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NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
PSAT scholars honored
Of the honorees, two are
Merit semifinalists. PAGE 4
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
TMS eighth-graders Zac Straub, Yash Balaji and Bryan Lewless work in the Project Lead the Way pre-
engineering classroom at Timberlane Middle School.
Future engineers hard at work
Middle school has
pre-engineering
program
Cooperation between educa-
tion and the community has
brought the future of education
to Timberlane Middle Schools
seventh- and eighth-graders.
The Hopewell Valley Educa-
tion Foundation has given
$40,000 to Timberlanes new
pre-engineering program, com-
pletely covering the start-up
costs for the new coursework,
including computers, software,
learning materials and the re-
designing of a classroom.
The HVEF hosted a reception
at Timberlane recently for sup-
porters in the new space, and
U.S Rep. Rush Holt, D-N.J., who
is also a physicist, stopped by to
see the new program in action.
We have a principal who
dreamed big, HVRSD Superin-
tendent Tom Smith said to the
crowd at the reception, refer-
ring to Timberlanes Tony Suoz-
zo, who initiated the switch to
Project Lead the Way Gateway
to Technology, last year. And
you all helped it come true.
This exemplifies what can hap-
pen when we work together.
The HVEF is a non-profit
foundation that provides and
solicits funding and develops
partnerships to enhance the ed-
ucational opportunities for
Hopewell Valley public school
students.
The $40,000 grant came from
Bristol Meyers Squibb ($10,000);
Janssen Pharmaceuticals
($10,000); the Institute of Elec-
trical and Electronic Engineers
(IEEE) ($10,000); the Arkay
Foundation ($5,000); and the
HVEF ($5,000), according to
Randee Tengi, president of the
board of HVEF.
The new courses are offered
as an elective this year for sev-
enth- and eighth-graders. They
are based on a national model,
designed to improve math and
science education in schools,
called STEM, which com-
bines science, technology, engi-
neering and mathematics in a
single course and includes ac-
tivities such as programming
robots, building 3-D models and
designing a glider. It replaced
the former Exploring Technolo-
gy Education class, commonly
known as wood shop, and is
taught by teacher Robert
Niederer.
Hopewell Valley Education
Foundation seeds program with $40K
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
please see HVEF, page 2
HVCHS names Distinguished Grads
A journalist, a singer-song-
writer, a U.S. Department of
State security specialist and a re-
tired New Jersey state
trooper were inducted into the
Hopewell Valley Central High
School Distinguished Graduates
Hall of Fame Oct. 27.
All four had unique advice to
share with students as they ac-
cepted their awards.
HoVal gives the awards each
year to honor four grads who
have distinguished themselves
in their professional fields.
The awards hang in a Hall of
Fame display outside of CHSs
Performing Arts Center.
Recipient Dina Cappiello,
Class of 91 and an award-win-
ning environmental journalist
for the Associated Press in
Washington, D.C., told the stu-
dents at an assembly in the PAC
recently that they will perse-
vere and excel in life if they
find a profession they love.
I am very lucky to have a job
that I love, she told them. You
need to find out what really
makes you soar, what really fires
up your engines. I discovered
that, and that makes life easy.
Among them are a journalist and retired N.J. state trooper
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
please see ALUMS, page 3
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Suozzo said 240 students are
signed up to take the half-year
courses this school year.
A few of those students
worked at computers as the re-
ception went on around them.
Eighth-grader Bryan Lew-
less, who is currently taking
the PLTW robotics course, sat
at a computer designing a ro-
botic arm, which he will then
build with materials in the
classroom. Yash Balaji, another
eighth-grader, was designing a
playground on his screen.
Its really fun, and its a
good way to start the day, said
Yash, who has the course first
period each day. Its a lot of
problem solving, and I like
that.
Student Jack Humphreys,
who hopes to design video
games for a living, said he likes
having access to some of the
better technology available
through the class.
But Zac Straub, who admits
hes into computers, said you
dont have to be to enjoy the
class.
Mr. Neiderer explains it
simply and makes it fun, he
said.
Suozzo said after start up, the
program will cost about the
same, or less, than the wood
shop program, and that it has
an important goal.
Clearly, as a nation, we are
not producing as many engi-
neers and scientists as we
would like, and this course re-
sponds to that, and is part of a
national effort to do better in
those fields, he said.
The seventh-grade PLTW
course consists of two, 45-day
modules.
One is called Design & Model-
ing, which explores the way
things are designed using com-
puter modeling, sketching and
other tools. The other 45 days
are spent exploring Energy &
the Environment, in which stu-
dents learn about the impor-
tance of energy in our lives, de-
sign and model alternative en-
ergy forms and explore the con-
cepts of innovation, energy effi-
ciency and waste management.
In the eighth-grade, PLTW
course, the first 45-day unit is
called Robotics and Automa-
tion, which covers the history
of these topics and offers
hands-on projects in mechani-
cal and computer control sys-
tems.
The second unit is Flight &
Space, in which students learn
about the history of aerospace,
again taught through hands-on
activities, and design and build
a model glider.
Also, simulation software
shows them what its like to
travel and live in space.
In 2011-12 only, because it is a
brand new course, eighth-
graders can take the seventh
grade classes if they wish.
We have been researching
this program for several years,
Suozzo said. We believe its an
excellent opportunity for our
students to develop the 21st-cen-
tury skills that they will need
for their future.
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Engineering begins
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HVEF
Continued from page 1
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NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
Distinguished HVCHS alums recognized
Jack Davis, class of 78, who
retired as a decorated New Jer-
sey state trooper in 2008, told stu-
dents that his mother taught
him long ago that the luck you
may see others have is usually
the result of years of hard work.
She said once, Isnt it inter-
esting that the harder someone
works, the luckier they seem to
be? the Titusville resident told
the students. Enjoy life and
work hard.
Ronald Hoch, Class of 61, a
senior security analyst at the
U.S. State Department and a for-
mer U.S. Secret Service agent
who protected Presidents Gerald
R. Ford and Jimmy Carter, told
the students to stay on the right
side of the law to safeguard their
futures.
My advice is to keep a clean
record, he told them, noting
that if they pursue a career in
any kind of security or law en-
forcement, background checks
will turn up any drug use and/or
arrests. He also noted that per-
severance would take them far.
A diamond is a lump of coal
that stuck with it, Hoch offered.
Singer-songwriter Danielia
Cotton, Class of 85, said that her
time as one of the few African-
American students at HoVal 25
years ago was not always easy.
I was a little Black kid, and I
didnt fit in, she told the stu-
dents. I didnt have the things
everyone else had, and I didnt
look like everyone else.
High school struggles, howev-
er, contribute to your growth as
a person, she said.
These are very definitive
years of your life, she told the
students. I am everything I am
because I struggled to find out
who I was. But please do remem-
ber, this is a great time of your
life. Just be happy.
Cappiello, an award-winning
environmental journalist for the
Associated Press, graduated
from Georgetown University
with a bachelors degree in biol-
ogy and decided to pursue a mas-
ters degree in secondary educa-
tion at Columbia University.
While at Columbia, she en-
rolled in writing and science
courses, which inspired her to
earn masters degrees in
both environmental science and
journalism.
She began her career in envi-
ronmental journalism as a re-
porter for the Albany (N.Y.)
Times Union newspaper. In 2001,
the New York State Associated
Press Association named her
Young Journalist of the Year.
After accepting a position
with the Houston Chronicle,
Cappiello continued her inves-
tigative environmental report-
ing, including a 2005 award-win-
ning series of articles called In
Harms Way, detailing the ef-
fects of refineries pollution on
neighboring communities.
A Pulitzer-Prize nominee and
now a journalist for the Associ-
ated Press in Washington, D.C.,
Cappiello continues to report on
environmental issues on the na-
tional and global stage.
Cotton is an award-winning
rock-soul singer and songwriter.
While growing up in Hopewell,
She attended HoVal, and then
went on to graduate from the
Mercer County School of the
Performing Arts at the top of
her class. Earning a full scholar-
ship to Bennington College,
she majored in acting, but
also continued her music stud-
ies.
In her career as a singer, song-
writer and guitarist, Cotton has
opened for some of the most
well-known names in rock,
blues, and rhythm-and-blues, in-
cluding Gregg Allman, B.B.
King, Derek Trucks, Bon Jovi,
Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Robert
Cray.
She followed her debut album,
ALUMS
Continued from page 1
please see GRADS, page 4
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011
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style to appreciative audiences.
Hoch is a senior security spe-
cialist for the U.S. Department of
State.
His early accomplishments
were in the field of sports.
In 1963, he was a member of
the national champion mens
soccer team at Mercer County
Community College (then
known as Trenton Junior Col-
lege) and was inducted into
the MCCC Hall of Fame.
He followed his success as a
soccer player with success as a
soccer coach, serving as an as-
sistant coach to the 1968 Univer-
sity of Maryland NCAA champi-
on soccer team. After graduating
from the University of Maryland
in 1970 with a bachelors degree
in physical education, Hoch was
appointed a special agent in the
United States Secret Service.
He served in the Secret Serv-
ice for 30 years, including presi-
dential details, before accepting
his current position as a senior
security specialist for the
U.S. Department of State.
Davis is an accomplished ath-
lete and public servant.
At Central High School, Davis
was a three-sport athlete and a
member of CHSs 1977 state
champion baseball team. During
his 25 years as a New Jersey
trooper, Davis received the New
Jersey State Police Certificate of
Commendation Award, as well
as the 200 Club Valor Award.
He has supervised the state
police recruiting unit, the staff
inspection unit and the intake
and adjudication unit. Davis was
one of the first New Jersey State
policemen to be trained in the
operation of the NJSP Emer-
gency Command Post which
was deployed to Liberty State
Park after the Sept. 11, 2001
World Trade Center attacks.
Once, while off-duty, he saved
the life of a young girl who had
plunged into the D & R Canal on
her bike.
Recognizing distinguished alumni
GRADS
Continued from page 3
Board honors
18 for PSAT
achievement
and success
The Board of Education hon-
ored 18 Hopewell Valley Central
High School students at its Nov. 14
meeting for their high perform-
ance on the National Merit Per-
formance Qualifying Test.
The National Merit Scholar-
ship Corporation awarded Com-
mended status to 16 of the stu-
dents, with two students named
as semifinalists in the National
Merit Scholarship competition.
National Merit recognition is
given to students who score
among the top tier of high-school
students around the country on
the PSAT/NMSQT test during
their junior year.
That test precedes the college
entrance SAT.
Semifinalists, who are the
highest-scoring entrants from
each state, will compete for Na-
tional Merit scholarships by tak-
ing the SAT and meeting high ac-
ademic standards. Finalists in the
competition will be announced in
February. See photo, page 8.
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6 THE HOPEWELL SUN NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
T
hanksgiving kicks off the tra-
ditional holiday season. And
with the holiday season come
all kinds of efforts to help those in
need.
We want to help spread the word if
you or an organization you are work-
ing with are trying to brighten the hol-
idays for someone.
Every year, schools, civic groups
and more do hold all kinds of drives.
Food is collected. Clothing is gathered.
Toys are purchased and donated so
that children have a happy holiday
season.
We want to help these efforts by get-
ting the word out. To do that, we need
you to tell us about any collection ef-
forts you have.
Its easy to do. Just shoot us an
email. Tell us who you are, what you
are doing and, most importantly, how
our readers can help you to achieve
your goal.
Its vital to tell us where and when
people can make donations and the
types of donations that you are accept-
ing. Letting people know where their
donations end up doesnt hurt either.
Once we get the information, we
will share it with our readers. Then,
hopefully, they will respond and fill
your collection baskets until they are
overflowing.
Theres no need to explain the eco-
nomic problems so many of our
friends and neighbors are experienc-
ing. You know many people are hurt-
ing, and have been hurting for some
time now. You know that, without your
help, they will have a difficult holiday
season.
So lets do all we can to help those in
need. All of you Holiday Heroes, let us
know what you are doing and how peo-
ple can make a difference.
Well take it from there.
Help during holidays
Collecting food? Gathering clothing? Tell us about it
Holiday heroes
If you are holding a drive to help the
less fortunate this holiday season, tell
us about it. Well spread the word.
Posted on sun news
OWS, protection, sewage and a chase
Zuccotti Park gets cleansed
from Occupy Wall Street
As if the public perception of the Occu-
py Wall Street protesters wasnt bad
enough already, last weeks raid of Zuccotti
Park in New York City added more fuel to
the fire. The protesters, it seems, created
unsanitary living conditions that had be-
come intolerable, according to NYC
Mayor Michael Bloomberg. And so, they
were cleared of the area forcibly of
course while cleaning crews literally
hosed down the filth.
It had to be embarrassing enough for the
original OWS organizers that some protest-
ers had taken the movement so far that
participants are being portrayed as not just
extreme, not just crazy, not just misguided,
but also smelly. And who can get behind
that?
Tim Ronaldson
Too often, institutions, not
kids, protected from abuse
In my younger years, I wasnt just a jour-
nalist. I was a teacher, too. In Roman
Catholic High Schools in the Archdiocese
of Newark. I loved teaching and I loved
being a mentor to teens who often had very
few role models in their lives.
To say it was a labor of love would be an
understatement.
The pay was nothing more than a pit-
tance. But the net results of being a good
teacher were invaluable and those memo-
ries remain among my fondest.
While I was employed by the Archdio-
cese of Newark, something beyond com-
prehension happened it was the scandal
that rocked the church in ways little else
could. Priests, by the hundreds, were being
named in lawsuits.
Some of the incidents dated back to well
before Vatican II to a time where the
church was tantamount in the lives of
many Catholics.
Kevin Canessa Jr.
Low speed chase takes police
on a leisurely Toms River tour
Police said said a man led them on an
ambling, low-speed chase through Toms
River for about 20 minutes Sunday night,
before rolling on to someones front yard
and trying to escape officers on foot, the
Asbury Park Press reported.
Police said they captured Matthew J.
Thoms, 43, as he hid in a bush in a nearby
backyard. Police had initially tried to stop
Thoms pickup truck when officers re-
sponded to a call about a suspicious vehicle
in the Bay Shore section of town, just be-
fore 11:30 p.m.
Barry Lank
Dont miss a thing!
These stories are a sampling of the
posts you can find every day on The
Central Jersey Sun an online
conglomeration of profiles, features
and opinions from around the region.
Check out these stories and more at
http://cj.sunne.ws.
The south section of Lambertville has
suffered a stink that sometimes lingered
over the neighborhood for days. Now, the
citys Municipal Utilities Authority has
overhauled and reopened the town's
sewage treatment plant.
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department.
Officer Mandy Grey responded
to a Hopewell Amwell Road ad-
dress for the report of an attempt-
ed burglary on Nov. 7.
Sometime between 8 a.m. and 4
p.m. on Nov. 4 someone, attempt-
ed to pry open a garage door at an
Amwell Road residence.
No entry was made, but ap-
proximately $200 worth of dam-
age was done to the door.
Sometime between Nov. 5 and
Nov. 7, someone is alleged to have
used blue, green, black, orange
and white spray paint to deface
the outside wall of the building
on the vacant 84 Lumber business
on Route 31.
An estimate of the damage was
unavailable.
Sometime between 6:30 p.m.
Nov. 12 and 8:23 a.m. Nov. 13,
someone used red and white
spray paint to deface the Van
Dyke Road railroad overpass
bridge.
An estimate of the damage was
unavailable.
On Nov. 4 at about 11 a.m.,
someone took a pair of prescrip-
tion sunglasses that had been ac-
cidentally left on a counter at the
Pennington Market.
The loss was estimated at $431,
police said.
Razor blades valued at $800
were reported stolen from the
Pennington Market Nov. 5.
Police said a review of video
surveillance found that a man
dressed in a heavy blue jacket and
dark jeans removed the razors
from the display rack at 11:39 a.m.
and immediately left the store
without paying for them.
Sometime overnight Nov. 10,
someone cut the padlock to a ve-
hicle trailer at Action Landscap-
ing on Route 31 and removed two
leaf blowers. The loss was esti-
mated at $1,020.
NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Drop us an email at
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The Hopewell Valley Marching
Black & Gold recently finished
third in the United States
Scholastic Band Association New
Jersey State Championships for
its highest finish in school-band
history.
The band, which was formed in
2007, traveled to Union High
School and competed as one of 16
bands in this classification,
Group 2-A.
The MBG performed the 2011
production: Emotion ... The
Power to Move, and received a
score of 92.16.
The bands previous finishes
were seventh in 2007, with a score
of 80.14; seventh in 2008, with a
score of 83.15; ninth in 2009, with
a score of 79.25; and ninth in 2010
with a score of 80.17.
Student leaders for the March-
ing Black & Gold include: drum
major Casey Parrett, president
Anoush Aghababian, section
leaders Emily Hopkins, Andrew
Pisetzner, Kennan Meyer, Lindsay
Colanduoni, Emma Max, Jackie
Burdwood and field manager
Nadia Fedchin.
The band is under the direc-
tion of David Schwartzer and as-
sistant director Jeff Parkinson.
THURSDAY
November 24
FOR ALL
Thanksgiving: Hopewell Public
Library closed.
HVRSD: Schools and offices closed.
FRIDAY
November 25
FOR ALL
Black Friday: Hopewell Public
Library closed.
HVRSD: Schools and offices closed.
MONDAY
November 28
FOR ALL
Township Committee Meeting: 7
p.m. at the Municipal Building.
WEDNESDAY
November 30
FOR ALL
Deer Management Advisory Meet-
ing: 7:30 p.m. at Municipal Building.
calendar PAGE 8 NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Or by email: calendar@hopewellsun.com.
Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all organizations.
Mortgage rates are effective March 16, 2011. This rate is on a thirty year fixed mortgage. Offer is subject to credit approval and may
change without notice. *Minimum loan amount is $200,000, maximum LTV 80%.
4.750
%
30 YEAR FIXED
MORTGAGE
FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS can purchase a new
home with as little as 3.5% down payment.
American Wide Loans has some of the
best Mortgage Rates and nationwide
home loans for all your mortgage needs.
We have a no points and no fees
option available for refinancing
and purchasing your home.
For more information about todays lowest rates,
call (888) 765-9960 or apply online at
http://elauw.it/amwideloans.
Hopewell Valley Marching Band places third in state competition
Special to The Sun
Pictured above are Hopewell Valleys National Merit Scholarship
Commended Students, who were honored at the Nov. 14 Board of Ed-
ucation meeting. They are, front row, from left, Mark Tengi, Maggie
Kent, Gayathri Tummala, Hannah Hirsh (semi-finalist) and Rohan
Galgali and back row, from left, Agastya Mondal, John Brence, Allen
Donne, Kennan Meyer, David Kilstein, Jacob Camins-Esakov and Ben
Steinberg.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
Why choose P. Cooper Roofing and Siding?
30 Years Experience Family Owned and Operated High Quality Products Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics Professional Installation
www.cooperroofing.com
Virtual Home
Remodeler
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
FREE
ROOF AND
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INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
FREE
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With any new roof
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Advertising in The Sun newspapers
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Stop by and pick up a few today.
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week. All classified ads must be prepaid.
Your Classified ad will run in all of The Sun Newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
SDK HOME REPAIR
Any repair you can
think of, we can do.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-481-8886
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
Home Improvement
Roofing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/7/11.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
Dog WaIking
WB
ABB GBOWIHGl
Join the Elauwit Team today!
.And so con you.
Email resume to tengle@elauwit.com or tronaldson@elauwit.com
The combination Front End Developer/Graphic Artist position will
work closely with the Digital Media Manager and Art Director.
The Front End Developer will be needed to enhance existing websites, build
new websites and any other work associated with the building of the Elauwit
brand. Tasks can be day to day or based solely upon projects, which will mainly
include the following:
WordPress Theming/Development
Deployment of new Wordpress sites
Improving existing Wordpress sites
Ability to create/implement design with/without direction
DESIRED SKILLS:
Front End Developer/Graphic Artist
HTML/CSS (by-hand, standards-
compliant, with strong under-
standing of cross-browser /
cross-platform issues)
Good knowledge of JavaScript,
PHP, MySQL
Experience with frameworks like
jQuery
Experience with Quark XPress,
Photoshop (Illustrator, a plus)
Good communication skills
Strong time management skills
able to meet deadlines
Works well together
The Graphic Artist will be needed to build and manipulate ads for the
newspapers, along with other small projects.
Handyman Services
Large or Small Repairs
Dependable, Family-based
Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
FREE ESTIMATES!
Fully Insured Lic. #13VH01208100
When you
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No pets
$1,350 per month
609-587-5328
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