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Graphic Design: Visual Communication BA (Hons) Course Handbook 2008/09

CONTENTS

Introduction to the course

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3 5 9

List of staff for your course Course Diagram

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Course Philosophy, Aims and Outcomes Stages of the course Stage Zero Units Stage One Units

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11

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14 21

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38 60 81

Stage Two Units

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Stage Three Units

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How your work is marked Assessment Methods Grading Descriptors

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92 95

Learning, Teaching and Academic Guidance for your course Glossary

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103

Introduction to your course

Contemporary graphic design uses visual language at the service of communicating information about products, services and ideas, and in most cases requires a commission, so consequently this course places a strong emphasis on professional competence and versatility, but of equal importance is the intellectual independence needed by you to be a successful designer amidst fast cultural, technological and social change. We attempt to enable you to achieve your full potential by experiencing a broad based and interdisciplinary curriculum that recognises that contemporary graphic design crosses over into other practices such as video/film fine art, animation, photography, illustration and interactive design. Employers now, increasingly need people with a multidisciplinary approach to creative problem solving and a flexible and open attitude. Consequently a distinct feature of this course is the importance we place on our students to critique the very nature and processes of graphic design, the purposes of communication and the nature of graphic authorship or self advocacy. You will study in a highly creative environment, which is both exciting and nurturing, and be able to access first class resources, which includes digital media studios, printmaking workshops, digital animation and specialist video and photographic facilities. By studying a range of visual communication electives which includes an opportunity to undertake an international exchange, our goal is to challenge you to find your own voice and subject focus whilst clearly understanding the placing of your work within a professional, social, cultural and economic context. Taught by a highly qualified and diverse mix of artists and professional designers, many of our employment contacts and work placement providers recognise that the breadth and interdisciplinary nature of this course of study sets many of our students ahead of others in the field. Students on the course build a graphically compelling professional portfolio of design work, and in their final year undertake design competitions such as the Design and Art Direction Student Awards, exhibiting their work nationally at the D&AD New Blood exhibition in London. Our graduates are consistent in obtaining employment in many fields of visual communication, and on graduation get work in top advertising agencies, design consultancies, publishing houses, museums, television and film companies, web design companies and multidisciplinary design consultancies. A number of professional contacts and advisors provide excellent student placements, live project opportunities and advice and some have provided employment including: The International Typographic Magazine Baseline, Conde Naste Magazines - publisher of Vogue among other titles, Carlton Publishing, DDB Advertising, Spin Design Group - designers of More4 TV Channel identity, and McMillan Books.

Recent Visiting lecturers have included: 1. Tony Brook, Spin Design More 4 Channel Identity, and Channel Five

2. Arnold Schwartzman OBE, Renowned graphic designer and Academy Award winning documentary filmmaker, Design Director for Saul Bass Associates and Royal Designer for Industry' RSA (The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce.) 2. Paul Farrington, Multimedia designer, design and branding, game designer 3. Alan Kitching Typographic Artist

Recent Student Successes Corinne Hitching third year graphic design student had her work published in the 2006/07 Design & Art Director's Student Annual. Chenu Zhao had her work published in the 2007/08 Design and Art Directors Student Annual. Amish Shah a final year Graphic Design student has completed a placement at the internationally recognised typography magazine "Baseline and has now been offered full time employment. Anja Bjorli Dahle a third year graphic design student won "Best of Show" at the recent D&AD "New Blood" Exhibition in London which features 100 leading design and advertising courses from the UK, Europe and US exhibiting 2,500 of the best graduates of advertising, graphic design and communication arts.

List of staff for your course


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Executive Dean of Kent Director of Studies Course Leader Deputy Course Leader Lecturers

Dianne Taylor Colin Gearing Colin Gearing Robin Chevalier Silke Dettmers Anne Caron-Delion Johanna Dennis Hugh Harwood Phil Jones Mark Sanderson Janice Thompson Ken Wood Nicholas Ross Ian Badger Christine Crosbie Jenny Painter

Course Administrator Technical Resources Manager Librarian Academic Liaison Librarian Academic Counsellor Registrar

Staff Profiles
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Colin Gearing Director of Studies /Communication Design Colin Gearing was born in Bristol, England and graduated from Leicester Polytechnic and Liverpool University where he studied typography and design. He has been teaching at Maidstone since 2004 and as Director of Studies in Communication Design is responsible for the MA in Graphic Design, BA (Hons) in Graphic Design and the FdA in Graphic Media courses. He has practiced graphic design both in the UK and the USA, and his work and that of his students has been published in Graphis, How, CMYK and Logolounge. He has held various other teaching positions in graphic design and typography at schools of design in the USA including Carnegie Mellon University, Robert Morris University, The Art Institute of Pittsburgh, and Savannah College of Art and Design. He has also served as Head of Design at Bowling Green State University, Ohio, and at Savannah College of Art and Design where he held the positions of Dean of the School of Communications and Media Arts and Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs. Having worked as a designer in advertising, publishing and information design both in the UK and the USA he continues his professional practice for a variety of clients, having a particular research interest in typographic design. His current teaching focuses on design fundamentals, typographic communication, and identity design. Colin is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and a Member of the American Institute of Graphic Artists

Silke Dettmers Senior Lecturer in Communication Design Silke Dettmers has lived in the United Kingdom since 1981. Born in Germany, she studied Graphic Design at Hochschule fuer Bildende Kuenste Braunschweig, and Illustration at St. Martin's College of Art and the Royal College of Art, London. She worked in advertising and as a freelance illustrator before starting to teach. At UCCA her responsibility lies with coordinating the 2nd year, her teaching however comprises all years plus MA. Silke's areas of special interest and expertise include text and image, bookworks, information design and the ethics of Graphic Design. Her own artistic practice for the last 15 years has been sculpture. Silke exhibits regularly and occasionally curates exhibitions. Her experience as a fine artist gives her a broad outlook on Graphic Design and allows her to develop interdisciplinary and crossover practices with students. She is the first year course tutor for the BA (Hons) Graphic Design course. Research profile www.axisweb.org/artist/silkedettmers

Philip Jones Following a five-year apprenticeship as a compositor, Philip Jones studied typographic design full-time for three years at the London College of Printing. He then worked for a number of years as a typographic designer with some of the leading London-based design consultancies specialising in corporate publications and information design. He taught part-time before taking a full-time senior lecturer appointment, and subsequently in 2001 a post at Maidstone College. Phil's research interests relate to his training in typesetting and include practical work that explores the language of letterpress, produced using his type and letterpress proofing presses. He is currently researching a comparison of the visual language of printed promotional material produced by UK and continental typefoundaries, and the semiotics of 'hobby' printing.

Robin Chevalier Deputy Course Leader Robin Chevalier graduated from Bristol University after specialising in Printmaking. A varied career in Graphic Design and Illustration followed. As a co-founder of graphic design consultants Room 3, he has worked for clients as diverse as Selfridges, Rank Xerox, The Sunday Telegraph, Unisys, Brent Council, Camden Council and The Association of Photographers. As an illustrator he continues to work regularly with The Guardian, Heals, Volkswagen, The Radio Times, The Wall Street Journal and Conran Octopus amongst others. This activity has instigated research into self authorship and the development of a magazine on this subject is in progress. Robin also paints and exhibits regularly around London and the South East. His work has shown at The Conigsbury Gallery, London, in the touring exhibition "Shed" and the Brighton Festival. He has been Deputy Course Leader for BA (Hons) Graphic Design at Maidstone since 2005. Before this he taught at Surrey Institute of Art and Design, Middlesex University and Chelsea School of Art. His primary responsibility is as third year tutor, but he teaches across all year groups and has some responsibility on the MA Graphic Design course. He is presently External Examiner for the MA Graphic Design Communication course at Chelsea College of Art and Design.

Johanna Dennis Johanna Dennis studied Graphic Design and Illustration at Kingston Polytechnic (now Kingston University) and Bath College of Higher Education (now Bath Spa University). She has worked ever since as a freelance Illustrator and Web Designer, often incorporating animation. She started to teach these disciplines in 2000 in North Oxfordshire College (De Montford University), City of Brighton and Hove College, and Chelsea College of Art and Design (University of the Arts, London) which is ongoing. At the University for the Creative Arts she is joint Year Leader for Stage 1 students, and teaches Communication Design to all years with specialist focus on Digital Media. Her own professional practice for the last 12 years has taken in work for the fields of Web Design, Advertising, Animation, TV graphics, Illustration, Pop Promos, Publishing, Editorial and Packaging.

Mark Sanderson Visual Theory Lecturer Theorist and architectural photographer. Current research is on Italian architecture of coastal resorts for working class children during the fascist era. The work explores the idea of the ruin, the modern project, utopia and the state. Architectural photography has been published in numerous architecture and interior design publications. Anne Caron-Delion Visual Theory Lecturer Anne Caron-Delion studied Art History at Birkbeck College and the History of Design at the Royal College of Art, London. She has worked as an archivist and as an exhibition researcher for the Design Council, and as Setting Up in Business Officer at the Crafts Council. Before taking up her post at UCCA, Anne taught at Middlesex University, Goldsmiths College and Winchester School of Art. She currently lectures to all three years of the BA in Communication Design, where her main areas of interest are contemporary notions of the handmade in graphics; the semiotics of mapping and information design; the body and technology, and theories of consumption. As Teaching and Learning Co-ordinator for Maidstone, her responsibilities also include developing initiatives to support the writing and research skills of students on the universitys degree courses; improving English language support for overseas students and overseeing peer observations for academic staff. Anne is currently collaborating on a research project to evaluate the impact of student writing workshops at Maidstone and develop a set of learning materials supporting new developments in this area.

COURSE DIAGRAM
BA (Hons) Graphic Design: Visual Communications Stage Zero Semester One I N D U C T I O N W E E K 15 credit 15 weeks Visual Language
MGEN0001

Semester Two 30 credit 7 weeks Specialist Practice


MGEN0005

15 credit 10 weeks Media & Materials


MGEN0002

15 credit 5 weeks Ideas in Practice


MGEN0003

R E A D I N G W E E K

30 credits 8 weeks Portfolio & Progression project


MGEN0006

15 credit 15 weeks Critical and Contextual Studies


MGEN0004

Stage One Semester One I N D U C T I O N W E E K 15 Credit / 5 weeks Typography Letterform and Sense of Place
MGRD1001

Semester Two 15 Credit / 5 weeks Letterform, Message and Meaning


MGRD1002

15 Credit / 5 weeks Sign, Symbol and Meaning


MGRD1003

R E A D I N G W E E K

15 Credit / 5 weeks Extended Practice Elective


MEXE1---

15 Credit / 5 weeks Structure, Space and Grids


MGRD1004

15 Credit / 5 weeks Narrative and Sequence Screen based design


MGRD1005

15 Credit / 15 weeks Sign Culture 1 : Constructing Meaning


MVTH1001

15 Credit / 15 weeks Sign Culture 2: Meaning in Context


MVTH1002

Stage Two Semester Three I N D U C T I O N 30 Credit / 10 weeks The Extended Page The Editorial Process
MGRD2001

Semester Four 15 Credit / 5 weeks Extended Practice Elective or Work Experience Elective
MEXE2---

* Students may undertake a Study Abroad option here

R E A D I N G W E E K

15 credits / 5 weeks Critical Roles


MGRD2002

30 Credit / 10 weeks Defining your Practice


MGRD2003

15 credit 15

W E 1515 15 Credit / 15 weeks E Theory: Critical Histories MVTH2001 K

15 Credit / 15 weeks Theory: Research Seminar MVTH2002

Stage 3 Semester Five


I N D U T I O N W E E K

Semester Six R E E D I N G W E E K 45 credit /10 weeks Student Initiated Major Project


MGRD3002

30 Credit / 15 weeks Student Initiated Minor Projects


MGRD3001

30 credit /15 weeks Dissertation


MINS3002

15 credit /15 weeks Portfolio and Career Development


MGRD3003

BA (Honours) Graphic Design

Alternative Unit map

Level one Weeks 1 5 Weeks 6 - 10 Unit MGRD1001: 15 credits Unit MGRD1002: 15 credits Identify yourself: Typography, Something to say: Letterform, Letterform and a Sense of Place Message and Meaning Unit leader: Robin Chevalier Unit leader: Phil Jones Unit MVTH1001: 15 credits Sign Culture 1: Constructing Meaning Unit leader: Phil Jones Semester 1 Weeks 1 5 Unit MEXE1---: 15 credits Extended Practice Elective Unit leader: to be advised Unit MVTH1002: 15 credits Sign Culture 2: Meaning in Context Unit leader: Anne Caron-Delion Weeks 6 - 10 Unit MGRD1004: 15 credits Structure, Space and Grids Unit leader: Robin Chevalier

Weeks 11 15 Unit MGRD1003: 15 credits Sign, Symbol and Meaning Unit leader: Silke Dettmers

Level two Weeks 1 5 Weeks 6 10 Unit MGRD2001: 30 credits The Editorial Process The Extended Page Unit leader: Robin Chevalier Unit MVTH2001: 15 credits Critical Histories Unit leader: Mark Sanderson Weeks 1 5 Unit MGRD2002: 15 credits Critical Roles Unit leader: Silke Dettmers Unit MVTH2002: 15 credits Research Seminar Unit leader: Phil Jones Weeks 6 10 Unit MGRD2003: 30 credits Defining Your Practice Unit leader: Silke Dettmers Semester 3 Weeks 11 - 15 Unit MEXE2---: 15 credits Extended Practice Elective Unit leader: to be advised

Semester 2

Weeks 11 15 Unit MGRD1005: 15 credits Narrative and Sequence Screen Based Design Unit leader: Johanna Dennis

Weeks 11 - 15

Level three Weeks 1 5 Unit MGRD3001: 30 credits Student Initiated Minor Projects Unit leader: Robin Chevalier Unit MINS3002: 30 credits Dissertation Unit leader: John Gange Semester 5

Semester 4

Weeks 6 10

Weeks 11 - 15

Weeks 1 5 Weeks 6 10 Unit MGRD3002: 45 credits Student Initiated Major Project Unit leader: Robin Chevalier Unit MGRD3003: 15 credits Portfolio and Career Development Unit leader: Colin Gearing

Weeks 11 - 15

Semester 6

Course Philosophy, Aims and Outcomes

Background The graphic design BA (Hons) at Maidstone has a recognised history of achievement and has been operating successfully with full validation since 2001, employing staff with national and international profiles and graduates who have made international reputations as professional designers. It is one of the more recognised and established programmes in the South East and with London only 50 minutes travel away by public transport is in effect very close to the heart of the communications industry. Museums, galleries, design consultancies, advertising agencies etc are easily accessible and available to students to enhance their studies. In building our reputation, a distinctive feature of the course has always been a teaching and learning approach that is broad based and one that engages students in the opportunity to experience the breadth of the subject within a dynamic set of cross disciplinary skills. This has been achieved through a blend of teaching and learning strategies and supported through the choice of visual communication extended practice electives in the first and second stages of the course. As design is increasingly becoming an integrative discipline, where designers must integrate aspects of aesthetics and the fine arts, aspects of the social and behavioural sciences and be able to work in teams drawn from many specialised areas of knowledge, then this has inevitably shaped our approach to curriculum design and delivery, particularly in the provision of the extended practice electives. By choosing from a range of electives such as text and image, animation, photography, video, illustration, printmaking, web design and book arts, we encourage students to combine ideas, methods and skills in order to address visual communication problems in innovative and creative ways and to extend practice. This provides the opportunity to acquire supplementary skills and experiences that feed into the main study areas and explore the practical and conceptual connections between them. In many respects the standards are higher than in similar programmes in that the scale and range of work undertaken addresses Graphic Design as a whole discipline rather than specialising in small areas of practice covered by the subject. The level of academic debate evident in work of those students working at the forefront of the discipline is aspirational and demanding of both subject and audience. External Examiner Report 2004/5

Philosophy Clearly, graphic design needs to put its languages at the service of an idea (and in most cases a commission) so consequently the course places a strong emphasis on professional competence and versatility, together with the intellectual independence needed for the contemporary practitioner to be successful. This approach has become increasingly the norm in graphic design courses, but not everyone studying design will be a practising/professional designer. The various visual media within the scope of graphic design are actually relevant to all practices that are engaged in the production of visual statements, and this course is operating in the belief that Graphic Design should be understood and learnt as another set of languages and ways of

thinking/imagining/mediating that cannot be simplified in terms of a conventional professional outcome. As a result, there is recognition that acquiring those languages usually available within a Graphic Design course has outcomes beyond the narrow definitions of professional designers but is a kind of open-ended visual literacy that benefits a wide variety of outcomes and practices. A flexible emphasis is therefore placed on independence, self-awareness, experimentation and exploration as much as on professional skills and presentation.

We believe that students need to think and reflect as well as do We frame the subject of graphic design in its historical and contemporary context We ensure an understanding of the principles/ core issues of visual communication; we consider this to be their equipment for (a) life (in art and design) We alert students to their social/ ethical responsibility as future designers We teach graphic design as an integrative/ interdisciplinary practice We explore the boundaries of the subject and anticipate future developments We consider conceptual-analytical skills as a lifelong transferable currency We consider skills and technology in relationship to ideas (a means to an end) rather than an entity in its own right We develop appropriate, varied, transferable methodologies with students We encourage an international outlook

A particular strength of the course is the broad based approach allowing individual students to find their own voices and ways of working within the broad scope of graphic design External Examiner Report 2004/5

We also place a great deal of emphasis on our students to critique the very nature and processes of graphic design, the purposes of communication and the nature of graphic authorship. The question "How do we communicate (now)?" remains a useful constant to return to educationally. Graphic Design is a dynamic subject that is in a dynamic relationship with the world. Graphic designers today are thinking, self-reflexive operators, who do not just respond to design problems identified by others, but are often themselves the instigators of visual/design changes. The growth and success of the course is a result of its ability to adapt to critical change and it has developed into a unique learning experience in the field, which reflects the emergence of graphic design as an internationally debated field of academic study, and one that recognises the significant impact contemporary art practice has made on it.

In the recognition that the practice of graphic design is not static and that its boundaries are no longer clearly defined, we as a consequence encourage our students to leave their comfort zones and be open to many new and exciting possibilities and directions. By developing creative, contextual and technical understanding and skills we seek to enable them to respond to all the personal challenges that this offers and to embrace the responsibilities and challenges that are associated with it. Another distinctive feature of studying graphic design at Maidstone is the high number of European and International students who have chosen to study on the course giving it a strong international dimension with the added opportunity for students to participate in an innovative programme of international student exchanges. By encouraging a global perspective we maximize on the diversity of opportunities that are now open to our graduates. We therefore seek through all stages of the course to guide students through a conceptual and analytical exploration of the ways in which communication design in its wide variety of media and contexts can create and change meaning. It seeks to open their mind to their own interests and subject focus, and to examine ways in which they can be authors of their own work whilst clearly understanding the placing of that work within a professional social, cultural and economic context. The course can therefore be characterised by the following unique features: 1. It provides analytical, interpretive and creative design practice organised within a sound higher education framework as preparation for employment or postgraduate study within the field. 2. It offers a broad based approach that engages students in the opportunity to experience the breadth of subject knowledge within dynamic skill sets, and by offering them the choice of visual communication electives that support the main area of study. 3. We place a high degree of emphasis on students to be able to critique the very nature and processes of graphic design, the purposes of communication and the ethical, and professional responsibilities of the designer. 4. The importance we place on students to be flexible and open to new possibilities and opportunities, allowing them to develop their own interests and subject focus. 5. The importance we place on encouraging students to examine ways in which they can be authors of their own work whilst clearly placing that work within a professional, social, cultural and economic context. 6. It provides a learning environment that allows an analytical exploration of the ways in which communication design - in its wide variety of media and contexts - can change meaning and enable career opportunities. 7. The recognition by the course team of the importance of a global perspective through the encouragement of the international student exchange scheme, international study visits, and the inclusion of an international dimension to project briefs whenever possible.

Students are recruited from across the world giving a truly international and multi-national dimension to the work carried out on the course. Graphic Design teaching at Maidstone enters boldly into contemporary debates about the nature of the discipline and its relationship to different areas of creative practice. Graduates are highly articulate, motivated and confident about their futures in the creative and design industries. External Examiner Reports 2004-6

Course Aims and Outcomes The BA (Honours) Graphic Design: Visual Communications course aims to; A1 Provide a specialist education in graphic design that encourages you to develop independent learning, critical thinking, engage in discourse and relate this to practice. Foster the development of visual, oral and written communication and engagement with the technologies and processes relevant to graphic design practice. Encourage speculation, research, critical judgement and fluency in subject debate as a means of informing you of your own creative practice and that of others. Introduce you to the contexts and scope of professional practice, and the social and cultural mechanisms that mediate between graphic design, the public and other audiences. Enable you to articulate and synthesise your knowledge and understanding, attributes and skills in effective ways in the context of creative practice, employment, further study, research and self-fulfilment. Apply, consolidate and extend your learning in different contextual frameworks and situations both within and without the field of art and design. Provide a learning environment that allows an analytical exploration of the ways in which graphic design - in its wide variety of media and contexts - can change meaning and enable career opportunities.

A2

A3

A4

A5

A6

A7

Stages of the Course ________________________________________________


Stage 0 (For students on the four year course only) Work at this Stage will enable you to gain knowledge, together with a conceptual and technical skills base in the field of graphic design. Semester one will introduce, through, projects, lectures and educational visits, the broader aspects of art and design and communication design, and to the creative exploration of ideas using a variety of materials and processes. You will begin to analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge to make more informed judgements, developing an ability to reflect on their own learning. You will be able to apply these skills independently in relatively simple and familiar contexts or with guidance and structure when working with greater complexity. During the second semester you will develop your ideas within the specialist route of graphic design combining knowledge, design and communication skills to produce a major self directed project. An exhibition and a portfolio of work will conclude the Stage. You will be expected to be able to operate in predictable and defined contexts that require the use of a specified range of standard techniques and will be able to act with relative autonomy within those contexts. The final unit helps you to define your practice as you become more of an independent learner in preparation for Stage 1. Aims (Stage 0) A1 Introduce you to the historical, cultural, theoretical and professional context for the subject. Develop your understanding and improve skills in drawing and visualisation. Introduce you to a range of materials, techniques and processes, encouraging creative experimentation and to discover graphic possibilities. Introduce you to the fundamental principle of visual language. Foster the ability to manage independent learning, and study techniques, both written and verbal. Develop visual judgement and personal creativity in the expression of ideas and concepts. Provide a rich foundation to explore the importance of documentary and visual research strategies and methodologies to produce effective creative outcomes within the field.

A2 A3

A4 A5

A6

A7

Stage 1 In Stage One of the course, you will engage with a series of themed practice units which build a fundamental, specialist knowledge of key issues in the subject area. Projects pose open questions in order to encourage you to take ownership of your learning, develop a point of view and to research and articulate findings. Practice units are complemented by closely related theory units, in which a particular feature is the increasing alignment of theoretical discourse with discussion of your own practice. Technical workshops are integrated within units and linked to the realisation of the unit aims. Stage One then offers a set of Electives which allow you to choose to extend your technical skill and concepts in the context of another subject area. This unit gives you the opportunity to make connections between different areas, share learning with peers from other courses and supports your emerging personal direction. Collaborative learning is encouraged through briefings, group seminars, critiques and tutored field trips and individual learning through workshops, tutorials and independent learning. Beginning with an induction week and a field study trip to research and collect visual materials in preparation for the first unit, the Stage introduces the importance of documentary and visual research and reinforces exploration, experimentation and design process as fundamental to successful creative design outcomes. The Stage continues by exploring visual principles of form, image, colour and typography with a particular emphasis on how meaning can be created and manipulated through words, images and media, and a new unit will address the essentials of symbol design - semantics, syntax and functionality examining visual forms as signifiers of meaning. This extends notions of identity from the first unit but now concentrates on how pictographic and abstract marks contribute to the construction of a graphic language. The exploration of the contextual and practical importance of structure, space and grids and, more broadly, the importance of visual systems and structure within the wider cultural context of the visual arts and design practices, is introduced and explored and later narrative and sequence are introduced as thematic concepts that can be applied to screen based outcomes. The notion of how designers can be authors of their own work is introduced along with the relationship between graphic design and contemporary art practice. Summative assessment is prefaced by self-assessment and followed by an assessment feedback tutorial. Aims (Stage 1) A1 A2 Introduce you to the cultural, theoretical and professional context for the subject. Introduce you to the fundamental principles of visual language, technical skills, knowledge, and strategies for conceptual thinking to enable creative graphic design outcomes. Provide you with a set of critical terms knowledge and concepts with which to enable analysis of visual images and evaluate design solutions. Enable you to develop a range of study skills, both written and verbal and introduce appropriate research methodologies. Provide a rich foundation to explore the importance of documentary and visual research strategies and methodologies to produce effective creative outcomes.

A3 A4 A5

Learning Outcomes At the end of Stage 1 you will be expected to be able to: LO1 Demonstrate an understanding of basic issues, fundamental concepts, practices and definitions relating to the discipline, together with an ability to view these in a wider context. Employ competence (commensurate with this level and hierarchy of knowledge) in using appropriate materials, media, technologies and processes in the solution of visual communication problems and their presentation. Demonstrate self-management, independent learning and an understanding of the cultural, theoretical and professional context for your work. Critically evaluate, develop arguments and demonstrate effective communication skills in the presentation of ideas and visual solutions. Demonstrate skills and understanding of a supplementary visual communication discipline and the practical and conceptual connections between it and the main study area. Understand the notion of graphic authorship and self advocacy using perceptive strategies to demonstrate an awareness of your own work and the external context of graphic design to achieve career goals. Engage with peers in group learning and to learn from each other Evaluate different approaches to solving problems and be able to communicate results accurately with structured and coherent arguments.

LO2

LO3 LO4 LO5

LO6

LO7 LO8

Stage 2 Stage Two of the course continues to build knowledge and skill with an increasing emphasis on your own subject direction. A Semester Three unit offers a set of extended practice electives that allow you to choose to further develop your concepts and technical skills in the context of another subject area, and at this stage a work experience elective also becomes available. The extended practice elective unit in Stage Two differs from that in Stage One in that it emphasises concept development. Theory units in Stage Two also offers options enabling you to make choices which support your own direction, to share discourse with students from other subject areas and to develop research skills through special workshops in preparation for the final year dissertation. The practice work in units of Semester Four focus on the development of your understanding of potential professional directions through a focus on engagement with other practitioners, and through a self- initiated project - chosen and developed in the context of individual tutorials. You may choose to undertake an international exchange during Semester Four or participate in an international study visit. The University has partner institutions in around 20 different countries and students benefit from the positive transformation in confidence, interpersonal skills, time management and language skills.

Learning in this stage is supported through briefings, individual and group tutorials, professional practice seminars and portfolio surgeries, critiques, field trips and advanced level technical, research and study skills workshops. The notion of communication design throughout the stage, is examined more closely and the theories and concepts that surround the practice/profession are critically examined with consideration to professional, ethical, and social responsibilities. Studio work is supported by a comprehensive study of the historical framework needed to understand contemporary practice and provide you with knowledge of key historical movements and historical references. Aims (Stage 2) A1 Consolidates and develops confidence and competence in using appropriate materials, media, technologies and processes in the solution of visual communication problems and their presentation. Broadens understanding of contemporary media practice through further elective study, which will inform the development of your own emerging visual language. Extend and develop creative, critical and analytical ability, encouraging a more self-directed and reflective approach, exploring further notions of self-advocacy and graphic authorship. Extend and develop research and study skills both written and verbal. Extend an understanding of the key professional, social and political issues implicit in graphic design practice and a theoretical framework / vocabulary for addressing such issues.

A2

A3

A4 A5

Learning Outcomes At the end of Stage 2 you will be expected to be able to: LO1 Apply effective visual research strategies and methodologies in the solution of graphic design problems. Identify and demonstrate a growing confidence in using appropriate materials, media, technologies and processes to produce creative design solutions. Demonstrate an enhanced ability to develop critical analytical and creative approaches. Undertake a more self-directed approach exploring further graphic authorship and developing an increasing personal visual language. Critically reflect on your own work and begin to identify self-initiated study areas/ interests for exploration during Stage 3.

LO2

LO3

LO4

LO5

Stage 3 Stage Three of the course gives you the opportunity to incrementally develop and test your subject direction and extend your ability to research, develop and realise your intentions. Work in both practice and theory is self-initiated and negotiated with tutors. Learning in this level is supported largely through individual tutorials, group seminars and professional practice opportunities which may include practitioner presentations and visits to studios or subject events. You may attend Open Lectures or join tutored field trips as they judge relevant to your work. The Stage opens with two student initiated minor projects, which provides a framework to develop and integrate independent research and visual language in areas of communication design practice of your own choosing. Both will require you to build on previously learned skills developed in previous components of the course such as proficiency in self-directed organisation and time management of an extended selfinitiated problem. The second assignment will require you to undertake a design assignment from the range offered in the RSA or D&AD student awards and will also require you to pursue in-depth research into the conceptual, practical, and aesthetic components of the chosen project. You will be encouraged to contextualise individual production in relation to historical and contemporary developments in practical and theoretical communication design discourse and further develop critical insight. Through the presentation of written project proposals and the completion of two pieces of graphic design project work, you will complete work to a high level of related practical and theoretical proficiency. Portfolio and career development is extended, to ensure that you are better equipped to meet the demands of the workplace. You will explore personal strategies for career development through the preparation of self-promotional materials and (digital) portfolios, and by encouraging you to make contact externally with individuals, institutions and companies, you will develop a career development plan alongside the personal /portfolio package. A dissertation requires you to extend your analytical and writing skills and to complete a major piece of research related to culture and communication. Finally a Student initiated major project requires you to research, develop, and realise a project of your own choosing that will allow you to demonstrate a high level of maturity through clarity and focus. The ability to synthesise previously learned practical and theoretical knowledge aligning you studies to career aspirations will be a key feature of this level. The course culminates in the opportunity to collaborate with others to present work in a form appropriate to purpose and content. In the past this has included an Assessment Show at Maidstone, and London based exhibitions including the Design and Art Direction Awards and Free Range. Aims (Stage 3) A1 Develop and extend skills in integrating independent research and individual visual language in areas of graphic design practice. Extend the contextualisation of the subject in relation to historical and contemporary developments in practical and theoretical graphic design discourse, further developing critical insight into the appropriate deployment of the conceptual, technical, and aesthetic components of a major extended project.

A2

A3

Further develop proficiency in self-directed organisation and time management of extended self-initiated practical projects and develops their ability to draw previous learning into a synthesised whole. Extend analytical and writing skills to complete a major piece of research related to culture and communication, further developing analysis, reason and discussion, carried through planned stages of research and writing. Consolidate and confirm previous learned knowledge and skills integrating learning experiences to produce work that communicates ideas and creative concepts to a high quality and professional standard.

A4

A5

Stage 3 Learning Outcomes At the end of the stage you will be expected to be able to: LO1 Confirm previously learned experiences to produce self initiated work that communicates ideas and concepts to a high quality and professional standard. Apply analysis, and reasoned argument in the production of major pieces of selfinitiated research. Manage self-directed organisation and time management. Acknowledge others and initiate collaboration with peers to present work in a form appropriate to purpose and content. Discuss and debate issues of professional practice and business studies together with issues surrounding the practice of graphic design, describing how the profession has developed and demonstrating a critical examination of the designer / client relationship. Present a portfolio of work which demonstrates professional competence and an individual approach to graphic design problem solving. Contextualise your individual production in relation to historical and contemporary developments in practical and theoretical graphic design discourse, examining the critical and contextual dimensions of their discipline.

LO2

LO3 LO4

LO5

LO6

LO7

Stage 0 Unit Descriptors


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Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Visual Language MGEN0001 Maidstone Stage 0, 15 credits Semester 1 15 weeks 150 April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit will equip you with essential knowledge, understanding and skills in 2D and 3D visual language. Beginning with the fundamentals of observed drawing you will work from objects, the figure and structures. It will include working in the studio, site visits and working on location. You will explore how to use drawing expressively, experimentally and inventively to create images. It is important that you develop your drawing and visual language skills in the context of your specialist study in order for you to generate, visualise, develop and realise your ideas with confidence. This unit complements directly the Media & materials unit. The unit will run throughout the entire semester and may comprise of a number of shorter assignments which you will complete in sequence. You will explore the vocabulary of visual language and become familiar with the meaning and use of mark-making, texture, surface, shape, space, form, structure etc. In the context of two and three dimensions you will develop the skills and ability to record observed colour and how to use colour to convey emotion and express meaning. You will be encouraged to observe your physical and cultural environment and using a range of media and materials develop and communicate your responses, feelings and ideas visually. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Foster understanding, skills and confidence in drawing, mark-making and in the use of colour sufficient for you to record observations and to communicate meaning. Reveal to you the purpose, application and value of visual language in your intended study. Enable you to explore and to express your opinions visually.

A2

A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 Explain the terminology and meaning of 2D and 3D visual language. Use drawing to record, develop and communicate ideas Demonstrate the observed, emotive and expressive use of colour. Recognise your own interests and to organise your response and records.

Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefings and introductory presentations Inductions and practical work in the studios and workshops including Health & Safety awareness. Seminars, group critiques and peer group review/debate Educational visits to museums, galleries and locations from which to study and work Tutorial guidance and feedback from formative/summative assessment Independent study.

Assessment Requirement Two components are required: An annotated sketchbook of visual and written research and material showing completion of the set/themed briefs within the unit. This may be in common with your submission for Media & materials unit and some of your Critical and contextual study unit. A body of work and worksheets demonstrating your understanding, experimentation and exploration of 2D and 3D visual language.

(Combined submission 100%) Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work that demonstrates: Knowledge of: Context (LO1)

Understanding through the application of: Research (LO1) Analysis and Synthesis (LO2 & LO3)

Technical and Applied skills through: Materials and media (LO2 & LO3) Methods and processes (LO2 & LO3) Managing self (LO4)

Reference Material Kovats, Tania, (2005) The Drawing Book: A survey of drawing: the primary means of expression, Black Dog Kantor, Jordan, (2005) Drawing from the Modern 1975-2005, Museum of Modern Art, New York Itten, Johannes, (1970) The Elements of Color, Van Nostrand/Reinhold BBC2 Series (2005) The Secret of Drawing, UCA Library Ref. Video Collection various

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Media and Materials MGEN0002 Maidstone Stage 0, 15 credits Semester 1 10 weeks 150 April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit complements the Visual language unit directly in equipping you with essential knowledge, understanding and skills in 2D and 3D visual language. You will be introduced to a range of media, techniques and processes in specialist workshops and studios. You will develop appropriate practical skills along with the discretion to use them selectively in the context of your specialist study. Assignments in this unit will be integrated with the unit(s) in Visual language, Critical and contextual study and later in the semester with Ideas in practice. The unit will run throughout the entire semester but comprise of a number of shorter assignments which you will complete in sequence. The unit will introduce to a wide range of workshop practices. These may include printmaking processes; intaglio techniques (dry point and etching), screen print and relief print. Photomedia workshops will familiarise you with basic darkroom procedures for B&W developing and printing. In the 3D workshop you will explore the possibility of making objects in a range of materials using hand and power tools. Media workshops will provide opportunities for inductions into key software used in image generation and manipulation for static and moving image/animation, letterform and page make-up. Whilst you will learn some practical knowledge and skills through this unit the intention is that it be in the context of your own ideas and creative response to the briefs. You will be encouraged to embrace an open and speculative use of your knowledge and to be innovative in how you utilise your skills and understanding in solving visual and communication issues.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 A2 Acquire a range of practical workshop skills and knowledge of materials. Gain an understanding in how you can develop your visual vocabulary through media, materials and techniques. Enable you to explore and to develop your ideas creatively.

A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 LO2 LO3 Demonstrate a range of practical workshops skills. Apply materials, techniques and processes to develop ideas Relate practical skills and understanding to visual and contextual research.

Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefings and introductory presentations Inductions and practical work in the studios and workshops including Health & Safety awareness. Seminars, group critiques and peer group review/debate Library research Tutorial guidance and feedback from formative/summative assessment Independent study.

Assessment Requirement Two components are required: An annotated sketchbook of visual and written research and material showing completion of the set/themed briefs within the unit. This may be in common with your submission for Visual language unit and some of your Critical and contextual study unit. A body of work and worksheets demonstrating your exploration, understanding, experimentation of a range of media, techniques and processes.

(Combined submission 100%) Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work that demonstrates: Knowledge of: Concepts Context (LO2) Technologies & processes (LO1)

Understanding through the application of: Evaluation and reflection (LO2 & LO3)

Technical and Applied skills through: Materials and media (LO3) Methods and processes (LO1 & LO2) Relevant equipment & tools (LO1) Managing self (LO1)

Reference Material Bhaskaran, Lakshmi, (2005) Designs of the Times: Using key movements and styles for contemporary design, Rotovision Wong, Wucius, (1977) The Principles of Three-dimensional Design, Van Nostrand/Reinhold Banham, Raynor, (1996) Theory and Design in the First Machine Age, (Architectural Press)

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Critical & Contextual Study MGEN0004 Maidstone Stage 0, 15 credits Semester 1 15 weeks 150 April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit should equip you with a broad historical knowledge and contextual understanding of a range of practices in art & design. You will develop study and research skills and how to use what you learn to inform your own practical work. There will be a thematic lecture programme and a contextual research element to each of the assignments this term. Visits to museums and galleries will contribute to experience. In addition to researching and writing up your contextual notes for these assignments and visits you will be expected to research, write and produce a short written essay from clear guidelines. It is important that you develop your historical knowledge and contextual understanding in the context of your practical work. The unit will run throughout the entire semester and may comprise of a number of shorter assignments which you will complete in sequence. Following a short series of lectures relating to the fundamentals of visual language and colour you will be introduced to a series of thematic lectures summarising the history and development of a range of practices in art & design including lens based media (photography and moving image), graphic design & illustration (with animation) and printmaking. A survey of current practice in relevant design and communication fields will conclude the semesters programme. The sequence of the lecture programme will mirror the range of studio practice where practicable and knowledge and understanding will be reinforced through periodic seminars and debates within the studio regime. You will discuss and develop your contextual understanding in subject specific seminar groupings.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 A2 Introduce you to critical discourse through historical analysis. Introduce you to a range of contexts and discourse in contemporary art & design practice. Enable you to research, analyse, formulate and express an opinion about significant influences in the development of art or design history.

A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Express knowledge and understanding of key developments within the history of art & design. Identity key issues, themes and influences in a range of contemporary art & design practice. Relate your theoretical understanding to practical work. Research, evaluate and present a written analysis and argument according to defined academic conventions.

LO2

LO3 LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefings and introductory presentations throughout the semester. Lecturers at which you should make notes and follow up with research and enquiry Library research and study skills. Seminars, group critiques and peer group review/debate. Educational visits to museums and galleries. Library research Tutorial guidance and feedback from formative/summative assessment. Independent study.

Assessment Requirement Three components are required and are weighted as follows: An annotated sketchbook of visual and written contextual research and material showing completion of the set/themed briefs within the unit. This may be in common with your submission for Visual language unit and Media & materials unit. (20%) An A4 file of lecture notes and record of your visits to galleries and museums (20%). Supporting notes and research for your essay. A written essay of min 1500 words which should be bound, illustrated and with a full bibliography The theme of your essay will be discussed and agreed with you in consultation with your tutor and will reflect some aspect of the history, key developments and practice in your subject or closely related field. (60%).

Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work that demonstrates: Knowledge of: Criticism and theory (LO1& LO2)

Understanding through the application of: Research (LO2) Deduction and criticism (LO2 & LO3)

Technical and Applied skills through: Professional skills (LO3 & LO4) Managing self (LO3& LO4)

Reference Material

Gombrich, E.H., (1995) The Story of Art, Phaidon Hughes, Robert, (1991) The Shock of the New: art and the century of change, Thames & Hudson Raizman, David, (2003) History of Modern Design, Laurence King Collings, Mathew, (1999) This is Modern Art, Weiderfield & Nicholson) Rush, Michael, (2003) Video Art, Thames & Hudson)

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Ideas in Practice MGEN0003 Maidstone Stage 0, 15 credits Semester 1 15 weeks 150 April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit will follow on from an interim tutorial point in which you will have had the opportunity to discuss your responses to previous set projects. Having identified and discussed the strengths and weakness in your work, this unit will through a short sequence of set projects, allow you to begin to apply your skills knowledge and understanding in the broad context of specialist study. The unit will introduce you to the working process by which you will be able to generate and develop original ideas. You will draw on your newly acquired command of visual language, media and materials in order to express and communicate appropriate visual statements and solutions. You will explore the methodology of creating new ideas. How to analyse the essence of a set brief, identify key issues, brainstorm lines of enquiry and to begin to focus visual and textual research to support and inform your emerging ideas. You will document your thinking process in your sketchbook which must be annotated and include an increasingly reflective and analytical dimension. The brief in this unit will be open to wide interpretation and you will be encouraged to develop creative strategies to produce individual and innovative responses to the issues. You will be encouraged to discuss your ideas at key stages within the group.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 A2 A3 A4 Explore the meaning and possibilities in set briefs Appreciate the creative potential of critical discussion and peer group interaction. Examine the strategies for generating and developing original ideas. Equip you to take increasing responsibility for devising and managing a personal working methodology.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 LO2 LO3 Identify and analyse key issues in a brief. Engage in a critical exchange of ideas with your peers. Create and document original ideas and solutions

Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefing and introductory presentation Practical project work in the studios and workshops. Seminars, group critiques and peer group review/debate Individual or group visits to museums, galleries and locations from which to study and work Library research Tutorial guidance and feedback from formative/summative assessment Independent study

Assessment Requirement One submission which must include the following: An annotated sketchbook of visual and written research and material showing completion of the set/themed briefs within the unit. This may be in common with your submission for Visual language, Media & materials unit and some of your Critical and contextual study unit. (100%)

Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work that demonstrates: Knowledge of: Concepts (LO1) Understanding through the application of: Deduction & criticism (LO1) Evaluation & reflection (LO1 & LO2)

Technical and Applied skills through: Team working (LO2) Managing self (LO3)

Reference Material Dexter, Emma, (2005) Vitamin D: New perspectives in drawing, (Phaidon) Busch, Akiko, (2002) Design is.. words, things, people, buildings and places at metropolis, Princeton Architectural Press Hoptman, Laura, (2002) Drawing Now: eight propositions, Museum of Modern Art, New York Packard, Vance, (1991) The Hidden Persuaders, Penguin

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Specialist Practice Text & Image MGEN0005 Maidstone Stage 0, 30 credits Semester 2 8 weeks 300 April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit will introduce you directly to the creative and practical boundaries, constraints and interfaces relating to your degree study. In this unit you must complete one themed set project in text and image. You will research ideas and work towards an outcome reflecting modes of practice in your subjects. The projects will enable you to begin to personalise your approach to interests, ideas and working methods and you will progressively work more independently, and you will continue to work in an exploratory and speculative manner. You will be encouraged to draw together and synthesise your previous knowledge and understanding and engage with aspects of specialist practice which the emphasis on the acquisition of skills and experience in the previous semester did not permit. Group discussion and seminars will foster the critical exchange of ideas and influences and will be an important aspect of this unit. You will also be expected to write a short essay to given guidelines demonstrating research and critical enquiry related to your studio practice. The unit will run throughout the first part of the semester but may comprise of a number of shorter assignments which you will complete in sequence. The brief will offer you a line of conceptual and critical enquiry leading to a choice of outcomes reflecting the use of text and image. Through an analysis of the communication process you will investigate the construction and deconstruction of images and the potential for relationship and interdependency with letterform to convey information and meaning. The fundamentals of graphic design will be explored.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 A2 Begin to undertake sustained study in the context of a graphic design. Pursue the potential of applying a range of media, materials, techniques and processes within the context of your specialist study.

A3 Develop research skills and critical judgement in the context of your specialist study.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Explain the basic terminology, working methods and modes of practice of your subject. Translate ideas and communicate meaning in the context of your specialist study. Apply process and knowledge to develop outcomes. Research, evaluate and present a written analysis of historical/contemporary practice related to your practical interests.

LO2 LO3 LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefings and introductory presentations Practical work in the studios and workshops Seminars, group critiques and peer group review/debate Educational visits to museums, galleries and locations from which to study and work Library research Tutorial guidance and feedback from formative/summative assessment Independent study.

Assessment Requirement Two components are required and are weighted as follows: An annotated sketchbook/body of work containing visual and written research and other material demonstrating completion of the set/themed briefs within the unit. You must include background context, historical references awareness of contemporary practice, ideas development supported with technical investigations appropriate to the work e.g. proofs, visuals, mock-ups, storyboards, sound tracks etc. The annotations must show evidence of reflection and evaluation of your ideas and work. (70%) Supporting notes and research for your essay. A written essay of min 2000 words which should be bound, illustrated and with a full bibliography. (30%)

(Combined submission 100%) Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work that demonstrates: Knowledge of: Contemporary practice (LO2) Technologies & processes (LO1)

Understanding through the application of: Research (LO4) Evaluation & reflection (LO3)

Technical and Applied skills through: Relevant equipment & tools (LO3) Managing self (LO3 & LO4)

Reference Material

Baines, Phil, (2005), Type and Typography, Lawrence King Lupton, Ellen (2004) Thinking With Type: a critical guide for designers, writers, editors and students, Princeton Architectural Press Poynor, Rick, (2003) No More Rules: graphic design and post modernism, Laurence King Saunders, Gill, (2006) Prints Now: directions and definitions, V&A Sidley, Tessa, ((2003) Editions Alecto: original graphics, multiple originals 1960-81, Lund Humphries Catalogue (1990) Picasso Linocuts, Marlborough Graphics

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Portfolio & Progression Project MGEN0006 Maidstone Stage 0, 30 credits Semester 2 7 weeks 300 April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit will conclude your semester and year. It will prepare you to move on to Stage 1 of your degree course and indicate the nature of your interests. Building on your broader study in the last unit and consolidating further the application of previous learning from the first semester you will take much of the responsibility for identifying and managing your final project of the year. With tutorial support and guidance you will select an approach to the thematic brief set for the unit and prepare a short written proposal to clarify your research sources, working methodology and expected outcome(s). You must negotiate and plan the use of supporting resources and outline you time management. You will continue to explore the potential of text and image and further investigate the potential within your initial selection. However there is some opportunity for students to seek redirection and all students are encouraged to maintain a speculative approach to enquiry, ideas and outcomes. Group discussion and interim seminars will continue to foster the critical exchange of ideas and influences and will be an important aspect of this unit. At the end of the unit you will be expected to write a short evaluation of your project and if appropriate present your work. Whilst the theme of text & image will offer broad and overarching guidance you will be encouraged to identify a line of conceptual and critical enquiry reflecting a more personal and selective outcome. These may include the theory and practice around any or several of; narrative, sequential and editorial illustration; packaging, advertising, editorial and web design; documentary, animation and multimedia.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 A2 A3 Consolidate and synthesise substantial previous learning. Develop an understanding of the theory specific to support individual practice. Research and develop a range of proposals for a project and produce a body of work reflecting an individually managed study plan. Evaluate and present a body of work

A4

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 Plan and manage a personal project proposal. Document and record research to develop a range of coherent ideas Consolidate and evaluate an individual body of work. Organise and present a body of work reflecting personal theoretical and practical enquiry.

Teaching and Learning Methods Project briefing and introductory presentation Practical work in the studios and workshops Seminars, group critiques and peer group review/debate Self initiated educational visits to museums, galleries and locations from which to study and work Library research Tutorial guidance and feedback from formative/summative assessment Independent study

Assessment Requirement Two components are required as follows: An annotated sketchbook/body of work containing visual and written research and other material supporting completion of the set/themed brief within the unit. You must include background context, historical references awareness of contemporary practice, ideas development supported with technical investigations appropriate to the work eg proofs, visuals, mock-ups, storyboards, sound tracks etc. The annotations must show evidence of reflection and evaluation of your ideas and work. A full bibliography of references sources used in this unit. Presentation of a completed project and a short evaluative statement.

(Combined submission 100%)

Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work that demonstrates: Knowledge of: Context (LO1)

Understanding through the application of: Research (LO2) Evaluation & reflection (LO3)

Technical and Applied skills through: Professional skills (LO4) Managing self (LO1& LO4)

Reference Material Students should identify their own reference and reading list/bibliography as part of their project proposal for this unit. The bibliography must be submitted a long with practical work for assessment.

Stage 1 Unit Descriptors


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Unit Descriptor
Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Typography, Letterform and Sense of Place MGRD1001 Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 1 weeks 1- 5 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version Content and Syllabus

April 2007 April 2007

This unit investigates visual identity concentrating on how typography and letterform contribute to the construction of graphic language and a sense of place. It enables you to visually introduce yourself to your cohort whilst also commenting on identity in a broader cultural context. You are introduced to ways in which meaning can be constructed and created through typography, letterform and image, and a technical grounding in typography is combined with a visually experimental and explorative approach to letterform. Emphasis is placed on the development of a research methodology, and the importance of systematically documenting ideas and visual research through a sketchbook. You will extend practical and critical communication skills and give oral and visual presentations of your work. Workshops introduce printmaking and appropriate software programmes. A study trip during induction week will require you to work in small groups to collect visual data and explore research methodologies. A critique/presentation of all research work undertaken in sketchbooks will take place during the first week of the unit. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Encourage an informed critical approach to your own work and that of others, as well as practical and critical communication skills. Introduce you to applied visual research and analysis and methodologies to realise a creative outcome. Enable a broad understanding of how typography and image can create meaning, while introducing you to the fundamental aspects of typography, encouraging you to experiment and explore relationships between type and images. Enable you to develop strategies to effectively manage time and develop skills as an independent learner. Enable you to develop presentation, and communication skills, and introduce you to the software, tools, materials and processes used in graphic design.

A2

A3

A4

A5

Learning Outcomes At the end of this unit you will be expected to be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Effectively and appropriately use visual research strategies through evidence of sketchbooks and visual data collection. Experiment with a variety of media and techniques to explore typographic forms, meanings and demonstrate a basic understanding of typographic terminology and letterform. Be able to employ presentation techniques competently in order to communicate ideas and concepts. Critically evaluate and analyse your own work and that of others. Implement basic skills in the use of appropriate computer software. Manage your own time and develop skills as an independent learner.

LO2

LO3

LO4 LO5 LO6

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Group tutorials Student independent learning Peer evaluation Formative and summative assessment feedback Study Trip Critique

Assessment Requirement Two components are required and are weighted as follows: Sketchbook and research demonstrating insight and process into the creative outcome; 50% Completed project; 50%

Assessment criteria You should present a body of work, which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes An awareness and understanding of how images convey meaning, and the critical and contextual dimensions of the students discipline. (L02) Appropriate technologies, methods and processes are identified (L02, L05)

Understanding through application of knowledge An effective visual research methodology, employing both convergent and divergent thinking is demonstrated. (L01) Relevant knowledge of typography and letterforms is compared, contrasted, manipulated, translated and interpreted. (L02) Creative, imaginative and conceptual skills are demonstrated to generate ideas. (L01, L02)

Application of Technical and applied skills Appropriate levels of technical skills, employing materials, media, techniques, methods, technologies and tools associated with their discipline are demonstrated whilst observing good working practices. Self-management and independent learning are demonstrated. (L06) Presentation and communication skills (the ability to articulate ideas and information comprehensibly in visual, oral and written forms) are effectively demonstrated (L04, L03)

Reference Material Essential Blackwell, Lewis and Wild, Lorraine (2000) Edward Fella : letters on America, photographs and lettering, Blackwell, King Lupton, Ellen, (2004) Thinking with Type, New York: Princeton Architectural Press Baines, Phil, Haslam, Andrew, (2005) Type and Typography, Laurence King Baines, Phil, Dixon, Catherine, (2003) Signs: Lettering in the Environment, Laurence King Recommended Carter, R, Day, B, Meggs, P, (2007) Typographic, Design, Form and Communication, Hoboken, NJ, John Wiley Meggs, Philip, (1992) Type and Image, Van Nostrand Reinhold Peterson, Bryan, L, (2003) Basics to get Creative Results, How Design Heller, S, Llic, Mirco, (2004) Handwritten: Expressive Lettering in the Digital Age, Thames and Hudson Poynor, Rick, (2003) No More Rules, Laurence King Gerber, Anna, (2004) All Messed Up: Unpredictable Graphics, London: Laurence King Suggested Articles Roberts, Lucienne, (2003) Literacy in Graphic Design (parts 1 & 2), Eye 3 Mayer, Peter, (1998) Visual Prose, Eye 30 Poynor, Rick, (1999) The Designer as Architect: The Book as Spectacle, Eye 32 Kitching, Alan, Argent, Patrick, (1999) Typographic Timelord, Baseline 29 Bailey, Nicola, (2001) Distressed Letters, Baseline 34

Baines, Phil, (2000) Sculptured Letters and Public Poetry, Eye 37 Rogers, Stuart, (2003) Concientious Scrawl, Baseline 40 Poynor, Rick, (1995) Other Spaces, Eye 25 Wilkins, Bridget, Type and Image, Octavo 90.7 Gerber, Anna, (2001) Honour Thy Error, Eye 41, Blackwell, Lewis, (2000) Character Witness, Creative Review, August Heller, Steven, (1993) The Cult of the Ugly, Eye 9 Poynor, Rick, (1999) Surface Wreckage, Eye 34

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Letterform, Message, and Meaning MGRD1002 Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 1 - weeks 6 10 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit further explores typography and the relationship of language to visual communication. You are introduced to how meaning can be contructed through type, letterform and image and also the historical context of type and basic skills. Initially the unit asks you to extend a visually experimental and explorative approach to typography, where emphasis is placed on the development of a research methodology, and the importance of systematically documenting ideas and visual research through the use of sketchbooks. Later the unit asks you to consider the relationship of language to typography and the potential of language to be utilised by communication designers to control a message. Emphasis is placed on how typography can be used both creatively and conceptually to mediate the meaning of language. Typographical fundamentals, technical and software skills and the historical context of contemporary digital typography are also studied.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 Extend your ability to develop an informed critical approach to your own work and that of others, as well as practical and critical communication skills. Provide you with the opportunity to consider the relationship of language and typography to visual communication and the potential of the designer to mediate the meaning of language. Extend your ability to experiment and explore relationships between type and images, and provide you with further understanding of typography and the historical context Enable you to extend strategies to effectively manage time and develop skills as an independent learner. Extend and further develop technical, presentation, communication and creative research skills.

A2

A3

A4

A5

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 LO2 LO3 Develop and apply an efficient research and analysis methodology to a creative outcome and demonstrate independent learning and self-management. Understand how typography and letterform can mediate the meaning of language. Critically evaluate the role of typography and letterforms in a broader cultural sense and an informed crtical approach to your work through personal research and the development of visual ideas. Appraise the historical context of typography and the typographical fundamentals that underpin new approaches. Demonstrate appropriate creative and technical competence commensurate with this level.

LO4 LO5

Teaching and Learning Methods In order to achieve the aims of this unit you will learn through the following ways: Briefings Group Tutorials Study Visit Discussion seminar Independent Study Peer Evaluation Critique presentation to peers and tutors, formative and summative assessment feedback.

Assessment Requirement One submission (100%) is required that must include these components: Completed project work Supporting material

Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes Relevant contextual and theoretical facts and issues surrounding the use of typography by the graphic designer to mediate meaning have been explored and demonstrated. (L02, L03) Appropriate technologies, methods and processes have been identified. (L05) A critical understanding of the role of typography and letterform in a broader cultural and historical sense has been demonstrated. (L03)

Understanding through application of Knowledge Efficient research and analysis methodologies have been identified to produce a creative outcome. (L01) Typographic knowledge has been compared, contrasted, manipulated, translated and interpreted to solve the communication problem. (L01, L02)

Application of technical and profesional skills Appropriate materials and processes are selected, to realise and present ideas and solutions. (L05) Appropriate software, methods and processes are competently demonstrated. (L05) Self-management and independent learning are demonstrated. (L01)

Reference Material Essential Speikermann, Eric, (2003) Stop Stealing Sheep and Find Out How Type Works, Berkeley: Adobe Press Baines, Phil, Haslam, Andy, (2005) Type and Typography, Laurence King Skolos, Nancy, (2006) Type, Image, Message, Gloucester: Rockport Ruder, Emil, (1977) Typography, Hastings House Swann Cal, (1991) Language and Typography, Lund Humphries

Recommended Reading Triggs, Teal, (2003) The Typographic Experiment: Radical Innovation in Contemporary Type Design, Thames and Hudson Poynor, Rick, (2001) Typographica, Laurence King Blackwell, Lewis, (2000) The End of Print: the Grafik Design of David Carson, Laurence King Spencer, Herbert, (1968) The Visible Word, Lund Humphries Spencer, Herbert, (1982) Pioneers of Modern Typography, Lund Humphries Spencer, Herbert, (1990) The Liberated Page, Lund Humphries Tschichold, Jan, (1995) The New Typography, University of California Press Muller, Lars, (2002), Helvetica: Homage to a Typeface, Lars Muller Publishing

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Sign, Symbol and Meaning MGRD1003 Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 1 weeks 11 - 15 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

Sign, symbol and Meaning is a unit designed to help you learn how to think, to communicate better and to introduce you to how signs and symbols rapidly communicate meaning. They are visual shorthand for communicating universal concepts with much more richness than words alone, and so this unit develops knowledge and skills to enable you to design symbols and icons to represent a complete thought or object in a simple way. A symbol is usually an image or physical object that represents something intangible, hard to define, or rich in meaning. In many cases the symbol must convey ideas rather than literal translations of physical objects. You will explore the essentials of symbol design - semantics, syntax and functionality and examine visual forms as signifiers of meaning. Cultural, psychological, social, and historical interpretations of forms are analysed through a series of design exercises, readings, discussion, and research. This unit also further explores notions of identity concentrating on how pictographic, and abstract marks contribute to the construction of a graphic language. Digital workshops continue with a more advanced look at Adobe Illustrator, and visual theory lectures support the theoretical aspects of the unit. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Establish an understanding of the essentials of symbol design (semantics, syntax, and functionality), and the importance of visual forms as signifiers of meaning and notions of identity. Extend visual research methodolgies and an informed critical approach to your work. Develop your skills in visual representation, thinking and the communication of concepts, ideas and actions by symbolic means. Extend technical, software, and presentational skills. Examine the historical and social significance of symbols and signs.

A2 A3 A4 A5

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 Develop and apply an efficient research and analysis methodology to a creative outcome, demonstrating self-management and independent learning. Discuss notions of identity and meaning and how it can be communicated through signs, symbols and icons. Critically appraise the role of signs and symbols in a broader historical and cultural sense. Demonstrate appropriate technical competence with more advanced use of software, methods and processes

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Group Tutorials Discussion seminar Independent Study Peer Evaluation Critique presentation to peers and tutors, formative and summative assessment feedback.

Assessment Requirement Three components are required and are weighted as follows: Studio Exercises 30% Sketchbook and process work for final assignment 20% Final Assignment 50% Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes Relevant contextual and theoretical facts and issues relating to symbol design are identified, defined and described in the supporting materials. (L02, L03) Appropriate design methods and processes are identified and used in designing symbols sketchbooks, layout pads, generation of ideas, refining ideas etc. (L01)

Understanding through application of Knowledge Research methodologies are demonstrated and a critical understanding of the role of signs and symbols in a broader cultural sense informs the development of creative ideas and creative outcomes. (L01, L02, L03)

Application of technical and profesional skills Appropriate technical competence using software and materials to realise and present ideas and design solutions. (L04) Competent use of vector based software, and digital printing processes are demonstrated. (L04) Self-management and independent learning are demonstrated. (L01)

Reference Material

Essential Frutiger, A, (1998) Signs and Symbols: Their design and Meaning, Ebury Press Dreyfuss, Henry, (1984) Symbol Source Book: An Authoratitive Guide to International Graphic symbols, Wiley Leborg, Christian, (2004) Visual Grammar, Princeton Recommended Poynor, Rick, (2004), Communicate: Independent British Graphic Design Since the Sixties, Laurence King Poynor, Rick, (2003), No More Rules: Graphic Design and Post Modernism, Laurence King Hollis Richard, (1994), Graphic Design, A Concise History, Thames and Hudson Triggs, Teal, (2003), The Typographic Experiment: Radical Innovation in Contemporary Type Design, Thames & Hudson

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Sign Culture 1: Constructing Meaning MVTH1001 Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 1 15 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit introduces you to the varieties of ways through which meaning is constructed within the visual image and to a range of theoretical approaches to its analysis. Through the exploration of examples from historical and contemporary practice and analysis of your studio work, a range of topics are examined. These may include basic concepts in semiotics, the relationship between word and image, the construction of narrative, photographic language, function and expression, culture connotation and myth, subversion and propaganda.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 Introduce you to the codes and conventions through which meaning is constructed within visual culture. Provide you with an understanding of theoretical concepts in analysis and discussion of the visual image. Develop your confidence in analysing and evaluating the visual image.

A2

A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Discuss and illustrate the way in which meaning is constructed within the visual image. Identify an understanding of the theoretical concepts and academic conventions in analysis and discuss visual images.

LO2

LO3

Express an awareness of a wide range of distinctive contemporary image-making strategies.

Teaching and Learning Methods Group seminars Tutored study visits Study skills support Independent study Summative assessment feedback Assessment Requirements One submission (100%) An essay of 2,000 words Assessment Criteria You should present an essay which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes The way in which meaning is constructed within the visual image. (LO1) An understanding of a basic set of theoretical framework concepts for the analysis and discussion of the visual image. (LO2)

Understanding through application of knowledge An awareness of a wide range of distinctive contemporary image-making strategies. (LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills

The ability to articulate ideas and information comprehensibly in written form using appropriate academic conventions. (LO2) Recommended Reading Additional seminar-related material is included in the seminar outlines. Chandler, Daniel (2002) Semiotics the Basics, London: Routledge Crow, David (2003) Visible Signs, London: AVA Publishing Fiske, John (1983) Key Concepts in Communication, London: Methuen Hall, Stuart (1997) Representation: Cultural Representations & Signifying Practices, London: Jobling, Paul & Crowley, David (1996) Graphic Design: Reproduction & Representation Since 1800

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Extended Practice Elective MEXE1--Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 2 weeks 1 5 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version Content and Syllabus

April 2007 April 2007

In this unit you choose from a series of individual electives each offering a distinct experience in a practical area outside your own subject, where you will be asked to respond to a given theme. Indicative electives might include: animation, photography, video, printmaking, bookworks, web development, sound, video, etc. The elective encourages you to extend your practice in Stage 1 by engaging with media/processes outside your subject area. You will be introduced to new skills (conceptual, and technical) that will enable you to evaluate your practice from an alternative viewpoint. Within this experimental context, you will begin the process of broadening your practice and identifying new working methodologies. Aims This unit aims to: A1 A2 A3 Enable you to acquire new skills with which to extend and broaden your practice. Facilitate experimentation and the application of media and processes. Provide an environment where you are able to develop practical and conceptual skills in relationship to a thematic brief. Help you to develop the skills required to be an independent learner: i.e. initiative, project planning and time-management.

A4

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Expand your practice through the use of new skills/processes and their applications. LO2 Engage with experimentation, in terms of concept, form and technique.

LO3

Respond to a thematic brief and develop a project through practice-based and library research. Apply independent learning strategies by the use of initiative, planning and timemanagement.

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Skills Workshops, including health and safety procedures. Group tutorials Critique presentation to peers and staff Student independent learning Self assessment Summative assessment feedback

Assessment Requirement One submission (100%) which must include these components: Completed project work Supporting material

Assessment Criteria You should present your project work and support material which demonstrates:

Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes An awareness of expanded practice through the effective use of new skills/processes and their applications. (LO1)

Understanding through application of knowledge An engagement with conceptual, formal and technical experimentation. (LO2) An ability to respond to a thematic brief and develop a project through practice-based and library research (LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills Effective project management via independent learning strategies. (LO4)

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Structure, Space and Grids MGRD1004 Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 2 weeks 6 - 10 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus

This unit asks you to explore the practical, historical and contextual importance of grids, structure and space within graphic design and also investigate more broadly the role of structure in the wider cultural context of the visual arts and other design practices. Within a broad theme of understanding the importance of the subject to artists and designers this unit initially focuses on documentation and investigation where drawing is explored as a medium for study. A carefully planned Study Trip will enable you to focus your research on a specific chosen location that demonstrates strongly the use of grids, structure and space and then hopefully act as a catalyst for the second stage of the unit. In addition to the primary research listed above, your sketchbooks should demonstrate an enquiry into the discourse surrounding structure. This should include references to the reading list and an evaluation of found material that shows an understanding of the subject. During the second stage of the unit you will be required to create a print based final piece that interprets and communicates grids and structure and its importance to artists and designers while at the same time creatively utilises structure in its design. As this unit initially places emphasis on investigation, it is therefore important that you evidence all research from your explorations from the Study Trip, as it is intended that the research and process work will inform your ideas for the final piece. Technical and software skills workshops will complement the unit study

Aims This unit aims to: A1 Further extend and refine visual research introduced in the previous units, particularly the role of documentary and investigative research, and reinforce drawing as an important medium for documentation and investigation. Extend practical and critical communication skills, exploring the historical and contextual importance of grids and structure within graphic design, the visual arts and other design practices. Extend creative and technical skills in the execution of a self initiated design solution.

A2

A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Develop an efficient research and analysis methodology to a creative outcome, recognising drawing as an important medium for documentation and investigation as evidenced in the sketchbook. Relate a critical understanding of the role of grids and structure in a broader historical and cultural sense and an informed approach to your work through personal research and the development of visual ideas. Further extend creative and technical competence, employing materials, media, techniques, methods and tools associated with the discipline consistent with good practices. Experience independent learning, goal setting, and time management to meet deadlines.

LO2

LO3

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Study visit to London Group tutorials Presentation events Independent learning Peer evaluation Formative and summative assessment feedback Critique

Assessment Requirement One submission (100%) is required which must include these components: Sketchbook and Research Materials Final Piece Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates:

Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes Relevant contextual and theoretical facts are identified, defined and described in the execution of an outcome, together with a critical understanding of the role of grids and structure in art and design. (L02) Appropriate technologies, methods and processes have been identified. (L03, L01)

Understanding through application of knowledge

The application of an effective research methodology, demonstrating the ability to analyse information and experiences, formulate independent judgements, and articulate reasoned argument through reflection, review and evaluation. (L01) Creative ideas and concepts have been generated through drawing and process work through drawing, observation, investigation, speculative enquiry and visualisation. (L01, L03)

Application of technical and professional skills Appropriate materials and media are selected, tested and utilised to realise a creative concept within the parameters of the design problem. (L03) Appropriate technologies and software are used effectively and competently. (L03) The ability to self-initiate concepts, self-management and independent learning are demonstrated. (L04) Reference Material Essential Roberts, Lucienne, Thrift, Julia, (2005) The designer and the grid, Rotovision Samara, Timothy, (2003) Making and Breaking the Grid, Rockport Publishing Muller-Brockmann, Josef (1996) Grid Systems in Graphic Design, Zurich: Niggli Muller, Lars, (1995), Josef Muller-Brockmann: designer - a pioneer of Swiss graphic design, Lars Muller Elam, Kimberly (2004) Grid Systems, Princeton Architectural Press Recommended Tschichold, Jan, (1967), Asymmetric Typography, Faber and Faber Cohen, Arthur A. (1984), Herbert Bayer: The Complete Work , MIT Press Elam, Kimberly (2001), Geometry of Design: Studies in Proportion and Composition, Princeton Architectural Press Lupton, Ellen (2004) Thinking with Type, Princeton Architectural Press Hurlburt, Allen (1982) The Grid, Wiley

Articles El Lissitzky, Baseline No 44 2004, the Swiss, P. 13 - 20 Baseline No 40 2004, Principles, Grids and Stylesheets - the Typographic Designer as Lifesaver, P 25 - 28 Eye No 26 Vol 7 Autumn 1977, Sound, Code, Image, P. 24 Creative Review, The DIY Issue; October 2001, Michael in Dreamland, P. 30

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Narrative and Sequence - Screen Based Design MGRD1005 Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 2 weeks 11 -15 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This final unit of the semester introduces narrative, sequence and interactivity as thematic concepts that can be applied to a screen based design outcome. You will be will be asked to consider how visual language, such as words, images, materials, format and structure can support narrative. The paradigm of interactive, screen-based design, will be explored where you will consider how communication can be determined by the interplay between information, visualisation, visual navigation, and audience. The unit will also introduce the notion of graphic authorship by asking you to consider the possibilities that this presents by producing a self-initiated outcome within stated parameters. The unit allows for the synthesis of design skills-image making, typography, grids and structure, sign, symbol and meaning - realised in previous level 1 units and continues with digital media workshops which will introduce appropriate specialist web based software.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 Extend and reinforce the importance of an appropriate research methodology to underpin creative outcomes when dealing with more complex information, and to investigate structure, narrative, sequence and interactivity within the context of a self-initiated project. Introduce you to the basic software used in the creation of web based solutions. Explore ideas (through a series of readings and discussion) about the nature of communication in words and images that will serve as a foundation for understanding narrative, sequence and contemporary interaction design.

A2 A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Write an effective self initiated brief identifying a target audience, and communication strategy, demonstrating written, verbal and presentation skills.

LO2

Demonstrate an efficient systematic and analytical creative methodology in the solution of a communication problem that is screen based and uses basic principles of narrative, sequence and visual navigation. Use appropriate technical competence and software in the production of a design solution and screen-based presentation. Practice effective self-management and independent learning.

LO3

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures Seminars Digital workshops Briefings Group tutorials Presentations Critique Independent learning Peer evaluation Formative assessment

Assessment Requirement Two components are required and are weighted as follows: A statement of intent (Brief) /sketchbook and process work Completed screen based project Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes An understanding of the basic principles of narrative, sequence and visual navigation has been demonstrated. (LO2) An understanding of your role as author of your own work has been demonstrated (LO1) Appropriate technologies, methods and processes are identified. (LO3) 25% 75%

Understanding through application of knowledge Research methodologies are demonstrated, and visual information is selected, analysed, synthesised and evaluated in order to generate a creative screen-based outcome. (LO1, LO2, LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills Creative and effective use of the screen-based medium is used to communicate a narrative, managing and exploiting the interaction between intention, process, outcome, context and the methods of dissemination. (LO2, LO3) Effective presentation and self-management skills are used demonstrating skills in communication and presentation the ability to articulate ideas and information comprehensibly in visual, oral and written forms. (LO1, LO4) Appropriate software and technologies, methods and processes are demonstrated. (LO3)

Reference Material Essential Fletcher, Alan, (2001) The Art of Looking Sideways, Phaidon Press Macdonald, Nico, (2003) What is Web Design, Roto Vision Studio 7.5 (E-design), (2002) Navigation for the Internet and Other Digital Media, Ava Publishing Tufte, Edward R, (1997) Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative, Graphics Press

Recommended Gotz, Veruschka, (2002) Grids for the Internet & Other Digital Media, AVA Publishing Hall, Peter, (2001), Sagmeister: Made You Look, Booth-Clibborn, New Ed edition Lloyd, Ian J, (2006) Build Your first Website The Right Way Using HTML & CSS, SitePoint Walter, Shane (2006) Motion Blur Onedotzero Graphic Moving Imagemakers, Laurence King, Bk & DVD edition OReilly, John, (2002) No Brief: Graphic Designers Personal Projects (Pro Graphics), Rockport Publishers Shepter, Joe, (2002) Personal Web Sites Top Designers Push the Boundaries with Experimental Design and Graphics, Rockport Publishers Inc

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Sign Culture 2: Meaning in Context MVTH1002 Maidstone Stage 1, 15 credits Semester 2 15 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit develops the exploration of the visual sign initiated in Sign Culture 1 but in the broader context of the place of graphic design in culture and society. The unit considers questions around the impact of developing technologies and media, ideas about site and audience, and ideology and ethics. It explores the cultural contexts within which the visual image is produced and consumed in contemporary society and addresses some of the social and political issues underpinning contemporary design practice. Topics may include: technologies of reproduction, digital culture, new media contexts, consumption and commodification, gender issues, globalisation, ethics in design. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Develop the exploration of the visual sign in the broader context of the place of graphic design in culture and society. Provide you with an understanding of how developing technology and media affect the practice of graphic design. Develop confidence in your ability to analyse and evaluate the visual image.

A2

A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Critically evaluate an understanding of the cultural contexts within which contemporary graphic design operates. Criticise the key social and political issues implicit in graphic design practice. Utilise a theoretical framework and vocabulary to analyse and evaluate graphic design in written form.

LO2 LO3

Teaching and Learning Methods Group seminars Tutored study visits Study skills support Independent study Summative assessment feedback

Assessment Requirement One submission (100%) is required: An essay of 2000 words Assessment Criteria You should present an essay which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes: The critical and contextual dimensions of the discipline including cultural, political, societal, and theoretical contexts. (LO1) An understanding of a basic set of theoretical framework concepts for the analysis and discussion of graphic design. (LO2)

Understanding through application of knowledge: An awareness of a wide range of distinctive contemporary image-making strategies. (LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills: The ability to articulate ideas and information comprehensibly in written form using appropriate academic conventions. (LO3)

Recommended Reading Additional seminar-related material is included in the seminar outlines. Lupton, Ellen (1999) Design Writing Research, London: Phaidon Poynor, Rick (2006) Designing Pornotopia, London: Laurence King Publishing Poynor, Rick (2003) No More Rules: Graphic Design and Postmodernism, London: Laurence King Publishing Williamson, Judith (1978) Decoding Advertisements, London: Marion Boyers

Stage 2 Unit Descriptors

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

The Extended Page / The Editorial Process MGRD2001 Maidstone Stage 2, 30 credits Semester 3 weeks 1 10 10 weeks 300 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit consolidates and develops the creative, graphic, typographic and technical skills from stage 1 and provides the opportunity for you to explore the visualisation of complex information within the context of a guided, self-initiated editorial design brief. By exploring a variety of approaches and by developing a systematic and analytical creative methodology, you will be able to visualise a creative concept supported by written and verbal material. Proportion, grids, systems, hierarchies, and other layout issues will again be explored in the process of envisioning information and contructing meanings. The structuring of a wide range of visual (and other) material will explore how designers organise sound, time, space and concepts.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 Reinforce the importance of an appropriate methodology to underpin creative outcomes when dealing with complex information, and to further investigate structure, narrative, sequence and graphic systems within the context of an editorial design project. Write an effective and professional self-initiated design brief with a target audience within the given editorial design context. Provide the opportunity for a specialist focus for your work, developing further creative, typographic, and technical skills.

A2 A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to:

LO1

Write an effective self-initiated brief identifying a target audience within an editorial design context, demonstrating effective written, verbal and self-management skills. Implement an efficient systematic and analytical creative methodology in the solution of a communication problem to a specific target audience. Create original concepts and ideas by evaluating and utilising appropriate grids and document structures to solve the communication problem. Use competently appropriate technical software, materials and processes in the production of a design solution and presentation.

LO2

LO3

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Group Tutorials Discussion Seminar Independent Study Self Evaluation Critique presentation to peers and tutors, formative and summative assessment feedback.

Assessment Requirement Two components are required and are weighted as follows: A statement of intent (project brief /sketchbook and process Completed project 75% Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes The critical and contextual dimensions of editorial design are identified, and creativity and originality have been demonstrated in the concepts and ideas presented. (LO3) 25%

Understanding through application of knowledge An effective self-initiated brief has been produced which identifies a target audience and demonstrates a sound understanding of the communication problem. (LO1) Management and exploitation of the interaction between intention, process, outcome, context and the methods of dissemination are demonstrated.(LO2)

Application of technical and professional skills Sufficient technical knowledge, methods, processes and expertise within editorial design have been demonstrated to realise intentions. (LO4)

Effective presentation and self-management skills have been demonstrated. (LO1) The ability to articulate ideas and information comprehensibly in visual, oral and written forms has been demonstrated. (LO1, LO2, LO3 , LO4)

Reference Material Essential Roberts, Lucienne, (2005), The Designer and the Grid, Rotovision Samara, Timothy, (2002), Making and Breaking the Grid, Gloucester: Rockport King, Stacey, (2001), Magazine Design that Works, Gloucester, MA: Rockport Ambrose, Gavin, (2005), Layout, Lausannne: AVA Publishing Moser, Horst, (2003), The Art Directors Handbook of Professional Magazine Design, Thames and Hudson

Recommended Andersson, Patrick & Steedman, Judith, (2002), Inside Magazines, Thames & Hudson Owen, William, (1991), Magazine Design, Laurence King Kalman, Maira, (2002), Colors Issues 1-13, The Tibor Kalman Years, Thames & Hudson Lasn, Kalle, (2006) Design Anarchy, Adbusters Jones, Terry, (1997), Catching the Moment, Booth Clibborn Editions Leslie, Jeremy, (2000), Issues: New Magazine Design, Laurence King

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Work Experience Elective MEXE2001 Maidstone Stage 2, 15 Credits Semester 3 15 Weeks 150

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit affords you the opportunity to explore the world of professional practice, by offering the option of a short work experience, or a live brief that includes amongst other possibilities planning and delivering workshops to students or competition entry. However the emphasis of this unit is an investigation into the restrictions and requirements of context in which the real world works. It can be argued that all work takes place in an institutional context - a discourse of values and beliefs and asset of explicit and implicit rules. Taking a specific organisation and its discourse, either in the public or private sector, (for instance a museum, gallery, magazine, newspaper, advertising or press agency, studio, school, university, charity, NGO, etc.) as the object of enquiry you will examine the imperatives, constraints and pressures within which individuals negotiate their working circumstances, beliefs and values. You will arrange, subject to availability, to spend a portion of the unit study time on a short placement in your chosen site. Students are expected to take responsibility for the preparation and finding of an appropriate work experience (with support from tutors). Monitoring and co-ordination of the work experience will be done by the course team where possible. The outcome of your work would normally take the form of a body of work and a placement report, which not only documents the operation of the organisation within which you find yourself, but also how the environment in which the organisation operates (the explicit and implicit rules) affects the way it works. The unit will provide a platform for informed debate both on your own work and the way in which related industries and professions operate in a wider political, economical and social context. You will be expected to develop an understanding of the professional context and the career potential of your own work. At the end of this unit you will be expected to have clear ideas about your own future career path. The syllabus will include: Institutional structures and characteristics Discussion of examples Site identification and research

Placement organisational requirements Representational strategies Production objectives and methods Presentational method Critical review Review and appraisal Aims This unit aims to: A1 Develop a body of work which reflect an understanding of the institutional context for work. Afford the opportunity and the context for your management of a short placement. Encourage and practice constructive appraisal and self-appraisal. Develop an understanding of the restrictions and requirements of professional practice.

A2 A3 A4

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to: LO1 Develop a strategy for representing your understanding of a specific organisational working context Negotiate access to and engage the co-operation of a selected organisation. Define and express your views in debate Demonstrate an understanding of professional practice in your chosen area Evidence an ability to work, understanding the operation of and the opportunities presented by collaboration with external agencies Work collaboratively and to interact critically with others

LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5

LO6

Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, Site visits, Independent study and research, Critical review.

Assessment Requirement One submission (100%) which must include these components: A visual record of your work experience/placement/live brief that demonstrates an understanding of the work environment, revealing behind-the-scenes how the environment in which the organisation operates (the explicit and implicit rules) affects the way it works.

or

A short (approx 500 word) report. A workbook evidencing your organisation, negotiations, research and idea development.

A written (2,500 word) case study of your work experience/placement/live brief.

Assessment Criteria You should present your project work and support material which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes Specific institutional structures and characteristics are evidenced in your project (LO1)

Understanding through application of knowledge Evidence of an appropriate strategy has been established for representing your understanding of a specific institutional working context. (LO1) Negotiated access to, and gained the cooperation of a selected institution is evidenced. (LO2)

Application of technical and professional skills An ability to define and express your views in debate. (LO3) An ability to reflect professional practice in your chosen area. (LO4) Collaborative working practices. (LO6, LO5)

Reference Material Essential Foucault, Michel, (1999), Ideology and Consciousness, In: Mitchell, Dean, Governmentality: Power and Rule in Modern Society, pp 5-21, London: SAGE. Bourdieu, Pierre and Haacke, Hans, (1995), Free Exchange, London: Polity. Foucault, Michel, (1986), Disciplines and Sciences of the Individual, In: Foucault, Michel and Rabinow, Paul, The Foucault Reader, pp 169-256, London: Penguin. Hebdige, Dick, (1988), From Culture to Hegemony, In: Hebdige, Dick, Subculture: The Meaning of Style, pp 5-19, London: Routledge. Wolff, Janet, (1990), Texts and Institutions: Problems of Feminist Criticism, In: Woolf, Janet, Feminine Sentences: Essays on Women and Culture, pp 103-119, Oxford: Polity Press.

Recommended Reading Watney, Simon, (1986), On the Institutions of Photography, In: Holland, Patricia, Spence, Jo and Watney, Simon, (eds), Photography Politics: Two, pp.187-197, London: Comedia.
Langson, Sally, (2006), Life after Art and Design, Abingdon, Routledge Burtonwood, Tom, (2006) Perspectives on Practice, The Artists Information Company, Newcastle. Thomas, Gwen, (2006 or latest edition), Beyond the Lens, The Association of Photrographers, London. McCormack, Lee, (2005), Designers Are W***ers, About Face, London Shaughnessy, Adrian, (2005), How to be a Graphic Desiger Without Losing Your Soul, Laurence King Publishing Ltd.

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Extended Practice Elective MEXE2--Maidstone Stage 2, 15 credits Semester 3 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus In this unit you choose from a series of individual electives each offering a distinct experience in a practical area outside your own subject, where you will be asked to respond to a given theme. Indicative electives might include: animation, photography, video, printmaking, bookworks, web development, sound, video, etc. The elective encourages you to extend your practice by engaging with media/processes unfamiliar to you, thus facilitating a fluid process of exchange and dialogue. This opportunity allows for associative connections and an exploration of multiple perspectives and applications. The elective provides an experimental context which you will be able to investigate what is meant by interdisciplinary practice. In the end, the elective experience sets out to inform and broaden your developing independent practice and working methodologies. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Enable you to acquire new and supplementary skills with which to extend and broaden your practice. Facilitate experimentation and the application of media and processes. Provide an environment where you are able to develop practical and conceptual skills in relationship to a thematic brief, and be responsive to a context of unfamiliarity. Introduce you to concepts of interdisciplinarity in relationship to subject specificity. Help you further develop the skills required to be an independent learner: i.e. initiative, project planning and time-management. Help you develop your emerging practice for stage 2 in a context outside your subject.

A2 A3

A4 A5

A6

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Expand and develop your practice through the use of new and supplementary skills/processes and their applications. Further engage with experimentation and risk, in terms of concept, form and technique. Respond to a thematic brief and develop a project through practice-based and library research. Understand interdisciplinary practice in contemporary art and design, and how this relates to your own subject (breadth and depth). Extend and develop independent learning strategies by the use of initiative, planning and time-management.

LO2

LO3

LO4

LO5

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Skills Workshops, including health and safety procedures. Group tutorials Critique presentation to peers and staff Student independent learning Self assessment Summative assessment feedback

Assessment Requirement One submission (100%), which must include these components: Completed project work and supporting material

Assessment Criteria You should present your project work and support material which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes An awareness of expanded practice through the use of new and supplementary skills/processes and their applications. (LO1) An understanding of interdisciplinary practice in art and design and its relationship to your own subject (breadth and depth). (LO4)

Understanding through application of knowledge A further engagement with conceptual, formal and technical experimentation. (LO2) An ability to respond to a thematic brief and develop a project through practicebased and library research. (LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills Effective project management via the further development of independent learning strategies appropriate to stage 2. (LO5)

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Critical Histories MVTH2001 Maidstone Stage 2, 15 credits Semester 3 weeks 1 10 15 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit gives you a choice of one seminar programme from a series, each offering a distinctive critical history of art and design relevant to your practice. Programmes offered might include: experimental film and video; photography; graphic design; word and image; art, design and the future; illustration; reproduction. While options reflect individual staff research interests, they will all focus on the relationship between key historical movements and contemporary practice, helping you to recognise the historical precedents and references that enable you to analyse and evaluate contemporary art and design relevant to your practice, and give you the basic skills for undertaking historical research to support your practice. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Provide you with a historical framework in which to understand contemporary practice. Introduce you to key historical movements relevant to your practice. Familiarise you with the historical references that enable you to analyse and evaluate contemporary practice. Give you the basic skills for undertaking historical research to support your practice.

A2 A3

A4

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Understand key historical movements underpinning the development of your chosen form of practice. Respond to historical references implicit in contemporary practice. Research a historically-based topic and relate it to contemporary practice.

LO2 LO3

Teaching and Learning Methods Group seminars Group tutorials Student presentations Study skills support Student independent learning Study visits Peer assessment Summative assessment feedback

Assessment Requirements One submission (100%) which must include this component: An essay of 2,000 2,500 words Assessment Criteria You should present an essay which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes An understanding of the key historical movements and development of your chosen subject area. (LO1) An understanding of the impact of the history of the subject upon contemporary practice in your chosen subject area. (LO2)

Understanding through application of knowledge An ability to research a historical topic using a range of different sources. (LO3) An ability to analyse information and experience, and formulate clear arguments through reflection, review, and evaluation. (LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills An ability to articulate and communicate ideas in written form using appropriate academic conventions eg: appropriate style, punctuation, structure, footnotes and bibliographies. (LO1)

Reference Material See individual unit handbooks

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Critical Roles MGRD2002 Maidstone Stage 2, 15 credits Semester 4 weeks 1 5 5 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus In the course of this unit we will be asking the question, should graphic design involve itself with the wider needs and problems of society? It has been argued that graphic design if not in its origins, then in its final outcome is a social activity. By social we mean: What graphic designers create eventually leaves their studio and enters a real and specific context out there. It affects society. This unit of study confronts you with the social and ethical responsibility of the designer. It also touches on and is entwined with the ongoing debate around the term authorship. The discussion whether a designer can/ is / or should be the author (true originator) of his/her own work has been hotly argued over for at least 40 years of graphic design history. Questions like these have been raised: Is it necessary for graphic designers/ artists to express points of view in their work? Is it possible not to express a point of view in ones work? (meaning: produce neutral, unmediated designs?) Can a graphic designer have a vision or voice of his/her own, e.g. when doing commissioned work? What about authorship when working in a team? Does developing a strong visual style alone establish authorship or does a designer need to produce something to say, an inner meaning (etc.)? This unit prompts you to investigate a chosen topic and position yourself in relation to it. It may look as if you are asked (just) to formulate an opinion and communicate this opinion as efficiently as possible. But what this unit of study really asks you is: What do you want to make of your opinions/ attitudes where and how do they influence your design decisions?

Aims This unit aims to: A1 Introduce you to issues of ethics and social responsibility that are tied in with the role of the graphic designer in todays society. Articulate visually the notion of the mediation of all messages, reflecting in your

A2

work an understanding of graphic authorship. A3 Manage a self-initiated programme of work conceptually, visually/aesthetically, in terms of production and with respect to time-management. Further extend an informed critical approach to your own work and that of others, as well as practical and critical communication skills. Extend an understanding of how technical applications can support practical creative work.

A4

A5

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to: LO1 Show an understanding of the current debate concerning issues based art and design practice, through your research and process work Exercise an increasing awareness of the social, political and cultural context in your own graphic design practice; Develop suitable strategies and employ appropriate languages for visual communication material authored by you. Manage a self-initiated project in terms of ideas, strategy, visual language, aesthetic choices, and time management skills. Demonstrate appropriate levels of technical skill, employing materials, media, techniques, methods, technologies and tools associated with your discipline, while observing good working practices.

LO2

LO3

LO4

LO5

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Group tutorials Independent study Peer evaluation Formative and Summative assessment feedback Critiques

Assessment Requirements Two components are required and will be weighted as follows: Research and design development (include. Statement of Intent) 30% Final work 70%

Assessment criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates; Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes An awareness and understanding of the current debate surrounding graphic

authorship and the contextual dimensions of the students discipline is demonstrated through evidence of reading, discussion, sketchbook and project work. (LO1, LO2)

Understanding through application of knowledge An effective visual research methodology, employing both convergent and divergent thinking is demonstrated in the process work and sketchbooks. (LO3) Creative, imaginative and conceptual skills are demonstrated to generate ideas using an appropriate visual language and employing an appropriate strategy. (LO3, LO4)

Application of Technical and applied skills Appropriate levels of technical skills, employing materials, media, techniques, methods, technologies and tools associated with their discipline are demonstrated whilst observing good working practices. (LO5) Self-management and independent learning are demonstrated. (LO4)

Reference Material Essential McQuiston, Liz, (1995 & 2004) Graphic Agitation: Social and Political Graphics Since the Sixties Graphic & Agitation 2, both: London, Phaidon Garland, Ken, (2002) First Things First in Bierut, Michael, Looking Closer 4: critical writings on graphic design, New York, Allworth Press, originally published in i.d. Vol. 47, No.2, (March/April 2000) Bierut, Michael (2002) A Manifesto with Ten Footnotes, in: Bierut, Michael, Looking Closer 4: critical writings on graphic design, New York, Allworth Press, originally published in i.d., Vol. 47, No.2 (March/April 2000)

Recommended Parrinder, Monika, (2000) Just say noquietly, Eye magazine No. 63 Hundertmark, Christian, (2006), The Art of Rebellion 2, World of Urban Art Activism, Publikat Verlag, Mainaschaff Poynor, Rick, (2003) No More Rules: Graphic Design and Postmodernism, London, Laurence King Publishing Lupton, Ellen, Miller, Abbott, (1999) Design, Writing, Research, London: Phaidon Lupton, Ellen, (2005), D.I.Y Design I Yourself, Princeton Architectural Press

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Defining Your Practice MGRD2003 Maidstone Stage 2, 30 credits Semester 4 weeks 6 10 5 weeks 300 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus Graphic designers today do not just respond to design problems identified by others, but often instigate themselves visual/ design/ cultural changes. This unit prepares you for this future role. This unit is concerned with giving your practice greater focus as well as giving you a more in depth understanding of certain aspects of visual communication practice. This unit asks you to reflect a specialist interest that you hold within the field of Visual Communication. This interest can arise e.g. out of the love for a particular medium or process; or it can develop from a design problematic that you are attracted to. Equally a visual language that you enjoy (e.g. typography, photography etc.) could become the focus of this unit. From whatever direction you enter this unit, you must eventually frame it in terms of one of the following five graphic design destinations: Persuasion Education Information Entertainment Self reflection

There will be a menu of skills workshops to choose from, which run in parallel to the project work. You may want to chose a skill that either can aid you directly in the completion of this very project. Alternatively you could opt for a skill that contributes to your personal skill profile. This final unit of Stage 2 acts as a stepping-stone to the personal, self-negotiated work you will be undertaking in Stage 3. It provides a first opportunity for you to be the author of a programme of work of your own choice.

Aims This unit aims to: A1 Extend the idea of self-initiated, personal graphic design work and act as a transitional learning experience into stage 3

A2

Manage a self-initiated programme of work conceptually, visually/ aesthetically, in terms of production and with respect to time- management Extend and develop further a critical approach to your own work and that of others, as well as practical and critical communication skills. Further develop an understanding of how technical applications can support practical creative work and extend technical skills.

A3

A4

Learning Outcomes On completion of the unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Further extend your knowledge and understanding of the current debate concerning graphic authorship, and develop further a critical approach and personal focus in your finished work. Write a coherent statement of intent for a proposal and manage a self-initiated project in terms of ideas, strategy, visual language, aesthetic choices, and time management skills. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in the use of appropriate materials, processes and technical applications in the production of a design solution. Construct an effective visual research methodology, employing both convergent and divergent thinking in the process work and sketchbooks, to arrive at a solution to the visual problem.

LO2

LO3

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Briefings Group tutorials Independent study Peer evaluation Formative and summative assessment feedback Critiques

Assessment Requirements Two components are required and are weighted as follows: Research and design development (include. Statement of Intent) 20% Final work 80%

Assessment criteria You should present a body of work, which demonstrates:

Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes Appropriate technologies, methods and processes are identified and used. (LO3)

Understanding through application of knowledge An effective visual research methodology, employing both convergent and divergent thinking is demonstrated in the process work and sketchbooks. (LO4) Creative, imaginative and conceptual skills are demonstrated to generate ideas using an appropriate visual language and employing an appropriate strategy. (LO3, LO4)

Application of Technical and professional skills Appropriate levels of technical skills, employing materials, media, techniques, methods, technologies and tools associated with their discipline are demonstrated whilst observing good working practices. (LO3) Self-management and independent learning are demonstrated. (LO2)

Reference Material Essential Poynor, Rick, (1998) Design without Boundaries: Visual communication in Transition, London, Booth Clibborn Meinhardt, Dorthe, Volker, Sven, German Design Council (2000) Beyond the Border:Crossover in Creative Culture, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York Springer Verlag OReilly, John, (2002) No Brief, Designers Personal Projects, Hove (UK), Rotovision Mau, Bruce (2004) Massive Change, A Manifesto for the Future Global Design Culture, London, Phaidon Press Rock, Michael, (Spring 1996) Graphic Authorship, http://www. typotheque.com (originally published under the title The Designer as Author, Eye magazine No. 20

Recommended Shaughnessy, Adrian, (2005) How to Be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul, London, Laurence King Publishing Hall, Peter, (2004) Sagmeister: made you look, London, Booth Clibborn Shore, Steven, (2007) The Nature of Photographs, London, Phaidon Press Taking A Line for a Walk, Diaries, Notebooks, Sketchbooks, Graphic Magazine, Issue Ten, (2006) London Stocklossa, Uwe, Rempen, Thomas, (2007) Advertising, New Techniques for Visual Seduction, London, Thames & Hudson Heller, Steven, Ilic, Mirko, (2007), The Anatomy of Design: uncovering the influences and inspirations in modern graphic design, Gloucester (Mass/USA) Rockport

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Research Seminar MVTH2002 Maidstone Stage 2, 15 credits Semester 4 15 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit offers you a series of research seminar options which focuses on one of a range of subject-based and inter-disciplinary themes. Collectively, these seminars represent a range of contemporary issues that are central to the interests of the courses and, in building upon staff research interests, offer contemporary thinking upon these topics. These may provide a basis for the development, in Stage 3, of an individual dissertation topic. The scope for such topics is intentionally wide and flexible and may be tailored to complement your own practice or interests. Typical seminars might include: Image of the City; Designs on the Future; Myth and Narrative; the Body in Representation; Time, History and Memory; Cultures of Consumption; Global Transformations; Electronic Culture. During the second half of the semester your tutor will help you to identify a suitable topic for your research, and guide you in the preparation of an extended bibliography, research plan and a short outline indicating key issues. Workshops on research skills accompany the seminar programme. The content and assessment task are designed to provide you with a model of research-based learning, providing a range of theoretical and methodological frameworks that will underpin your Level 3 work. However, the Research Seminar is a freestanding unit and the research proposal assessment task for this unit does not form part of the assessment of the Dissertation Unit in Stage 3. Aims This unit aims to: A1 A2 A3 A4 Familiarise you with contemporary issues and debates relevant to your practice. Acquaint you with the conventions of written research. Help you to develop your research skills to the level necessary for level 3 study. Enable you to prepare a detailed synopsis, work plan and bibliography.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to:

LO1

Understand key comtemporary issues and theoretical perspectives within your identified area of research.

LO2 Identify and examine a topic for further research and development into a dissertation. LO3 Understand the research methodology appropriate to your chosen topic and plan for its development into a dissertation. Research and develop a topic in an extended piece of academic writing.

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Group seminars Individual tutorials Research skills workshops Study skills support Summative assessment feedback

Assessment Requirements Two components are required and are weighted as follows: A 3,000 word essay relating to the seminar course that you have undertaken (70%) An oral and visual seminar presentation of a written research proposal comprising: an outline of a research topic (500 words) indicating key issues to be addressed and a short bibliography and outline plan (30%)

Assessment Criteria You should present an essay and support material which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes An understanding of the critical and contextual dimensions of the discipline including cultural, political, societal, or theoretical contexts. (LO1)

Understanding through application of knowledge A clear understanding of the research methodology appropriate to your chosen topic. (LO3) The ability to source, navigate, select, retrieve, evaluate, manipulate and manage information from a variety of sources. (LO3) The ability to develop a coherent argument. (LO2)

Application of technical and professional skills The ability to communicate ideas clearly through oral presentation and writing using appropriate academic conventions. (LO4)

Reference material Reference material appropriate for your topic will be identified through seminars and tutorials.

Stage 3 Unit Descriptors


_____________________________________________________________________ Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Student Initiated Minor Projects MGRD3001 Maidstone Stage 3, 30 credits Semester 5 weeks 1 15 15 weeks 300 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus The unit will require you to work on two projects, both requiring you to build on previously learned skills developed in previous components of the course such as proficiency in selfdirected organisation and time management of extended self-initiated problems. The unit provides a framework within which to develop and integrate independent research and individual visual language in areas of graphic design practice of your own choosing. You will be encouraged to contextualise your individual production in relation to historical and contemporary developments in practical and theoretical graphic design discourse and further develop critical insight into the appropriate deployment of the conceptual, technical, and aesthetic components of extended projects. This unit will further enable you to develop proficiency in self-directed organisation and time management. The first project will require you to produce a written proposal and the completion of a selfinitiated project to a high level of practical and theoretical competency and the second assignment will require you to undertake a design assignment from the range offered in the Royal Society of Arts, Design and Art Direction Student Award Scheme, or other appropriate design assignments. Your individual project work will be supported and guided through a series of briefings, seminars, tutorials, and professional practice sessions given by course staff and specialist visiting tutors. Both projects will require you to pursue in-depth research into the conceptual, practical, and aesthetic components of your subjects and to draw these components into a synthetic whole. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Develop and encourage skills in integrating independent research and individual visual language in areas of graphic design practice. Extend contextualisation of the subject in relation to historical and contemporary

A2

developments in practical and theoretical graphic design discourse, further developing critical insight into the appropriate deployment of the conceptual, technical, and aesthetic components of an extended project. A3 Further develop proficiency in self-directed organisation and time management of extended self-initiated practical projects and develops the students ability to draw previous learning into a synthesised whole. Extend analytical and writing skills to complete research which will inform creative outcomes and further develop analysis, reason and discussion. Consolidate and confirm previous learned knowledge and skills integrating learning experiences to produce work that communicates ideas and creative concepts to a high quality and professional standard.

A4

A5

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Develop and integrate independent research and an individual graphic design language in an area of graphic design practice of your own choosing Contextualise your individual production in relation to historical and contemporary developments in practical and theoretical graphic design discourse. Demonstrate increased critical insight into the appropriate deployment of the conceptual, technical, and aesthetic components of an extended graphic design project. Organise self directed time management of extended self-initiated practical projects. Draw previous learning into a synthesised whole

LO2

LO3

LO4

LO5

Teaching and Learning Methods Project critiques, seminars and presentations Professional practice lectures and seminars Individual tutorials Independent study Formative assessment feedback Peer evaluation

Assessment Requirement Two components are required and are weighted as follows: Completed project 1 with all research and preparatory work Completed Project 2 with all research and preparatory work 65% 35%

Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes The ability to develop and integrate independent research and an individual visual language in an area of graphic design practice of your own choosing has been realised. (LO1) The ability to contextualise individual production in relation to historical and contemporary developments in practical and theoretical graphic design discourse has been demonstrated. (LO2)

Understanding through application of knowledge Increased critical insight into the appropriate deployment of the conceptual, technical, and aesthetic components of an extended graphic design project has been demonstrated. (LO3) You have drawn previous learning into a synthesised whole. (LO5) You have generated ideas, concepts, proposals, independently and/or collaboratively in response to the self-initiated activity and set briefs of D&AD. (LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills Appropriate materials and media are selected, tested and utilised to realise and present creative ideas and professional solutions. (LO3) Appropriate technologies, methods and processes are demonstrated. (LO3) Proficiency in self-directed organisation and time management of extended self-initiated practical projects is demonstrated. (LO4)

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Dissertation MINS3002 Maidstone Stage 3, 30 Credits Semester 5/6 15 weeks 300 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit consists of a substantial period of self-directed research on a subject that is related to the historical, theoretical or critical concerns of your discipline or professional area. The unit enables you to develop a range of research skills appropriate to your chosen topic. You will be expected to articulate a clear, cogent and sustained argument in an extended piece of writing that conforms to academic conventions and that demonstrates an understanding of the subject area through analysis and evaluation. Indicative study skills content may include: research methods; library and internet research skills; developing a proposal; constructing an argument; using secondary sources; styles of academic writing etc. Subject specific content individually devised. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Enable you to undertake in depth research into a subject of your own choice that is relevant to your course of study (subject to approval by your tutor). Provide an opportunity for you to demonstrate an understanding of the historical, theoretical or critical concerns of your discipline by applying them to a specified research question or case study. Enable you to produce a clear, cogent and sustained written argument, supported by appropriate evidence that conforms to academic conventions illustrated where necessary.

A2

A3

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Explore in depth a subject-related academic enquiry showing an understanding of its historical, theoretical, or critical context.

LO2 LO3

Select, manage and integrate information from a variety of sources. Analyse and evaluate sources, and use them to develop and support a clear cogent and sustained argument in written form. Communicate ideas and information clearly in written form and to obey academic conventions (e.g. references, illustrations, bibliography, appendices).

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures Seminars Group Tutorial Individual Tutorials Independent Study

Assessment Requirements One submission (100%) Two bound copies of a dissertation of 8,000-10,000 words Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes The historical, critical or theoretical context of your chosen subject area. (LO1)

Understanding through application of knowledge Research skills: the ability to select, manage, and integrate information from a variety of sources. (LO2) Critical analysis and evaluation (LO3)

Application of technical and professional skills The ability to develop a clear cogent and sustained argument in written form (LO3) The ability to use appropriate academic conventions (LO4)

Recommended Reading Fairbarn, Gavin & Winch, Christopher. (1996). Reading, Writing and Reasoning: A Guide for Students, 2nd ed. Buckingham: Open University Press. Walliman, Nicholas, (2004) Your Undergraduate Dissertation: The Essential Guide for Success, London: Sage

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Student Initiated Major Project MGRD 3002 Maidstone Stage 3, 45 credits Semester 6 10 weeks 450 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit provides you with a framework within which to research, develop and realise a major self-initiated project of your own choosing. It enables you to draw up a written project proposal that effectively and succinctly communicates the key elements of your conceptual, technical, aesthetic and theoretical concerns and intentions. It allows you to develop work that demonstrates a high level of maturity through its clarity and focus and the synthesis of previously learned practical and theoretical knowledge and to describe your level of achievement on the course through the quality of the concept, research and analysis, contextualisation and the application of practical and technical skills. The unit culminates in a presentation of work that provides you with the opportunity to collaborate with others to present work in a form appropriate to purpose and context. The project is initially articulated through a written project proposal and realisable project management plan. Visual and verbal presentations in group seminars and tutorials are an intrinsic part of the articulation and development of the project as it matures. Development is supported and evidenced through research and preparatory work. There is continued engagement with professional practice through visiting lectures, seminars, studio visits and portfolio surgeries with practitioners. This is specifically linked to the project through the expectation that you will approach the work of this unit in a professional manner and, in the final presentation of work for assessment, make a critical judgement about the appropriate form of your work in this context based on your knowledge and understanding of subject protocols. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Develop and encourage skills in integrating independent research and individual visual language in areas of graphic design practice. Extend contextualisation of the subject in relation to historical and contemporary developments in practical and theoretical graphic design discourse, further developing critical insight into the appropriate deployment of the conceptual, technical, and aesthetic components of an extended project. Further develop proficiency in self-directed organisation and time management of extended self-initiated practical projects and develops the students ability to draw previous learning into a synthesised whole.

A2

A3

A4

Extend analytical and writing skills to complete a major piece of research related to culture and communication argument, further developing analysis, reason and discussion, carried through planned stages of research and writing.

A5 Consolidate and confirm previous learned knowledge and skills integrating learning experiences to produce work that communicates ideas and creative concepts to a high quality and professional standard. Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to: LO1 Independently initiate and draw up a written project proposal which effectively and succinctly communicates the key elements of your conceptual, technical, and aesthetic concerns and intentions aligned to a realisable project management action plan. Initiate, plan and develop work which demonstrates a high level of maturity through its clarity and focus and the synthesis of previously learned practical and theoretical knowledge. Demonstrate research and analysis, contextualisation and the application of practical and technical skills. Produce a body of work independently, in a form appropriate to purpose and context, based on your knowledge and understanding of subject protocols.

LO2

LO3

LO4

Teaching and Learning Methods Project critiques, seminars and presentations Professional practice lectures and seminars Individual tutorials Independent study Formative assessment feedback

Assessment Requirement One submission (100%) is required which must include these components: Completed project Research and preparatory work

Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes Your ability to make a final presentation of your work in a form approprite to purpose and context based on your knowledge and understanding of subject

protocols is demonstrated. Your ability to independently initiate and draw up a written project proposal which effectively and succinctly communicates the key elements of their conceptual, technical, and aesthetic concerns and intentions aligned to a realisable project management action plan. The critical and contextual dimensions of the discipline (reference as appropriate; business, cultural, economic, environmental, ethical, global, historical, political, societal, and/or theoretical contexts has been understood and demonstrated.

Understanding through application of knowledge The quality of your concept, and the research and analysis, contextualisation and the application of practical and technical skills reflect your ability to develop; work which demonstrates a high level of maturity through its clarity and focus and the synthesis of previously learned practical and theoretical knowledge. Knowledge and information is selected and ideas developed to professional material outcomes.

Application of technical and professional skills Appropriate materials and media are selected, tested and utilised to realise and present ideas and solutions to a professional standard. Independent study and self-management skills have been demonstrated through the ability to set goals, manage workloads, and meet deadlines. Transferable, professional skills are effectively demonstrated such as interpersonal and social skills and collaboration with others to organise and present the final degree show.

Unit Descriptor

Unit Title Unit Code Location Stage & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours

Portfolio and Career Development MGRD3003 Maidstone Stage 3, 15 credits 6 - weeks 16 - 25 15 weeks 150 hours

Date first approved Date of this version

April 2007 April 2007

Content and Syllabus This unit extends your knowledge of the concepts and issues surrounding the professional practice of a designer and also explores personal strategies for career development through the preparation of self-promotional materials and portfolios. It will also examine how the profession of graphic design has developed and encourage a critical examination of the designer / client relationship. You will be encouraged to make contact externally with individuals, institutions and companies that you determine will be of relevance to informing you of your career interests and work closely with the careers office to develop career research and develop a career development plan alongside the personal /portfolio package. The role of the graphic designer and his/her professional, ethical, and social responsibilities will be explored further and issues relating to copyright, contracts and business operation are addressed. Aims This unit aims to: A1 Encourage a business-like and professional approach providing you with a sufficient understanding of design procedure and professional practice to enter the employment market. Extend on your understanding of the role of the graphic designer, the cultural context of graphic design practice, and to understand more clearly the area of specialist practice you wish to enter. Provide an understanding of the legal and contractual constraints relating to graphic design, and to improve your ability to articulate issues relating to their practice through written, verbal, and visual presentations. Explore a range of individual marketing strategies and portfolio development to maximise employment opportunities or realise future aspirations towards postgraduate study.

A2

A3

A4

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit you should be able to establish through the assessment requirements that you are able to:

LO1

Demonstrate an increasing understanding of the role of the graphic designer, and an awareness of the cultural context of graphic design practice. Demonstrate through a CV, portfolio of work and self presentation, confidence and professionalism to realise future aspirations, and transferable, professional skills. Show an awareness of the designer client relationship and the legal and contractual constraints relating to graphic design. Use employment search planning and procedures, refining your portfolio to meet the expectations of your chosen career route. Plan and manage your own time necessary to realise a professional outcome.

LO2

LO3

LO4

LO5

Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures and seminars Discussion Briefings Mock Interviews Group tutorials Presentation events Independent learning Peer evaluation Formative and summative assessment feedback

Assessment Requirement Two components are required and are weighted as follows: A portfolio of Evidence A Career Development Plan, research materials and professional CV. Assessment Criteria You should present a body of work which demonstrates: 80% 20%

Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes Relevant contextual and theoretical facts and issues relating to professional practice and employability are identified, defined and described. (LO1)

Understanding through application of knowledge Employability, personal career planning and research has been undertaken and reflected upon to produce an effective strategy to meet graduation objectives. (LO4, LO2)

Application of technical and professional skills Appropriate technologies, methods and processes are demonstrated in the production of a portfolio, cv and/or other promotional materials. (LO2) Transferable, professional skills are effectively demonstrated. (LO3) Self management and independent learning are demonstrated. (LO3)

Reference Material Essential Baron, Cynthia (2003) Designing a Digital Portfolio, Riders Press Eisenman, Sara (2006) Building Design Portfolios, Rockport Linton, Harold, (2004) Portfolio Design, WW Norton and Co Corfield, R, Page, Kogan, (2006) Successful Interview Skills, 3rd ed. London: Kogan Page Myers, Debbie Rose (2005) The Graphic Designers Guide to Portfolio Design, Wiley Recommended Foot, Cameron, (2001) The Creative Business Guide to running a Graphic design business, Wiley Marjanovic, Igor, Ray, Katerina Ruedi, Lokko, Lesley Naa Norle, (2004) The Portfolio: an architecture student's handbook, Architectural Press Keats, Daphne, (2000) Interviewing: A Practical Guide for Students and Professionals, Open University Press Graphic Artists GuildInc. (2003) The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Guidelines (11th Edition) New York Periodicals Baseline Blueprint Campaign Design Week Eye

How your work is marked


_______________________________________________________________________ Assessment Methods Formative assessment Formative assessment is an interim review of your work undertaken at key points during particular units. It provides an indicative measure of your progress, allows you to consider your work in relation to that of your peers, allows you to agree with staff any adjustments you need to make in order to satisfy course requirements, and is designed to help you improve your performance. It does not contribute to the final unit mark. Summative assessment Summative assessment is that carried out at the end of a unit. It provides an evaluation of your progress during the unit, generates a unit mark, and confirms the conditions for referral and retake. The purpose of assessment Assessment measures your performance in completed units. It is therefore retrospective and should not necessarily be taken as a guide to future success. Assessment can have the following purposes: to measure your performance over a specified part of the course by published criteria against a stated requirement; to provide you with feedback about your performance, helping you to identify strengths and weaknesses; to determine your suitability to progress to the next stage of the course; to determine the award of an appropriate qualification.

The assessment scheme is designed to recognise and credit achievement rather than to penalise failure. If you fail a unit you will have a further chance to improve your work and pass. You progress from stage to stage of your course by accumulating sufficient credit (i.e. by passing units). The final award requires students to accumulate credit in the same way. The Student Regulations Handbook contains more detailed information on the assessment scheme and regulations. Assessment methods used on the course Assessment practices adopted by the course are consistent with the Universitys Assessment Policy. The Assessment methods employed are effective in permitting students to demonstrate course outcomes. Assessment Criteria specific to each unit and generic Grading Descriptors ensure a consistency of approach to assessment. A range of assessment strategies is used: formal examinations; essays; group production projects; individual production projects; production simulations to deadline; individual writing assignments; written critical evaluations; student presentations; individual student

logs of project activity; tutor observation of student performance in extended group projects and real time production simulations; assessed work placements; and a dissertation. On practical units, whenever possible, assessments are integrated into the teaching and learning: extended production projects give scope for tutor guidance week by week, for example; or a final summative assessment will be based closely on earlier formative assessments which have given students scope to steadily build and develop skills assisted by tutor feedback. Considerable use is made of portfolio assessment in which group work and individual work for one unit can be combined, often with a written critical evaluation which fosters reflective learning, reflective practice and links between theory and practice. Care is taken by lecturers to try to ensure that all students engage in assessed group work. On such group assessments, individual student logs of activity are required and tutor observations of individual student contribution are recorded on assessment feedback sheets. Individual performance in group work is formally recognised in the assessment criteria for group assessments. On most individual assignments, and some group assignments, there is scope for negotiated briefs so that students particular interests and favoured specialisms can be accommodated. This increases student engagement and motivation and means that the course, while focusing on core skills, can appeal to students who have ambitions in particular specialties. Unit assessment and Stage assessment Unit assessment is the basic unit of assessment. Unit information will include a timetable for assessment and a clear statement of assessment requirements, assessment criteria and assessment methods appropriate to its outcomes and length of study. Throughout the course a range of assessment methods will be used. They may include reviews of coursework, presentations, written submissions and set examination papers. Peer and self-assessment are also used at appropriate points, to enable you to achieve an increasingly self-critical view of your work. Each unit is assessed on completion and given a percentage mark. These grades are subject to confirmation by the Unit Assessment Board at the end of the academic year. You will also receive verbal and written feedback from your tutors. The credit value of each unit is proportional to its study time. This provides weighting for the unit; unit marks contribute proportionately to the Stage mark. Units will normally be assessed within their duration. Exceptionally assessment may extend beyond the unit but a deadline will be set for the release of marks and the return of work. Stage assessment is the major summative assessment point which allows progression between stages of a course. Where appropriate it may form the basis for the recommendation of an award. The purpose of stage assessment is to consider the overall performance of students within a stage of a named course, to award credit where appropriate and to set any conditions for progression or retrieval of failure.

Stage assessment collates the weighted marks from units to produce a single end of stage mark. Assessment Boards The Unit Assessment Board is responsible to the Progression & Award Board for the conduct of all assessment associated with the course. The full Progression & Award Board normally meets annually at the end of the academic year. Its membership includes an Executive Dean appointed by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Chair), a Dean appointed by the Executive Dean, Directors of Studies, the Academic Registrar or nominee, the Chief External Examiner(s) and a Registrar appointed by the Executive Dean. Confirmation of marks External examiners are appointed by the Universitys Academic Board. They moderate internal marks (where appropriate), ensure correct procedures are followed and proper standards maintained. The external examiner will consult with internal examiners and may examine samples of work submitted, or meet with students. However, external examiners do not need to see you personally or your individual work in detail for the Unit Assessment Board to reach a decision on your marks, or your classification of award. Final responsibility for determining marks rests with the Unit Assessment Board. Difficulties with work You may experience difficulties associated with practical projects, research methods or writing. There can be a variety of causes ranging from dyslexia to nerves. If you have such problems, you should inform your tutor at the earliest opportunity; the University will then consider how it can best assist you. Student Services may also be able to provide help, advice and support. The course is designed to help you succeed in what you undertake, but if you have problems you must help the course team to help you. You should also disclose any health problems which might have implications for your course of study. It is your responsibility to make known to your Course Leader any circumstances which may have seriously affected your performance in assessment. This should be done by completing a Mitigating Circumstances claim form prior to submission so that such issues may be taken into account during assessment. Further information about the Mitigating Circumstances Policy is contained within your Student Regulations Handbook. Submission and return of work You are advised to keep a copy of all work submitted for assessment, wherever feasible and appropriate. Make a note of the date and name of the person to whom you submitted your work, as this will make it easier to resolve any issues that may arise regarding submission. At the beginning of each unit, you will be notified of the date and time by which work must be submitted for assessment.

Grading Descriptors

Grading and Marking Percentage marks are given for all assessments on undergraduate and post-graduate courses. Where there is more than one assessment requirement for a unit, these may be assessed holistically as a portfolio, resulting in a single mark, or they may be marked separately. If they are marked separately the final mark for the unit is calculated based on an average mark of the contributing requirements, unless specific weightings are given to the individual requirements. If weightings are given, these weightings must be stated in the unit descriptor in the Course Handbook. If marked separately all assessment requirements must be passed for a pass to be achieved in the unit. Grading descriptors have been developed to assist in the assurance of standards and equity across courses. Their application is reviewed annually to ensure a consistent approach across the University. All work which leads, or may lead, to an award of The University is subject to an element of internal and external verification. The main purpose of internal verification is to ensure that assessment criteria are being applied consistently, across individual units and across the full course. Internal verification may take the form of double marking, team marking or sampling. The main purpose of external verification is to confirm that marking standards are appropriate and consistent with those at other institutions across the sector. Grading descriptors articulate the level of performance required to achieve a given grade for your project work. Details of what you need to do to meet the grading descriptors are in the following series of charts.

Generic Criteria Level One Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes The extent to which knowledge is demonstrated: relevant contextual or theoretical issues are identified, defined and described historical or contemporary practices are identified, defined and described appropriate technologies, methods and processes are identified, defined and described Level One Understanding through application of knowledge The degree to which research methods are demonstrated: relevant knowledge and information is compared, contrasted, manipulated, translated and interpreted knowledge and information is selected, analysed, synthesized and evaluated in order to generate creative ideas, practices, solutions, arguments or hypotheses Level One Application of technical and professional skills The degree to which: appropriate materials and media are selected, tested and utilised to realise and present ideas and solutions appropriate technologies, methods and processes are demonstrated transferable, professional skills are effectively demonstrated self management and independent learning are demonstrated

(80%-100%) Extensive knowledge of fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and a widening appreciation of historical and contemporary practices

(70%-79%) Significant knowledge of fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and a widening appreciation of historical and contemporary practices

(60%-69%) Confident familiarity with fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts

(50%-59%) Familiar with fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts

(40%-49%) Adequate knowledge of fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts

(30%-39%) Limited knowledge of fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts

(0%-29%) Little or no knowledge of fundamental contextual and theoretical issues or critical concepts

In depth and broadening knowledge of appropriate technologies and processes

Significant knowledge of appropriate technologies and processes

Thorough knowledge of appropriate technologies and processes

Sound knowledge of appropriate technologies and processes

Adequate knowledge of appropriate technologies and processes

Limited knowledge of appropriate technologies and processes Incomplete comprehension of relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Little or no knowledge of appropriate technologies or processes Little or no comprehension of relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Deep level of comprehension and exploration of relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Deep level of comprehension of relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Strong comprehension of relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Sound comprehension of relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Surface-level comprehension of relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Outstanding ability to analyse and synthesise knowledge in order to produce creative practice in standard situations and to evaluate the results

Strong ability to apply and analyse knowledge to produce creative practice in standard situations, with some evaluation of the results Relevant and accomplished application of basic practical and technical skills Highly effective application of fundamental transferable and professional skills Strong ability to work independently and use feedback to plan future tasks effectively

Sound ability to apply and analyse knowledge to produce creative practice in standard situations

Sound ability to apply knowledge to produce creative practice in standard situations

Competent application of knowledge to the production of creative practice in standard situations

Limited ability to apply knowledge to produce creative practice in standard situations

Little or no ability to apply relevant knowledge to produce creative practice in standard situations

Relevant, accomplished and fluent application of basic practical and technical skills

Strong application of basic practical and technical skills

Sound application of basic practical and technical skills

Competent application of practical and technical skills

Rudimentary application of basic practical and technical skills Limited application of fundamental transferable and professional skills Limited evidence of ability to learn independently

Scant application of basic practical and technical skills

Outstanding application of fundamental transferable and professional skills

Strong application of fundamental transferable and professional skills

Sound application of fundamental transferable and professional skills

Competent application of fundamental transferable and professional skills Adequate evidence of beginning to develop as an independent learner

Ineffective application of fundamental transferable and professional skills Little or no evidence of ability to learn independently

Substantial ability to work independently and use feedback to reflect critically on own progress

Evidence of developing well as an independent learner

Evidence of beginning to develop as an independent learner

Generic Criteria Level Two Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes The extent to which knowledge is demonstrated: relevant contextual or theoretical issues are identified, defined and described historical or contemporary practices are identified, defined and described appropriate technologies, methods and processes are identified, defined and described

(80%-100%) Outstanding breadth of knowledge of contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and their relationship to historical and contemporary practices

(70%-79%) A significant breadth of knowledge of contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and their relationship to historical and contemporary practices

(60%-69%) Confident knowledge of a range of contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and their relationship to historical and contemporary practices

(50%-59%) Familiar with a range of contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and their relationship to historical and contemporary practices

(40%-49%) Familiar with fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and their relationship to historical and contemporary practices

(30%-39%) Some knowledge of fundamental contextual and theoretical issues and critical concepts and their relationship to historical and contemporary practices

(0%-29%) No significant knowledge of fundamental contextual and theoretical issues or critical concepts

Extensive knowledge of relevant and specialist techniques and processes

Significant knowledge of relevant specialist techniques and processes

Confident knowledge of relevant specialist techniques and processes

Sound knowledge of relevant specialist techniques and processes Relevant knowledge is competently explored and interpreted when proposing solutions to projects and problems

Adequate knowledge of relevant specialist techniques and processes

Limited knowledge of relevant specialist techniques and processes Limited ability to manipulate or interpret relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects and problems

No significant knowledge of relevant specialist techniques or processes Little or no ability to manipulate or interpret relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects or problems

Level Two

Understanding through application of knowledge The degree to which research methods are demonstrated: relevant knowledge and information is compared, contrasted, manipulated, translated and interpreted knowledge and information is selected, analysed, synthesized and evaluated in order to generate creative ideas, solutions, arguments or hypotheses

Relevant knowledge is systematically and rigorously explored and interpreted when proposing solutions to projects and problems which demonstrate evidence of independent thought

Relevant knowledge is thoroughly explored and interpreted when proposing solutions to projects and problems which demonstrate some evidence of independent thought Strong ability to analyse and synthesise knowledge to produce creative practice and to evaluate results Accomplished application of specialist practical and technical skills

Relevant knowledge is thoroughly explored and interpreted when proposing solutions to projects and problems

Competent ability to explore and interpret relevant knowledge in seeking solutions to projects and problems

Outstanding ability to analyse and synthesise knowledge to produce original creative practice and to evaluate results Accomplished and fluent application of specialist practical and technical skills

Sound ability to analyse and synthesise knowledge to produce creative practice and to evaluate results Strong application of specialist practical and technical skills

Sound ability to apply and analyse knowledge to produce creative practice and to evaluate results Sound application of specialist practical and technical skills

Competent ability to apply and analyse knowledge to produce creative practice

Limited ability to apply knowledge to produce creative practice

Little or no ability to apply knowledge to produce creative practice

Level Two

Application of technical and professional skills The degree to which: appropriate materials and media are selected, tested and utilised to realise and present ideas and solutions appropriate technologies, methods and processes are demonstrated transferable, professional skills are effectively demonstrated self management and independent learning are demonstrated

Competent application of specialist practical and technical skills

Rudimentary application of specialist practical and technical skills Rudimentary application of transferable and professional skills Evidence of a rudimentary ability to learn independently

Ineffective application of specialist practical and technical skills

Outstanding demonstration of transferable and professional skills

Highly effective demonstration of transferable and professional skills Strong ability to learn independently and critically evaluate own progress

Confident application of transferable and professional skills

Sound application of transferable and professional

Competent application of transferable and professional skills

Ineffective application of transferable and professional skills

Strong ability to learn independently and critically evaluate own progress using a wide range of feedback sources

Strong ability to learn independently make use of feedback

Sound ability to learn independently and make effective use of feedback

Evidence of ability to learn independently and make use of feedback

Limited evidence of ability to learn independently

Level Three

Generic Criteria Knowledge of contexts, concepts, technologies and processes The extent to which: relevant contextual or theoretical issues are identified, defined and described historical or contemporary practices are identified, defined and described appropriate technologies, methods and processes are identified defined and described

(80%-100%) Outstanding breadth and depth of knowledge of contextual and theoretical issues, some of which are at the forefront of the discipline, and their relationship to a range of historical and contemporary practices Extensive knowledge of a range of relevant specialist techniques and processes

(70%-79%) A breadth and depth of knowledge of contextual and theoretical issues, some of which are at the forefront of the discipline, and their relationship to a range of historical and contemporary practices

(60%-69%) Confident knowledge of a range of contextual and theoretical issues, some of which are at the forefront of the discipline, and their relationship to a range of historical and contemporary practices

(50%-59%) Familiar with a range of contextual and theoretical issues, at least some of which are at the forefront of the discipline, and their relationship to a range of historical and contemporary practices Sound knowledge of a range of relevant specialist techniques and processes

(40%-49%) Familiar with a range of contextual and theoretical issues and their relationship to a range of historical and contemporary practices

(30%-39%) Some knowledge of a range of contextual and theoretical issues and their relationship to a range of historical and contemporary practices

(0%-29%) Limited knowledge of contextual and theoretical issues and their relationship to a range of historical and contemporary practices No significant knowledge of a range of relevant specialist techniques or processes No significant ability to apply research methodologies to projects, problems and hypotheses, and no evidence of independent thought or critical analysis No significant ability to produce a range of creative practices or to evaluate them in a wider context to generate effective results Rudimentary application of a range of specialist practical and technical skills Ineffective application of advanced transferable and professional skills Evidence of a basic ability to manage own learning

Significant knowledge of a range of relevant specialist techniques and processes

Confident knowledge of a range of relevant specialist techniques and processes

Adequate knowledge of a range of relevant specialist techniques and processes

Limited knowledge of a range of relevant specialist techniques and processes

Level Three

Understanding through application of knowledge The degree to which research methods are demonstrated: relevant knowledge and information is compared, contrasted, manipulated, translated and interpreted knowledge and information is selected, analysed, synthesized and evaluated in order to generate creative ideas, practices, solutions, arguments or hypotheses

Systematic and thorough application of a range of research methodologies to projects and problems and hypotheses, with evidence of highly focused independent thought and some new insights into the subject

Rigorous application of a range of research methodologies to projects , problems and hypotheses with evidence of highly focused independent thought and critical analysis

Confident ability to apply a range of research methodologies to projects, problems and hypotheses with clear evidence of independent thought and critical analysis

Sound ability to apply a range of research methodologies to projects, problems and hypotheses and to demonstrate independent thought and critical analysis

Competent ability to apply a range of research methodologies to projects, problems and hypotheses with some element of independent thought and critical analysis Competent ability to produce a range of creative practices and evaluate them in a wider context to generate effective results Competent application of a range of specialist practical and technical skills

Ability to apply a limited range of research methodologies to projects, problems and hypotheses with little evidence of independent thought or critical analysis

Outstanding ability to produce a range of creative practices and to critically evaluate them in a wider context , generating sustainable arguments and highly effective and original results Accomplished, original and fluent application of a range of specialist practical and technical skills

Strong ability to produce a range of creative practices and to critically evaluate them in a wider context, generating sustainable arguments and highly effective results

Strong ability to produce a range of creative practices and to evaluate them in a wider context, generating effective results

Sound ability to produce a range of creative practices and to evaluate them in a wider context, generating effective results

Limited ability to produce a range of creative practices and to evaluate them in a wider context to generate effective results Basic application of a range of specialist practical and technical skills

Level Three

Application of technical and professional skills The degree to which: appropriate materials and media are selected, tested and utilised to realise and present ideas and solutions appropriate technologies, methods and processes are demonstrated transferable, professional skills are effectively demonstrated self management and independent learning are demonstrated

Accomplished and original application of a range of specialist practical and technical skills

Confident and imaginative application of a range of specialist practical and technical skills

Sound application of a range of specialist practical and technical skills

Outstanding accomplishment of a range of advanced transferable and professional skills applied to complex situations and problems Outstanding ability to manage own learning in a sustained manner and to critically evaluate own progress, making use of a wide range of feedback sources

Accomplished application of advanced transferable and professional skills to complex situations and problems

Confident application of advanced transferable and professional skills to challenging situations and problems Strong ability to manage own learning in a sustained manner and to critically evaluate own progress making effective use of feedback

Sound application of advanced transferable and professional skills

Competent application of advanced transferable professional skills Competent ability to manage own learning in a sustained manner and make effective use of feedback

Limited application of advanced transferable and professional skills

Very high ability to manage own learning in a sustained manner and critically evaluate own progress making effective use of feedback

Sound ability to manage own learning in a sustained manner and critically evaluate own progress making effective use of feedback

Basic ability to manage own learning in a sustained manner and make use of feedback

Learning, Teaching & Academic Guidance for your course

What do I need to know about this in relation to my course? All courses at the University are founded on the principle that the most effective educational experience combines structured teaching and your own independent study. Your course is designed to give you maximum responsibility for the management of your own learning. The skills and abilities that will support you after graduation extend beyond your subject knowledge. This will require a high degree of commitment and personal organisation from you. It is important that you attend all taught sessions, making arrangements to cover material from any session which you are unable to attend (e.g. through illness). How can I manage my independent study time? During each unit, staff will explain to you what work you are expected to cover in self-managed study time. It is essential that you organise your time so that you can carry out the required amount of independent study. Failure to do this is likely to result in your being unable to complete the work required in the time available. If you feel you need further information or help with managing your studies, please alert your tutor who will be able to help. What is a Unit Handbook? A Unit Handbook will be given to you at the introduction of each unit. It will include a brief, timetable, assessment deadline, study plan (where relevant) and any further information such as technical notes, additional research and reference material that you may need in order to complete the unit. How will I be taught on my course? Several different learning and teaching methods are used at the University, and may be used on your course. These are defined as follows: Projects Projects combine formal teaching and independent study on a focused task with a defined outcome. They may be initiated by staff, or jointly between staff and students. The outcomes of projects vary according to courses; for example, it may be a slide presentation, a written report or a product. Each project culminates in some form of review or critique. Practical Work projects will be set in a practical workshop situation, using materials, processes and techniques to generate research and an understanding of theoretical principles. Depending on the equipment and processes used, this may involve an introduction to safe working practices through technical demonstrations that you must attend before commencing personal practical work.

Lectures Lectures are the principal teaching method used for the presentation and discussion of theoretical issues. They are used to focus on issues central to a unit and are often used in conjunction with seminars to extend and examine the issues raised. Your lecture notes are a valuable adjunct to other information sources and may prove useful to you long after completion of your course.

Seminars Seminars provide an opportunity for dialogue and interaction between staff and students. Seminars may be used to support lectures, or may be central to practical delivery.

Tutorials Tutorials provide an opportunity to discuss your progress and to agree a further course of action. They may be used to address specific issues in your work, to follow up assessments or to discuss other factors affecting your progress. Informal and formal tutorials are held with each student. Each student is assigned a personal tutor. Following a tutorial, a copy of the tutorial form is given to you which records the discussion. You should retain a copy of the tutorial form for your own records so that you can assess your progress over a period of time.

Group work Group work is recognised as an important educational experience in its own right and is valued by many employers. Assessment aims to balance the merits of group achievement and individual performance.

Project Proposals Project Proposals are used on many courses. Project Proposals make it possible to focus your course in a way which reflects your own interests and aspirations, within the scope of the course. Project Proposals are one way of helping you to negotiate and plan your studies with staff, agreeing the aims of your work. Your Project Proposals and study plan will form part of the Unit Handbook for relevant units.

Student presentations Student presentations comprise one student or a group of students giving an illustrated talk on an agreed subject to a group of their fellow students. This enables students to share their experiences and learning, and develop the knowledge and understanding of the group as a whole. A primary function of presentations is to develop your skills and ability in verbal communication.

Self-managed independent study Self-managed independent study forms an essential part of your course. It is important that you develop an organised and effective approach to independent study to enable you to complete and extend projects and take full advantage of learning resources at the University and elsewhere. Independent study may take place at your home, at the University (for example, in the Library) or externally (for example, at museums or exhibitions). It is suggested that you keep a record of private study undertaken for discussion with staff.

Study visits Study Visits may involve organised visits to any of the following: buildings, stores, companies and organisations, design practices, trade fairs, exhibitions, museums and galleries. They may take place in the UK or overseas, and may require financial contribution from you, in which case you will be notified of any costs well in advance of the visit.

Academic Guidance
The University has identified threshold standards of academic guidance and support across all five campuses. While Executive Deans can quite rightly exercise local decisions on how these standards are supported, the policy identifies the appropriate commitment the University makes to students to guarantee they receive sufficient opportunities for guidance on their progress through their courses. Accordingly, the University has established Threshold Standards for Academic Guidance in three areas: a) Unit choice and change of unit b) Progress within units c) Progress within the course

Unit choice and change of unit

Threshold Standard: i) Students will be provided with timely and appropriate advice on unit choice Method: To meet this standard, the University will be required to provide: B Advance information and advice about unit options including the process of making a choice, prioritising choices, the method of and timescales for logging and changing choices, and how the outcomes will be notified Clear indication of the latest advisable times by which a change of unit can be made

Progress within units

Threshold Standards: i) Students are entitled to know what additional support is available to them in the course of a unit in addition to timetabled teaching. Method: To meet this standard, the University will be required to: Provide clear information on how students can request assistance with a unit, which includes information on any scheduled tutorials, surgeries, staff availability and locations for advice.

ii) Students on referral and/or retake should be provided with a timetabled personal tutorial to discuss what they need to do in order to retrieve failure. Method: To meet this standard, the University will: C Ensure that a date and time for a tutorial is provided in all referral and retake letters. Note attendance or non attendance at such tutorials on the students file Record the content of the tutorial on tutorial forms and log these forms appropriately.

Progress within the course

Threshold Standard: i) The Course Leader is responsible for monitoring the students overall progress within the course. All students will be provided with the opportunity to attend one scheduled personal tutorial to review their overall academic progress in Semesters I and 2 of each academic year. Method: To meet this standard, the University will: Ensure that a course specific personal tutor system is in place. Inform students about tutorials, and access to tutors and additional tutorial advice.

Monitoring Course Leaders will be asked to comment on, and evaluate the efficacy of the Academic Guidance Policy during Annual Academic Monitoring.

GLOSSARY

Aims AP(E)L

The purpose behind your work. Aims are course-related and express the course's intentions at particular points, whether relating to individual projects, stages of your course or indeed the course as a whole. In each unit a list of aims, coded A, sets out the intended purpose of the unit. The formal procedure whereby prior learning which has taken place outside the University, certificated or experiential, is accredited by the University for the purpose of admission to or progression on a course of study. The formal procedure whereby you challenge a decision made regarding your performance in assessment. Disagreement with academic judgement does not constitute grounds for appeal. Details about the appeals procedure are contained within the Student Regulations Handbook. The processes and mechanisms through which the quality and standard of your work is measured and evaluated. Assessments are retrospective and do not credit future potential, although the feedback provided by marks and comments should be of assistance. A sample of marks from all units will be verified to ensure the quality of marking. Formative assessment is an interim review of your work undertaken at key points during particular units. It provides an indicative measure of your progress, allows you to consider your work in relation to that of your peers, allows you to agree with staff any adjustments you need to make in order to satisfy course requirements, and is designed to help you improve your performance. It does not contribute to the final unit mark. Summative assessment is that carried out at the end of a unit. It provides an evaluation of your progress during the unit, generates a unit mark, and confirms the conditions for referral and retake. Peer and Self-assessment requires you to assess your own work and that of fellow students. It encourages a sense of ownership of the process of assessment, assists you to become an autonomous learner, helps to develop a range of transferable skills and makes assessment part of the learning process rather than an adjunct to it.

Appeal

Assessment

Assessment Board Assessment Criteria Assessment Requirement

The generic term for a board of examiners at the University. The University has a 2-tier assessment system, comprising Unit Assessment Boards and Progression & Award Boards. The particular characteristics against which your work will be assessed. What needs to be done as a means of demonstrating attainment of a units learning outcomes.

Award

The academic qualification conferred upon a student who has successfully met and completed the requirements of a specific course of study. The member of staff responsible for the management and organisation of a course of study. A numerical value ascribed to a unit of study, related to the learning outcomes and the notional time judged necessary to achieve them. Each unit carries a credit rating: a unit is rated at 15 credit points; a double unit is rated at 30 credit points. The awareness, acquisition and application of subject-specific and generic knowledge and skills, as well as key personal qualities, to maximise potential through successful university study including postgraduate study, life-long learning and sustainable employment in a changing and competitive world. Relevant subject experts, either academic or professional, from outside the University who moderate the assessment of students and contribute to the maintenance of academic standards in all courses of study of the University. An indicative framework which sets out the typical levels of performance required to achieve grades at each level. A common framework applies across all undergraduate courses at the University; the grading descriptors are set out in section 6 of this Handbook. That which has been learned or a student is able to do as a result of study or training. A list of learning outcomes coded LO is set out for each unit. Each unit carries a Level rating, which denotes the classification of the relative academic complexity of learning outcomes associated with units. The level rating does not necessarily coincide with the year/ stage of fulltime study. All students in stages 1 and 2 are assigned a Personal Tutor. The role of the personal tutor is to maintain an overview of an individual students profile and provide advice on a students overall progress. Personal tutors meet with their tutor groups following the publication of stage assessment profiles. Personal tutors also meet individually with any student who is perceived to have potential problems. The personal tutor may refer students to other sources of advice and support as appropriate.

Course Leader Credit

Employability

External Examiners

Grading Descriptors

Learning Outcomes Level

Personal Tutor

Progression & Award Board

A sub-committee of the Academic Board, this Assessment Board has responsibility for determining the progression of students and, when students have met the requirements for the award, the level and where appropriate the title of the award to be received. The Board also determines Retake requirements.

Reference material

The information which supports the aims of a unit and which students are advised to consult. Materials can take any form including visual, textual, websites etc. They may also be identified by the student or suggested by staff as work develops. The means whereby a student is granted a further opportunity to be assessed in a unit, following initial failure. The opportunity is subject to qualifying conditions, and so may not be available to every student (see Student Regulations Handbook). The means whereby a student is able to retrieve failure following Referral. This opportunity is subject to qualifying conditions, and may not therefore be available to all students (see Student Regulations Handbook). If a unit is failed due to the non-submission of an assessment requirement, there is no opportunity for referral, and a student will receive an automatic retake (this opportunity is also subject to qualifying conditions).

Referral

Retake

Stage Study Visits

The period of time leading up to a formal point of progression or award. Visits in the UK or overseas selected for specific educational and cultural purposes. Where they require a financial contribution, you will be notified of any costs well in advance. The list of topics or points to be covered by a block of study. A self-contained unit of study. Each unit has a set of specific learning outcomes. The member of staff responsible for the management and organisation of a designated unit. The unit leader is responsible for organising group and individual tutorials, as appropriate, to provide you with advice and guidance on progress on the unit.

Syllabus Unit Unit Leader