken wires by passing cable through gloved hands and: o Flexing it every few inches to expose breaks o Broken wires can be removed by bending the wire back and forth parallel to the rope length Do not attempt to pull wires out of rope. Step 4 All labels should be present and fully legible Step 5 Inspect each system component or subsystem per associated manufacturer's instructions. remove unit from service immediately.WIRE ROPE: Inspect entire length of the wire rope. There should be no evidence of elongation. Always wear protective gloves when inspecting wire rope.  A “lay” of wire rope is the length of wire rope that it takes for a strand (the larger groups of wires) to complete one revolution or twist along the rope.  The wire rope should be free of corrosion. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-7 . Step 3 ENERGY ABSORBING COMPONENT: Inspect energy absorber to determine if it has been activated. or contact an authorized service center for repair. Ensure energy absorber cover is secure and not torn or damaged.  Remove the energy-absorbing lanyard from service immediately and destroy if there are any broken wires within 1 inch of the metal compression sleeves (swages) at either end of the assembly.

SERVICING. contact DBI-SALA. or require more information. clean environment out of direct sunlight.  Store the lanyard in a cool. it can degrade the webbing or rope to a point where it has become weakened and should be removed from service If you have any questions concerning the condition of your lanyard.  An excessive buildup of dirt.. or have any doubt about putting it into service. paint. and hang to air dry o Do not force dry with heat If you have any questions regarding cleaning of this equipment. etc. STORAGE  Clean lanyard with water and a mild detergent solution. dry. may prevent the lanyard from working properly o In severe cases. contact DBI-SALA. o Avoid areas where chemical vapors may exist o Thoroughly inspect the lanyard or energy absorber component after extended storage © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 3-8 . dry cloth. o Wipe off hardware with a clean.MAINTENANCE.

2000108 2” Throat Opening 2000106 1 3/16” Throat Opening DESCRIPTION Snap Hooks: Snap hooks are self closing/self locking connectors. Optional Retaining Pin Part Number Mfg. ID Year of Mfg. Some snap hooks have an eye. 2100000 ¾” Throat Opening 2007153 2 ¼” Throat Opening Carabiners Nose Gate Part Number Mfg. Carabiners: Self-locking carabiners are self closing/self locking connectors. The snap hooks provide an eye for attachment of a lifeline or lanyard. Use an inspection log sheet to record snap hook and carabiner inspections. some include a pin that may be used to retain a permanently connected lanyard or lifeline. ID Year of Manufacture Gate Part Number Mfg. 4 Snaphook Nose Nose Gate must close Warning Lock Gate must lock Gate Part Number Mfg. ID Year of Mfg. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 4-1 . Nose Nose Gate Gate Optional Retaining Pin 2000523. 2000524 ¾” Throat Opening Part Number Mfg. Lock Lanyard/Lifeline Eye Lanyard/Lifeline 9503175 ¾” Throat Opening Lanyard/Lifeline Swivel Eye 9500100.Chapter Hooks and Carabiners Objectives BY the end of this chapter students should be able to: Inspect snap hooks and carabiners Explain the changes required by ANSI for gate strength. ID Year of Mfg. which swivels relative to the hook. ID Year of Mfg Gate must close Warning Lock Nose Lock Gate must lock Gate Part Number Mfg. ID Year of Mfg.

carabiners to carabiners. and withstand a side load of 3600 lbs. Results of each formal inspection must be recorded according to legislative standards IMPORTANT: If this equipment has been subjected to fall arrest or impact forces. Do not install more than one snap hook or carabiner into a single connection ring or opening (except for emergencies). the mating connector must be compatible in size and shape. Load Directions MAKING CONNECTIONS: USE CONSIDERATIONS: When making a connection using a snap hook or carabiner. Further.1 has specified new strength requirements for snap hook and carabiner gates. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 4-2 . at least annually.000 lbs.INSPECTION FREQUENCY:  Before each use. or returned to an authorized service center for repair. for the intended load direction for each hook. or snap hooks to carabiners. Improper loading directions can cause the hook to fail or the gate to open. Do not connect snap hooks or carabiners to objects or openings that may abrade or wear the hook material. Do not use hooks that will not completely close over the attachment object. Do not connect snap hooks to snap hooks. visually inspect according to manufacture and standards.  The snap hook or carabiner must be inspected by a competent person. it must be immediately removed from service and destroyed. The new snap hooks and carabiners have a minimum tensile strength of 5. releasing the load. ANSI Z359. the front of the gates will be able to withstand a load of 3600 lbs. New Design Requirements: As of November 2007. in the intended direction of the load. other than the user.

may make repairs to this equipment. carefully inspect the equipment it to assure it is in good working condition. Step 4 Inspect each system component or subsystem according to manufacturer's instructions. INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1 Inspect the snap hook or carabiner for damage. NOTE: Only DBI-SALA. distortion. burrs. remove unit from service. or parties authorized in writing. ensure roll out cannot occur. If the inspection reveals a defective condition. Check for worn or damaged parts. The gate and lock should operate smoothly. Step 5 Record the inspection date and results in the in the inspection and maintenance log at the end of this module. Do not use hooks or connectors that will not completely close over the attachment object. Look carefully for cracks. cracks. Step 2 Inspect the snap hook or carabiner for excessive corrosion. Correct connection Correct connection Connection Compatibility Correct connection Incorrect connection Incorrect connection Tight Fit Rough Edge BEFORE EACH USE. with no difficulty. or contact an authorized service center for repair. Gates must close and lock. Check for bending or distortion. Rollout occurs when interference between the hook and mating connector causes the hook gate to unintentionally open and release. dents.MAKING CONNECTIONS: When using a hook to connect to the anchorage connector. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 4-3 . or corrosion. Gates must fully close and engage nose of hook. Inspect for sharp edges. sharp edges. or deformities. burrs. Self -locking snap hooks and carabiners should be used to reduce the possibility of roll out. Markings should be present and fully legible. Inspect other fall arrest or restraint equipment according to manufacturer's instructions. Step 3 Inspect markings.

If you have questions concerning the condition of the snap hook or carabiner. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 4-4 . contact your manufactures representative or refer to the accompanying user guide for the product.MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING If gate operation is sluggish. apply a small amount of WD-40 or similar moisture repellant agent to the hinge end only.

Chapter Anchorage Connectors 5 Objectives By the end of this module students should be able to: Perform inspections of various anchorage connectors such as Anchor Straps. and Trolleys Use an inspection log sheet to record anchorage connector inspections. A Selection of Anchorages Connectors Boom Belt Scaffold Choker Standard Tie-off Adaptor Adjustable Tieoff Adaptor Kevlar Web Tie-off Adaptor Chain Tie-off Beam Trolley Fixed Beam Anchor © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 5-1 . Beam Clamps.

© Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 5-2 . and used under the supervision of a qualified person. steel fabrication. and nuclear industry). lift. The connecting subsystem must be connected to the small D-ring only. or in high temperature environments (foundries. restraint. or other defects that may weaken the structure. Do not use a knot to connect a lifeline to the anchorage connector. Do not attach sub-system to both D-rings on tie-off adaptor Do not leave slack in the anchorage connector. STRUCTURE: The structure to which the anchorage connector is attached must be free of corrosion. fire services. serious injury to the user is possible. WARNING: The anchorage connector must be tight against the anchoring structure. or support tools or equipment from this equipment. Ensure connections are fully closed and locked. for tie-off adapters. chemical manufacturing. Do not pass lanyard or lifeline through the anchorage connector Dring and hook back into lanyard or lifeline. cracks. connect your subsystem to the small D-ring only. oil industry.APPLICATIONS PURPOSE: There are many Anchorage Connectors in today’s market designed for a variety of personal fall arrest. When using an energy-absorbing lanyard. Do not attach the subsystem to both D-rings. emergency rescue services. and work positioning. Do not leave slack in the tie-off adapter. Ensure self -retracting lifeline is positioned so that retraction is not hindered. welders. If the anchorage connector were to slide down the structure in a fall arrest situation. suspension. connect the energy absorber "pack" end to the harness. deformities. or rescue systems. Kevlar web tie-off adapters should be used when working with high temperature tools or materials. Do not hang. WARNING: The tie-off adapter small D-ring must pass through the large D-ring. this may increase the free fall distance in the event of a fall. Always protect lifeline or lanyard from abrading against sharp or abrasive surfaces in your work area. Tie-off adapters and scaffold chokers may be used as an anchorage connector for a horizontal lifeline if the system is designed. CONNECTING TO THE ANCHORAGE CONNECTOR: The connection to the installed anchorage connector must be with a self-locking snap hook or self-locking carabiner only. installed. Do not attach an anchorage connector to a vertical structure unless a means of restraining the connector from sliding down the structure is present.

cracks. The frequency of formal inspections should be based on conditions of use or exposure.  Formal Inspection: A formal inspection of the anchorage connector must be performed at least annually by a competent other than the user.  Recording: Record the inspection results in the inspection and maintenance log at the end of this module.Tie off Adaptors INSPECTION FREQUENCY:  Before each Use: Inspect the tie-off adaptor as detailed in the steps below. distorted or have any sharp edges. including  Chain (if applicable)  Pivotal link  D-rings  O-ring  Rivets  Adjuster buckle These items must not be damaged. burrs. IMPORTANT: If this equipment has been subjected to fall arrest forces it must be immediately removed from service and destroyed INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1 Inspect the anchorage connector hardware. or corrosion. broken. worn parts. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 5-3 .

Step 2 Inspect the anchorage connector webbing and stitching. Step 3 Ensure the condition of the anchorage will support the anchorage connector loads. Step 5 Inspect each system component or subsystem according to associated manufacturer's instructions. The webbing must be free of:  Frays  Cuts  Broken fibers  Tears  Abrasions  Mold  Discoloration The webbing must also be free of:  Knots  Excessive soiling  Heavy paint build-up  Rust staining Check for chemical or heat damage indicated by:  Brownish areas  Discoloration  Brittle areas Check for ultraviolet degradation indicated by:  Discoloration  Presence of splinters or white powder  Slivers on the webbing surface Check for pulled or cut stitches  Broken stitches may be an indication that the anchorage connector has been impact loaded and must be removed from service All the above factors are known to reduce the strength of the anchorage connector. An anchorage connector connected to a damaged anchorage must not be used. Step 4 Ensure the anchorage connector is securely attached to the anchoring structure. do not use. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 5-4 . If anchorage connector is loose. Damaged or questionable anchorage connectors must be removed from service.

MAINTENANCE. clean environment. or returned to DBI-SALA for inspection or repair.  Wipe off hardware with a clean dry cloth  hang to air dry  Do not force dry with heat An excessive build-up of dirt. etc. or have any doubt about putting it into service. Fixed Beam Anchor Column Side Mount Top Mount Bottom Mount INSPECTION FREQUENCY: Before each use. dry. may prevent the anchorage connector from working properly. contact DBI-SALA. If you have questions concerning the condition of your anchorage connector. Avoid areas where chemical vapors exist. and may degrade the webbing to a point where it has become weakened and should be removed from service. The Fixed Beam Anchor must be formally inspected by a competent person other than the user at least annually. inspect the Fixed Beam Anchor. Thoroughly inspect the anchorage connector after extended storage.Step 6 Record the inspection date and results in the inspection log at the end of this module IMPORTANT: Only DBI-SALA or parties authorized in writing may make repairs to this equipment. Record the results in an inspection and maintenance record log © Capital Safety 2008 equipment has been subject to fall arrest forces MHB123107 1-800-328-6146 5-5 IMPORTANT: If this it must be removed from service and destroyed. paint. . Store the anchorage connector in a cool. STORAGE Clean anchorage connector with water and a mild detergent solution. out of direct sunlight.

Do not use acids or other caustic chemicals that could damage the system components. or return to DBI-SALA for repair. and locks in place Step 4 Inspect labels. A lubricant may be applied to the detent pin. look for:  Cracks  Dents  Deformities  Bending or wear on the support tube  Beam hooks  Adjustment pin  Adjustment handle Ensure no parts are missing Step 2 Inspect entire unit for excessive corrosion Step 3 Ensure the detent pin can be inserted through the adjustment holes. © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 5-6 . All product information labels must be present and fully legible Step 5 Record the inspection date and results in the inspection and maintenance log If inspection reveals an unsafe or defective condition remove unit from service and destroy. service. STORAGE CLEANING: Periodically clean the Fixed Beam Anchor using water and a mild soap solution. USER EQUIPMENT: Maintain.INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1 Inspect Fixed Beam Anchor for damage. SERVICING. and store harness and personal fall arrest components according to manufacturer’s instructions. NOTE: Only DBI-SALA or parties authorized in writing may make repairs to this equipment. MAINTENANCE.

visually inspect the Trolley. Step 4 The warning label must be present and fully legible. All wheels should turn freely and be undamaged. Step 2 Inspect trolley wheels. or returned to DBI-SALA for inspection or repair. All fasteners must be secure. INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1 Inspect trolley for damage. Look for cracks or deformities. Look for excessive wear or damage to the anchorage point. Step 5 Record inspection results in log © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 5-7 . Step 3 Inspect entire unit for corrosion.Beam Trolleys INSPECTION FREQUENCY: Before each use. Record the results in an inspection and maintenance record log IMPORTANT: If this equipment has been subject to fall arrest forces it must be removed from service and destroyed. The Beam Trolley must be formally inspected by a competent person other than the user at least annually.

may prevent the trolley from working correctly. STORAGE: Store this equipment in a cool. STORAGE MAINTENANCE: Clean the trolley using water and mild detergent. No lubrication is required. Inspect the trolley after extended storage. SERVICING: Must be completed by an authorized service center. paint. dry. Authorization must be in writing. etc. SERVICING. Wipe dry with a clean cloth and hang to air dry. ID Label Standard Adjustable Length Tie-Off Adaptors and Boom Belt Kevlar Web Tie-Off Adaptors Chain Tie-Off Adaptor Part 1 and 2 © Capital Safety 2008 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 5-8 . clean environment.MAINTENANCE. An excessive build-up of dirt. Do not force dry with heat.

e. inspection work. confined space work. In the retrieval mode. oil production. students should be able to: Perform inspections on Types I.Chapter Self-Retracting Lifelines (SRL) Objectives By the end of this chapter. generally having an internal shock absorbing system. etc. Some SRL models incorporate a built-in retrieval feature. and III SRL’s. These models have the same fall arrest capabilities as those described above when used in their non-retrieval mode. It is also permissible to use retrieval models for raising and lowering of materials within the stated capacity range. maintenance work. Type 3: Type Two self retracting lifelines with a retrieval mechanism. Type 2: 10 feet and over. They may be used in most situations where a combination of worker mobility and fall protection is required (i. This chapter will look at the inspection requirement for each category. 6 General: Self Retracting Lifelines may be divided into three categories: Type 1: 10 feet and shorter with typically an external shock absorbing system. Type One (Talon) © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 INSPECTION FREQUENCY: MHB123107 6-1 . general construction. II. Use an inspection log sheet to record the SRL inspections. APPLICATIONS PURPOSE: DBI-SALA self-retracting lifelines (SRL) are designed to be components in personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).). these models may be used for emergency rescue (raising or lowering) of personnel within the capacity range stated.

If the red stitching is torn or missing and the fold opened. the SRL has been impacted and must be removed from service and returned to an authorized service center for repair.BEFORE EACH USE: Inspect the SRL according to the inspection steps listed in this section. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-2 . WARNING: If the SRL has been subjected to fall arrest or impact forces it must be removed from service and returned to an authorized service center for repair. Do not re-stitch fold. find the fold in the web lifeline stitched with red thread. AFTER A FALL: Inspect SRL by factory authorized service center IMPACT INDICATOR: To inspect the impact indicator.

with no slipping.INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1 Check for loose screws and bent or damaged parts. Only DBI-SALA or parties authorized in writing may make repairs to the SRL. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-3 . Contact an authorized service center for repair. Step 9 Inspect each component of the personal fall arrest system according to manufacturer’s instructions. Step 5 Labels must be present and fully legible. or other damage. Step 3 Lifeline must fully extend and retract smoothly with no hesitation or slack line condition. Lifeline must not be damaged. Ensure the anchorage point is not damaged or distorted. Step 10 Record inspection results in the inspection and maintenance log REMOVE SRL FROM SERVICE if inspection reveals an unsafe or defective condition. Step 2 Check housing for distortion. and working condition. burns. chemical damage. Step 4 Ensure the device locks when the lifeline is pulled sharply. Step 7 Check lifeline for cuts. distortion. Step 8 Check connecting hooks or carabiners for damage. Step 6 Check for corrosion on the entire unit. or severely abraded areas. cracks. or corrosion. Lockup should be positive.

nylon web lifeline. Rinse and thoroughly air dry. nylon web lifeline. Thoroughly inspect the SRL after extended storage. SERVICING. Avoid storing the SRL in areas where chemical vapors exist. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-4 . Series Self-Retracting Lifeline: Includes quick connect anchorage attachment handle and 8 ft. ID Label on Lifeline or on Housing Return SRL to an authorized service center for lifeline replacement if necessary. Series Self-Retracting Lifeline: Includes swivel eye anchorage attachment and 16 ft. A return authorization number must be issued by DBI-SALA. nylon web lifeline. DESCRIPTIONS Talon 8 ft. LIFELINE: Warning Label Specification Label Clean lifeline with water and a mild detergent. PERSONAL FALL ARREST SYSTEM COMPONENTS: Clean and store associated system components according to manufacturer’s instructions. Position the SRL so water can drain out. Talon 16 ft. Clean labels as required. Do not lubricate any part of the SRL. AND STORAGE MAINTENANCE: HOUSING: Periodically clean the exterior of the SRL with water and a mild detergent. STORAGE: Store the SRL in a cool. An excessive build-up of dirt or other contaminants may prevent the lifeline from fully retracting. dry. SERVICING: Do not disassemble the SRL. out of direct sunlight.MAINTENANCE. causing a potential free fall hazard. and clean environment. or. order picker anchorage attachment handle and 8 ft. Additional maintenance and servicing must be performed by an authorized service center. Do not force dry with heat.

positive with no slipping. or other damage. Step 5 The labels must be present and fully legible. Step 4 Ensure device locks up when lifeline is jerked sharply. IMPACT INDICATOR: To inspect the impact indicator. cracks. If the hook is in the “indicated mode.” an impact loading has occurred. After Fall Arrest Inspect load indicator and entire SRL by factory authorized service center if impact indicator is deployed.” INSPECTION STEPS Step 1 Inspect for loose bolts and bent or damaged parts. Step 3 Lifeline should pull out and retract fully without hesitation or creating a slack line condition. SRL's which have been subjected to impact loading:  Must be removed from service for inspection  Do not attempt to reset impact indicator  Return to an authorized service center for resetting  NOTE: On some models swivel will not turn freely in “indicated mode. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-5 Lockup should be . Step 2 Inspect housing for distortion. look for exposed color band on hook.INSPECTION FREQUENCY: Type Two (Ultra-Lok) Before Each Use: Inspect as per steps listed below.

Slide up cable bumper and inspect ferrules for cracks or damage. paint build-up. that portion is acceptable and the inspection can continue. pull lifeline out of the SRL until it stops. chemical contact areas. and rust staining. corrosion. discolored. contaminants. Inspect for chemical or heat damage indicated by brown. Use caution near power lines. cuts. burns. and abrasions. NOTE: All of the above factors are known to reduce rope strength. Inspect for excessive soiling. Step 7 WIRE ROPE: Inspect wire rope for cuts. If the reserve lifeline cable stop or cable guide sleeve is visible. If a fall has been arrested when most of the lifeline was out. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-6 . Inspect for ultraviolet damage indicated by discoloration and the presence of splinters and slivers on the rope surface. broken wires. and the unit must be serviced by an authorized service center before reuse. Damaged or questionable ropes must be replaced WARNING: Do not tie or knot lifeline. frayed strands. the reserve lifeline has been spent. Inspect impact indicator. A “lay” of wire rope is the length of wire rope it takes for a strand (the larger groups of wires) to complete one revolution or twist along the rope. Dirt. and water can lower dielectric properties of the lifeline. corrosion. it is possible that the reserve lifeline has been deployed. NOTE: Replace the wire rope assembly if there are six or more randomly distributed broken wires in one lay. Step 8 Inspect connecting hooks for signs of damage. Swivel should rotate freely.Step 6 Look for signs of corrosion on the entire unit. kinks. fraying. or three or more broken wires in one strand in one lay. Rope strength is reduced proportional to the cross sectional area of the rope damaged. or signs of chemical damage. Inspect lifeline frequently for cuts. If the reserve lifeline has not been deployed. SYNTHETIC ROPE (Spectra and Technora): Inspect synthetic rope for concentrated wear. and working condition. Step 9 WIRE ROPE MODELS: Inspect reserve lifeline payout. broken yarns. To inspect for reserve lifeline deployment. The lifeline must be free of knots throughout its length. Replace the wire rope assembly if there are any broken wires within one inch (25mm) of the ferrules. or brittle areas. Avoid lifeline contact with sharp or abrasive surfaces. or severely abraded areas.

etc. STORAGE Periodically clean the exterior of the SRL using water and a mild soap solution. clean environment out of direct sunlight. If the reserve lifeline has not been deployed (the reserve lifeline label is not visible) that portion is acceptable and the inspection can continue. the reserve lifeline has been spent and the unit must be serviced by an authorized service center before use. SERVICING. Lifeline replacement. must be completed by an authorized service center. Do not attempt to disassemble the SRL. An excessive buildup of dirt. Step 11 Record inspection results in the inspection log MAINTENANCE. If the reserve lifelinewarning label is visible. as well as additional maintenance and servicing procedures. An authorization and return number must be issued by DBI-SALA. may prevent the lifeline from fully retracting back into the housing causing a potential free fall hazard.SYNTHETIC ROPE MODELS (Spectra and Technora): Inspect reserve lifeline payout. Avoid areas where chemical vapors may exist. it is possible the reserve lifeline has been deployed. Replace lifeline if excessive buildup is present. To inspect for reserve lifeline deployment. Store SRL in a cool. paint. See Figure 14. Thoroughly inspect the SRL after any period of extended storage. Rinse and thoroughly air dry. pull lifeline out of the SRL until it stops. Step 10 Inspect each system component or subsystem according to manufacturer's instructions. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-7 . Clean labels as required. Do not force dry with heat. Clean lifeline with water and mild soap solution. dry. If a fall has been arrested. Position the SRL so excess water can drain out.

extruded aluminum housing. 30. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-8 . self-locking swivel snap hook with impact indicator. ALUMINUM HOUSING WEB STYLE SELF-RETRACTING LIFELINES: Includes a lightweight. ULTRA-LOK® WEB STYLES SELFRETRACTING LIFELINES: Includes swivel eye anchorage. heavy duty. and 1-inch wide nylon web lifeline in a length of 11 feet Swivel Eye Inspection Label Warning Label Ultra-Loc Label ID Label Connections Label Wire or Synthetic Rope Bumper Self Locking Hook ALUMINUM HOUSING WIRE ROPE STYLE SELF RETRACTING LIFELINES: Includes a lightweight. self-locking snap hook. and 1-inch wide nylon web lifeline in lengths of 11 and 20 feet. self-locking swivel snap hook with impact indicator. or synthetic rope lifeline in lengths of 20 and 30 feet. extruded aluminum housing. and choice of galvanized wire rope lifeline or stainless steel wire rope lifeline in lengths of 20.DESCRIPTIONS: ULTRA-LOK® WIRE & SYNTHETIC ROPE STYLE SELF RETRACTING LIFELINES: Includes swivel eye anchorage. self-locking snap hook. and choice of galvanized wire rope lifeline or stainless steel wire rope lifeline in a length of 11 feet. and 50 feet. heavy duty.

Applications. inspect load indicator and entire SRL. Contact DBI-SALA if you have any questions regarding inspection frequency. IMPACT INDICATOR: Inspection of impact indicator is dependent on the type of SRL being inspected and as discussed in the course and in the user instruction manual for each specific unit. may require increased inspection and servicing frequency. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-9 . which require continuous raising and lowering.Type Three INSPECTION FREQUENCY (Retrievals): Before Each Use: Inspect per steps listed After Use of Retrieval Mode After raising or lowering.

. When the retrieval handle is released. An excessive buildup of dirt. causing a potential free fall hazard. Pull ring on shift knob should spring back when released. SERVICING. NOTE: Only DBI-SALA or parties authorized in writing may make repairs to this equipment. STORAGE Periodically clean the exterior of the SRL with water and mild soap solution. Do not force dry with heat. Replace the lifeline if there is excessive buildup. may prevent the lifeline from fully retracting. To test. Inspect unit before returning to service. Step 13 Shift knob should rotate freely when engaging/disengaging. raise and lower a test weight (sand bag) of between 75 lbs. and 310 lbs. MAINTENANCE. remove the SRL from service immediately and contact an authorized service center for repair. Retrieval operation should be smooth and even. the weight should not move and retrieval handle should stay in position (no movement). WARNING: If the lifeline contacts acids. Clean lifeline with water and mild soap solution. Detent pin must operate freely. A “clicking” sound should be evident when raising load. INSPECTION STEPS FOR RETRIEVAL COMPONENTS: Step 12 Inspect retrieval arm for distortion or other damage. remove unit from service and wash with water and mild soap solution.Follow steps 1 through 11 as per Ultra lok SRL’s and add the below steps for retrieval units. Retrieval handle should engage into retrieval arm with ease and push button should work freely. Position the SRL so excess water can drain out. Step 15 Retrieval pawl cover must be secure and without deformation. etc. If inspection reveals a defective condition. Optional mounting bracket must be securely attached to SRL and free from defects. paint. Clean labels as required. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-10 . Step 14 Inspect retrieval mode for operation. Rinse and thoroughly air dry.

Return to an authorized service center for resetting. look for an exposed red color band. Store SRL in a cool. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-11 .” an impact load has occurred. Do not attempt to reset the impact indicator. Do not disassemble the SRL. The stitched loop will pull out at approximately 450 lbs. Do not lubricate any parts. If the hook is found to be in “indicated mode. SRL’s. dry. General Requirements For all Blocks CABLE AND ROPE STYLE BLOCKS: To inspect the impact indicator. The web near the hook end of the lifeline is folded onto itself and stitched with red thread. Avoid areas where chemical vapors may exist. the SRL has been impact loaded and should be removed from service and returned to an authorized service center for repair. If the red stitching is broken the SRL has been impacted Impact Indicator Fold Before Impact Impact Indicator Fold After Impact If the Impact Indicator has been broken and the loop torn apart. out of direct sunlight. clean environment. which have been subjected to impact loading. If the red stitching is intact. Red Band Reserve Lifeline Red Band Normal Mode Indicated Mode Indicator Fold Reserve Lifeline Label WEB STYLE BLOCKS: These SRL's incorporate an impact indicator in the web lifeline. forming a small loop. the SRL has not been impacted. must be removed from service for inspection. Clean and store body support and associated system components according to manufacturer's instructions.Lifeline replacement and additional maintenance and servicing procedures must be completed by an authorized service center. Inspect the SRL after extended storage. Authorization and a return number must be issued by DBI-SALA.

Do not allow Spectra rope to contact materials exceeding 140°F (60°C).LIMITATIONS: The following application limitations must be considered before using SRL: CORROSION: Do not leave this equipment for long periods in environments where corrosion of metal parts could occur because of vapors from organic materials. Hot sparks may burn or damage this equipment. Do not use in environments exceeding 140°F (60°C). metal cutting. CHEMICAL HAZARDS: Solutions containing acids. Use near seawater or other corrosive environments may require more frequent inspections or servicing to assure corrosion damage is not affecting the performance of the product. which is very corrosive. Provide protection for this equipment when using near welding. When working with such chemicals. The lifeline may only be replaced by an authorized service center). frequent inspection of the entire SRL must be completed. may damage DBI-SALA SRL's. Use caution when working around sewage or fertilizer because of their high concentration of ammonia. SRL is using Technora synthetic ropes are heat resistant up to 900°F (480°C). Consult DBI-SALA for details on use in high temperature environments. or similar activities. prolonged use) may require increasing the frequency of inspections © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 MHB123107 6-12 . alkali or other caustic chemicals. HEAT: This equipment is not designed for use in high temperature environments. it must be removed from service IMPORTANT: Extreme working conditions (harsh environment. 15 WARNING: If the self-retracting lifeline has been subjected to fall arrest or impact forces. Consult DBI-SALA if in doubt about using this equipment around chemical hazards. particularly at elevated temperatures. Chemical damage to the lifeline is difficult to detect and it is recommended that the lifeline be replaced periodically to ensure safety. NOTE: SRL's using Spectra synthetic rope is not flame or heat resistant.

maintenance. oil production. window washing. 30 feet) Rope Cut to Length 5/8” Polyester/Polypropylene Rope 5/8” Polyester Rope 3/4” Polyester/Polypropylene Rope 3/4” Polyester Rope 3/8” 7x19 Wire Rope 1-800-328-6146 DBI-SALA Equipment Inspection 7-1 . These lifelines and lifeline subsystems (with the exception of 3/8 inch wire rope) are not designed for use in horizontal lifeline systems. A Selection of Lifelines Vertical Lifelines: PURPOSE: Vertical lifelines and vertical lifeline subsystems are intended to be used as part of a personal fall arrest or restraint system when coupled with a rope grab. © Capital Safety 2006 1202749 (3/4” polyester/polypropylene rope. They provide the pathway or anchor for the sliding rope grab to travel. 30 feet) 1202753 (5/8” polyester/polypropylene rope. Applications include: Inspection work. 30 feet) 5901003 (3/8” wire rope. construction. and confined space rescue to name a few.Chapter Vertical Lifelines & Rope Grabs 7 Objectives In this module through discussion and practical inspection techniques. demolition. 30 feet) 1202750 (3/4” polyester/polypropylene rope. the student will gain the knowledge and experience to complete a proper inspection of: Vertical Lifelines Rope Grabs and Recording the inspection process. 30 feet) 1202754 (5/8” polyester/polypropylene rope.

prolonged use. Hook gates must move freely and lock upon closing. with five full tucks.  Formal Inspection: A formal inspection of the lifeline must be performed at least annually by a competent other than the user. INSPECTION STEPS LIFELINES: Step 1 Inspect lifeline hardware (snap hooks. Damaged or questionable rope should be replaced. burrs. IMPORTANT: Extreme working conditions (harsh environments. paint build-up. and thimbles must be held firmly by the splice. Check for chemical or heat damage. as detailed at the end of this module WARNING: If this equipment has been subjected to. These items must be free of sharp edges. Replace the wire rope if there are six or more randomly distributed broken wires in one lay. Check for ultraviolet damage. The frequency of formal inspections should be based on conditions of use or exposure. Step 2 Inspect the lifeline per the following: SYNTHETIC ROPE: Inspect rope for concentrated wear. cracks. discolored. The rope must be free of knots. WIRE ROPE: Inspect entire length of wire rope. broken yarns.). Broken wires can be removed by bending the wire back and forth parallel to the rope length.  Recording: Record the inspection results in the inspection and maintenance log. worn parts. Always wear protective gloves when inspecting wire rope. abrasions. indicated by brown. These items must not be damaged. Do not pull broken wires out of the rope. cuts. indicated by discoloration and splinters and slivers along the rope surface. and discoloration. flexing the rope every few inches to expose breaks. or brittle areas. ferrules.INSPECTION FREQUENCY:  Before each Use: Inspect the lifeline as per the outline listed on the following pages. or three or more broken wires in one strand in © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 DBI-SALA Equipment Inspection 7-2 . Material must be free of frayed strands. excessive soiling. or corrosion. or distorted. fall arrest forces remove from service and destroy. Inspect for broken wires by passing cable through gloved hands. and rust staining. burns.) may require increasing the frequency of inspections. etc. etc. All of the above factors are known to reduce rope strength. Rope splices must be tight. thimbles. broken.

out of direct sunlight. remove equipment from service and destroy. clean environment. and in severe cases. Replace the wire rope if there are broken wires within one inch of the swages at either end of the assembly. dry. Additional maintenance and servicing procedures must be completed by and authorized service center. Wire rope should be free of corrosion. Step 3 Inspect labels. Do not disassemble this equipment. or subsystem according to Step 5 Record the inspection date and results. Authorization must be in writing.one lay. SERVICING. Avoid areas where chemical vapors may be present. Thoroughly inspect the lifeline after extended storage. Store the lifeline in a cool. All labels must be present and fully legible. MAINTENANCE. etc. weaken the rope. A Selection of Lifeline Labels: © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 DBI-SALA Equipment Inspection 7-3 . paint. Do not force dry with heat. Wipe hardware dry with a clean. If inspection reveals an unsafe or defective condition. STORAGE Clean the lifeline with water and a mild detergent. Step 4 Inspect each system component manufacturer’s instructions. or contact an authorized service center for repair. dry cloth and hang to air dry. may prevent the lifeline from working properly. A “lay” of wire rope is the length of wire rope it takes for a strand (the larger group of wires) to complete one revolution along the rope. An excessive build-up of dirt.

etc.) may require increasing the frequency of the inspections © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 DBI-SALA Equipment Inspection 7-4 . Roller Cover The rope grab will move Side Plate up and down the lifeline. IMPORTANT: If the rope grab has been subjected to fall arrest or impact forces. Handle Spring but in the event of a fall.Rope Grabs Detent Pin Lanyard Connection Handle PURPOSE: DBI-SALA Hinged Rope rope grab fall arresters are intended to be used Retainer as part of a personal fall Rope Size Gauge arrest or restraint Gravity Lock system when coupled to an appropriate lifeline. INSPECTION OF ROPE GRABS FREQUENCY:  Before each Use: Inspect the rope grab as per the outline listed below. it must be immediately removed from service and destroyed.  Formal Inspection: A formal inspection of the rope grab must be performed at least annually by a competent other than the user. prolonged use. as detailed at the end of this module.  Recording: Record the inspection results in the inspection and maintenance log. IMPORTANT: Extreme working conditions (harsh environments. lock onto the lifeline to arrest the falling worker. The frequency of formal inspections should be based on conditions of use or exposure.

Step 8 Record the inspection date and results in the inspection log. There should be no binding or sticking. Step 3 Inspect handle spring. IMPORTANT: If inspection reveals a defective condition. Equipment found to be in defective condition must be removed from service. repair. The top button should spring back up when pushed down. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 DBI-SALA Equipment Inspection 7-1 . or contact a factory authorized service center for repair IMPORTANT: Do not attempt to alter. it should be free to travel the full length of the guide slots. Inspect the hinge for signs of rope wear. The pin should easily slide through the rope grab body and hinge. Step 4 Inspect detent pin. Step 2 Inspect the lanyard connection handle for freedom of motion. There should be no dips or depressions worn into the rope channel. Repairs may only be performed by DBISALA or those authorized in writing to do so.INSPECTION STEPS FOR ROPE GRABS: Step 1 Inspect action of locking roller. fully legible. It should be in its correct place and undamaged. When the rope grab is held upside down. The lever must push the roller into the rope. or make substitutions to the rope grab or rope grab parts. the gravity lock should drop down and prevent the hinge from fully closing. Check that the gravity lock on the hinge works freely. Step 5 The rope grab hinge must pivot freely and close completely. All labels and markings must be present and Step 7 Inspect each system component or subsystem per associated manufacturer's instructions. Also inspect for wear on the nose of the handle where it contacts the roller. Step 6 Inspect labels and markings. remove unit from service immediately and destroy.

or have any doubt about putting them into service. Wipe off hardware with clean. and in severe cases degrade the rope to a point where it has weakened and should be removed from service. Authorization must be in writing. © Capital Safety 2006 1-800-328-6146 DBI-SALA Equipment Inspection 7-1 . may prevent the rope grab from working properly. Additional maintenance and servicing procedures (replacement parts) must be completed by a factory authorized service center. dry cloth. Store the rope grab and lifeline in a cool. An excessive buildup of dirt. Do not force dry with heat. Do not attempt to disassemble the unit. and hang to air dry. etc. paint. Thoroughly inspect the rope grab and lifeline after any period of extended storage. clean environment out of direct sunlight.MAINTENANCE Clean the rope grab with water and a mild soap solution. contact DBI-SALA. If you have any questions concerning the condition of the rope grab or lifeline. See Lifeline User Instruction Manual for specific maintenance details. dry. Avoid areas where chemical vapors may exist.

burns. Accepted Rejected 4. cracks and corrosion. burrs.) Labels: Inspect.Full Body Harness Inspection Checklist / Log Harness Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing.) Hardware: (includes D-rings. buckles. distortion. sharp edges. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1. and back pads) Inspect for damage. tears. Accepted Rejected 5. Webbing: Inspect for cuts.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: . keepers.) Accepted Rejected 7. frays.) Accepted Rejected 3. abrasion. and discoloration.) Accepted Rejected 6. make certain all labels are securely held in place and legible. excessive soiling.) Stitching: Inspect for pulled or cut stitches.

Labels: Make certain all labels are securely held in place and legible. abrasion. burns. Accepted Rejected 4. and discoloration. sharp edges. Synthetic Rope: Inspect for pulled or cut yarns.) Accepted Rejected 6. Wire Rope: Inspect for broken wires. corrosion. corrosion and proper operation. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1. thimbles.Lanyards Inspection Checklist / Log Lanyard Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. Webbing: Inspect for cuts. and excessive soiling. excessive soiling and discoloration.) Stitching: Inspect for pulled or cut stitches.) Energy Absorbing Component: Inspect for elongation. burns. tears. carabiners. tears. abrasion. and separation of strands. cracks. burrs.) Hardware: (includes snap hooks. and D-rings).) Accepted Rejected 5. kinks. adjusters.) Accepted Rejected 3. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2. keepers. Inspect for damage.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: . frays. distortion. knots. excessive soiling. Accepted Rejected 7.

) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: .) Labels: Inspect.) Stitching: Inspect for pulled or cut stitches. frays. 4.) Hardware: (Includes D-rings) Inspect for damage. excessive soiling and discoloration. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1.) Accepted Rejected 7. sharp edges. tears. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.Hooks / Carabiners Inspection Checklist / Log Tie-Off Adaptor Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. Accepted Rejected 5. burrs. make certain all labels are securely held in place and legible. cracks and corrosion.) Accepted Rejected 6. abrasion. Webbing: Inspect for cuts. burns. distortion.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 3.

) Accepted Rejected 7. deformities and locking operation. burrs.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: . 4. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2. make certain marking(s) are legible.) Physical Damage: Inspect for crack sharp edges.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 3.) Markings: Inspect.) Accepted Rejected 6.Tie-Off Adaptors Inspection Checklist / Log Hook / Carabiner Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. Excessive Corrosion: Inspect for corrosion which effects the operation and/or strength. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1.) Accepted Rejected 5.

If welded.) Physical Damage: Inspect for cracks sharp edges.) Excessive Corrosion: Inspect for corrosion which effects the operation and/or strength. burrs and deformities. Fasteners: Inspect for corrosion.Anchorage Plates Inspection Checklist / Log Anchorage Plate Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. Accepted Rejected 3. Accepted Rejected 5.) Markings: Inspect.) Accepted Rejected 7. inspect weld for corrosion.) Accepted Rejected 6. tightness damage and distortion. make certain marking(s) are legible.) Accepted Rejected 4. cracks and damage. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: .

etc. proper operation and markings (see separate checklist/log for hooks & carabiners). Retraction/Extension: Inspect spring tension by pulling lifeline out fully and allowing it to retract fully (no slack). tears.) Overall Disposition Inspected By: Date Inspected: .) 3. burns. MN 55066 Self Retracting Lifeline Model: Manufacture Date: Serial Number: Lot Number: Purchase Date: Owner/Dept/Location:_________________________________________________________ Owner’s ID #:_______________________________________________________________ Comments: ___________________________________________________________________________ General Factors 1. make certain all labels Are securely held in place and legible. broken wires (see impact indicator section). Housing: Inspect for distortion.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 9.) Screws / Fasteners: Inspect for damage and make certain all screws and fasteners are tight. Labels: Inspect.) Impact Indicator: Inspect indicator for activation (rupture of red stitching. Hooks / Carabiners: Inspect for physical damage. abrasion.Self Retracting Lifelines Inspection Checklist / Log 3833 SALA Way Red Wing.) 6.) Accepted Rejected 8. elongated indicator. excessive soiling and discoloration. Locking Action: Inspect for proper lock-up of brake mechanism. corrosion. Inspect anchoring loop for distortion and damage.) 4.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 5. Accepted Rejected Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.) 7. Reserve Lifeline: Inspect reserve lifeline retention systems for deployment. cracks and other damage. frays. Lifeline: Inspect for cuts.

) Accepted Rejected 5. MN 55066 ______Manufacture Date: Lot Number: Purchase Date: General Factors 1.) Accepted Rejected 6.) Accepted Rejected 3.) Accepted Rejected 7.) Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.) Accepted Rejected 4.Inspection Checklist / Log _________________ Model: Serial Number: Comments: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: .

LAD002: Corrosion Resistance of Ladder Safety System Wire Ropes Retrieval/Rescue Equipment (RET) No. MISC003: Capacity of Fall Protection Equipment No. SRL001: Use of SRL Lifelines on Flat Roof Applications No. LAD001: Top Bracket Anchorage Strength for Lad-Saf® Systems No. MISC006: Anchorage Strength No. DBI-SALA 2006 1 . SRL004: Use of SRL's in Training Environments No. February 1998 No. RET001: Powered Operation of Salalift® I Winch Load Arrestor Equipment (LDA) Miscellaneous (MISC) No. SRL006: Tag Lines for Self-Retracting Lifelines Ladder Safety System (LAD) No. MISC007: Certification/Inspection Frequency No.OBSOLETE No. MISC002: Product Life. SRL003: Servicing/Inspection of Self-Retracting Lifelines No. MISC008: Buckle Specifications and Operations Capital Safety. MISC005: Cleaning of Web Personal Fall Protection Products No. MISC001: Marking/Identifying Web Products No.Technical Bulletin Index Anchorage Connector (AC) Body Belt (BB) Connector (CON) Energy Absorber + Lanyard (EA+L) Full Body Harness (FBH) Horizontal Lifeline (HLL) Lanyard (L) Rope Grab (RG) No. RG001: Use of Rope Grabs in Flat or Sloped Roof Applications Self-Retracting Lifeline (SRL) No. MISC004: Compatibility of fall Protection Equipment No. SRL005: Extended SRL Service Frequency Conditions . SRL002: Using DBI-SALA SRL’s with In-Line Lanyards No.

com for updates on all Technical Bulletins. Capital Safety.Standard Regulation Reviews Steel Erection Safety Standard (Subpart R) Please check our website: www. DBI-SALA 2006 2 .capitalsafety.

and strength). 8.000 pounds for fall arrest or 3. 2.000 pounds for restraint applications. The lifeline must be protected from contact with sharp or abrasive edges and surfaces. warning guardrails. which meets the requirements specified in the user instruction manual (i. otherwise 5.e. 1. The following guidelines should be observed and the special conditions noted. See user instructions for additional fall clearance information. NOTE: Restraint anchorage may only be used where there is no possible vertical free fall. Provisions shall me made (i. B Subject: Use of Rope Grabs in Flat or Sloped Roof Applications The use of DBI-SALA Rope Grabs (model 5001441.. etc. lines.e. See user instruction manual for additional anchorage strength information. RG001. Make certain enough clearance exists in the path of the fall to prevent striking an object. size. 7. The anchorage point shall be capable of supporting 5. Capital Safety. Rev. The rope grab locking operation must not be hindered by interference with the roof or objects on the roof surface. material. 5001442) on flat or sloped roofs is acceptable as a means of fall protection under most conditions. from monitors. The rope grab shall be connected directly to the body support (via locking carabiner) or with a short lanyard (not to exceed three feet in length). The rope grab and the lifeline system shall be positioned to prevent a free fall exceeding six feet (for fall arrest system).) to prevent swing falls unprotected roof edges or corners. 3..Technical Bulletin No. construction. The rope grabs must be used on a lifeline. Restraint systems do not allow a free fall. Restraint anchorage does not have sufficient strength for fall arrest. DBI-SALA 2006 3 . 4. 6.

application limits and consequences of improper use of the rope grab system. Capital Safety.9. DBI-SALA 2006 4 . 10. Training shall be conducted on the correct care and use. All applicable guidelines in the user instruction manual shall be followed. operating characteristics.

Rev. or out away from the SRL. The total fall distance will be greater than if the SRL were mounted overhead. C Technical Bulletin No. 4. leading edges. DBI-SALA 2006 5 . or similar applications where the SRL is not located overhead of the work area is acceptable under most circumstances provided special precautions are taken as described in this bulletin The following guidelines must be followed when using SRL’s in horizontal or near horizontal applications: 1. This energy absorber is connected in-line between the harness dorsal d-ring and the SRL’s snap hook. 2. depending on the swing fall hazard. Added fall clearance distances may be required. SRL001. See bulletin SRL002. rather than laid flat. Do not use energy absorbing lanyards for this purpose. especially when working near corners. increased clearance distances will be required to prevent striking a lower level or obstruction. Special brackets are available to support the SRL for some applications. Therefore. to prevent uneven spooling of the lifeline and to benefit retraction. DBI/SALA offers a special model energy absorber (part number 1220362) for this purpose that includes a snaphook on one end and a D-ring on the other to ensure compatible connections can be made. A separate in-line energy absorber must be installed between the end of the lifeline and the harness to reduce the arrest forces resulting from falling over an edge. Sharp edges must be avoided or covered Capital Safety. 5. 3. Subject: Self-Retracting Lifelines on Flat Roofs Or Leading Edge Applications The use of DBI/SALA Self-Retracting Lifelines (SRL’s) for fall protection on flat roofs. The SRL should be positioned on it’s edge. Swing fall hazards may exist. Sharp edges which the lifeline may contact during a fall could cut or damage the SRL’s lifeline.

7. before the brake will engage and a fall stopped. The cable extension speed must reach a speed of approximately 4. Employee training should be conducted to help assure a safe working environment. DBI-SALA 2006 6 . All applicable user instruction manuals should be reviewed and followed. Falls where the lifeline may slide along a sharp edge must be guarded against. Capital Safety.5 feet per second. 8.over. such as in a sliding fall down a sloped surface. the SRL will not engage. If a person fails to reach a speed of approximately 4. 6.5 feet per second.

Rev.. or snap hook to web/rope/cable loop is not recommended. DBI-SALA 2006 7 . C Technical Bulletin No. Free Fall: The addition of a lanyard in-line between the SRL snap hook and the user’s body support (i. Subject: Using DBI/SALA Self-Retracting Lifelines With Separate Lanyards For most applications. the use of separate lanyards connected in-line with DBI/SALA Self-Retracting Lifelines (SRL’s) is not recommended. including: 1. This type of connection would not be compatible. The undetected free fall will produce greater fall energy and could extend the total fall distance considerably or damage the SRL. of the lanyard may cause some of this increase. 4. The extension. the majority of the increased fall distance is due to slack in the lanyard and the need to extend the fall arrest distance in absorbing the additional fall energy. a short (18 inches long) d-ring extension (model 1201117) can be used to help in the connection/disconnection of the SRL to the Capital Safety. 2. A number of other concerns may apply to a specific application. Compatibility: The practices of attaching snap hook to snap hook. or stretch.SRL002. There are several concerns regarding this lanyard/SRL combination. Reduced retraction can cause a slack line resulting in increased fall distances and increased arresting forces. or both. especially if the locking action on the snap hook does not function properly. But.e. 3. Increased fall distances may allow the attached worker to contact a lower level or obstruction. and could cause rollout to occur. If needed. harness) connection d-ring will potentially cause an undetected free fall if the fall occurs with the SRL fully retracted (but the lanyard is slack). Retraction: The added weight of the in-line lanyard may overpower the SRL’s retraction spring. Fall Distance: An increase in the total fall distance will occur when a lanyard is used in-line with the SRL if free fall increases as described above.

For applications where the SRL is anchored behind the user.body support. and the line does not pay out vertically. DBI-SALA 2006 8 . All applicable user instructions shall be reviewed and followed. which automatically reduce the arresting forces. Capital Safety. the use of a separate. in-line energy absorber pack (i. This d-ring extension provides a compatible connection point for the SRL snap hook. Examples of applications where this would be used include flat roof work and leading edge work. Please contact DBI/SALA regarding applications that you believe requires an in-line lanyard. See technical bulleting SRL001 for more information..e. Employee training should be conducted to help assure a safe working environment. model 1220362) can be used. All DBI/SALA SRL’s contain built-in shock absorbing devices.

Our extensive servicing experience allows us to provide information to you that will help assure proper product performance. Capital Safety. Subject: Servicing / Inspection of Self Retracting Lifelines Servicing and inspection of mechanical fall protection devices.S. and maintain the highest level of safety that is desired and deserved. Manufacturing the highest quality SRL’s. How often should DBI/SALA SRL’s be serviced? There is no specified or required frequency for servicing and/or recertification of SRL’s. Why should I have my SRL serviced? Like any mechanical device.Rev. DBI/SALA is available to assist in determining the SRL’s service frequency needs. All applicable OSHA and ANSI standards are complied with as well. Servicing of SRL’s that have been impacted exhibit or contain other damage/defects will allow those SRL’s to be put back into use following repair. The work environment. ANSI Z359. Our position is a proactive one. SRL003. The “Before Use Inspection” and the annual inspection by a Competent Person will help provide information on the SRL’s condition and indicate how often the SRL should be serviced. The following questions and answers will help you further understand the issues relating to the inspection/servicing of SRL’s. DBI-SALA 2006 9 . Second party testing and approvals are proof that DBI/SALA’s SRL’s are second to none. SRL’s manufactured by DBI/SALA feature the highest quality U. including the industry’s most stringent standard. made components. Proper servicing at the appropriate time will help assure product performance and reduce overall cost of ownership in the long run. SRL’s will require some servicing or repair over time. The frequency of servicing/inspection as well as who should perform these activities are critical issues. and providing superior support has always been a priority with DBI/SALA. the type of work being performed and the frequency of use are some of the factors that will determine how often the SRL should be serviced.1-1992. such as Self Retracting Lifelines (SRL’s) are important requirements of any effective safety program. work with customers to make servicing and inspection more convenient and economical. B Technical Bulletin No.

Inspect at least annually by *competent person. The information found in the regulations covers inspections as follows: OSHA 1910.66 OSHA 1926. Inspected by user prior to use. The springs may corrode or become use. Certification is issued for each completed unit. and the entire unit is assembled and inspected. Capital Safety. ANSI Z359. The critical energy absorbing brake element is re-calibrated to ensure performance. Inspect systems prior to use. *A competent person.502 Remove impacted systems and components. Note: For Canada. Remove impacted systems and components. cuts.e. as defined by OSHA. hazardous. What is actually done to a DBI/SALA SRL during servicing? The SRL is completely dismantled. Proper retraction is key to one of the benefits of an SRL (i. Inspect systems prior to use. This is the result of broken wires. The retraction spring approximately 25% of weak from prolonged primary functions and distance). The label is replaced. bad kinks. DBI-SALA 2006 10 . or dangerous to employees. All components are checked for wear. What is typically found during a servicing/inspection? Approximately 40% of the time the lifeline needs to be replaced. that of limiting fall What does OSHA/ANSI require for servicing? OSHA AND ANSI regulations specifically address inspection of products such as SRL’s. authorized servicing will correct those unacceptable conditions and help assure proper product performance. as needed. On web lifelines often there is extreme wear/abrasion. cleaned and inspected. Parts are replaced only as needed. is one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary. and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them. thereafter annually. or corrosion (wire rope models)..When the “Before Use” inspection or the annual inspection by a Competent Person detects an unacceptable condition. corrosion or other damage.1-1992 Comply with manufacturer’s instructions. the CSA standards require SRL's to be serviced within two years of the manufacture date. burns or excessive dirt. is also another critical area that is replaced the time.

This includes multiple locking pawls. Capital Safety. DBI/SALA. Are the components of competitive SRL’s more durable and longer lasting when compared to DBI/SALA? No. DBI-SALA 2006 11 . reserve lifeline features and anti-ratcheting designs. This will also help reduce the turn-around time. Set cost will continue to be developed for additional models.What is being done by DBI/SALA to make servicing of SRL’s easier and more economical at a reduced turn-around time? Regional repair facilities are set up to provide more localized service. DBI/SALA’s exclusive patented sealed SRL design is a perfect example of what we do to extend the life of SRL’s and make them more durable. “back-up” features does DBI/SALA use and how does this compare to the competition? DBI/SALA uses several “back-up” systems in its SRL’s. Most of the competitive units do not contain these systems. In many cases stainless steel materials are used. DBI/SALA has established a one-rate set service cost for some SRL’s. There is no other environmentally sealed SRL on the market today. Critical components are made of hardened materials and treated or coated to prevent corrosion and increase life expectancy. What types of redundant. in fact. uses only the most durable components in its designs.

d. g. DBI-SALA 2006 12 . Fasteners/hardware condition. f.. Fall protection equipment is controlled and monitored and only used for training purposes. 1. 2. Manufacturers recommended servicing frequency guidelines be followed (i. d. Lock-up of the lifeline. Lifeline condition. SRL is serviced/recertified every two (2) years. Housing condition. The inspection shall be performed in accordance with DBI/SALA instructions. Inspections include checking: a. b.e. minimum). The following guidelines should be observed for training applications where it is desired to continue using an impacted SRL. Trainee safety is foremost. Primary purpose of the activity is instructional. An impact indicated SRL can only be used in training environments where there is control and monitoring performed on a regular basis. Capital Safety. Snap-hook condition. Limited fall hazards. Other conditions typically associated with training include: a. Retraction of the lifeline. e. Subject: Use of SRL's in Training Environments The use of DBI/SALA Self-Retracting Lifelines (SRL's) in a fall protection training environment allows for some special circumstances to apply.Technical Bulletin SRL004 No. b. c. the DBI/SALA SRL may not need to be immediately removed from service following the activation of the impact indicator. Continuous supervision and instruction. f. A Competent Person must inspect SRL immediately after initial impact and all subsequent impacts. c. e. In particular. Fall protection equipment is only used according to manufacturing instructions.

d. 5. by whom. DBI-SALA 2006 13 . which allow for impacted SRL to be used training circumstances only. 3. Inspections performed (when. Documents/records shall be kept on file indicating: a. b. Date of first use for SRL. SRL shall be serviced/recertified by factory authorized personnel immediately following the conclusion of the session or program. c. Quantity/circumstances of impacts. Trainees shall be informed of the special circumstances. findings).Any unacceptable conditions (excluding impact-indicating hook) shall require SRL to be removed from service immediately. Capital Safety. 4. SRL service history.

SRL006

Technical Bulletin

No.

Subject: Tag Lines for Self-Retracting Lifelines
DBI/SALA recommends that a tag line be used to allow the line on a self-retracting lifeline (SRL) to fully retract back into the housing during extended periods of non-use. A retracting line that is paid out for extended periods of time may cause premature weakening of the SRL's retraction spring, therefore, effecting the operation of the SRL. 1. A tag line is a separate line that is used exclusively for allowing the SRL's line to retract back into the housing during non-use. The tag line is attached to the SRL's connecting hook and is long enough to allow the SRL line to retract in fully. 2. An extended period of time is defined as anything greater than a 24-hour period. 3. When using a tag line, the tagline should be controlled as the SRL's line is retracted back into the housing. Do not allow the tag line/SRL line to retract out of control (at a high rate of speed). 4. Depending on the work site environment and conditions, it may be necessary to restrain the free end of the tag line to prevent interference and entanglement with equipment or machinery. 5. Tag lines shall not be used directly for personal fall arrest, restraint, work position, personnel riding, or rescue applications. 6. Typical tag line materials include small diameter (3/16 inch to 1/2 inch) lightweight ropes made of materials such as polypropylene or nylon. 7. All applicable manufacturers’ instructions for the SRL shall be followed.

Capital Safety, DBI-SALA 2006

14

SRL007

Technical Bulletin

No.

Subject: Self-Retracting Lifelines on Drilling and Service Rigs
There is a recognized hazard where the available anchorage and necessary movement of a worker using a self-retracting lifeline (SRL) on a drilling and/or service rig is such that the cable or webbing of an SRL could come in contact with a structural edge of the rig (column and/or girder). The use of DBI/SALA SRL’s for fall protection on drilling and/or service rigs (or similar applications where the SRL is not located directly overhead of the work area and the risk of contacting a structural edge is apparent) is acceptable under certain circumstances provided special precautions are taken as described in this bulletin. The following guidelines must be followed when using SRL’s in areas where structural edges are in abundance: 1. Swing fall hazards may exist, especially when working near corners, or out away from the SRL. Added fall clearance distances may be required, depending on the swing fall hazard. Collision with objects during a swing fall should be guarded against. 2. The total fall distance may be greater than if the SRL were mounted directly overhead. Therefore, increased clearance distances will be required to prevent striking a lower level or obstruction. 3. Where the potential to impact on a structural edge exists, a separate in-line energy absorber must be installed between the end of the lifeline and the harness to reduce the arrest forces resulting from falling over an edge. This energy absorber is connected in-line between the harness dorsal d-ring and the SRL’s snap hook. If the harness being used does not have an integral shock absorber attached to the rear “D” ring, DBI/SALA and Protecta offers a special model energy absorber (part number 1220362) for this purpose that includes a snap hook on one end and a d-ring on the other to ensure compatible

Capital Safety, DBI-SALA 2006

15

connections can be made. DO NOT use energy absorbing lanyards for this purpose. See bulletin SRL002. DBI/SALA also offers a leading edge type SRL that contains heavier wire rope lifeline and a built in energy absorber for added protection against lifeline damage when contact is made with sharp edges. 4. Sharp edges which the lifeline may contact during a fall could cut or damage the SRL’s lifeline. Sharp edges must be avoided or covered over. Falls where the lifeline may slide along a sharp edge must be guarded against.

Capital Safety, DBI-SALA 2006

16

300 pounds.300 pounds.Rev.350. DBI/SALA is of the opinion that it is very unlikely on a vertical system that more than one user would fall at a time. Dynamic testing on the system using a 100-kg sand bag and body belt gave maximum arresting forces at 1.375 persons 4. Capital Safety. a figure of 975 pounds was added. LAD001. DBI-SALA 2006 17 . representing the MAF of a human body (versus a san bag). A safety factor of 2 was applied to the dynamic Maximum Arresting Force (MAF). Therefore. and 4 person system is 5. A Technical Bulletin No. three person system is 4. For each additional user on the system.350 persons 5.300 pounds pounds pounds pounds These “anchorage” strengths were established as follows: 1. 2. 3.375 pounds or 15 KN. Therefore. we have decided not to add additional safety factors onto the arrest loads of the second. This figure was rounded to 3.375 + 975 = 4.325 + 975 = 6.350 pounds. An assumption was made that a human body would generate only 75% of the forces created by the sandbag.325. Subject: Top Bracket Anchorage Strength for Lad-Saf® Systems DBI/SALA recommends the following values as the required strength of the top bracket connection/support structure per number of users on the system: 1 2 3 4 person 3. a two person system anchorage is 3.300) + 750 = 3.350 + 975 = 5. Static pretension in the carrier cable is assumed 750 pounds (per installation instructions). Result: 1 person system anchorage strength is (2 x 1.325 persons 6. third and fourth person attached to the system.

DBI-SALA 2006 18 .The anchorage strengths given here represent the minimum recommended values for newly installed systems. Environmental or use factors that could affect the long-term strength of the anchorage connection must be considered during installation and accounted for. Capital Safety.

0025 inches ** 795 hrs. A Subject: Corrosion Resistance of Ladder Safety System Wire Ropes The corrosion resistance of wire ropes used as the carrier component for ladder safety systems varies widely. The carrier cable is an important part of the cable ladder safety systems. 7 x 19 construction conforms to Federal Specification Wire Rope and Strand RR-W-410.400 lbs. Rev. Test Results Summary Wire rope construction of “red “ rust * 1 x 7 galvanized 7 x 19 galvanized avg. Minimal maintenance is performed on the ladder safety systems once they are installed. . for extended periods of time (often several years).00036 inches ** * 144 hrs. making the corrosion resistance a critical safety issue for those using the system and relying on it to provide fall protection. The carrier must withstand the effects of the environment that it is installed in. Testing conducted on two different construction styles of 3/8 inch diameter galvanized wire rope has shown that significant corrosion resistance differences exist between a 1 x 7 construction and a 7 x 19 construction. Minimum breaking strength –15. Third party testing conducted by Stork /Twin City Testing Corporation has shown that a galvanized 1 x 7 construction will withstand over 5-1/2 times the duration of salt spray testing before red rust appears when compared to a galvanized 7 x 19 construction. The 1 x 7 construction has an average coating thickness of approximately 7 times that of the 7 x 19 construction. coating thickness . Often the specific wire rope construction plays an important role in the ability to resist corrosion. Minimum breaking strength – 14. first sign 1 x 7 construction conforms to Wire Rope and Strand ASTM A475.Technical Bulletin No. Capital Safety.400 lbs. DBI-SALA 2006 19 . LAD002.

0012. maximum thickness . 0003.* salt spray tested in accordance with ASTM B117 standard **minimum thickness . maximum thickness . Contact DBI/SALA for specific recommendations. Capital Safety.0051 *** minimum thickness. DBI-SALA 2006 20 .0004 In severely corrosive environments the use of stainless steel cable and mounting brackets is recommended for optimum product life and product performance.

Winch is only used for raising (no lowering allowed). 7. 5. 1. ANSI Z117. Winch brakes are not removed or disabled. Certain situations where the speed of the rescue. All applicable manufacturer instructions shall be followed. Maximum speed of power drive mechanism is 80 RPM's. The DBI/SALA Salalift® I winch may be operated by a powered drive mechanism under the following conditions. DBI-SALA 2006 21 . Manual mode to raise and lower shall remain operational after removal of powered drive mechanism. 9. coupled with fatigue experienced by operator during long lifts. may necessitate the need for a powered drive operation. Capital Safety. 3. Proper grounding and insulation must protect electric drives. Winch gear oil must be checked monthly and changed every six months minimum. 6. 2. Power drive mechanism is applied to low speed input shaft only.1-1995. 8.146. All applicable safety measures for confined spaces shall be followed. Maximum torque of power drive mechanism is 35 foot pounds (torque limiter must be used). Subject: Powered Operation of Salalift® I Winch The DBI/SALA Salalift® I winch is designed and typically used for manual operation. See OSHA 1910. 10. 4.Technical Bulletin RET001 No.

L. DBI-SALA 2006 22 . Winch input shaft is 1/2 inch square drive.The U. Classification on the Salalift® I winch only applies to manual operation. Capital Safety.

connecting rings. Marking directly on the web can be performed with permanent type markers. away from snap hooks. Sanford Sharpie permanent markers) should be used. Capital Safety. 4. Riveting. The fastener can be passed through or around a web or web loop (opening) for attachment.e. Information such as company name and inspection status is often applied to the product for proper identification. etc. Plastic or wire tie type fastener should be used. Specific punches can be used on the inspection log label to represent a month the inspection was performed. buckles.). harnesses..MISC001. The method of attaching separate identification tags should not affect the strength of the web. 3. anchorage straps. Avery Dennison Marks-A-Lot. A Technical Bulletin No. Separate identification tags/labels can be applied to the product.e. Subject: Marking/Identifying Web Products Marking/Identifying various fall protection products (i. A location that will not interfere with the products performance should be selected (i. Inspection status/log labels applied to the product at the time of manufacture or inspection can be used to record inspection dates. lanyards.. Permanent markers which are water resistant and quick-drying (ex. 2. etc. DBI-SALA 2006 23 .. The web should not be punched. 5.) made of webbing is appropriate as long as acceptable materials or processes are used. Paint and/or paint pens should not be used to mark directly on the web. dry and cause the fibers to break when flexed. The following guidelines should be observed and the special conditions noted. Permanent markers which are waterproof/water resistant and quick-drying (ex. Sanford Sharpie permanent marker) should be used. 1. Rev. Paint can penetrate the web fibers. punching holes and gluing the separate label to the web is not recommended in the field. 6. belts.

All applicable user instruction manuals for the products should be reviewed and followed. Capital Safety. Some types of permanent inks can be used to identify the product. and benzyl alcohol as an example effect polyester fibers (used in most DBI/SALA web products). Contact the factory for approval of specific materials. DBI-SALA 2006 24 . 8. phenol/tetrachlorethane. Nitrobenzene. dichlorobenzene. Some solvents used in inks and other marking products can cause loss of strength in webbing. Contact the factory for approval of specific inks. 10. Employee training should be conducted to help assure a safe working environment. 9.7. especially at elevated temperatures and high concentrations.

A DBI/SALA product can be used as long as the inspection performed does not reveal any damage. 2. After a fall. davit arms) (recorded). Capital Safety. After a fall. 3. wear. *Remove impacted systems and *Inspect systems prior to use. or other characteristics that will effect the product’s performance. tripods. Rev. the product shall be removed from service and destroyed (or used for educational purposes). Inspection and servicing frequency may need to be modified based on the amount of use and the conditions within the environment the product is used in. E Bulletin MIS Subject: Product Life Date: February 1998 The current DBI/SALA policy on the life of products is totally dependent on the condition of the item and not the age. Inspect before each use (by user).66 components. OSHA 1926.502 components. *Remove impacted systems and *Inspect systems prior to use.Technical C002. Annually (by competent person other than the user) (recorded). Rescumatics. DBI-SALA 2006 25 . The frequency of inspections to determine the usability of the product shall be as follows: 1. RPD’s. Current OSHA and ANSI regulations indicate the following regarding inspection of equipment: OSHA 1910. Self-Retracting Lifelines (SRL’s) shall be inspected and serviced (if required. Monthly (by competent person other than user) (for winches. see user instructions) by factory authorized service center. The inspection of the product shall be performed according to details outlined in the user instruction manual on the specific product as well as other applicable information provided by DBI/SALA.

service date. *Comply with manufacturer’s instructions. the activation date should be recorded in the user instruction manual in the inspection and maintenance log under the inspection date column (or record/document in some manner). service date or purchase date. The activation date is defined as the time when a product is first put into actual service (initally or after service/repair). or manufacture date should be used to determine when product is due for inspection. *Inspection by user prior to use. If the activation date is unknown. DBI-SALA 2006 26 .1-1992 person. the product purchase date. Activation Date Typically the date of manufacture on a product or the date of purchase is used to help determine when a product is due for inspection. If inspection timing is based on the activation date instead of the manufacture date. Prior to placing a product into service that product shall be properly stored according to the user instruction manual. Copies of user instructions and other available inspection information can be obtained from DBI/SALA.ANSI Z359. Indicate that the entry is date of first use (or activation date). The date of the products first use can also be used as an activation date. *Inspect at least annually by competent All equipment found to be unusable shall be tagged as rejected and pulled out of service. Capital Safety.

in testing. However. Fall arrest systems should be rigged to minimize potential free fall. tools. The Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS) must incorporate a full body harness. For example.1 is marked with a capacity limit of 310 pounds. or subsystems must be equally rated for capacity. and clothing exceed 310 pounds. The following guidelines.Technical Bulletin Rev. MISC003. 6. whenever possible. or other device to control fall arrest forces may be use. 5. using rigid steel weights. Self-Retracting Lifeline (SRL). components. 1. systems. and limitations. Only systems that include an energy absorber. 4. Sufficient strap length in adjuster buckle locations must be provided to assure the harness will not release. the following maximum arresting forces were observed for six-foot free fall drops using DBI/SALA model 1220006 shock absorbing lanyards: . Other PFAS equipment.000 pounds. Anchorage must be capable of supporting at least 3. 2. caution must be used in applying personal fall arrest equipment for these situations. DBI/SALA will allow use of its equipment. must be considered before use. Free fall distance must not exceed six feet (refer to equipment instructions for free-fall limitations). BI No. DBI/SALA recommends. Obviously.600 pounds without failure (engineered anchorage) or 5. Simple lanyard systems must not be used. Subject: Capacity of Fall Protection Equipment All personal fall arrest equipment meeting the requirements of OSHA and ANSI Z359. Arresting forces may increase. this capacity limitation should be followed. DBI/SALA recommends at least three inches of webbing extending beyond the adjuster buckle. In situations where the combined weights of the user’s body. 3. The full body harness must be properly sized for the user.

(364 lbs. (Exceeded 1. (350 lbs.784 lbs.). Harnesses .5 inches. Test weight – 250 lbs. arrest distance 32.964 lbs.). MAF 1. Test Weight – 240 lbs. (336 lbs. MAF 1. Fall arrest distances may increase. MAF 712 lbs. for use by personnel weighing up to 360 pounds. (322 lbs.424 lbs.464 lbs.Test weight – 220 lbs. The following products/models have been reviewed. Other energy absorbing components. MAF 632 lbs. MAF 810 lbs. In most falls.).). inspected.). Note: The value in parentheses is an estimated equivalent human body weight using the OSHA Conversion Factor of 1. MAF 1. Test weight – 300 lbs.4. Test weight – 230 lbs. MAF 1. arrest distance 24 inches. Actual human arresting forces may be higher. and maintained according to all other aspects of the User Instruction Manual provided with the equipment. Test weight – 360 lbs.800-pound limits). shock absorbers for example could extend up to 42 inches. 8. Equipment must be used. (378 lbs. such as SRL’s. Test weight – 260 lbs. Testing conducted using rigid steel weights on the DBI/SALA model 3103020 SRL gave the following results for “normal use” zero free fall drops: Test weight – 220 lbs. arrest distance 62 inches. could extend even further. and approved. (308 lbs. MAF 816 lbs. MAF 760 lbs. Test weight – 270 lbs.). heavy users will experience extended fall arrest distances. and rope grabs could have arrest distances up to 70 inches.

Lanyards Self-Retracting Lifelines Connectors / Anchorage 1003000 1003006 1201390 2000106 2000108 2000523 2101630 2103140 2103143 210347 2103254 2108406 2108407 2108408 2110808 2110941 Rope Grabs with Lifelines 5001441 w / 1202700 / 1202800 / 1202900 series lifelines 5000335 1201117 1201173 1201281 1201470 1201611 1202328 1220006 1220007 1220074 1220077 1220256 1220406 1220416 1220551 1220558 1220680 1220706 1220906 1221006 1221106 1221206 1221327 1224006 1224007 1224012 1224024 1224102 1224103 1224251 1224253 1224306 1224310 1224311 1224406 1224409 5900050 5900051 3103020 3103031 3103041 3103107 3103108 3103113 3103207 3103208 3103213 3403400 3403401 3403500 3403501 3403600 3403601 3504430 3504431 3504433 3504450 3504451 Please Note: The above mentioned products will be labeled for 310-pound capacity. Retain this technical bulletin as documentation. . even though they are approved for use up to 360 pounds.

d-rings and anchorage connectors are considered when addressing compatibility issues. The gate presses against the connecting ring. carabiners. The gate opens allowing the snap hook to slip off. a situation could occur where the connecting element applies a force to the gate of the snap hook or carabiner. Typically the size and configuration of snap hooks.Rev. Connectors are considered to be compatible with connecting elements when they have been designed to work together in such a way that their sizes and shapes do not cause their gate mechanisms to inadvertently open (rollout) regardless of how they become oriented. If the connecting element that a snap hook (shown) or carabiner attaches to is undersized or irregular in shape. allowing the snap hook or carabiner to disengage from the connecting point. Do not use equipment that is not compatible. . B Technical Bulletin MISC004. Small ring or other non-compatibly shaped element Force is applied to the snap hook. as well as component subsystems. Subject: Compatibility of Fall Protection Equipment Compatibility refers to the harmonious operation between individual elements. This force may cause the gate (of either a selflocking or a non-locking snap hook) to open.

necessary. Self locking snap hooks and carabiners are required by ANSI Z359. Fall protection systems assembled from components and subsystems made by different manufacturers should only contain components that meet the requirements of applicable fall protection standards.1 and OSHA. 5. anchorage connectors and anchorage points) of a fall protection system are critical to help assure safety to the user. The respective manufacturers shall be consulted and. such as ANSI Z359.1-1992. 2. 3. perform the testing required by ANSI Z359. if Non-compatible connectors may unintentionally disengage. The stability and compatibility of couplings between anchorage connectors and anchorage points shall be considered when selecting anchorage points and anchorage connectors.. Only use self locking snap hooks and carabiners. shape. Compatibility between elements and components (i. Connectors must be compatible with the anchorage or other system components.DBI/SALA recommends equipment from one manufacturer be used as a system to help assure compatibility. . Connectors must be compatible in size. Specific guidelines to follow when addressing compatibility issues include: 1.1-1992. Snap hooks and carabiners shall be securely closed and locked once coupled to a connector. Substitutions or replacements made with nonapproved components or subsystems may jeopardize compatibility of equipment and may effect the safety and reliability of the complete system. Snap hooks and carabiners shall be compatibly matched to their associated connector to reduce the possibility of rollout. Subsystems and Components. body supports. and strength. Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems. Read and understand all user instructions for the equipment involved. DBI/SALA equipment is designed for use with DBI/SALA approved components and subsystems only. connecting components. 4.e.

C. DBI/SALA connectors (snap hooks and carabiners) are designed to be used only as specified in each product’s user’s instructions. (22kN). or that roll-out could occur. where features that protrude from the snap hook or carabiner catch on the anchor and without visual confirmation seems to be fully engaged to the anchor point. In a false engagement. 7. B. Large throat snap hooks are designed for use on fixed structural elements such as rebar or cross members that are not shaped in a way that can capture the gate of the hook. Connectors shall be suitably sized and configured to interface compatibly with other connectors they will be attached to. D. and free fall distances. . 10. 8. Other factors to consider when looking at compatibility issues include impact forces. F. Connectors (hooks. To a D-ring to which another connector is attached. DBI/SALA snap hooks and carabiners should not be connected: A. Fall Arrestors (rope grabs) shall be analyzed for compatibility with the lifeline it operates on.000 lbs. and D-rings) must be capable of supporting at least 5. Directly to webbing or rope lanyard or tie-back (unless the manufacturer’s instructions for both the lanyard and connector specifically allow such a connection). E. NOTE: Large throat opening snap hooks should not be connected to standard size D-rings or similar objects which will result in a load on the gate if the hook or D-ring twists or rotates. carabiners. Use connectors that are suitable to each application.6. To any object which is shaped or dimensioned such that the snap hook or carabiner will not close and lock. total fall distances. In a manner that would result in a load on the gate. swing fall hazards. 9. To each other.

.

MISC005. the commercial laundering will cost approximately $2. Frequ ency Scope . As an estimate. and reflective elements) and hardware materials/coating msut be analyzed prior to cleaning to determine effectiveness and potential damage from the cleaning process. specific procedures have been established by DBI/SALA for DBI/SALA products. cleaning cost should be performed before proceeding with the process. cleaned periodically to help extend the life expectancy of the product and maintain an acceptable level of performance for the product. Rope type lanyards are typically more economical to purchase that most other fall protection products and. A Technical Bulletin No. Subject: Cleaning of Web Personal Fall Protection Products Personal Fall Protection Products manufactured from webbing can. Because of the wide variation of cleaning processes available and the potential effect on performance. elastic types. therefore. cuts. The cleaning processes and procedures specified in this bulletin typically apply to DBI/SALA's nylon and polyester webbing products used in Personal Fall Arest Systems (PFAS)..Rev. to help assure acceptable results. the justification to clean these items is difficult.00 per unit. Considerations include age of product. wear. cost of cleaning and the estimated effectiveness of the cleaning process. The overall condition of the product should also be considered. Justifi cation Analysis of the product's cost vs. etc. can be cleaned using similar processes. Synthetic rope products.) to rope lanyards in many applications also makes cleaning difficult to justify.e. Specialized web materials (Kevlar. and should be. such as lifelines or lanyards. The potential damage (i.50 to $5.

Laundered products must be inspected prior to use. as well as cause degradation of product markings.Testin g perfor med indica tes that laund ering itself does not contri bute to streng th loss. althou gh it was obser ved that comm ercial washi ng could cause abrasi on betwe en metal hardw are eleme nts and webbi ng straps . The specific length of time between . to determine if the product is acceptable for use.

Once cleaned. the product should be rinsed in clean water and hung to air dry in a well-ventilated area out of direct sunlight. Some applications may require weekly applications may require the product to annual basis Effectiveness Laundering will be effective on the typical dirt and grease found in many industrial settings. Machine Wash: A top or side loading agitating style washing machine (commercial or consumer type) is acceptable for cleaning web products. when drying. 1. Highpressure power type washers and steam cleaners should be avoided when cleaning web products. Contact DBI/SALA for post laundering evaluation and testing. The scrubbing action will help break down the dirt. the product should be hung up to air dry in a well-ventilated area. or other material on the webbing. Many paints. and industrial chemicals cannot be completely removed from wht webbing. The product should be placed in a mesh bag to prevent entanglement. A full wash and rinse cycle should be performed. when drying. Never exceed 200° F. out of direct sunlight. Once cleaned. other be cleaned on an laundering is solely dependent on the cleanliness of product. Never exceed 200° F. Hand Scrubbing: This procedure is effective for low volumes of equipment and can be performed internally at an economical price. tar. The product can be soaked in water/cleaner solution before hand scrubbing.the cleaning. grease. . 2. Laundering Procedure Various procedures can be effective in cleaning web products. Post laundering sample destructive testing may be appropriate if questionsexist regarding the product's ability to perform is designed. Two acceptable procedures are detailed below. It is recommended that samples be laundered and inspected before a large quanitity is processed to determine the effectiveness of lanudering. because of potential harm to the web fibers.

A pH. consult cleaning agent supplier for compatibility. 401 E. Cleaning Agent Specifications The pH. A mild detergent (bleach free) such as one used for laundering clothing is acceptable.O. Also.Cleaning Agents A variety of cleaning agents is available. Tacoma. and 160° F.N. OH 45237 Phone: (513) 821-8333 Flo-Class (Commercial laundry detergent) U. The water temperature. Greenville.. Product Life . should not exceed 160° F. is recommended for safe. Wabasha St. Recommended cleaning agents include: By Pas 1500 Series (Commercial laundry detergent) By Pas International Corp. if consumer type washing machine is to be used.X. a commercial/industrial strength-cleaning agent can be used. P. Several of other cleaning agents is available on the market that may produce acceptable results. Paul. effective cleaning. MN 55102 Phone: (800) 553-8683 The cleaning agent supplier should be asked to supply appropriate information on the amount of cleaning agent to use and disposal instruction based on your procedure and the degree of cleaning required. Generally a wash temperature between 140° F. DBI/SALA recommends cleaning agents not listed be reviewed by DBI/SALA for approval. For added cleaning power. 27th St. Cincinnati. NC 27858 Phone: (252) 756-8616 Innovator Plus (Commercial laundry detergent) EcoLab Attn: Textile Care Division 370 N. The cleaning agents listed have been reviewed and approved for use. when laundering. WA 98421 Phone: (800) 552-3100 Choice (Commercial laundry detergent) WSI 1865 Summit Rd. MI 49426 Phone: (616) 875-7234 Citra-Scrub (For scrubbing by hand) Inland Chemical Co. Inc. Incorporated 707 Arlington Blvd. Box 14 Hudsonville. level higher than 12 may harm the webbing and effect the performance of the products. level (acidity or alkalinity) of the cleaning solution should be no higher than 11 or 12.

For information on product life of DBI/SALA products. . MISC002". please request "Technical Bulletin No.

1 for certification definition. D. or twice the potential impact load. C. the strengths stated above must be multiplied by the number of personal fall arrest systems attached to the anchorage. installed. the strengths stated above must be multiplied by the number of restraint systems attached to the anchorage.Technical Bulletin MISC006 Subject: Anchorage Strength The anchorage strength required is dependent on the application. Positioning/Work Positioning: The structure to which the work positioning system is attached must sustain static loads applied in the directions permitted by the work positioning system of at least 3. with certification of a qualified person. When more than one restraint system is attached to an anchorage. per user attached.000 lbs.000 lbs. See ANSI Z359. Personnel Riding: The structure to which the personnel riding system is attached must sustain static loads applied in the directions . Fall Arrest: The structure to which the personal fall arrest system is attached must sustain static loads applied in the directions permitted by the fall arrest system of at least: 3. or 5.. Restraint: The structure to which the restraint system is attached must sustain static loads applied in the directions permitted by the restraint system of at least 3. and must support at least 5. or be designed. and used as part of a complete personal fall arrest system which maintains a safety factor of at least two. Following are anchorage strength requirements for specific applications: A.66: Anchorages used for attachment of a personal fall arrest system shall be independent of any anchorage being used to support or suspend platforms.000 lbs. without certification. and is supervised by a qualified person. When more than one personal fall arrest system is attached to an anchorage. the strengths stated above must be multiplied by the number of work positioning systems attached to the anchorage.000 lbs.502. B. See OSHA 1926. When more than one work positioning system is attached to an anchorage. whichever is greater.500 and 1910. From OSHA 1926.600 lbs.

permitted by the personnel riding system of at least 2,500 lbs. When more than one personnel riding system is attached to an anchorage, the strengths stated bove must be multiplied by the number of personnel riding systems attached to the anchorage. E. Rescue: The structure to which the rescue system is attached must sustain static loads applied in the directions permitted by the rescue system of at least 2,500 lbs. When more than one rescue system is attached to an anchorage, the strengths stated above must be multiplied by the number of rescue systems attached to the anchorage.

Rev. B

Technical Bulletin

MISC007

Subject: Certification / Inspection Frequency
The following information describes the normal servicing, recertification and inspection requirements for the DBI/SALA products. Consult the user instruction manuals for complete details and information. Consult DBI/SALA for requirements relating to equipment used under special circumstances. SELF RETRACTING LIFELINES (SRL), CLIMB ASSIST SYSTEMS *DBI/SALA and ANSI require the product to be inspected at least annually by a Competent Person. Extreme conditions of use may require increasing inspection frequency. (In Canada, CSA requires SRL’s to be serviced within two years of mfg. date, thereafter annually) *Before each use, DBI/SALA, OSHA and ANSI require SRL’s to be inspected (by the user). *After an impact, the SRL must be removed from service (per DBI/SALA, OSHA and ANSI) and inspected. Servicing may be required. WINCHES *DBI/SALA recommends that Salalift I and II winches be serviced and recertified every year. Extreme working conditions may require increasing the frequency. *On a monthly basis, DBI/SALA recommends that a competent person other than the user formally inspect the winches. *Before each use, DBI/SALA requires winches to be inspected (by the user). *After an impact, the winch must be removed form service and inspected. Servicing may be required. RESCUE POSITIONING DEVICES (RPD’S) *DBI/SALA recommends that RPD’s be serviced and recertified every year. Extreme working conditions may require increasing the frequency. *On a monthly basis, DBI/SALA recommends that a competent person other than the user formally inspect the RPD. *Before each use, DBI/SALA requires the RPD to be inspected (by the user).

Comment [SL1]:

RESCUMATIC CONTROLLED DESCENT DEVICE *DBI/SALA recommends that Rescumatics have maintenance check performed every 6 months by the user. *On a monthly basis, DBI/SALA recommends that the Rescumatic be formally inspected by a competent person other that the user.

HARNESSES/LANYARDS /POSITIONING EQUIPMENT /ROPE GRABS. the product must be removed from service (per DBI/SALA. OSHA and ANSI require an inspection (by the user). OSHA and ANSI require an inspection (by the user). *After an impact. OSHA and ANSI). DBI/SALA. *Before each use. *Annually. *After an impact. *Before each use. LOAD ARRESTORS *DBI/SALA requires the load arrestors to be serviced and recertified every two years. the load arrestor must be removed from service and returned to a repair center for service/recertification. Servicing may be required. Extreme working conditions may require increasing the servicing frequency. Extreme working conditions may require increasing the service frequency. TRIPODS/DAVIT ARMS /SUPPORT STRUCTURES *DBI/SALA requires at least a monthly inspection by a competent person. remove the product from service and inspect. the system must be removed from service (per DBI/SALA. TEMPORARY HAORIZONTAL LIFELINE SYSTEM *DBI/SALA requires the system to be inspected annually by a qualified person. *Before each use. OSHA and ANSI) or returned to the factory for inspection and/or repair. the entire system (including the sleeve) shall be inspected by a competent person. . a competent person should inspect the units. *After an impact. *After an impact. DBI/SALA. and after installation. DBI/SALA and OSHA require the system to be inspected (by the user) *After an impact.LAD SAF LADDER SAFETY SYSTEM *DBI/SALA requires the Lad Saf system (including sleeve) by inspected at least annually by a competent person. a qualified person shall inspect the system. ANCHORAGE CONNECTORS *DBI/SALA and ANSI require the product to be inspected at least annually by a competent person. *Before each use.

corrosion resistance and Parachute Buckle Specifications Buckle Operation: The parachute buckle works by capturing the webbing between a knurled bar and the buckle frame. donning. pass through buckles. care. Correct operation. over the knurled bar. See specific product instructions for additional information on inspection. body belts and other fall protection equipment: parachute buckles. Each of these types of buckles must be adjusted to a snug fit as described in its accompanying user’s instructions to assure proper harness fit and performance. materials. tongue buckles. standards for each type are listed below. then back under the outer . and quick connect buckles. MISC008 Subject: Buckle Specifications and Operations DBI/SALA uses four types of buckles in full body harnesses. use. and maintenance. A spring-loaded slider bar maintains constant tension on the knurled bar.Technical Bulletin No. The webbing is woven into the buckle by passing the webbing up through the center slot of the buckle. strength.

Do not cut excess webbing off the strap. .portion of the frame. when used on leg straps. Pass the free end of the strap through a web keeper to allow the webbing to lay flat and be restrained. to maintain a safety factor in an impact situation. At least three inches of the free end of the webbing must extend out of the buckle. folding back on itself.

yellow.1-1992. slide the male buckle frame up or down the webbing to lengthen or shorten the .14-1991. Do not cut excess webbing off the strap. Type II. Standards: OSHA 1910.66. Loosening the strap can be facilitated by lifting the free edge of the buckle out to about a 90° angle from the body (to reduce friction on the knurled bar) and pulling it away from the body.8Kn) without breaking. Class Fe/Zn 12.Buckle Adjustment: Pulling the free end of the webbing straight out away from the buckle will increase the tension on the strap. Tension can be released by pushing the free end of the webbing back toward the buckle and allowing the webbing to slip through the buckle. The female frame is an open rectangle that is permanently attached to a loop at the end of a strap. To engage the buckle. such as shoulder straps. heat treat: 35-42 Rc. After it has passed through. The male frame is permanently attached to the joining strap by weaving the webbing through two slots in the frame. Pass Through Buckle Specifications Buckle Operation: The pass through buckle is composed of two mating flat metal frames. ANSI Z359. slider and knurled bar: AISI 4130 or 4140 alloy steel. Strength: Buckle is capable of withstanding a tensile load of 4000 lbs. ANSI A10. turn the male buckle at an angle so that it will pass through the female frame. Buckle Adjustment: To adjust the tension on the straps to be joined by a pass through buckle. (Note: The webbing is permanently attached to some parachute buckles. Buckle Release: The buckle may be removed from the webbing by continuing the tension releasing action until the webbing travels all the way through the buckle. in accordance with SAE AMS-H-6875A. turn it back so that the male frame lies directly on top of the female frame. Corrosion Resistance: Finish: zinc plate per ASTM B633-98.502. and may not be removed.) Material: Frame. (17. OSHA 1926.

Standards: OSHA 1910. Heat treat: 35-42 Rc.8Kn) without breaking. Strength: Buckle is capable of withstanding a tensile load of 4000 lbs. Buckle Release: To disengage a pass through buckle.66. Corrosion Resistance: Finish: zinc plate per ASTM B633-98. Adjust the excess webbing through the 3 bar keeper to keep the webbing flat. (17. Class 2.502. .14-1991.1-1992. yellow or cadmium plate per Mil-QQ-P-416 F(2). Material: AISI 4130 or 4140 alloy steel or AISI 1541 carbon steel.strap to the desired length. Do not cut excess webbing off the strap. Type II Class Fe/Zn 12. ANSI A10. force a portion of the male buckle strap up through the female frame until there is enough slack in the strap to allow the male frame to be turned to an angle that will allow it to pass back through and out of the female frame. ANSI Z359. in accordance with SAE AMS-H-6875A. Type II. yellow chromate. OSHA 1926.

Hold the tongue out of the way and allow the webbing to pass back through the strap to loosen or pull more webbing through the frame to tighten the strap. remove the free end of the strap from the web keeper and pull the strap back at an acute angel from the metal frame to release the tongue from its grommet. When the desired tension is achieved. To join the straps. Do not cut excess webbing off the strap. Allow the tongue to pierce the nearest grommet and tuck the free end of the strap through a web keeper. This will allow the webbing to lay flat and keep it from hindering movement or interfering with other equipment Buckle Adjustment: To adjust the tension on the strap. Buckle Release: To disengage. pass the free end of the grommeted strap through the frame and pull the strap back at an acute angle to take up the slack in both straps. engage the tongue into the nearest grommet and tuck the free end of the strap back into the web keeper.Tongue Buckle Specifications Buckle Operation: The tongue buckle consists of a metal frame with a moveable tongue that lays down the middle of the frame. remove the free end of the strap from the web keeper and pull the strap back at an acute angle to the frame to release the tongue from its grommet. The frame is stitched into a loop at the end of a strap. The connecting strap is a piece of webbing that is pierced by grommets at regular intervals. Hold the tongue out of the .

. Heat treat: 35-42 RC.way and allow the strap to pass back through the buckle frame until it exits completely. Material: Frame: AISI 4130 or 4140 alloy steel or cold rolled sheet or strip steel UNS 641300 per ASTM A505-87. in accordance with SAE AMS-H-6875A.

Heat treat: 35-42 RC.1-1992. in accordance with SAE AMS-H-6875A. Standards: OSHA 1910. in accordance with ASTM A366/A366M-97E1. ANSI A10. yellow. The male portion is a metal tongue with flanges on the end. commercial quality. Class 2 yellow chromate.Tongue: 1018 Co steel in accordance with ASTM A510-96. ANSI Z359.502. A plastic end cap keeps the buckle captive on the strap. Type II.66. OSHA 1926. Quick Connect Buckle Specifications Buckle Operation: The quick connect buckle consists of two parts. To operate. Corrosion Resistance: Finish: zinc plate per ASTM B633-98. This portion is permanently attached to the end of a strap. insert the male portion into the receptor half of the buckle until a distinct click is heard. or Cadmium plate per QQ-P-416 F(2).14-1991. The noise is created by spring loaded latches that capture the . Type II Class Fe/Zn 12. Heat treat: 35-42 RC. in accordance with SAE AMS-H-6875A. Roller: Cold rolled steel. The joining strap is woven through the receptor half of the buckle so the buckle can be positioned along the length of the strap. Strength: Buckle is capable of withstanding a tensile load of 4000 lbs.8Kn) without breaking. (17.

flanges on the tongue. A sharp tug on the strap will reveal whether the connection is complete. .

Knurled bar: Round steel bar UNS G10100. To decrease strap tension. Corrosion Resistance: Finish: Cadmium plated per QQ-P-416. Standards: OSHA 1910. Type I. When the desired tension is achieved. Buckle Release: To release the buckle. Material:Top and bottom plates. Strength: Buckle is capable of withstanding a tensile load of 4000 lbs. ANSI Z359. bright finish typw 302 or 304 per ASTM A313/A313M.Buckle Adjustment: To increase tension on the strap. simultaneously squeeze the spring loaded metal latches toward each other with one hand and pull the male portion out of the receptor with the other hand. hard drawn. OSHA 1926. (17. Depressing only one of the latches will not release the buckle. cold drawn per ASTM A108 Spring: Diameter .018 in.8Kn) without breaking. Type II. Class 1. Constant extreme tension on the strap (much greater than in normal use) would be required in order to allow the buckle to release when the latches on each side are depressed separately. type 6. or Zinc with clear chromate per ASTM 8633.14-1991. Do not cut excess webbing off the strap. Heat treat 35-39 Rc.502. tuck the free end of the webbing into the web keeper to keep it flat and to keep it from interfering with other equipment. . drop tests have confirmed this. stainless steel spring wire. Yellow plastic tab: Nylon. ANSI A10. pull the yellow plastic tab on the receptor out away from your body and allow the strap to slide back through the buckle.66. Class Fe/Zn 12.1-1992. release tabs and tongue: Cold rolled alloy steel UNS G41300 SAE AMS 6350. lift the yellow plastic tab on the receptor away from your body with one hand while pulling the free end of the strap out from the buckle with the other hand. while the buckle is engaged.

or refinery environment. Store in a clean dry environment avoiding corrosive fumes or chemical substances. If you have questions concerning the condition of the snap hook or carabiner contact DBI/SALA. apply a small amount of WD-40 or similar moisture repellant agent to the hinge end only. Additional maintenance and servicing procedures must be completed by an authorized service center. Look carefully for cracks. other than the user.Rev.Inspect the carabiner for damage. sharp edges. dents. INSPECTION FREQUENCY: • Before each use. at least annually. INSPECTION STEPS: Step 1. drilling. burrs. Locking mechanisms may be lubricated with a general purpose oil after cleaning. Subject: Cleaning of Carabiners The connector may be cleaned with a mild detergent or disenfected with a mild sterile disenfectant. • The carabiner must be inspected by a competent person. If gate operation is sluggish. Authorization must be in writing. Check for bending or distortion. Cleaning and lubrication should be carried out after every use in a marine. or deformities. visually inspect according to steps listed below. A Technical Bulletin MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING CARE: MISC009. .

Step 3.Inspect markings. The gate and lock should operate smoothly. or contact an authorized service center for repair. Step 4. Step 5. with no difficulty. . Markings should be present and fully legible.Step 2.Record the inspection date and results in the in the inspection and maintenance log in section 9. remove the unit from service and destroy it.Inspect each system component or subsystem according to manufacturer's instructions. If inspection reveals a defective condition. Gates must fully close and lock.Inspect the carabiner for excessive corrosion.0.

siding systems. communication towers. welding. Following the hearing. typically not requiring fall protection until 25 foot or higher. All comments on the proposal will be heard at a hearing in December 1998. 1998. Presently OSHA 1926. misc. and rigging structural steel. 2001 and will go into effect on January 18. and/or repair of steel in single and multi story buildings. update the current regulations. broadcast towers and water towers or tanks (the new standard would will cover those working on the Formatted: Left Formatted: Left Formatted: Left . The proposal will remain out for comment until November 12.761) On August 13. The current standard also requires employees to be protected by safety belts when gathering and stacking temporary floor planking and when working on float scaffolds. This proposed OSHA standard has been under development since 1994 and will. alteration. Who is effectedaffected by the new standard? The new standard would will apply to employees engaged in the erection. whichever is less) below tiers of beams on which any work is being performed. connecting.750-1926. bolting. a proposed Fall Protection standard for steel erection work (Subpart R) was published in the Federal Register. This includes hoisting.750-1926. This important fall protection standard will update the current regulations that have been in effect for over 25 years. if approved. The new standard would will not cover work on electric transmission towers. metals and ornamental iron. bridges.752 requires nets to be used at 25 feet and above (when scaffolds are not used) and floor planking to be used (within two stories or 30 feet. and other structures where steel erection occurs. the comments will be reviewed and a final rule issued later.2002. steel joist and metal buildings as well as installation of metal deck.Standard/Regulation Information OSHA Steel Erection Safety Standard (Subpart R. Current Steel Erection Standards The current OSHA fall protection standard for steel erection work is very general in nature. It is estimated that 39. 1998.The final rule was published on January 18.000 structural metal workers perform these duties. which have been in place for 25 years. 1926.

) *Connectors working at heights between 15 feet and 30 feet. (connectors are the “first people” up at height.. (Some work in CDZ does require fall protection.) Workers engaged in decking in a controlled decking zone (CDZ) at a height between 15 feet and 30 feet. in terms of when and where to use fall protection. placing and connecting steel members) 2..761) addresses fall protection and would establishrequirements. Indent: Left: 0" Formatted: Left . The current OSHA Subpart M standard (Construction Industry) does not apply to steel erection work. Exceptions to this include: Formatted: Left Exceptions are: 11. Formatted: Left Overview of Fall Protection Requirements The proposed new standard has specificSubpart R (1926. distance triggering fall protection.structure that supports the tank).) Formatted: Left. 15 feet as the fallMost steel erection work will be covered by a 15-foot trigger height. States with their own plans must adopt a comparable standard within 6 months of publication of a final rule. Indent: Left: 0" Formatted: Left.750 .

Major points of Subpart R – Fall Protection Section 15-foot trigger height for most workers, 30-foot trigger height for connectors. Connectors working between 15 feet and 30 feet must be given the means to tie-off. Connector determines when/if to tie-off. Forms of fall protection include perimeter safety cables, guardrails, nets, and personal fall arrest or fall restraint systems. Controlled decking zones (CDZ) may be established over 15 feet and up to 30 feet where metal deck is being installed. Training – Qualified person to train exposed workers in fall protection and to train exposed workers engaged in special, high-risk activities. The guardrails, nets, personal fall arrest systems and fall restraint systems specified in Subpart R must conform to the criteria set forth in Subpart M (1926.502). Major points of Subpart M criteria include: (This criteria would apply to Subpart R) Full body harness only for fall arrest. 1,800 pound maximum arresting force. Anchor points support 5,000 lbs. or provide 2:1 safety factor minimum when part of complete, engineered system. Six foot maximum free fall distance (exceptions do apply). Horizontal lifelines shall be designed, installed, and used under supervision of a qualified person, which maintains a safety factor of at least two. Summary

Formatted: Left

With the release of this standard, the steel erection industry will be regulated by a more detailed, up-to-date standard. This particular standard, which was created through the negotiated rulemaking process, is expected to prevent many deaths and lost workday injuries every year.

Fall Protection Equipment Inspection Log
Classification Company

SERIAL #

DATE OF MFG.

MODEL #

DESCRIPTION

INSPECTION PASS FAIL INSPECTED INSPECTION PASS FAIL INSPECTED INSPECTION PASS FAIL INSPECTED DATE BY DATE BY DATE BY

COMMENTS

Form 5-1

©

Copyright Capital Safety 2006

Green: Pass, Safe for use

Yellow: Requires cleaning

Red: Remove from Service- send to manufacturer for Inspection/Servicing

Black: Destroy Immediately

Fall Protection Equipment Inspection Log
Classification Company

SERIAL #

DATE OF MFG.

MODEL #

DESCRIPTION

INSPECTION PASS FAIL INSPECTED INSPECTION PASS FAIL INSPECTED INSPECTION PASS FAIL INSPECTED DATE BY DATE BY DATE BY

COMMENTS

Form 5-1

©

Copyright Capital Safety 2006

Green: Pass, Safe for use

Yellow: Requires cleaning

Red: Remove from Service- send to manufacturer for Inspection/Servicing

Black: Destroy Immediately

buckles. burns. distortion.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: . sharp edges. cracks and corrosion.) Hardware: (includes D-rings. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1. and back pads) Inspect for damage. Webbing: Inspect for cuts. keepers. and discoloration. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.Full Body Harness Inspection Checklist / Log Harness Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing.) Accepted Rejected 6.) Labels: Inspect. Accepted Rejected 5. Accepted Rejected 4. burrs.) Accepted Rejected 7.) Stitching: Inspect for pulled or cut stitches. abrasion. tears. make certain all labels are securely held in place and legible. excessive soiling.) Accepted Rejected 3. frays.

Lanyards Inspection Checklist / Log Lanyard Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. Wire Rope: Inspect for broken wires. burns. kinks. excessive soiling. Labels: Make certain all labels are securely held in place and legible. sharp edges. Synthetic Rope: Inspect for pulled or cut yarns. burns. tears.) Hardware: (includes snap hooks. thimbles. Webbing: Inspect for cuts. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2. abrasion. corrosion. and D-rings). and excessive soiling. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1. excessive soiling and discoloration. Accepted Rejected 7.) Accepted Rejected 3. corrosion and proper operation. cracks. keepers. frays. Inspect for damage.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: . tears. abrasion. and separation of strands.) Stitching: Inspect for pulled or cut stitches. adjusters.) Accepted Rejected 5.) Accepted Rejected 6. burrs. Accepted Rejected 4. knots. and discoloration. carabiners. distortion.) Energy Absorbing Component: Inspect for elongation.

burrs.) Hardware: (Includes D-rings) Inspect for damage. burns. 4. abrasion. Webbing: Inspect for cuts. excessive soiling and discoloration. make certain all labels are securely held in place and legible.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 3.) Accepted Rejected 7.) Accepted Rejected 6. distortion. cracks and corrosion.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: . frays. sharp edges.) Stitching: Inspect for pulled or cut stitches. Accepted Rejected 5. tears.Hooks / Carabiners Inspection Checklist / Log Tie-Off Adaptor Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing.) Labels: Inspect. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.

Excessive Corrosion: Inspect for corrosion which effects the operation and/or strength.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 3.) Markings: Inspect. 4. deformities and locking operation.) Accepted Rejected 7.) Accepted Rejected 6. make certain marking(s) are legible.) Physical Damage: Inspect for crack sharp edges.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: . burrs. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.Tie-Off Adaptors Inspection Checklist / Log Hook / Carabiner Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing.) Accepted Rejected 5.

burrs and deformities. cracks and damage. Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2. inspect weld for corrosion.) Markings: Inspect. Fasteners: Inspect for corrosion.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: .) Accepted Rejected 6.) Accepted Rejected 7. tightness damage and distortion. If welded. make certain marking(s) are legible. MN 55066 Purchase Date: General Factors 1.Anchorage Plates Inspection Checklist / Log Anchorage Plate Model: Serial Number: Comments: Manufacture Date: Lot Number: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. Accepted Rejected 3.) Physical Damage: Inspect for cracks sharp edges. Accepted Rejected 5.) Accepted Rejected 4.) Excessive Corrosion: Inspect for corrosion which effects the operation and/or strength.

) Screws / Fasteners: Inspect for damage and make certain all screws and fasteners are tight. Hooks / Carabiners: Inspect for physical damage. proper operation and markings (see separate checklist/log for hooks & carabiners). broken wires (see impact indicator section). abrasion.) 6. make certain all labels Are securely held in place and legible.) 7.) 4. tears. cracks and other damage.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 9. Inspect anchoring loop for distortion and damage.) 3.) Overall Disposition Inspected By: Date Inspected: .) Accepted Rejected 8.) Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected 5.Self Retracting Lifelines Inspection Checklist / Log 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. frays. burns. Labels: Inspect. Accepted Rejected Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2. Locking Action: Inspect for proper lock-up of brake mechanism. MN 55066 Self Retracting Lifeline Model: Manufacture Date: Serial Number: Lot Number: Purchase Date: Owner/Dept/Location:_________________________________________________________ Owner’s ID #:_______________________________________________________________ Comments: ___________________________________________________________________________ General Factors 1. etc. Lifeline: Inspect for cuts. excessive soiling and discoloration. corrosion. Housing: Inspect for distortion. Retraction/Extension: Inspect spring tension by pulling lifeline out fully and allowing it to retract fully (no slack).) Impact Indicator: Inspect indicator for activation (rupture of red stitching. Reserve Lifeline: Inspect reserve lifeline retention systems for deployment. elongated indicator.

) Accepted Rejected 5.) Accepted Rejected 7.) Accepted Rejected 4.) Accepted Rejected Overall Disposition Accepted Rejected Inspected By: Date Inspected: .) Accepted Rejected 6.) Accepted / Rejected Accepted Rejected Supportive Details or Comments 2.) Accepted Rejected 3.Inspection Checklist / Log _________________ Model: Serial Number: Comments: 3833 SALA Way Red Wing. MN 55066 ______Manufacture Date: Lot Number: Purchase Date: General Factors 1.

stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means. No part of this publication may be reproduced. mechanical.Capital Safety USA DBI-SALA Training 3833 SALA Way RED WING. recording or otherwise without prior written permission from Capital Safety USA.capitalsafety.com EMAIL: info@capitalsafety. © Copyright Capital Safety USA 2008 . photocopying. MN 55066-5005 PHONE: 800-328-6146 FAX: 651-388-5065 WEBSITE: www.com © Capital Safety 2008 All rights reserved. Electronic.

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