Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note

: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   The Close­up Image          Introduction    It seemed instinctual to print these images as photographs and work with them,  almost as objects, laid out across the surface of my bed. Film stills struggle with  the memory of the film they came from; what was before and after, like an infant  who has stumbled a little too far from her mother.     This research file started with looking at the close‐up image. Prompted by Agnes  Varda’s treatment of her film subjects in The Gleaners and I, it became possible to  notice  how  Trinh  T.  Minh‐ha  made  Reassemblage  in  Senegal.    The  rallying  children  in  Phillippe  Parreno’s  No  More  Reality  is  also  examined  for  notions  of  reality and representation.    The  ideas  that  are  touched  upon  include  Deleuze’s  writings  on  the  movement‐ image  with  regards  to  framing  and  affect,  Laura  U.  Marks  emphasis  on  haptic  visuality and Hito Steyerl’s exploration of the form of documentary.     The texts disregard the margins; sentences embrace the white space and become  closer.    ❖ 

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Phillippe Parreno, No More Reality (1991), 4’    The  context  is  in  Serpentine  Gallery  last  January  showing  a  series  of  Phillippe  Parreno’s  films.  Four  different  films  occupy individual  spaces  in  the  gallery  but  none is shown concurrently. The audience is thus coerced into moving as a troop  from each space to the next to encounter the films one after another. Forming a  sort  of  meta‐narrative,  the  audience’s  collective  movement  act  as  intensely  surreal breaks in between the four otherwise autonomous films.     Near the entrance is a 4‐minute pixelated camera recording of an event. This is  somewhat true to what I remembered:   

    A  group  of  children  are  shouting  NO  MORE  REALITY!  NO  MORE  REALITY!  …  There  is  a  lot  of  noise,  both  in  the  sense  of  the  event  and  the  quality  of  the  recording.  These  little  people  are  holding  up  banners  which  says  the  same  as  their chants as they move forward like in a street march. Children are screaming  and  whistles  can  be  heard.  The  low‐resolution  image  sometimes  turns  into  an  indiscernible  abstraction  when  things  come  too  near  the  camera.  But  these  moments eventually past as the anonymous face walks along and distance once  again allows us to see.       

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album  

 

 

 

 

 

  Two notions can be addressed here, reality and the poor image1. Before that, this  is a documentation of the piece I found on the Internet:   

 

 

                                                        

1 Steyerl, H. (2009). “In Defense of the Poor Image” in e­flux journal (No. 10, Nov) 

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album  

    Its  vivid  colours  and  pristine  quality  obviously  contrast  to  the  one  screened  at  the Serpentine. To my discovery, the film shown in the latter is actually a reshot  of  the  original  on  the  artist’s  mobile  phone.  I  see,  a  copy,  less  valuable  in  all  aspects; one that had Hito Steyerl standing up for In Defense of the Poor Image.  She identifies an alternative circuit of poor images whose definition is its lack of  definition,  marginalized  in  a  hierarchy  of  images  dominated  by  cinema  and  advertisements.       Perhaps the cheap reshot of No More Reality is a poignant misplacement in the  context of the white cube? Its graininess is what I remembered. Steyerl mentions,  “[r]esolution was fetishized as if its lack amounted to castration of the author.”2       The poor image that is subservient to an original is let loose in the digital world,  “they lose matter and gain speed.”3 Pirated films, videos shot on camera phones  smuggled out of exhibitions, images compressed, copied and pasted everywhere.  Quality is transformed for quick transmission and easy appropriation. Here, it is                                                          
2 Steyerl, H. (2009). “In Defense of the Poor Image” in e­flux journal (No. 10, Nov)  3 See Ibid. 

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   being  restored  into  the  sanctuary  of  originality,  the  author’s  own  castration  is  undone.       To  address  the  content,  this  is  a  fictional  event  arranged  by  the  artist  and  the  children.  Its  recording  takes  the  form  of  documentary.  Let  us  return  to  Steyerl  and recall an anecdote about “a strange broadcast”4 she saw on CNN years ago. A  senior correspondent covering the Iraq war uses his camera phone for a direct  broadcast while exclaiming that such live footage had never been seen. Indeed, it  was  as  good  as  an  abstract  image  composed  of  green  and  brown  patches  synonymous to the soldiers.     “The more immediate they become, the less there is to see.”5    This  notion  of  reality  is  deeply  entwined  with  the  poor  image.  Baudrillard’s  successive phases of the image can be evoked: “    1. It is the reflection of a basic reality.  2. It masks and perverts a basic reality.   3. It masks the absence of a basic reality.   4. It  bears  no  relation  to  any  reality  whatever:  it  is  its  own  pure      simulacrum.”6    In  today’s  era  of  media  proliferation,  he  speaks  of  images  as  simulation  in  opposition  to  representation.  Before,  an  image  directly  represents.  Then  it  fails  to represent, introducing the question of truth (of the image). Then it casts doubt  on the truth it is meant to represent and in a panic to save this truth, the image is  once again relied upon to represent. In this sense, the image has the capacity to  precede reality, which becomes pure simulation without any reference.                                                          
4 Steyerl, H. (2007). “Documentary Uncertainty” in A prior (No. 15)  5 See Ibid.  6 Baudrillard, J. (1998). “Simulacra and Simulations” in Poster, M. (ed.)(2001). Jean Baudrillard, 

Selected Writings. Cambridge: Polity Press. p. 173 

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album     “Whereas  represention  tries  to  absorb  simulation  by  interpreting  it  as  false  representation, simulation envelops the whole edifice of representation as itself  a simulacrum.”7     The simulacrum is the popular image in media, recognised as real, reaffirmed as  real. The poor image is then where this discomfort of the simulacrum hides. Its  lack of reference seeks refuge in bad quality as reality.    The children rallying in the playground as a pseudo media event; did they mean  to call for the rejection of reality or to announce it as already invalid? The task to  represent  reality  will  forever  plague  the  image.  Therefore,  the  films  chosen  in  this  file  are  all  documentaries  of  some  sort,  imbricating  similar  ideas  of  representation. To begin like this is to establish the ground for foraying into the  film stills that follow. It is to address them in close proximity with the films they  originate  from  without  suffocating  their  image‐ness. 

                                                        
7 Baudrillard, J. (1998). “Simulacra and Simulations” in Poster, M. (ed.)(2001). Jean Baudrillard, 

Selected Writings. Cambridge: Polity Press. p. 173 

   

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Agnes Varda, The Gleaners and I (2000), 78’      The practice of gleaning in agricultural terms refers to the picking up of leftover  crops by poor peasants after harvest is done. In this film, Agnes Varda parallels  her filmmaking with gleaning as she collects through images, bending down and  going close. Her subjects are fellow gleaners as well as the things they scavenge,  from potatoes too big for commercial packaging to grapes in abandon vineyards  to expired food thrown out by supermarkets.     Mostly, we see her documenting with a camera in her hand and other times, our  perspective  coincides  with  hers.  Her  thoughts  are  superimposed  as  intimate,  retrospective voiceovers interspersed with conversations with her subjects.     In  one  sequence,  Varda  is  collecting  heart‐shaped  potatoes,  filming  and  putting  them  in  her  bag.  An  establishing  shot  locates  Varda,  back  bent  in  a  field  of  rejected  potatoes, her  attention is focused onto  her viewfinder. She goes closer  and  we  share  her  moment  of  discovery  as  the  film  switches  to  first‐person  perspective. A single heart‐shaped potato fills the screen. Next, a wide‐angle shot  again, of her reaching down. Back to first‐person, a hand reaches into the jerky  close‐up image and pulls the potato out of screen. The unsteady image shuffles  and we hear the soil crackling under her feet as she moves. Finally, a glimpse of  her fingers and the potatoes in the bag.        

 

 

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album  

    The  close‐up  here  aligns  with  Eisenstein’s  conception  of  it  as  a  montage  unit  ‐  “not so much to show or to present as to signify, to give meaning, to designate.”8     Kracauer clarifies, “the significance of the close‐up for the plot accrues to it less  from  its  own  content  than  from  the  manner  in  which  it  is  juxtaposed  with  the  surrounding shots.”9    The close‐up draws attention to a detail important to the narrative. In this case, it  lends continuity to the movement being filmed. It extends from the shot before  and explains the one after.     If Varda’s left hand is the action (collecting), her right hand makes the image.   &  If her right hand is the action (filming), our looking makes the image.     

                                                          

 

8 Eisenstein quoted in Kracauer, S. (1960). “The Establishment of Physical Existence” in Theory of  9 See Ibid.

Film: The Redemption of Physical Reality. New Jersey: Princeton University Press. p. 47 

 

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album  

 

 

    The action has taken precedent over the image. The moment when her attention  is  shifted  away  from  carefully  framing  the  image  toward  handling  the  potatoes  seems  like  an  intimate  one.  With  the  frame  thrown  off,  our  ears  are  attuned,  when is she done?   

          The deliberate alternation between first‐person (seeing as Varda sees) and third‐ person  (looking  at  Varda  act)  perhaps  entice  the  spectator’s  identification  with  Varda’s fascination for the things she films. The film is as much about her as the  subjects  she  documents;  reminiscent  of  Baudrillard’s  theory  of  collection  in  which the collector is actually the subject of the collection.   

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   For Baudrillard, objects can only either be utilized or possessed. Objects, whose  functions  have  been  divested  so  as  to  be  possessed,  derive  meaning  from  the  collection/collector. In turn, the subjectivity of the collector is defined by his/her  collection.10    It  is  possible  to  tie  this  in  with  Gleaners.  Varda  ‘possesses’  her  film  subjects  through films and in documenting her process of collecting, she, the filmmaker,  becomes central figure.      

                                                              

10 Baudrillard, J (1994). “The System of Collecting” in Elsner, J. & Cardinal, R. (ed.)(1994). The 

Cultures of Collecting. London: Reaktion Books 

10 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Two similar sequences in the film are of Varda’s own hands. The right is holding  the  camera  and  filming  the  left.  She  speaks  of  her  age  while  carefully  scanning  the creases and zooming into the veins. A self‐portrait, it is a poetic gesture.      

 

 

 

 

 

11 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album  

 

 

      Kracauer  expands  from  Eisenstein’s  close‐up  and  argues  for  its  revealing  function  of  things  normally  unseen.  “Any  huge  close‐up  reveals  new  and  unsuspected  formations  of  matter  […]  they  blast  the  prison  of  conventional  reality, opening up expanses which we have explored at best in dreams before.”11  This is as much Deleuze’s aesthetics of sensation as Laura Marks’ haptic visuality.     Barbara  Kennedy  explicates  Deleuze’s  conception  of  an  abstract  machine  that  produces  sensations.  Sensations  point  towards  an  intense  experience  “freed  from the model of recognition and […] the ideal of common sense.”12 Operating                                                          
11 Kracauer, S. (1960). “The Establishment of Physical Existence” in Theory of Film: The 

Redemption of Physical Reality. New Jersey: Princeton University Press. p. 48 
12 Kennedy, B. (2000). “Towards an Aesthetics of Sensation” in Deleuze and Cinema. UK: 

Edinburgh University Press. p. 109 

 

12 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   at a level without the empirical senses, Kennedy’s proposition is that sensation  supersedes representation and itself “becomes ‘real’.”13    It defamiliarizes. It is foreign. Even the owner of the hands has to say, “I feel as if  I am an animal.” This time, perhaps it is her perspective that coincides with ours.  The close‐up has confronted the reality of her age. Her subjectivity is thrown off  guard.  This  malleability  can  be  understood  with  a  haptic  relationship  with  the  image.  Haptic  perception  relates  to  tactility,  akin  to  touching  with  our  eyes.  In  total opposition to an optical one which sets up a safe distance, haptic visuality  signals a sense of loss.14 Marks said,    “We become amoeba‐like, lacking a centre, changing as the surface to which we  cling changes. We cannot help but be changed in the process of interacting.”15     In Deleuze’s term, the close‐up is also a sign. But rather than to signify, it is one  to  be  encountered  in  “pure  movement,  duration  and  rhythm”16.  “They  are  material forces, not figurative images.”17     Ceasing  to  be  a  hand,  the  expanse  of  almost  translucent  skin,  we  cling,  both  filmmaker and viewer, onto the image, that is age.     

                                                        
13 See Ibid. p. 110  14 Marks, L. (2002). Sensuous Theory and Multisensory Media. US: University of Minnesota Press. 

p. xvi 
15 See Ibid.

16 Kennedy, B. (2000). “Towards an Aesthetics of Sensation” in Deleuze and Cinema. UK:  17 See Ibid.

 

Edinburgh University Press. p. 110 

 

 

13 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album  

 

 

14 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Varda’s approach to her filming subject becomes complicated when she tries to  represent.  Neither  inanimate  objects  nor  herself,  Varda  documents  a  group  of  homeless  youths  who  have  been  implicated  in  a  lawsuit  for  vandalizing  and  rummaging through supermarket bins. Cutting between the lawyer, supermarket  manager  and  the  youths,  Varda  attempts  to  represent  a  neutral  sequence  of  event.      While at it, she was struck by the beauty of the youths with their dogs, drawing  an aesthetic parallel with hair and fur. One sequence features a series of close‐up  faces of dog and man. Why do I find this coherence morally troubling? Man are  not dogs?      For Deleuze’s affect‐image, the close‐up and the face are equivalent. It is the part  of the body that experience micro‐movement of expression instead of movement  of extension.18 The immobility of the body is a sacrifice for intensive expressive  movements  on  the  face.  This  is  what  constitutes  affect,  nuances  leading  up  to  paroxysm.       He continues to identify two poles of the close‐up ‐ the reflecting face relating to  Quality  and  the  intensive  series  of  faces  relating  to  Power.19  The  former  is  an  eternal  image,  within  the  contours  of  the  face  is  reflected  a  unity,  a  thought,  a  quality.  The  latter  is  a  series  of  faces  (close‐ups)  that  brings  the  viewer  from  quality to quality, to emerge with a new quality, Power.       This somewhat obscure description is trudged through so as to identify Varda’s  series of faces with what Deleuze says of Eisenstein and his montage use of close‐ up. Deleuze explains that Eisenstein’s compact and continuous series is capable                                                          
18 Deleuze, G. (1983). Cinema I ­ The Movement Image transl. by Tomlinson, H. & Habberjam, B.  19 See Ibid. p. 93 

(1986). London: Continuum. p. 90  

 

15 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   of  destroying  the  binary  between  a  collective  and  the  individual.  It  is  done  by  “directly uniting an immense collective reflection with the particular emotions of  each  individual.”20  To  clarify  using  Varda’s  sequence,  the  close‐up  is  used  to  profile  each  individual,  dogs  included;  their  peculiar  colour,  texture  and  expressions together form a harmonious palette. That is used to illustrate their  common plight and their collective reproach to the law.      The succession of same, but different, contemplative faces produces affect. As the  voice‐over  says,  “it  was  picturesque.”21  It  is  in  the  filmmaker’s  power  to  create  this  new  quality  concerning  beauty.  It  can  be  said  that  the  subjects  have  been  aestheticized via the close‐up. In a sense, this means representation (of the event  or  of  the  homeless)  is  exceeded.  But  is  this  an  objectification  of  the  filmed  subject?     

 

 

                                                          
20 See Ibid. p. 94  21 Film quote from Varda, A.(2000). The Gleaners and I

    16 

 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album    

 

 

 

   

 

 

17 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Trinh T. Minh­ha, Reassemblage (1982), 40’    As  a  theorist  deconstructing  the  form  of  documentary,  Trinh  T.  Minh‐ha’s  Reassemblage is more a work of questions than answers. The film is constantly  self‐reflexive, “a film about what? About Senegal. About what in Senegal?”22      Minh‐ha mentions that wide‐angle shots are conventionally employed in favour  of  close‐up  in  documentaries  for  their  supposed  objectivity.  The  close‐up  presents  partial  images  which  are  neither  informative  nor  faithful  to  reality.  In  the  pursuit  of  naturalism,  other  techniques  are  also  preferred,  for  instance,  the  portable camera and voice recorder that records “real people in real location at  real tasks.”23 Documentaries thus derive its authority as truth from this constant  reference to reality. The adherence to teach or inform closes up meaning, leaving  no  room  for  interpretation  and  the  documentary  form  becomes  a  language  of  power. As Minh‐ha points out, “what is put forth as truth is often nothing more  than a meaning.”24     In  subversion,  Reassemblage  exemplifies  montage  techniques  that  are  non‐ didactic.  As  with  many  ethnographic  films,  it  presents  the  villagers  in  various  mundane  activities  but  in  a  formal  language  that  disrupts  what  is  familiar.  Conversations  foreign  to  the  English‐speaking  viewer  are  left  untranslated;  the  voice‐over is Minh‐ha’s own in an introspective tone and there is generous use of  the close‐up.    The film opens with a black screen accompanied by the sound of what seems like  a  tribal  celebration,  drumming  and  dancing.  Deleuze’s  theorizes  the  frame  as  a  limited system in which data is contained and is always either tending towards  saturation or rarefaction.  The black screen is the extreme rarefied image. But it                                                          
22 Film quote from Minh‐ha, T. (1982). Reassemblage   23 Minh‐ha, T. (1993) “The Totalizing Quest of Meaning” in Renov, M. (ed.)(1993). Theorizing  24 See Ibid. p. 90

Documentary. London: Routledge. p.94 

 

 

18 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   is not empty, it is an opacity that is “legible as well as visible”.25 The black screen  is perhaps, like a close‐up? Unrecognisable, what are we to make out of it? This  blackness infused with festivity is a comment on representation, on the value we  have placed on looking. The anthropological eye that is blocked first before it can  see. 

                                                        
25 Deleuze, G. (1983). Cinema I ­ The Movement Image transl. by Tomlinson, H. & Habberjam, B. 

(1986). London: Continuum. p. 14 

 

19 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   The next example is a full sequence.   (Every time it cuts, the new image is recorded.)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album  

 

 

21 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   It  begins  with  Minh‐ha  saying,  “nudity  does  not  reveal  the  hidden.  It  is  its  absence.”26 A woman is sitting half‐nude.    Through  the  voice‐over,  she  continues  with  an  anecdote  about  nudity.  A  man  who is attending a slideshow on Africa turns to his wife with guilt in his face and  says, “I’ve seen some pornography tonight.”27     Partial  images  of  other  half‐nude  women  follow  one  after  another.  The  closest  zooms  in  onto  a  single  breast,  some  shows  just  the  upper  torso,  others  have  space  for  a  background.  These  close‐ups  do  not  constitute  a  whole;  there  is  no  establishing shot or a single subject these breasts can anchor to. The quick cuts  between  them  also  mean  they  function  differently  from  those  in  Varda’s  film.  They  behave  like  proper  fragments  arbitrarily  montage  together.  As  bare  as  nudity, perhaps there is no signifying message?    This is also a clever juxtaposition with the slideshow of Africa we are prompted  to imagine, which the man has seen and taken as pornography.   

                                                        
26 Film quote from Minh‐ha, T. (1982). Reassemblage  27 See Ibid.

 

 

22 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Another sequence uses a close‐up image of a breast repeatedly.   

   

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

    It is of the women labouring. The sequence is rhythmically edited to synchronise  with what sounds like drums or the pounding of grains. The alternating motif of  the single breast must mean something, but what?    23 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album     Deleuze mentions the screen as the ultimate frame, it “gives a common standard  of measurement to things which do not have one – long shots of countryside and  close‐ups of the face, an astronomical system and a single drop of water – parts  which  do  not  have  the  same  denominator  of  distance,  relief  or  light.”28  It  therefore  deterritorialises  the  image.  Again,  Deleuze  on  the  close‐up:  “It  abstracts  it  from  all  spatio­temporal  co­ordinates,  that  is  to  say  it  raise  it  to  the  status of Entity.”29    There is a sense of freedom in the close‐up. On screen, the frame equalizes it with  the widest of landscape and all spatio‐temporal co‐ordinates can be disregarded.  Yet, when it repeats itself, it is located, in between the other shots. It refuses to  rise to an independent status of Entity. However, its neighbouring shots do not  recognise  it  either.  What  is  apparent,  however,  is  the  zooming  in  and  out  of  perspective.  Maybe  these  close‐ups  act  as  shifters,  ensuring  no  continuity  and  thereby emphasizing the constructedness of things seen on screen.     

                                                        
28 Deleuze, G. (1983). Cinema I ­ The Movement Image transl. by Tomlinson, H. & Habberjam, B.  29 See Ibid. p. 98 

(1986). London: Continuum. p. 16 

 

24 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Conclusion    Lastly,  the  idea  of  objectifying  or  possessing  film  subjects  should  be  revisited.  The  close‐up  sought  to  disown  representation  and  so  the  filmed  subject  is  sometimes forgotten. Is that acceptable? Freed to make its own meaning, can we  also suggest that the close‐up is the most vulnerable for manipulation?    Deleuze  usefully  reminds  us  of  the  out‐of‐field.  That  is  what  is  not  seen  or  understood within the frame of the screen. The close‐up by suppressing the out‐ of‐field,  “gives  it  an  even  more  decisive  importance”.  Either  by  connecting  the  image with what is beyond, before or after, the close‐up facilitates the presencing  of things (without having to be seen, it is present nonetheless).    The  word  presencing  is  borrowed  from  Steyerl  who  talks  about  documentary  form as a translation between language of things to language of man.    “Translating the language of things is not about eliminating objects, nor  about  inventing  collectivities,  which  are  fetishised  instead.  It  is  rather  about  creating  unexpected  articulations,  […]  presencing  precarious,  risky,  at  once  bold  and  preposterous  articulations  of  objects  and  their  relations,  which  still  could  become  models  for  future  types  of  connection.”30      That said, the close‐up shot is capable of the unexpected. Constituted in the film,  it  can  never  divorce  itself  from  what  is  before  and  after.  Perhaps  it  is  the  interplay  between  these  two  positions  that  opens  up  meaning  and  grant  new  affects.  

                                                        
30 Steyerl, H. (2006). “The Language of Things”.  

Availabe from: http://eipcp.net/transversal/0606/steyerl/en/base_edit 

    25 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   Bibliography    Baudrillard, J (1994). “The System of Collecting” in Elsner, J. & Cardinal, R.  (ed.)(1994). The Cultures of Collecting. London: Reaktion Books    Baudrillard, J. (1998). “Simulacra and Simulations” in Poster, M. (ed.)(2001). Jean  Baudrillard: Selected Writings. Cambridge: Polity Press    Deleuze, G. (1983). Cinema I ­ The Movement Image transl. by Tomlinson, H. &  Habberjam, B. (1986). London: Continuum     Kennedy, B. (2000). “Towards an Aesthetics of Sensation” in Deleuze and Cinema.  UK: Edinburgh University Press    Kracauer, S. (1960). “The Establishment of Physical Existence” in Theory of Film:  The Redemption of Physical Reality. New Jersey: Princeton University Press    Marks, L. (2002). Sensuous Theory and Multisensory Media. US: University of  Minnesota Press    Minh‐ha, T. (1993) “The Totalizing Quest of Meaning” in Renov, M. (ed.)(1993).  Theorizing Documentary. London: Routledge    Steyerl, H. (2006). “The Language of Things”   Availabe from: http://eipcp.net/transversal/0606/steyerl/en/base_edit  Accessed on: 27 Apr 2011    Steyerl, H. (2007). “Documentary Uncertainty” in A prior (No. 15)  Availabe from: http://www.aprior.org/apm15_steyerl_docu.htm  Accessed on: 27 Apr 2011    Steyerl, H. (2009). “In Defense of the Poor Image” in e­flux journal (No. 10, Nov)  Available from: http://www.e‐flux.com/journal/view/94  Accessed on: 27 Apr 2011    Film references    Varda, A.(2000). The Gleaners and I, 78’    Parreno, P. (1991). No More Reality, 4’     Minh‐ha, T. (1982). Reassemblage, 40’    Other resources    No More Reality film stills taken from:  

 

26 

Joyce Teo | BA(Hons) Fine Art & History of Art Year II Goldsmiths | April 2011 | HT52063A Moving Image *Note: This is a soft copy of a research file in the form of a photo album   http://www.newmedia‐art.org/cgi‐bin/show‐ oeu.asp?ID=150000000034760&lg=GBR  Accessed on: 27 Apr 2011 

 

27 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful