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Contents what’s inside
Tahoe Magazine is a product of the
Tahoe Daily Tribune, North Lake Tahoe
Bonanza, Sierra Sun and Lake Tahoe
Action. All content is copyrighted,
November, 2011. Tahoe Magazine
strives for accuracy and is not
responsible if event details change
after publication.
cover stories
___________________________________________
14 Tracing the roots of the
snow halfpipe
28 Seasons of change for
the ski industry
M ski & ride
___________________________________________
20 Push it to the limit
with snowkiting
36 Earning your turns
in the backcountry
Mtahoe people
___________________________________________
40 The legendary Jim Rippey
44 Photographer Keoki Flagg
48 Ski racer Travis Ganong
50 South Shore’s sweetheart,
Jamie Anderson
Mresort guides
___________________________________________
58 Winter recreation map
60 What’s new at all 14
of the region’s ski resorts
Mtahoe history
___________________________________________
90 The Donner Party
94 Ice harvesting used to be
big business
Mdining & nightlife
___________________________________________
100 Local bands rock Tahoe
112 Fine dining on a
ski bum’s budget
Mwhat to do
___________________________________________
122 Do what the locals do
126 Events not to be missed
144 Advertisers’ directory
cover photo
Skiers Nancy Ellrod & Larry Segal
enjoy some fresh powder down
Mainline Pocket at Squaw Valley USA.
Photo by Hank de Vre
Publishers:
Michael Gelbman
Kimberly Kuntz
Editors:
Annie Flanzraich
Kevin MacMillan
Layout & Design:
Keigh Cox
Jesse Mireles
Jina Padilla
Terri Thomas
Media Marketing Consultants:
Lorea Beshears
Stacy Collins
Michelle Geary
Ryan Johnson
Susan Kokenge
Carolyn O’Connor
Natasha Schue
Circulation:
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• Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel
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• Lake Tahoe has the largest concentration of
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• Te Winter Olympics were held at Squaw
Valley in 1960.
• Te Godfather II, Te Bodyguard, City of
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• Tere are 63 tributaries draining into Lake
Tahoe and only one outfow at the Truckee
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• Te Tahoe City Dam at the Truckee River only
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 11
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12 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Communities Towns & resorts surrounding Lake Tahoe
If you live here long enough, you stop seeing
the lake as a region. It’s because all those little
communities surrounding the lake — from the
25,000 people in South Lake Tahoe to the 250
in Carnelian Bay — have fierce local identities
they do not want to lose. This guide will help you
understand where you are, as you tour beautiful
Lake Tahoe.
INCLINE VILLAGE
This luxury village is home to some of the wealthiest people
in the world. When you drive through, take Lakeside Boulevard
to view the large estates that border the lake on its northeast
side. Only five miles from the casinos, and 30 miles from Reno
and Carson City, Incline Village offers its own mountain in
Diamond Peak and a number of winter athletic training hot
spots — not to mention private beaches that, even in the
winter, afford beautiful views of the lake.
KINGS BEACH
Just west of Incline Village, Kings Beach sits atop Lake Tahoe.
With easy access to Northstar, the casinos and the lake, Kings
Beach truly lives up to its name. And it’s only going to get
better. With $48 million in improvements scheduled for the
downtown corridor, the future of Kings Beach will see easy
access for visitors between the shopping areas and recreation
areas, all of which serves as the perfect Kings Beach venue for
the upcoming 31st annual SnowFest!
NORTHSTAR
Just north of Kings Beach on Highway 267, halfway between
Truckee and the lake, Northstar is a blossoming resort area
that is filled with summertime activities. Best known for its
shopping — jewelry, kids clothing, outdoor gear, you name
it — its winter terrain park and its family friendly ski trails,
Northstar is perfect for an afternoon with the kids. Also home
to the $300 million Ritz Carlton, Lake Tahoe and a multi-
million redeveloped base area, Northstar will play host to a
number of fun festivals and events year-round.
TRUCKEE
The Town of Truckee is the gateway to the lake. With a rich
history of saloons, gunslingers and other wild west fantasies,
it works hard to keep its local charm while playing host
to the thousands of guests who stay in our area each year.
With nearby Donner State Memorial Park and a downtown
shopping area, Truckee can entertain just about anyone with
some time on their hands. With a rich downtown shopping
corridor and easy access to, among others, Sugar Bowl Ski
Resort, Royal Gorge USA-Cross Country Ski Resort and the
marvel that is the Donner Summit backcountry, Truckee’s
winter playground is at your fingertips.
SQUAW VALLEY
Halfway between Truckee and the lake on Highway 89,
Squaw Valley USA is a world-recognized ski resort and home
of the 1960 Winter Olympics. It’s also home to a great party to
kick off SnowFest! The Tram Car takes visitors up to the top
of the mountain to enjoy spectacular views and ice skating.
The base area provides shopping and family activities, and
plenty of parking. Speaking of Olympics, the mountain is home
to some of the world’s best winter athletes, including gold
medalist and America’s sweetheart, Julia Mancuso.
ALPINE MEADOWS
Just a couple miles south of Squaw, Alpine Meadows is
arguably the locals’ favorite skiing and riding spot in the whole
area; offering a diverse selection of terrain and difficulty, you’ll
need your A-game to represent at this resort. And definitely
be sure to learn “Cornology” at Alpine — what they call the
science of skiing spring snow.
TAHOE CITY
On the northwest side of the lake, Tahoe City is a perfect
little hamlet for visitors to enjoy the quiet of the lake while
having plenty of entertainment options close by. With good
restaurants and easy access to businesses and the picturesque
walk along Commons Beach, Tahoe City has everything you
need. And this is where SnowFest! started, way back in 1981.
Celebrate 31 years of this true community event this March in
TC, as the locals call it.
HOMEWOOD
On the West Shore just south of Tahoe City lies Homewood,
a small winter ski resort that boasts one of the best lake views
in the entire basin. Homewood is one of the most beautiful
places to stay, as it is surrounded by old-growth elm and pine
trees, and sits just yards from the lake. And if you get a chance,
talk to some of the locals — they are the definition of “tight-
knit community,” and you might learn a thing or two from
them, especially about our curious bear population.
MEEKS BAY
With a heritage as a gathering place that began as the
ancestral Washoe lands, this small neighborhood on Tahoe’s
West Shore offers spectacular views of the lake and great access
to nearby state parks. Meeks Bay has its own fire station, and
the luxurious Meeks Bay Resort offers a truly unique vacation
experience at one of Tahoe’s oldest and most historical locales.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 13
SOUTH LAKE
TAHOE/STATELINE
The largest of the communities
around Lake Tahoe, South Lake
Tahoe — its only city — has a large
variety of entertainment options.
The area’s biggest casinos bring
in the area’s biggest acts— from
Elton John to Bob Dylan to Rascal
Flats and Nelly — so if nightlife is
what you’re looking for, make a
trip to South Lake. Did we mention
Heavenly Mountain Resort is there
too? South Lake Tahoe has it all.
MEYERS
Just south of South Lake Tahoe,
Meyers is a funky town that is
home to many locals. If you’re
looking for a trip off the beaten
path, try lunch or dinner in Meyers,
and come back telling stories about
the “real” Tahoe.
KIRKWOOD
About an hour south of the lake,
Kirkwood is a ski resort that offers
plenty of fun for locals and visitors.
One of its best deals happen in the
Spring — if you own a local season pass to any of the region’s other
resorts, you might want to keep your ears open for Kirkwood’s spe-
cial deal. Trust us.
HEAVENLY
Heavenly Village offers shopping selections, great food and even
a cinema for the whole family to enjoy. The world-famous gondola
will take you to gorgeous winter views of the lake and the snowshoe
hike back to town, should you try it, is perfect for those who are in
shape — or want to be.
ZEPHYR COVE
Located on the southeast short of the lake, Zephyr Cove is a
historic area. Businesses nearby offer a slew of fun activities, and
Zephyr Cove Resort offers perhaps the best line of snowmobile
tours in the region, for people who need a bit more horsepower in
their winter fun.
GLENBROOK
On the northeast shore of Lake Tahoe, historic Glenbrook
epitomizes the idea of rural and lake. Only 150 acres of the town
have been developed, leaving homeowners and visitors with
undisturbed serenity and unique recreational opportunities.
SAND HARBOR
With a sandy beaches, boat launches, picnic spots and access to
world-class biking, hiking and fishing, Sand Harbor is one of the
most popular summer spots on the lake. But that doesn’t mean it’s
not full of plenty of winter adventures. Be sure to pack your snow-
shoes or cross-country skis, as you can catch the Flume Trail and
the Tahoe Rim Trail nearby, hit the trails down the road at Spooner
Lake cross country and explore the backcountry between Lake
Tahoe and Carson City. T
Lake
Tahoe
Airport
Sand
Harbor
Kirkwood
Meyers
To Markleeville
South
Lake Tahoe
Heavenly
Alpine
Meadows
Squaw Valley
Northstar
Gardnerville
Hope Valley
Sierra-at-Tahoe
North
South
West East
Sugar
Bowl
14 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
OF THE HALFPI PE
By Sylas Wright
Tahoe Magazine
Shaun White owes a heart-
felt thank you to the
Lake Tahoe skate rats of
the late 1970s.
Because without them,
there might not exist the fnely
manicured, giant snow ditches with
the smooth vertical walls on which he
makes such a comfortable living.
He can credit Mark Anolik, who in 1979 discov-
ered what became known as the frst-ever snowboard
halfpipe near the site of the Tahoe City dump. Terry Kidwell
— aka the Father of Freestyle — deserves a genuine nod of ap-
preciation, too, as do his old skateboard buddies, Bob Klein, Allen
Arnbrister, Keith Kimmel and Shaun Palmer, among others.
Tey’re the ones who took skateboarding to the snow, steering the
nascent — and still not accepted — sport of snowboarding in the freestyle
direction that defnes it today.
“Te reason the Tahoe City Pipe was found and ridden is because of skate-
boarding and the desire of guys like Terry Kidwell and Keith Kimmel to ride
their snowboards in the snow like a skateboard. Same with me,” said Andy
Berendsen, a pro skater at the time from Winchester Skatepark near San Jose.
“When I started hanging out with those guys, we were all on the same
page,” Berendsen continued. “We wanted to ride skateboards in the snow,
basically — with bigger airs and all that kind of stuf.”
From its start more than three
decades ago as a single ditch
at the Tahoe city dump to the
towering 18- and 22-foot super
pipes that are becoming the
norm at Lake Tahoe, the
evolution of the halfpipe
has come a long way
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 15
best, he said, adding that they focused their eforts on building up
and hitting the frst, main transition.
“By that time we had also been riding powder for a couple
of years, so we were already into riding. Ten we started hitting
that pipe and tried to take it in a little bit diferent direction,” said
Kidwell, who still lives on the West Shore of Lake Tahoe.
Te direction they went was a given. Tey brought their skate
tricks to the snow — backside airs, hand plants, rock´n’ rolls, alley-
oops, all of them. In a few years at another early sessioning spot,
the Donner Quarterpipe, Kidwell would throw the frst-ever Mc-
Twist on snow, shortly after skater Mike McGill invented the trick.
“Terry was all stoked on that, so he learned it in a couple of days,
and did it all stylie and tucked and tweaked and all that stuf,” said
Berendsen, who moved up to Tahoe full time in 1985.
Word spread about the Tahoe City Pipe, and before long Kidwell
and Klein were joined by Damian Sanders and Shaun Palmer, who
would come up from Tahoe’s South Shore, as well as Tom Burt,
Jim Zellers, Berendsen and his good skateboarding friend from
Winchester Skatepark, Steve Caballero. Anolik quit snowboarding,
for the most part, and faded from the scene.
Mike Chantry, who was the manager and resident pro at Flow
Motion Skatepark in Reno in the late ´70s, also was in the
mix. And Chantry had con-
nections, having worked
with Tom Sims on some of
the frst-ever Sims Snow-
board models in the ´70s.
“Chantry was right in the
middle of it because he was
a little older than the rest of
us and he had a job — he
was a lineman for the phone
company — and that gave us
a place to stay and hang out
and ride his ramp,” Berend-
sen said.
It was Chantry who then
brought Sims to the Tahoe
City Pipe during a session.
“Tat’s when we got
spotted by Tom Sims,” said
Kidwell. “Basically, he saw
me and Allen and a couple
other people, and me and
Allen got sponsored on the
spot with free equipment
and stuf. So I transitioned to
Sims right there.”
Kidwell was the best rider
of the group, hands down,
both Chantry and Berend-
sen said. In fact, he’s the
main reason Sanders and
... continued on next page
Hannah Teter of Meyers airs out of a 22-foot superpipe during a 2010 U.S. Grand Prix
event at Mammoth Mountain. Sylas Wright / Tahoe Magazine
“WE WANTED TO RIDE
SKATEBOARDS IN
THE SNOW,
BASICALLY.”
- ANDY BERENDSEN, PRO SKATEBOARDER
THE BIRTH OF THE SNOW HALFPIPE
Te exact sequence of events regarding the initial discovery of the
Tahoe City Pipe is debatable.
According to Anolik, a 14-year-old skateboarder from North Ta-
hoe High School at the time, he came across the natural pipe-shaped
feature by luck and then relayed the site to the elder Kidwell, Klein
and Arnbrister at school.
“It was up from the creek, just this little drainage that had the
shape of a halfpipe,” Anolik said. “When we came to school on
Monday I said, ‘Hey man, you guys should come check out this spot
I found; it’s like a natural halfpipe.’ And it just kind of took of from
there.”
Kidwell, who was already riding a primitive fberglass Winterstick
board, “with a big ol’ scag on the bottom,” thinks he remembered
driving with Klein when the two friends spotted the feature from a
dirt road.
“We were four-wheelin’ around and we saw it, and we instantly
saw the potential,” Kidwell said. “It was like, ‘Wow, we’ve got to show
up here in the winter and build a lip on this.’”
Klein put the story in context to the best of his ability.
“Te funny thing to me about the Tahoe City dump is that for
years and years and years I have told the same story: Mark Anolik
found it, he told me and Terry and Allen Arnbrister about it and it
was on from there,” he said.
“Just a couple of years ago, Terry said he remembers it difer-
ent, and I thought it was really funny because he felt it impor-
tant to clarify. I told him he didn’t need to change his memory
and neither did I. We should both just tell what we remember
and let the reader decide.”
Regardless of who discovered it, the Tahoe City Pipe was
on the map, and with a small but devout clique of
riders who sessioned it often.
Kidwell described the natural fea-
ture as having about 10-foot walls
(without snow), with a larger
run-in wall entering it. Tere
were only a couple of hits at
Palmer drove all the way from South Lake Tahoe to ride on
the North Shore.
“Te guys from the South Shore would come because Ter-
ry was up here, and they all wanted to hang out with Terry,”
Chantry said. “He was the god. Tey all wanted to be hanging
out with him every weekend. So my place was snowboard
and skateboard central.”
EXPANDING THEIR HORIZONS
By 1980, Donner Ski Ranch had become the frst ski resort
in the Tahoe area to sell a lift ticket to a snowboarder. Other
local resorts followed suit in the coming years.
But really, “it was still all about hiking back then,” Berend-
sen said, “all about just fnding whatever you could fnd to
ride.”
Enter the Donner Quarterpipe, a natural feature located
just of of Old Highway 40 between Sugar Bowl and Donner
Ski Ranch. “Someone found that and we started session-
ing it around ’83,” said Berendsen, who now works as a lift
mechanic at Sugar Bowl so he can snowboard in the winter.
“We used to park our car right by the road and turn the stereo
on so you could hear it.”
Te Donner Quarterpipe, which was reportedly unveiled
by brothers Eddie and Cary Hargraves, was the site of much
of the early snowboard foot-
age, Kidwell said. It’s also
where Kidwell frst learned his
McTwist.
“Tat was kind of a famous
spot in a way because of the
footage that came out of there,”
said Kidwell. “What was cool
about that hit is that there was
a really long runway into it.
Te Tahoe City halfpipe, you
had to build an extra mound
to get extra speed.”
In 1983, Sims organized
the frst snowboard contest,
the World Championships at
Soda Springs. It turned out
horribly, said Chantry, who
went on to become a head
U.S. snowboard judge and
later established the current
judging criteria used in inter-
national events.
“All they did was push
snow up on the sides, and it was just
like this ugly, crazy-looking 4-foot ditch,” Chantry said. “We looked at it and
said, ‘No friggin’ way.’ So we grabbed shovels and started digging freeways,
and everybody had their own hit, so there was like 99 hits going down
this pipe. Everybody had their own, and then somebody would grumble
because someone got a bigger air and landed in their landing and put a
kink in it.”
Te Burton team led by Jake Burton, an East Coast Snurfer, reportedly
threatened to boycott the frst contest, claiming halfpipe riding did not
belong in snowboarding competition.
... from previous page EVOLUTION
16 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Tom Sims rides the Tahoe City Pipe in 1983, four years after its discovery. Photo: James Cassimus/ Courtesy of Mike Chantry
Terry Kidwell hand plants at the Donner Quarterpipe in 1986.
Photo: Bud Fawcett / Courtesy of Mike Chantry
Terry Kidwell airs
out of the Tahoe
Quarterpipe in
1985. Photo:
Bud Fawcett
/ Courtesy of
Mike Chantry
775.588.6276
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Berendsen described the contrasts between the West Coast skateboard-
er-snowboarders versus the more alpine-minded riders from the East.
“Te East Coast riders were racers, and when we met them out here
they were fast and aggressive and all about racing. And we were like, ‘Let’s
do an air. Follow us.’ But they didn’t really take to that real well,” Berendsen
said. “So it took a long time for that to settle down, for the East Coast and
West Coast to become friends and not worry about it anymore.”
Eddie Hargraves, who lived in Soda Springs, won the frst contest, while
Kidwell won the next two, said Chantry, who, along with Klein, judged
the second and third years of the World Championships. Kidwell won
again the frst year the World Championships moved to Colorado, in 1986,
Chantry said.
GROWING THE SPORT
By then, halfpipe building was beginning to progress with the use of
machinery, and several resorts hopped on the bandwagon.
“By ’88, you knew it was going to go of,” Kidwell said. “While we didn’t
know halfpipes would become 22 feet or whatever, you saw the progres-
sion, and you just knew it was going to get bigger.”
... continued on page 18
“SO IT TOOK A LONG TIME FOR... EAST COAST
AND WEST COAST TO BECOME FRIENDS AND
NOT WORRY ABOUT IT ANYMORE.”
— ANDY BERENDSEN, PRO SKATEBOARDER
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 17
A the scan of the original poster from the 1985 Snowboarding
Championships World Pro Am at Soda Springs, with signatures from
many famous snowboarders from that era.
18 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
... from previous page EVOLUTION
Two years later, in 1990, the frst halfpipe-cutting machine
debuted, called the Pipe Dragon, which later became the Super
Dragon. Resorts also tinkered with digging their pipes into the
ground — a practice that took some fne-tuning to master but is still
used today.
All the while, halfpipes continued to grow in size, from 12-foot
walls to 15, then 18, which became the standard superpipe size, said
Mike Schipani, terrain park manager at Northstar-at-Tahoe.
Schipani said Northstar began using a Pipe Dragon in 1999. By
2006, the North Shore resort had four halfpipes, Schipani said — a
13-footer, an 18-foot superpipe and two other 13-footers set up side-
by-side with a spine between them.
Now, with Vail Resorts’ recent signing of Shaun White, who has
named Northstar his home mountain, Northstar will boast its frst-
ever 22-foot superpipe, shaped with a Zaugg pipe cutter.
“We are super excited,” Schipani said. “In order to remain pro-
gressive in this industry, you defnitely need a 22-foot superpipe.”
Boreal Mountain Resort also will feature a 22-foot pipe this sea-
son, while Squaw Valley USA opened a 22-footer to the public at the
end of last season, after it was used for a private photo shoot.
From here, while the world’s top riders continue to progress in
the halfpipe — both snowboarders and skiers, who took to the pipe
with the arrival of twin-tip skis in the late ´90s — no one is quite sure
where the progression will end on the building side.
“I’ve wondered that myself,” Schipani said. “From here on out, I
think it’s hard to say. It’s hard to say if it will go to the 24- or 25-foot
pipe in the future.”
“I don’t know if they’re going to keep getting bigger — they prob-
ably could,” said Jon Slaughter, marketing director at Boreal. “But I
think we’re going to see more of a progression in the riding than the
building. You’re going to start seeing guys doing back-to-back triple
fips.”
No matter where the progression leads, the Father of Freestyle,
who’s still snowboarding strong at the age of 48, will be there, stay-
ing true to the roots he helped plant more than 30 years ago in the
Tahoe City Pipe.
“I still have a lot of fun in them,” Kidwell said of halfpipes. “I’m
not trying to spin to win or anything in the 18-foot ones. I don’t
have anything to prove anymore. It’s just like it was in the beginning
— it’s all about having fun.” T
“IN ORDER TO REMAIN
PROGRESSIVE IN THIS
INDUSTRY, YOU DEFINITELY
NEED A 22-FOOT SUPERPIPE.”
— MIKE SCHIPANI,
TERRAIN PARK MANAGER AT NORTHSTAR-AT-TAHOE
Danny Davis of Truckee performs a double cork high above the
wall of a 22-foot superpipe during a 2010 U.S. Grand Prix event at
Mammoth Mountain. Sylas Wright / Tahoe Magazine

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Ski & ride
PUSH IT TO
THE LIMIT

S NOWKI T I NG IS SLOWLY GAINING
SPEED ON THE WEST COAST — ONE LOCAL
RESIDENT EXPLAINS WHY IT’S A RUSH
EVERYONE SHOULD TRY
T
yler Brown can ski uphill.
He can ski on fat ground.
He can ski almost anywhere,
as long as there’s wind. And this
isn’t cross-country skiing or Alpine
touring or ski mountaineering
— it’s skiing with jumps, fips,
spins and speed powered by a
source as natural as, well, air.
Brown, of Truckee, is a part
of the up-and-coming group of
snowkiters in the Tahoe area
who are pushing the sport to new
boundaries, both physically and
technically.
“It’s so three-dimensional,”
Brown said. “With skiing and
snowboarding, it’s just going
downhill. I can look at a mountain
so much more diferently now.”
Similar to its watery coun-
terpart, kitesurfng, snowkiting
follows the same basic structure: a
large kite with a four-line control
system pulls a skier or rider across
the snow. Lately, Brown and crew
have been using the kites to access
the backcountry on both the North
and South shores of Lake Tahoe.
“If you can ski down it, you can
(kite) up it,” Brown said. “It’s pretty
incredible how far we can get out
there.”
Brown can race up mountains,
climbing at a rate around 1,000
vertical feet every two minutes de-
pend-
ing on wind,
he said. Skilled snowkit-
ers can jump from clifs or let their
kites lift them of fat ground and
glide safely to landings, he said.
With the variety and shear scope
of the terrain, the possibilities for
maneuvers and exploration are
greater on snow than in water,
Brown said.
“IF
YOU CAN SKI
DOWN IT, YOU CAN
(KITE) UP IT.
IT’S PRETTY INCREDIBLE
HOW FAR WE CAN GET
OUT THERE.”
— Truckee resident Tyler Brown
ATHLETE PROFILE
TYLER BROWN
HOMETOWN: TRUCKEE
CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: CURRENT NORTH AMERICAN SNOWKITE TOUR CHAMPION
FAVORITE SPOTS: EASTERN SIERRA
FAVORITE TRICK: OFF AXIS 720 TOXIC GRAB
WORST CRASH: “I landed on flat from about 40 feet up. I bruised both
heels and lost both of my big toe nails that same day.”
OUTLOOK FOR THE SPORT: “In the next 10 years i feel more and more
people will discover kiting and realize how great of a backcountry
tool a kite can be. Backcountry quivers will consist of a shovel,
probe, beacon, skins and a kite. Eventually, the mountains will
be filled with colorful kites, granting backcountry enthusiasts
access to miles and miles of free terrain.”
LI FE PHI LOSOPHY:
“Life is short. You never know
how much time you have. Get out
there and go for it!”
SPONSORS: BEST KITEBOARDING,
TAHOE MADE ATTIRE, KGB KITEBOARDING,
GO PRO, LINE SKIS
THE LIMIT
... continued on page 22
By Dylan Silver
Tahoe Magazine
Photo: Richard Hallman
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22 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
David Grossman, publisher of Drift Snowkite Magazine, agrees.
“Te sport has incredible terrain to play in, an almost smooth surface
to move over and the advantage of 100 years of ski and snowboard
technology and skills to build of of,” he said.
Snowkiting has taken of in popularity in snowy states with large open
treeless areas like Utah, Montana, Minnesota and Idaho.
“California hasn’t been leading the charge in snowkiting like it did in
skateboarding, surfng and even snowboarding, but the scene is set for
that to change,” Grossman said.
Growing the sport out West
In 2011, Brown won the North American Snowkite Tour, a series
of four competitions across the U.S., placing him at the top of the
competitive feld. He plans on traveling to Europe next season to
compete, but he still has his eye on growing the sport in California.
Brown and Royce Vaughn of Kite Gear Boxx out of Oakland, Calif.,
have been looking to host snowkite lessons in the Tahoe area, but
haven’t found a home base just yet. Vaughn believes it’s easier to learn
the mechanics of fying kites on snow than it is on water, and because of
this, snowkiting is growing rapidly.
“People are saying it’s the fastest growing sector of kiteboarding,”
Vaughn said.
Without the challenges of being in the water, beginners can learn
to navigate the wind in a matter of hours as opposed to several days,
Vaughn said. And once a beginner learns how to handle the kite, it’s
easier to cross over into other realms, he said.
“Once you get the hang of the kite, you can do it anywhere in the
world,” Vaughn added.
Snowkiters are fying around Mt. Rose, Hope Valley, Grass Lake, Red
Lake Peak and Caples Lake, among others. Tere’s a lot to explore and
kiters will keep going farther and farther into the mountains.
... from page 20
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 23
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Tough with the right size kite
snowkiters can ride in winds up to
40 mph, the ideal conditions are
15-20 mph winds, common in the
Lake Tahoe Basin.
As people realize how
practical and fun it is to access the
backcountry in the area, more and
more skiers and snowboarders
will likely take up snowkiting here,
Grossman said.
“Tahoe has an amazing pool of
talent in skiers and snowboarders,”
he added. “All those athletes
need to take a couple hours and
learn some kite skills and feel
the freedom and power a kite
provides.” T
QUI CK HI TS
Equipment
//Te equipment is similar to
kitesurfng. Of course, you’ll
need a kite, harness, lines
and control bar at minimum.
On top of that, you’ll need a
full ski and snowboard setup:
snow pants, jacket, gloves,
boots and skis or snowboard.
A helmet and knife are also
recommended.
where
//Snowkiting can be done
almost anywhere there’s wind
and few obstacles. Kiters must
have enough room to fy the
kite. Due to the speed, long
distances can be traveled
quickly. Te more space, the
better. Snowkiters in Tahoe are fying around Mt. Rose,
Hope Valley, Grass Lake, Red Lake Peak and Caples
Lake.
lessons
//Before snowkiting, one should know the basics of how
to fy a performance kite. Lessons are not ofered in Lake
Tahoe, though the possibility has been discussed by at
least one ski resort.
Photo Illustration: Michael Pavel
24 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
SKi & RIDE
communicate skier locations through radio frequency.
“We’re tracking where people go on the mountain,
at least what lifts they’re using,” Slone said.
Slone said Vail intends to release EpicMix at Northstar for the 2011-
’12 season and incorporate resort photography using radio frequency
technology as a way for photographers to automatically upload free
low-resolution images to skiers’ accounts, with hi-resolution images for
sale online.
Likely hoping to capitalize on Facebook trends, the social media
giant estimates more than 250 million photos are uploaded each day
to its site, according to Vail, with photo sharing one of its most popular
features.
“Using this RF technology, EpicMix photographers will seamlessly
deliver an image to everyone in a group picture and kids’ photos will be
sent to their parent’s secure account,” according to Vail.
MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL
Te benefts to EpicMix are spread to users in the form of fun stats,
photos and easy access to the mountain RF technology also used for
scanning lift tickets through ski clothing, meaning faster lift lines.
However, there is also a fnancial beneft to the resort with all of the
valuable user data.
If skiers take part in EpicMix, Vail will know who users ski with, their
favorite runs, favorite resorts, favorite times to ski and if accounts are
linked to Facebook or Twitter. Under a marketing microscope, this
By Jason Shueh
Tahoe Magazine
THE LATEST BUZZcoming from Tahoe ski
resorts may not be at the resorts at all. It may be coming from
your cell phone.
Today’s modern tech is plowing its way into the ski indus-
try via Facebook, Twitter and skier tracking apps on smartphones. Te
turn in technology could spell a revolution for the traditional skiing
experience, both for skiers and snowboarders and resorts across the
nation.
Take Vail Resorts’ latest app, EpicMix: the program released in
the 2010-’11 winter season at Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone,
Vail and Heavenly resorts allows instantaneous tracking of skier stats
including total vertical feet skied, lifts used, total days skied, resorts
visited within the Vail Resorts chain — all while automatically feeding
the information directly to a user’s EpicMix profle online, as well as
Facebook and Twitter if linked to the EpicMix profle.
Mike Slone, the company’s interactive director, said though the
program is still in its infancy, it has garnered huge success by users who
enjoy the bragging rights through the online comparisons with friends,
and the digital trophies they receive for their skiing accomplishments.
Last season, Vail reported nearly 100,000 guests activated EpicMix
accounts at the aforementioned fve resorts (the company purchased
Northstar-at-Tahoe after he app was introduced), generating more than
35 million social impressions and stacking up more than 55 billion
vertical feet of skiing.
“We wanted to create something that would enhance the overall
skier experience without intruding in it,” Slone said.
A key component to the app’s unobtrusive success is the surpris-
ing kicker that users don’t even need to turn their cell phones on to
participate — the majority of all lift tickets and season passes are able to
“We wanted to create
something that
would enhance
the overall skier
experience without
intruding in it.”
Mike Slone of Vail
Resorts, about the
company’s EpicMix app
... .continued on page 26
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 25
26 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
means the data could be turned to dollars
through personalized ofers, packages and
targeted mountain improvements.
Slone said Vail will be using the data to assess
its skiing operation similar to other resort com-
panies; however, for those fearing release of too
much personal information, there are privacy set-
tings within EpicMix to keep personal data secure
from other users or to have the resort clip out the
RF chip within a season pass (the downside to this
“Privacy is of utmost
importance to us. If
you don’t want to
be tracked you don’t
have to be.”
Mike Slone, regarding
privacy and social
media
being manual scans each time a skier uses a lift).
“Privacy is of utmost importance to us,” said Slone. “If
you don’t want to be tracked you don’t have to be.”
Ultimately, Slone said the app translates to turning the
ski experience into an inherently social experience more so
than it ever has been.
As an example Slone said he’s personally overheard
lunch conversations stemming from the program’s skiing
stats, seen Facebook pages using EpicMix’s trophy pins as
notable accomplishments, and users trying to visit more
runs and more resorts to earn their digital pins.
“EpicMix has really created a lot of cool stories,” said
Slone.
One of his fondest recollections of just how infu-
ential the app has been is a conversation he had with
an 83-year-old man who said when he began to use
the app, he began sking more and riding in places he
never thought to ride. Others have said they began
visiting more resorts they never considered before
despite years of skiing. T
... from page 24
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800.244.1752 Toll Free
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 27
Ski resorts are now neck deep
in social media programs like
Facebook and Twitter, using them
not only to spread the word but
also to generate discussions and
interact.
Rachael Woods, marketing
director at Alpine Meadows and
Homewood, said her resorts have
been using Facebook for the past
six years with startling results,
their pages exploding with fan-
driven conversations, resort con-
tests, latest news — and, perhaps
the best telling of success — more
than 10,600 “likes” as of August.
SKIING BEFRIENDS FACEBOOK AND TWITTER
“Facebook is a really quick and
convenient way to interact with
people who have a vested interest
in the mountain, and it’s a lot of
fun,” said Woods.
More than simply a vehicle
to distribute information, Alpine
Meadows has been using Face-
book to talk about everything from
a tasty pizza lunch, gathering feed-
back on potential promotional
contests to posting interesting
video footage of snowboarding
feats — really, anything of note or
interesting.
During Alpine’s Fourth of July
holiday, the resort held a July Fan
Quest Challenge, a uniquely Face-
book-oriented contest in which the
resort challenged skiers to sign up as
an Alpine Facebook fan in return for
discounts on lift tickets — every 1,000
new fans equaled a $3 reduction in
pre-sale lift tickets.
Te contest was a smashing suc-
cess both for skiers and the resort.
“Skiing and snowboarding I think
are inherently social and I think
Facebook is fun and infor-
mative,” Woods said. T

Ski & ride
By Matthew Renda & Jason Shueh
Tahoe Magazine
L
ake Tahoe has always been
entangled in a wrestling match
between ski industry growth
and local community interests
— and now more than ever, as millions
in resort upgrades are under way
heading into the 2011-12 ski season.
SEASON OF CHANGE
On the heels of historic purchases and mergers,
resort GMs feel Tahoe is on verge of something special

“This is our
time in ...
Lake Tahoe.”
— Squaw Valley USA
CEO Andy Wirth
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 29
... .continued on page 30
Vail Resorts is nearing completion
of $30 million in resort improvements
at Northstar-at-Tahoe. Across the way,
Squaw Valley Ski Holdings — which now
runs both Squaw Valley USA and Alpine
Meadows following September’s historic
combination of the neighboring resorts
— is embarking on a five-year, $50 mil-
lion renovation at Squaw, host of the 1960
Winter Olympics. Heavenly, Diamond Peak
and Mt. Rose ski resorts have already com-
pleted brand new base lodge construction.
At Kirkwood, officials there are pumping
in $6 million in improvements. And even
more change could come if JMA Ventures’
multi-million proposed renovation of
Homewood Mountain Resort on the West
Shore gains approval.
An industry term is “yield per skier,” which
designates how much each skier spends not only on the lift ticket,
but associated amenities such as merchandise, food and lodging.
Those on the business side of the ski resort organizational struc-
ture are consistently trying to augment this number. Conversely,
local government and residents are in a constant struggle to
ensure the yield is channeled toward local jobs, public projects
and local business revenues while allowing for
sustainable traffic levels and environmental
preservation.
The continual back-and-forth is a lot to take
in, as often it’s the community members struck
by the dramatic changes — which really started
in October 2010, when Vail bought Northstar
(KSL Capital, majority owner of Squaw Valley
Ski Holdings, bought Squaw a month later)
— who are unfortunately stuck in the middle.
If you ask some of the region’s top ski execu-
tives, they’ll tell the ongoing changes and
upgrades are not only necessary for the future
of Tahoe, but as trend-setting to earmark the
region as one of the best ski destinations in
North America.
“This is our time in ... Lake Tahoe — it’s our
time on a much bigger scale,” says Andy Wirth,
CEO of Squaw Valley USA.
Corporate takeover?
Optimism for change is not shared by all. Nina Pivirotto, 24,
came from Pittsburgh after graduating college to live, work and
play in the outdoor recreational Mecca that is Lake Tahoe. She is,
“Nobody wants
to see the
corporate world
take over Tahoe.”
— Nina Pivirotto,
24-year-old Tahoe resident
Left: Squaw Freeride Team member Tim Dutton emerges from a deep powder pocket on a run at Squaw Valley USA.
Copious snowfall during the 2010-11 winter season made for great powder skiing at all of the Tahoe ski areas. Photo: Keoki Flagg
30 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Ski industry ... from page 29
... .continued on page 32
in many ways, a typical Tahoe resident
— young, educated, but willfully eschewing
the big city rat-race, the corporate ladders and
rush to procure the corner office.
Like some, she prefers ski small resorts
like Homewood — in its current state — with
traditional lifts and absence of hotels or retail
outlets.
“Nobody wants to see the corporate world
take over Tahoe,” she said.
However, Alex Kruse, an employee at a local
snowboard and ski shop, couldn’t disagree
more. Kruse, 25, sees larger corporations as an
indigenous part of life in any true ski destina-
tion — the ski ame-
nities, season pass
options and cul-
ture necessitating
deep pockets only found within
the corporate world.
“I think it’s awesome that
you can buy one pass and ride
both Heavenly and Northstar,”
he said, referring to the fact
Vail’s Epic Pass not only gets
skiers access to Colorado-based
resorts such as Vail, Keystone,
Breckenridge and Beaver
Creek, but also secures access
to Northstar and South Lake
Tahoe’s Heavenly, which was
bought by Vail in 2002.
Kruse said he enjoys the vil-
lage atmosphere, teeming res-
taurants and rowdy bars that
accompany a big business ski
resort.
“Part of the reason I came to
Tahoe is because I wanted to
participate in a scene,” he said.
Countering opinions, however, beg the question: If there
is a middle ground between the region’s community inter-
ests and the ski industry’s corporate world?
Future prosperity,
a joint endeavor?
Standing at that intersection is Sandy Evans Hall, presi-
dent of the North Lake Tahoe Resort Association. She is
tasked with leading the organization as it invests millions
each year into North Tahoe marketing, tourism, infrastruc-
ture and transportation projects and programs through
Transient Occupancy Tax revenues — a surcharge tax paid
by lodging guests to rent rooms for 30 days or less.
According to NLTRA data, the average TOT collected in
District 5 of Placer County — encapsulating much of North
Tahoe — totaled about $9.25 in 2009-10 fiscal year, and
about $10.46 in 2010-11, an 11 percent increase.
Robust TOT funding, Hall said, in addition to the ski
resorts’ visitor draws, are vital to the concept of a destina-
tion ski area — replete with hotels, restaurants and other
amenities — that provides critical financial support to a
healthy local economy capable of providing a decent job
supply.
“What we’ve found by conducting research is the destina-
tion visitor stays in the area longer, spends more money per
day,” she said. “Also, the destination visitor typically comes
from high-income brackets, and they spend money in our
area.”
The last point is a big one for Hall and other regional eco-
nomic leaders, as increased visits don’t only benefit the big
resorts, but also the small independently owned lodging
operations, restaurants, retail stores and other enterprises
dependent on a strong annual influx of tourists for survival.
The resorts are aware of this symbiotic relationship,
and a good example is Vail Resorts’ charity donation pro-
gram, Echo, as evidence of the company’s commitment
to the entire Tahoe region; $20,000 was awarded this year
Excellence in Education, supporting schools within the
Tahoe Truckee Unified School District, and to the Truckee
River Watershed Council.
Another example, said Vail’s Bill Rock, CEO of Northstar,
is a $1 donation per online transaction between Heavenly
and Northstar to the Tahoe Fund, a nonprofit corporation
supporting conservation around the Lake Tahoe Basin, esti-
mated to total $75,000 by the end of Vail’s fiscal year.
“It’s like
anything else ...
there are bad
corporations
and there
are good
corporations.”
— Blaise Carrig, co-
president of Vail Resorts
Management Company
A snowboarder at Diamond Peak catches some air. Photo: Tom Zikas
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This all is coupled with Squaw and JMA Ventures, which have
individually donated at the $25,000-plus level to the Tahoe Fund.
Furthermore, JMA President Art Chapman said planned
improvements to Homewood’s lodging and village would bring an
estimated 500 construction jobs, 180 full-time jobs and roughly
$16-$20 million in visitor spending to the entire region through
additional visitors — in addition, an estimated $7 million would
be contributed annually to local public services through property
tax revenues and TOT taxes.
“Clearly this investment is going to have long-term conse-
quences in terms of adding to Tahoe as a major destination,”
Chapman said. “People today are going to other ski areas including
Utah and Colorado, and it was with this vision we undertook this
master plan for Homewood.”
One of the things that Vail
Resorts brings to Lake Tahoe’s
table is the capital resources and
know-how to begin aggressive
marketing campaigns that will
play nationally and internation-
ally.
“The national marketing game
is a pretty expensive one to play,”
said Blaise Carrig, co-president
of Vail Resorts Management
Company. “I think it’s fair to say
that Lake Tahoe has been under-
marketed in the past, at least on
a national or international level,
but obviously we are trying to
change that.”
One resort does
not a destination
make
One ski resort is not a ski
destination, just as one casino
or one amusement park is not a
destination. For tourism aficio-
nados, a destination is a region
dedicated to one dominant pur-
pose. In Tahoe — though recreation activities abound — skiing and
snowboarding is that purpose.
Yet a ski destination comes with costs as well as financial benefits.
More visitors mean more traffic congestion during peak hours. For
resorts to be competitive nationally, this requires land development
and the notion of marketing the region as a whole — which does cre-
ate some competition to local business owners unable to make such
huge infrastructure investments.
The goal, of course, is balance.
“It’s like anything else,” Carrig said. “There are bad corporations
and there are good corporations.”
Part of the reason that Vail Resorts is so successful (the company
recently reported that Epic Season Pass sales volume is up 9 percent
over the previous year), Carrig said, is it excels at giving the customer
what it wants while keeping its eye on balancing community inter-
ests.
“Each resort has to be true to its authentic roots,” he said. “Vail
owns six resorts, and I focus on cherishing and nurturing the indi-
“In Tahoe,
we have lots
of choices,
and that’s a
good thing.”
— Chase Kohee,
24-year-old Tahoe
resident
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 33
Lake Valley Properties
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for over 30 years
vidual position of each of those. Breckenridge is different from
Heavenly. So we try to run like a small resort where it makes sense,
and try to operate like a big corporation where it makes sense, like
marketing campaigns or capital improvements.”
At Northstar this year, authenticity means expansion in the form of
170 acres of new sidecountry terrain, a new high speed chairlift, the
construction of the on-mountain Zephyr Lodge, a 22-foot half pipe
constructed by Olympic Snowboarder Shaun White and village retail
improvements.
Squaw’s answer, Wirth said, was acquiring Alpine Meadows, a deal
that’s been a rumor for years. Last week, Wirth said he is in discus-
sions with Troy Caldwell — owner of the private White Wolf property
separating Squaw and Alpine — about a possible future cooperative
agreement, although Wirth he did not specify if such a agreement
could provide a connection between the resorts.
“Troy is a great guy,” said Wirth. “He’s a great friend. He’s got a
dream and we’re working together in terms of accomplishing things
on a long-term basis.”
While much of Squaw’s $50 million in upgrades will be allocated
toward culinary services and village renovations, Wirth said a sig-
nificant outlay will be dedicated to lift infrastructure, trail maps on
the mountain, and new grooming equipment with an eye toward
enhancing the ski experience.
Absolute balance
However, despite all the improvements, many avid skiers are still
turned away by crowds; thus, resort managers are always battling to
balance maximizing revenue with pleasing the customers and secur-
ing brand loyalty and repeat business.
“(The resort I skied at last year) got really crowded,” said Jacob
Casler, an 18-year-old Sierra Nevada College student. “I don’t care
how good the terrain is — if it’s too crowded, I’d rather not go.”
Danielle Dozbaba, a 19, agreed.
“The atmosphere is so important when deciding where to ski,” she
said. “Last year, I lived in Summit County, Colo., and I like going to
(Arapahoe Basin) because the lack of tourists meant everybody who
was skiing there was good.”
Chase Kohee, 24, brought up a different aspect of balance.
“Corporations themselves are not good or bad,” he said. “I don’t
want all the resort to be corporate-run and huge. You look at Sierra-
at-Tahoe and they’re bringing people to their resort through style,
events and fun. You look at Heavenly and they got their own way of
pushing business. Everybody’s got a different way of doing things.
“In Tahoe, we have a lot of choices, and that’s a good thing.” T
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36 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
SKI & RIDE Backcountry
has never been more popular in the Sierra Nevada
— but it has its dangers, too
By Adam Jensen
Tahoe Magazine
earning
your turns
M
aybe it’s the fresh snow.
Maybe it’s the sense of
solitude in nature. It may even
be that the cost of a lift ticket is
simply putting one foot in front of
the other. But increasing numbers
of skiers and snowboarders are
venturing into the Sierra Nevada
backcountry.
Te exact number of snow
enthusiasts making the leap to
the backcountry is unknown, but
anecdotal evidence abounds.
“I remember, back in the day,
it was pretty much limited to just
Telemark skiers, and we all knew
each other by name,” said Travis
Feist, a backcountry skier and an
instructor at Lake Tahoe Commu-
nity College. “Now, the Powder
House is always packed.”
Brandon Schwartz, a fore-
caster with the Sierra Avalanche
Center, agrees. Schwartz spends
at least fve days a week in the
backcountry assessing snow
conditions and generating the
center’s daily avalanche adviso-
ries.
Te number of cars parked at
trailheads, as well as the number
of encounters he has with other
backcountry users, has spiked
in the past several years. Like-
wise, the number of hits on the
Avalanche Center’s website also
increased, Schwartz said, by ap-
proximately 45 percent between
winter 2009-’10 and 2010-’11. A
similar jump was seen between
the winters of 2008-’09 and 2009-
’10.
Te number of Alpine Touring
setups being sold in the U.S. also
increased 60 percent between
2006-’07 and 2009-’10, accord-
ing to statistics from SnowSports
Industries America.
Alpine Touring setups
— known informally as “AT” or
“Randonee” setups — allow the
heel of a skier to move up and for-
ward. Te extra movement makes
it possible for skiers, with the use
of climbing skins, to enter the
backcountry on the same equip-
ment they use to descend. Tey
difer from traditional Telemark
skis in that they allow the heel to
be secured, giving an Alpine skier
the opportunity to make familiar
Alpine turns on the way down.
SnowSports Industries
America does not track the sale
of splitboards, which have also
made accessing the backcountry
easier since being developed in
the mid-1990s. Aptly named, a
splitboard is a snowboard that
separates down the middle so it
can be used as a set of free-heel
skis to approach backcountry
lines.
Interest in splitboarding has
grown almost exponentially in
the past couple of years, said
Jef Johnson, sales and market-
ing manager for Spark R&D, a
splitboard binding company out
of Bozeman, Mont.
“Just the last couple years have
been crazy as far as growth goes,”
Johnson said.
“UNLIMITED
POWDER.

— South Lake Tahoe skier Travis Feist, on why the backcountry is so appealing

... .continued on page 38
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Improvements in technology
are cited by several people as a
key reason for increased interest
in backcountry skiing and rid-
ing. Better skis, splitboards and
climbing skins have opened up
backcountry travel to a whole new
group of users, Schwartz said.
High quality AT bindings,
especially, have made the experi-
ence more attractive and safer,
said Dave Salazar, backcountry
skier and employee at Sports Ltd.
in South Lake Tahoe. Te technol-
ogy has advanced to the point
where he’ll use an AT setup even
while skiing at a resort.
But why invest the energy in
what sometimes amounts to an
all-day walk for a single back-
country run, when more vertical
feet can be tallied doing laps on a
chairlift at a resort?
“I think the draw is untracked
conditions and beautiful places,”
Schwartz said.
“Unlimited powder” is how
Feist put it.
Te Lake Tahoe area benefts
from a wealth of terrain without
the population base of a place
like Denver, he said, making the
amount of fresh snow per capita
almost limitless. Easy access to
the backcountry from places
like Carson Pass also make the
region’s backcountry especially
attractive.
But it may not just be soft snow
and scenic vistas driving inter-
est in out-of-bounds skiing.
Eliminating one compo-
nent of the ski resort experi-
ence cost equation may
have also fueled growth,
said Kelly Davis, director of
research with SIA.
Backcountry skis and bind-
ings can easily cost as much or
more than an Alpine setup, but
the cost of a lift ticket lies solely in
how much energy one is willing to
spend. Sales fgures have shown
an overlap between resort and
backcountry skiers, Davis said.
“Backcountry equipment sales
saw a spike in boots in 2008-’09
when the economy tanked, but
ski sales didn’t spike until the
2009-’10 season, indicating that
participants new to the backcoun-
try bought the boots in 2008-’09
to try the new discipline and save
money on lift tickets,” Davis said.
“Ten they decided to buy real
AT/Randonee skis last season and
stop slapping skins on their old
Alpine skis.”
“I think the draw is untracked conditions
and beautiful places.”
— Brandon Schwartz, a forecaster
with the Sierra Avalanche Center
TECHNOLOGY,
EASE OF ACCESS
CONTRIBUTE TO
GROWTH
Sports Ltd. employee Dave Salazar
displays a set of Alpine Touring bindings.
Adam Jenson / Tahoe Magazine
... from page 36
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• Take an avalanche course and
supplement that knowledge by
reading up on avalanches. Learn
to recognize avalanche terrain
through instruction by a knowl-
edgeable instructor.
• Avoid traveling in the back-
country alone, and don’t get
separated from your group.
• Take the right equipment and
know how to use it. A probe,
transceiver and shovel are
necessary components of back-
country travel. Make sure you
know how to use a transceiver
by searching for your travel com-
panion’s receivers ahead of time.
Extra clothing camping gear,
food and plenty of water are also
important safety measures.
• Do your homework on the
route and snow conditions in the
exact location you plan to ski. Be
prepared to adjust plans if nec-
essary. Pay close attention to the
forecast and constantly shifting
weather in the Sierra Nevada.
• Never travel in the backcountry
on the day after a big storm. Al-
low the snowpack to settle for at
least 24 hours. Have the courage
to know when you shouldn’t go.
Don’t allow your judgment to be
clouded by the desire to ride the
steepest or freshest snow.
• Don’t assume a slope is safe
because there are tracks going
across it. Wind, sun, and tem-
perature changes are constantly
altering the snowpack. What was
safe in the morning could slide
in the afternoon.
— Source: National Ski Patrol
Cost savings do come with a
dangerous tradeof — a required
increase in awareness.
Inexperienced backcountry
skiers and snowboarders often
don’t realize the danger just
outside a resort’s boundaries, let
alone miles into the backcountry
where help is potentially hours
— or days — away, said Schwartz,
adding that even minor problems
such as a broken binding can
compound quickly because of the
lack of immediate assistance.
But probably the largest
concern for the backcountry user
is being caught and buried in
an avalanche. Resorts are able
to mitigate the chances of an
avalanche through various control methods,
but no such protections exist outside a resort’s
boundaries. And near record snowfall during
2010-’11 winter made for
especially heavy slides,
according to the avalanche
center’s annual report.
“With record early season
snowfall, the snowpack took
on mid-winter characteristics
by mid-December,” it reads.
“Numerous avalanche cycles
occurred with large avalanches
occurring during both periods
of rapid loading and rapid
warming. Large avalanches
occurred in avalanche paths
that had not been active in
many years.”
Both Schwartz and Feist
recommended backcountry
skiers and snowboarders take
an avalanche course prior
to making their way out of
bounds.
“Education from a
professional source goes a long
way,” Schwartz said.
Te interest in avalanche
safety courses at Lake Tahoe
Community College has grown along with the
popularity of the backcountry.
“We can’t ofer enough classes — they’re full
right away,” Feist said.
Although the Sierra Nevada has a reputation
for quickly stabilizing within two days of a storm,
assumptions about snow safety are one of the
avalanche safety instructor’s foremost concerns.
“I think the biggest danger is the assumption
that it’s safe,” Feist said.
Although helpful, the avalanche center’s
daily advisory is not the only information people
should take into consideration when heading
out, Schwartz said.
“It’s a starting point in their decision-making
process for the day, for where, when and how
you travel,” Schwartz said.
And for a growing number of skiers and
riders, those travels are taking them out of the
traditional confnes of a ski area.
“It’s just still on the increase,” Johnson said.
“I’m just interested to see where it goes.” T
AVALANCHE RISK
CONCERNS FORECASTERS
— Brandon Schwartz
Some tips for
traveling
in the Sierra
‘backcountry:
“Education from a professional source goes a long way.”
Splitboarders Chris Edmonds and Canyon Florey traverse toward a steep zone in
the Lake Tahoe backcountry. Photo: Mikey Wier
TAHOE magazine 39


By Sylas Wright
Tahoe Magazine
I never even really knew you could be a
professional snowboarder. I didn’t know
that was something that existed.
— Jim Rippey


tAHOE PEOPLE
THE
legend whose very name
embodies the sport of snow-
boarding walked away from his niche about
as abruptly as he happened upon it.
Jim Rippey, one of the world’s elite
snowboarding talents throughout the 1990s
and beyond, knew in an instant that he was
done, his star-studded career a thing of the
past. And he didn’t try to fght it.
“I felt like the Lord spoke to my heart,”
said Rippey, a Truckee resident who was
working in the Tahoe backcountry with
Standard Films at the time of his decision.
“Tere were these younger kids who were
trying to flm some lines, and I was sitting
there watching them and I remember the
Lord spoke to my heart and said, ‘Jim, you’ve
been there, you’ve done that and you’ve
done it at the highest level, and now it’s time
to let go of it. I’ve got something else for you
to do.’
“And I was just like, ‘Wow, OK.’”
Te message from Rippey’s personal lord
and savior was clear: Te time had come to hang up his board and
boots and pursue another passion.
“So I went out to dinner with my wife that night and remember
telling her I was done snowboarding professionally. And I started to
cry, just hearing myself say that. Snowboarding had been my identity
for 15 years of my life,” Rippey said.
Fast forward more than a half decade, and Rippey has answered
his second calling. Te kid from Quincy who stumbled upon
snowboarding at age 19 now makes his living at Grace Church in
Reno, where he’s worked as a pastor the past 2 1/2 years.
But he hasn’t abandoned snowboarding completely.
“I’m actually the chaplain for the winter and summer X Games,”
said Rippey, who, at 40, still rides on occasion. “I go there and pray
with the athletes who are believers, and those who aren’t, and I’m
also there in case something bad happens to support the families
and the athletes.”
Ministry is actually the third profession at which Rippey tried
his hand, after professional snowboarding and, believe it or not,
professional football.
“I had this dream before I ever got into snowboarding to be an
NFL punter, and I had never fully pursued it,” he said.
JIM RIPPEY
THE MAN,
THE MYTH,
THE
Jim Rippey in Alaska. Photo: Courtesy of Jim Rippey
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 41
... continued on page 42
A LEGEND
IN THE MAKING
Rippey, who was born and raised in
Quincy, Calif., went straight to Cabrillo
College in Santa Cruz out of high school to
become a punter on the football team. But
after being plugged in at cornerback, and
not being allowed to just punt, he quickly
realized it wasn’t for him.
“Tey had me playing cornerback and I
knew I wasn’t going to make it to the NFL
playing cornerback. So I practiced with
them for a few weeks and before the frst
game I said, ‘You know what, this is not the
school for me,’” he said.
Rippey returned to Quincy with plans to
enroll the following year at Butte College in
Chico, where he still hoped to be a punter
on the football team. But after running into
an old friend — and the only snowboarder
he knew — he decided to put college on
hold.
“He said he was going to Tahoe to work
as a lift operator and that it was a real chill
job, that you got to ski or snowboard on
your time of,” Rippey recalled. “And I said,
‘Man, that sounds perfect.’ So I ended up
going to Tahoe for the ’89-’90 season and
just fell in love with snowboarding. I put


the skis in the closet and started snow-
boarding the frst night I went there.”
Rippey’s natural talent transferred well
to the relatively new sport, which was gain-
ing steam following a decade of obscurity.
His frst season he met a Burton rep and
saw an entire Burton team snowboarding
for a living, spawning an idea that maybe
he could do the same. After all, he had
already mastered how to spin and even fip
after only a few months of riding.
“I never even really knew you could be
a professional snowboarder. I didn’t know
that was something that existed,” said
Rippey, who asked the Burton rep what he
needed to do to get sponsored.
“He said to go out and do some contests
and then come and see me at the end of
the year. So I told my dad I was going to
take another year of school and pursue
this snowboard thing and see what hap-
pens.”
Rippey entered four contests his frst
year snowboarding, winning three and
placing third in the other. He won the Cal
Series the next year and turned pro his
third season (’91-’92).
Jim Rippey, one of the most popular professional
snowboarders throughout the 1990s and beyond, now
works as an associate pastor at Grace Church in Reno.
Photo: Courtesy of Jim Rippey
He had the backflip on lock and he’d do it off
whatever — an 80-foot rope swing, whatever.
— Truckee snowboarder Andy Finch,
on Rippey’s legacy


The snowboard industry for the first time started
leveling off, so when Burton let me go I tried to get
on with other teams ... everyone was cutting their
team back. The timing was just horrible.
— Jim Rippey


BUDDING TALENT
After Donner Ski Ranch his frst year, Rippey went
to work at Boreal as a night lift operator so he could
ride during the day, oftentimes at Sugar Bowl, he said.
It wasn’t long before he began carving out a name for
himself in the industry, amazing judges and snowboard
fans alike with large, stylish airs and signature tricks that
bear his name to this day — such as the Rippey fip.
“Jim Rippey was a pioneer, for sure, whether it was
backfips on a snowmobile or the Rippey fip, the double
back — he was doing a lot of stuf early on that other
people weren’t,” said professional snowboarder Andy
Finch of Truckee, who was still a preteen when Rippey
began making a name for himself. “He had the backfip
on lock and he’d do it of whatever — an 80-foot rope
swing, whatever.”
“I like doing big fips,” Rippey confrmed. “Tose are
fun.”
Rippey — who shocked the adventure sports world in
2001 by landing the frst-ever backfip on a snowmobile,
earning him ESPN’s Feat of the Year — had a pro model
for seven years, which was the longest-running pro
model in the history of Burton Snowboards until Shaun
White. Five out of those seven years it was the best-sell-
ing board in the world, Rippey said.
Te popular snowboarder continued to excel in
the sport, starring for years in Standard Films’ “Totally
Board” videos while earning prize money in some the
world’s most prestigious snowboard events. He recalls
winning the Air & Style contest in 1997 using his Rippey
fip — a backfip combined with a frontside 360 and a
method grab — then tying Terje Haakonsen in a quar-
terpipe contest doing the same trick, only modifed. He
won the Vans Triple Crown the same year for the third
time.
“Rippey is a legend,” said professional snowboarder
Chas Guldemond of Reno. “I always looked up to his
raw approach to snowboarding. He just went for it and
made it look so easy. He made a huge impact on me and
the sport of snowboarding, and I am grateful for that.”
RIPPEY ... from page 41
42 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Jim Rippey airs over Joe Curtes in this
2000 photo taken in New Zealand.
Photo courtesy of Jeff Curtes
PARTING WAYS
But times changed. And while Rippey
continued to flm and compete at a high level,
a new wave of young riders was rising through
the ranks. Burton, his longtime sponsor,
dropped Rippey from its team in 2003.
“Tey got a new marketing manager and
new team manager, and they fred half the
team. So I was one of the people who got the
ax,” Rippey said.
After parting ways with Burton, Rippey con-
tinued to ride professionally for about another
year.
“Te snowboard industry for the frst time
started leveling of, so when Burton let me go
I tried to get on with other teams, and no one
was adding to their team. Everyone was cut-
ting their team back,” he said. “Te timing was
just horrible.”
A short time later, Rippey, who had devoted
his life to Christianity at Sierra Bible Church
in Truckee in 2000, found himself crying over
dinner after telling his wife he was through
with snowboarding. Ten one Sunday at
church he met Gary Cook, a former Truckee
High football player who had just signed a free
agent contract with the Oakland Raiders as a
punter.
“I asked him if I could come down to train-
ing camp and just kick the ball around a little
bit with him,” Rippey said. “So I did, and I was
kicking the ball really far, so I decided I was
going to give it two years and see what I could
do.”
Rippey advanced past all the cuts at the
NFL free-agent camp until reaching the fnal
day, when he got to punt in front of all the NFL
coaches. While he punted for a good NFL aver-
age, Rippey said, he did not receive a call from
a team. He repeated the process the following
year, with the same result.
Knowing he had given football his best
shot, Rippey gave up that dream and left
Truckee in 2008 to attend Bible school in San
Diego.
And the rest is history.
“It’s pretty amazing to see the changes that
have gone on in his life,” said Finch, who is
also a Christian. “But he still has that little kid
in him. He still wants to go huck of clifs. He
just has this raw talent that’s scary. He has this
energy and confdence that allow him to be so
good.
“But as I’m starting to fnd out, our bod-
ies don’t allow us to do what our brains are
imagining. It’s a tough thing to accept, but I
know his identity in Christ has really given him
strength and comfort and peace, and it’s pretty
awesome to hang out with Rippey any time I
get the chance to.” T
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 43
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CAPTURING
LAKE
TAHOE
By Jason Shueh
Tahoe Magazine
T
he texture is
gritty and the
image dotted as if
obscured in a bed of rice. It
strikes of something, some
type of idea, some emotion.
And yet from what? Is it the angle
of the clif? Is it the shearing of the
snow, so broken and splintered, jagged
and bone fractured? Or perhaps it is the sky
that has turned black or the rocks that jump
to view like mounds of meat? Te skier is the
focus, of course, and the eyes are drawn to his
rough silhouette, his fgure precariously dan-
gling over the peak, a plume of snow under-
foot. Te photograph has a rawness to it; and
yet, it’s hard to turn away.
“Tey always ask me if he died from the
fall,” says Olympic Valley photographer Keoki
Flagg, gazing at “Te Eagle’s Nest,” an image
of professional freeskier Shane McConkey
descending Squaw Valley’s 8,200-foot peak,
KT22.
“For the
average
person
who walks
in the
door, this
is beyond
anything they
can imagine,”
said Flagg, standing
in his gallery, Gallery
Keoki, located at the Village
at Squaw Valley.
McConkey died in March 2009 after a
BASE jumping accident in Italy’s Dolomite
Mountains. Te photo Flagg talks about,
however, was shot in 1996, when it was just
McConkey, a Tahoe local, doing what he did
best – McConkey’s typical day at the ofce.
Te photo is emblematic of what Flagg
likes to call the “magic moment,” when a
photograph does more than simply chronicle a
subject, but reaches out, expresses some deep
emotion. Flagg said he’s been searching for
these elusive moments for more than 30 years
as he’s photographed professional athletes
TAHOE PEOPLE
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 45
WHAT THIS GALLERY TELLS
ME IS THAT THOSE MAGIC
MOMENTS ARE TIMELESS,
BUT THEY’RE RARE. — Keoki Flagg
around the globe for magazines such as National Geographic
Adventurer, Powder, Outside, Men’s Journal and Sports Illustrated.
Most would call his job a dream job. His work spans seven
continents. He regularly works with elite athletes in exotic locales,
all while earning recognition nationally and internationally for his
work, a winner of the 2001 International Banf Photo Contest and
the Captain John Noel Award. Is it the perfect job? Flagg says it is;
however, he also says it requires an immense faith and a devout
work ethic.
TURNING TAHOE
Taking the shot, that’s the easy part.
Getting there, knowing the right angles, harnessing the light,
selecting the right camera, stationing your tripod, ensuring your
equipment works, staying ft to follow your athletic subjects, photo-
graphing them authentically, developing your flm, under deadlines,
repeatedly, shooting at the level of the industry’s best and having
enough business savvy to earn a living doing it well, this is the hard
part.
... continued on next page
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Left: Inside Gallery Keoki located at Squaw Valley USA’s village. Photo courtesy of
Gallery Keoki. Left center: The photographer Keoki Flagg. Courtesy of Gallery Keoki
and photographer Tom Day.
Keoki’s photograph “The Unknown” was taken on an expedition to the Antarctic
Peninsula. The small silhouettes of athletes Christian Cabanilla, Jessica Sobolowski
and clients of Ice Axe Expeditions can be seen making their way through the snow.
46 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
“Te hardest thing for me to do was defne what made
my work mine, what it was between my magic moments and
everything else,” said Flagg.
Flagg’s frst professional pieces began showing up in the
early ’90s and would gradually culminate into the creation of
Gallery Keoki and numerous features in top tier magazines.
However, would-be photographer’s beginnings and his search
to defne his own style began without any promise of success.
He was born in Hawaii in 1965 and spent his childhood
between stints on the tropical island and extended family road
trips in Europe, traveling in the back of his parent’s camper. His
parents would place a note book in his hand and drive from
one spot to the next — Switzerland, Italy, France, wherever the
road took them.
“What I learned was just a love of the world. It formulated a
lot of my future thinking,” said Flagg.
Flagg said his upbringing spurred a wanderlust that sent
him burrowing through Asia and Africa for four years, after
his graduation at Connecticut College with a bachelors in fne
art. It was through these travels that Flagg said he identifed
photography as his life ambition.
“I really got serious about my shooting. And what I mean by
that is that I would travel extensively or stay in a place exten-
sively just because I saw something there I wanted to capture,”
Flagg said.
Editorial and magazine work followed before a family wed-
ding brought him to Squaw Valley, where he said he became
enamored by the region’s ski culture and wonderfully enigmat-
ic spirit. He decided to lay roots at Squaw in 1992.
CRAVING THE COUNTERINTUITIVE
Sitting in his gallery of ce, Flagg is surrounded by photo-
graphs, various equipment, an ill computer to be repaired and
a cabinet housing his mechanical feet of
cameras. Te cabinet’s treasures
include his Hasselblad Xpan
used for mountainous vistas,
his modifed Widelux camera
for 35-millimeter rotating
shots, his Linhof Technorama
for “extreme panoramas”
— and then there is his
collection of 1960 Rolleifex
cameras for their retro, yet
uncanny, appeal.
Tey all serve a purpose
— depending on circum-
stance, depending on
subject matter or a sense of
mood, it varies.
However, despite his
publicized works, awards
and the development of
Gallery Keoki, Flagg says he’s
still unsure how it all comes
to be. After all, there’s no se-
cret formula for the perfect shot.
“What this gallery tells me is that those magic moments are time-
less, but they’re rare,” Flagg says.
Take the photo of McConkey. Flagg said the actual photograph
shot was very typical, KT22 a slope pros and advanced riders have
descended dozens, hundreds, perhaps thousands of times. Yet an
experiment made the shot unique.
“Tis same picture I had taken before but it wasn’t until I bor-
rowed a technique from Ansel Adams where I basically turned the
sky black. And once I removed it from being a color picture it wasn’t
about ‘how rad’ this person, this equipment, this stunt was,” said
Flagg. “It was about something else.”
Most of the magic moments aren’t so fortuitous for Flagg. Most of
his best works require all-day treks through the snow, hours standing
in the cold, hour after hour taking and retaking a shot waiting for a
precise moment, a time of day, a sequence of actions.
Yet, grabbing one of his Roleifex cameras, Flagg said it can also
just be something simple that brings out a wonderful image, with
portrait shots sometimes even the odd looking camera will do the trick.
He holds up the box shaped Roleifex, shrugs and smiles. T
Flagg ... from page 45
“The Eagle’s Nest” a 1996 photograph of Shane McConkey descending Squaw
Valley USA’s KT22 summit. Keoki Flagg said he took the shot standing atop the
KT22 patrol shack with his 200 millimeter lens and using a technique from Ansel
Adams to add contrast by turning the sky black.
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48 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Tahoe People
By Sylas Wright
Tahoe Magazine
ON THE FAST TRACK
AN INTERVIEW WITH LOCAL
WINTER SPORTS ATHLETE
Travis
Ganong
Travis Ganong tucks
through a turn during
the World Cup races
held at Beaver Creek
last year. Photo:
Dominique Taylor
IN
his frst full year
racing on the circuit,
the now-23-year-old
Squaw Valley skier recorded World Cup
points at four venues — Lake Louise,
Bormio, Wengen and Kitzbuehel — while
capping his season with an 18th-place fnish
in the super G and a 24th in downhill at the
Alpine World Ski Championships.
But a freak injury during his downhill run
ended his season before it was complete,
leaving Ganong eager to get back on course
and prove his 2010-’11 season was no fuke.
Check out what he has to say about the up-
coming season.
Q: What did you do during your ofseason? Did you get a
chance to spend any time back home in Tahoe?
A: “I had a very long ofseason this year. My season was
cut short in February when I had an injury, so for the frst
time in many, many years I was actually able to spend a
big chunk of the winter home in Tahoe. Although a lot of
that time was spent healing and sitting inside watching all
the snow pile up, I did get to catch the last few big storms
of the year and get back out there at Squaw for a few
powder days. I then spent a lot of time up in the
Banf area with my girlfriend training in the gym
and getting strong again. Tat place was cool! But
I always looked forward to the trips back to Tahoe to
ski over the Fourth of July and for a few weeks before my
season started up again when we took of to New Zealand
on Aug. 2. I actually was even able to ski back home on July
28 right before New Zealand. Crazy.”
Q: Was it nice to get of the snow after a long race season,
or were you chomping at the bit to get back out on the hill?
A: “I love to ski and so I am always chomping at the bit to
go skiing again. Summers are fun and all, but all I need is a
week or two away from my skis and boots and I am ready to
go again. Tere is a reason why I can be found climbing the
peaks around Tahoe in the summer with a pair of skis. I am
always chomping at the bit to get back out there. Racing on
the World Cup can be stressful and very tiring week in and
week out, but I think that my passion for the sport allows
me to not get burned out as much as other skiers. And so
yeah, not much time of is needed — or wanted.”
Q: You must be pleased with what was considered your
rookie season on the World Cup last winter. Looking back
at it, is there any one accomplishment that you are most
proud of?
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A: “I was very pleased with my
skiing last winter. It was an amazing
season with many frsts. It was
my frst time scoring World Cup
points in downhill. I scored at
Kitzbuhel, Wengen and Bormio, and
I qualifed for the World Ski Champs
in Garmisch, which was an amazing
experience. As a rookie on tour it
usually takes some time before you start
scoring World Cup points, but I was able
to fnd the speed and do it on my frst try at
some of those classic challenging hills. Te best
accomplishment would defnitely have to be scoring
World Cup points at Kitzbuhel on my frst try in front of that massive
crowd and my parents and family members. Tere was a large group
from Tahoe there that day as well. It was a special experience.”
Q: I read about you bashing your hand on a gate during the U.S. Alpine
Championships. What happened there, and how have you healed up
from the injury?
A: “I actually bashed my hand in at the World Ski Championships.
So yeah, that injury that I referred to earlier was my hand. I was racing
in the World Championships DH in
Garmisch, Germany. Getting to represent
my country is something I always dreamed
about doing. So about 45 seconds into a
2-minute run, I hit my hand on the base
of a gate going about 80 mph, and one of
the bones shattered into a bunch of pieces.
Ouch! But I kept going and fnished the race,
with adrenaline being the only thing that kept
me going. I fnished 24th, but that was it for the
season. Now I have a titanium plate, eight screws
and a bone graft in my hand. It feels great. I’m ready
to go for this upcoming season.”
Q: What are your goals for this race season and beyond?
A: “My goals for this season are to continue to establish myself
on the World Cup tour. I want to ski as fast as possible and see
what happens. Down the road I want to go to the Olympics in
Sochi, Russia, and Yongpyong, and continue to promote ski
racing through my blog (www.travis-ganong.com) and through
my results, and build my sport on the U.S. You can actually watch
every single race this season on TV, which is a huge step in the
right direction.” T
I
f women’s snowboarding is a stampeding herd of
bufalo, South Lake Tahoe’s Jamie Anderson will be
the frst to trample whatever gets in its way. At 21, she’s
already crushed the biggest competitions in the sport,
including the X Games and U.S. Open. Last year, for the
second year in a row, she took top honors in the TTR World
Tour. And now she’s set her sights on medaling in slopestyle
at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games.
On top of her ultra-busy contest schedule, she’s
designing her own line of outerwear for Billabong (out this
year!), her own eyewear for Electric, her own snowboard
for Gnu and her own shoes for DVS. She’s constantly
flming for her online series, JA Visuals, as well as various
snowboard videos. And she fnds time to spend at home in
Tahoe.
“I always love coming home to
the Lake,” she says. “Nothing beats
our summers and nothing beats our
bluebird powder days.”
Growing up in Tahoe, Anderson
hit the snow early. Before the age of
10, she was on the Sierra-at-Tahoe
Resort team and killing it in local
competitions. It wasn’t long before,
photos of her hit the magazines
and TV networks began to take
notice. By 2009, she was named
Snowboarder Magazine’s woman
rider of the year.
And by 2010, her sponsor list grew to incorporate non-
snowboarding brands like Verizon and, um, Lemonheads.
Te rest is sweet history. T
Jamie Anderson Q & A
Q. What’s the hardest part of being a
professional snowboarder?
A. Living your life on the road so much of the
year...
Q. You’ve designed dozens of different
products. Which ones stand out as some of
your favorites? Why?
A. I am really liking my newest collection
with Billabong. I’m using organic cottons and
recycled polyester, and I am really excited to
wear the eco products in my line!
Q. Will you compete in the 2014 Olympic
slopestyle? What will you do to train?
A. I will try to make the 2014 Olympic team for
sure! To train, I am going to work my butt off,
riding, mountain biking, swimming, running,
hiking, yoga, tramp sessions, and Camp
Woodward!
Q. What do you like more: contests or filming?
A. I like them both! I think everyone would
prefer to shred pow and film, but the contest
scene if fun as well. It’s intense and
really fun to be a part of.
Q. Where do you like to ride
the most?
A. Sierra-at-Tahoe. It’s a
really fun mountain
to shred. All over.
Not
afraid
to go
BIG
tAHOE PEOPLE
By Dylan Silver
Tahoe Magazine
50 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Jamie Anderson soars over a
jump in competition.
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Authentic, Winter’s Blue

TAHOE PEOPLE
WHEN IT SNOWS IN
R OME . . .
FOR ANY TRAVELER, SOME NAIVETÉ IS INEVITABLE.
EATING, SLEEPING AND PLAYING IN UNFAMILIAR
ENVIRONS NATURALLY PRESENTS SOME UNCERTAINTY.
AND, AT LAKE TAHOE, THERE’S A SOMEWHAT UNIQUE
COMPLICATING FACTOR — SNOW.
Ycv`renc|frcm
arcvndhere ARE YOU?
NO
OH, THE SNOW.
S
now tends to make everything a bit of a process and can make
people do crazy things — everything from sacrifcing their friends
in the name of powder turns to throwing all the rules of the road out the
window at frst fake.
Tere are plenty of good of cial do’s and don’ts of both driving and
skiing/snowboarding, but there are also a few unwritten rules for travel-
ing and playing in the snow.
Some things are a little bit silly. Tat space between your goggles and
your beanie? It’s not so afectionately referred to as a [ gaper gap. ]
And, while it’s of little importance in the grand scheme of things, it’s a
sign you might not be from around here.
Some things are more serious. Something like a frustrated snow-
boarder unstrapping his or her board and sending it down the hill can
get someone hurt. One bump and that high speed projectile is danger-
ously airborne. [ Riding a snowboard like a sled ] is an equally bad idea.
Tese tips may seem like common sense, but you’d be surprised at
some of the lesser-known efects of snow on the human brain.
With a little bit of knowledge, you’ll be skiing and driving like the Ro-
mans, er, Tahoans. Here are some do’s and don’ts for the highway and
the slopes:
DO slow down. Excessive speed is the No. 1 reason for accidents
during and after a snow storm. Otherwise, the rules of the road remain
the same; i.e., when making a left turn from a center lane, make sure you
get far enough over that you’re not blocking traf c. Oh, and when you do
have to make a turn, please do use the blinkers on your vehicle. Other
motorists appreciate the heads-up.
DON’T forget to [ take the chains of. ] Chains are important
and you should always respect chain controls when they are in place.
But it’s also important to remember that chains generally aren’t neces-
sary when the pavement is dry or the temperature has risen well above
freezing and the roads are simply wet rather than icy.
52 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
By Adam Jensen
Tahoe Magazine
... continued on page 54
GREAT PRODUCTS, PRICES,
QUALITY AND SERVICE
SEARS — Locally
owned and operated
by Charlie Riley, Sears
offers exceptional
products in a large
selection, with the high
quality and competitive
prices you want.
Delivery and Installation
available. Same prices,
same value without
driving to Reno or
Sacramento.
Open 7 days a week!
M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6, Sun 11-4
Hometown SEARS Truckee
at Citizens Bank Plaza
12047 Donner Pass Road, Truckee
530-550-0110
Phone orders gladly
accepted with a
SEARS card.
Your Craftsman
Headquarters for
SNOWBLOWERS
in North
Lake Tahoe
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 53
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DO respect the berms. It’s tempting to want to smash
right through the long piles of snow that develop in the
middle of the road after a big storm. Some vehicles can
make it, but you better be absolutely sure yours is one of
them before you try. Driving down to the next stop light
may add 30 seconds to your trip, but it will save you from
the dread of being haplessly high-centered on an embar-
rassingly public thoroughfare.
DON’T sit/lie down in the middle of a run.
Do you really want to put your head on the same surface
where sharp metal edges are whizzing by at high speed?
If you need to rest or want to check out the scenery, fnd a
spot of to the side of a run where you can be easily seen
from above.
DO pull over. Being comfortable driving in the snow
is important and slowing down to account for conditions
is a big part of that. Still, if you notice a line of cars devel-
oping behind you, it’s good policy to pull over when you
can do so safely. You’ll make a highway full of friends.
DON’T be [ too quick with the safety bar. ]
Just about everybody is fne with putting
the safety bar down while riding a chairlift,
but no one likes being hit in the head. Just
give a shout out to your lift mates before
grabbing for the bar.
DO [ take your ski boots of ] before heading to the gro-
cery store. Ski boots perform well in snow that can alternately
be referred to as chowder, corn or mashed potatoes. Tey
perform terribly in the aisles actually containing these items.
DON’T rock out too hard. Riding to music is fun.
Having to yell at a someone you’re sitting right next to be-
cause they’ve got the volume up as high as Slasher from “Hot
Dog...the Movie” is not.
DO check out the terrain parks. Terrain parks are a blast,
but they have a rhythm to them that a newcomer is likely
unfamiliar with. If you’ve never been before, hang out at the
top for a second and see what everyone is doing. Once there’s
an open spot, drop on in and keep going. Hanging out on a
landing of a jump or a rail is extremely dangerous because ski-
ers and riders are coming in at high speed and won’t be able
to see you until it’s too late. T
... from page 52
54 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine

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*Based on August 31, 2011 report of year to date sales from Subaru North America. *Based on September 30, 2011 report of year to date sales from Subaru North America.
56 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
recreation outdoor fun
The cross country skiing trails at Tahoe Donner are world-class and the views
are spectacular wherever you look. Photo courtesy of Tahoe Donner.
LAKE TAHOE:
A Mecca for
cross country
skiing
I
t has long been known how valuable the sport of cross country
skiing is for both for the body and the mind. Some consider cross
country skiing the perfect sport: It uses most all muscle masses,
burns lots of calories and it’s enjoyable. It provides an opportunity
to spend time with friends and family while getting exercise. As a
muscle-powered sport, the pace is relaxed enough to make it social
as well as athletic, and affords a winter experience.
Cross country skiing burns more calories per hour than other
sports. A person can burn from 472 calories an hour to as much
as 1,116 calories when climbing uphill. Burning calories can be as
much fun as taking calories in, both fulfilling in their own way. It
certainly allows you to have that extra hot chocolate at the end of the
day.
Cross country skiing also is an excellent low-stress outdoor
exercise. The movement of gliding is easy on the legs and back, as
opposed to the pounding of other sports. Medical professionals
advocate it as the best cardiovascular fitness activity. The benefits
are endless for this low-risk, low-impact aerobic form of exercise.
Lake Tahoe is mecca for cross country skiing. There are many
options for skiing, all providing a very different experience, on end-
less kilometers of machine groomed trails to the peaceful undevel-
oped meadows or backcountry trails.
At Lake Tahoe we have a long ski season, typically beginning at
Thanksgiving going to late April. The cross country resorts offer
everything from expansive meadows to steep herringbone climbs;
from great decks for picnics to yummy cafes. Most areas have excel-
lent machine groomed trail (a feature Tahoe areas pride themselves
with) and all areas have lot of ascends and descents, the mountains
around Lake Tahoe are steep.
Nestled in a beautiful alpine valley high in the Sierra, Kirkwood’s
Cross Country Ski and Snowshoe Center is like no other. As skiers
climb the higher trails to 9,000 feet they have a sensation of being
atop the Sierra. Kirkwood’s 80 kilometers of diverse terrain provide
excellent skiing for all abilities. Skiers can ski to ridge tops, over gran-
ite domes or glide through meadows. Located on Highway 88, it’s an
incredibly beautiful 40-minute drive from South Lake Tahoe.
Spooner Lake Cross Country is located right at Spooner Summit
on Highway 50. It has lots of easy trails around the lodge, which
serve as a great warm-up for the steeper terrain ahead. The ultimate
goal is to climb the long steep trails up North Canyon. The trail
seems to climb forever but the award is well worth it, at the top there
are the absolute best views of Lake Tahoe. The 80 kilometers of trail
are groomed for classic and skate skiing.
The Hope Valley Outdoors Center and Sorensen’s Resort are
the headquarters for activities in the pristine Hope Valley. The
expansive Hope Valley has everything from easy skiing in the valley
floor to steep challenging mountain peaks. There are some marked
trails in the valley. he Hope Valley Outdoor Center is located at the
junction of Highway 88 and 89 in a comfortable yurt. The center has
marked ski trails, ski and snowshoe rentals, lessons and tours.
The historic Camp Richardson Resort is located just outside
of the city limits of South Lake Tahoe on Emerald Bay Road. The
resort’s 35 kilometers of trail winds through the forest at lake level,
offering easy flat terrain for the novice skier. Lessons and rentals are
available at the resort.
Heavenly’s Adventure Peak has five kilometer’s of groomed trail at
the top of the gondola. The adventure begins with a scenic 2.4-mile ride
up the mountain. The trails meander through the forest and provide
awesome views from nearly 3,000 feet above Lake Tahoe. Cross country
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 57
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skis and snowshoe rentals are available, as well as snow bikes. The area
also has a tubing hill and a restaurant.
Tahoe Donner has over 100 kilometers of trails. 51 trails with a huge
variety of terrain for all levels. Nearly half of the trails are intermediate
level and it has two “wilderness’ trails that are groomed for diagonal
striding only and three trails that are reserved just for snowshoers.
Scattered over its sprawling network of trails are five warming huts. It’s a
great lace for beginners as well as experienced skiers. It caters to skaters,
striders and snowshoers.
At beautiful Sugar Pine Point State Park, follow the California
state park’s four cross-country trails — for both beginning and
advanced adventurers — that lead you through towering pines,
open meadows, ancient stream paths and a historic estate. Winter
visitors to the park will find more than 20 kilometers of marked
cross-country ski trails and a heated restroom in the General Creek
campground A $6 Day Use Fee applies for parking unless you have
a California State Parks Pass (sticker) - there is no charge for use of
the cross country ski trails. Interpretive presentations on a variety of
winter related subjects are presented most weekends, from January
through March. Topics include “Cold Weather Survival,” “Winter
Wildlife,” and guided cross-country ski hikes. Whether your pas-
sion is on skis or snow shoes, you will truly enjoy all that Sugar Pine
Point State Park has to offer this winter.
Royal Gorge has the most of everything - the most snow (600
inches a year), the largest trail system and the biggest grooming
fleet. It offers 300 kilometers of trails, 88 trails and 6 trail systems.
It considers itself as the largest cross country ski area in North
America. Royal Gorge has eight warming huts for people who
want to take a break and have a snack.
Northstar-at Tahoe offers a different experience from most
cross country ski areas, primarily because it requires you to buy
a trail pass at the village Center and then take the Big Springs
Express Gondola or Village Express Quad Chairlift to reach its 50
kilometers of trails. The trail systems features three warming huts
with free hot drinks. On some occasions, Northstar’s trails hook
up with the neighboring Tahoe Cross Country Trail system.
Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area is one of the few areas that
allows you to let your dog run along with you on the trails. Dog
passes are $4 and you have to clean up after them (poop bags are
provided). It offers 65 kilometers of groomed trails on 19 trails.
It also offers free beginners and skating lessons at various times
throughout the winter.
This is only a partial list of the cross country ski opportunities
in the area. For a full listing see the map on the next page. Cross
country skiing is a perfect chance to leave the rational mind
behind for a while. Try it, and become part of the movement of
the winter environment at Lake Tahoe. T
58 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
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recreation Map
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 59
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60 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Alpine Meadows
intermediate trails: 40% advanced trails: 35%
WWW.SKIALPINE.COM | LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
TOP ELEVATION: 8,637 FEET
Vertical drop: 1,802 feet
Acres: 2,400
Terrain: 100-plus trails
Terrain parks: 3
Ski season: November to May
Average snowfall: 365 inches
BASE ELEVATION: 6,835 FEET
FAST FACTS: ALPINE MEADOWS
Chair lifts: 14 lifts including one high-speed detachable six-passenger chair; two
high-speed express quads; three triple and five double chairs; three surface lifts.
Amenities: Newly expanded children’s center, kids’ indoor play area,
snow tubing, ten dining options, outdoor sundeck and fire pit, newly
expanded rental center, high performance demo equipment, ski and snow-
board school, disabled sports center, retail shop, high-speed internet access.
beginning trails: 25%
WHAT’S NEW
New for winter 2011-2012, the entire rental fleet at Alpine Meadows’
Easy In-&-Out ski rental center will usher in the latest in cutting-edge
equipment. Designed by Volkl, the RTM 74 Gold model’s Extended
Low Profile (ELP) shape will be available to every guest seeking rental
equipment, which features the newest design in ski technology. Typically
available in most rental centers as a high-performance upgrade, Volkl’s
ELP skis have become the new standard at Alpine Meadows. A departure
from traditional skis, both the tips and the tails of this technologically
advanced line are elevated.
AT-A-GLANCE
With seven powder bowls, countless ridgeline adventures,
summit-to-base groomed trails, and mountaintop views of Lake
Tahoe, Alpine Meadows Ski Resort hosts some of Tahoe’s — and
the country’s — finest terrain.
Alpine’s reputation for a relaxed, welcoming atmosphere can
be experienced both on and off the slopes. Beginner skiers and
boarders enjoy gentle groomed slopes, all just steps from the
mountain’s day lodge — while experienced adventurers can explore
Alpine’s countless powder fields, steep descents, or guided tours
through the mountain’s famous natural terrain.
The newly expanded children’s center is conveniently located
within the day lodge — also mere steps from the kids-only
instructional area, Tubeville snow tubing center, and beyond.
Full- and half-day ski and snowboard camps invite kids as young
as age three to have fun on the slopes; and as the official home
of Disabled Sports USA, Far West division, Alpine Meadows
provides unmatched daily instruction to students with physical and
developmental disabilities.
With ten mountain dining options, Alpine Meadows offers
delicious options which satisfy any appetite; and the Last Chair Bar
& Grill, located in the day lodge, is a favorite spot to savor après-ski
refreshments while sharing the day’s stories from the slopes. T
LEARN MORE: www.SkiAlpine.com
A couple takes in the view from Alpine Meadows this past winter.
Photo: Jonathan Selkowitz
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775 588 6130
South Lake Tahoe
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Glenbrook
775 749 5663
Incline Village
775 831 7300
Tahoe City
530 581 0722
Truckee
530 550 2464
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62 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Boreal
WHAT’S NEW
Woodward Tahoe is set to launch at Boreal during the summer of
2012. Woodward will be offering week-long camps this summer for
snowboard, ski, skate, BMX and cheer/gymnastics with onsite lodging
for campers. Included will be an indoor skatepark, ski/ride ramps,
foam pits, trampoline and a digital media area as well as on-snow
park and pipe riding into the summer. Check out the action at www.
woodwardtahoe.com. Along with the addition of Woodward Tahoe,
Boreal has purchased a 22-foot pipe cutter, so skiers and riders can
continue to push progression in the Olympic-sized Superpipe.

AT-A-GLANCE
Always the first resort open in the area and open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.,
Boreal gives skiers and riders more access to the mountain every season.
Located directly off Interstate-80, Boreal has become a Mecca for terrain
park enthusiasts, and the 1-2-3 Ride Free program gives beginners a
reason to keep coming back for more. T
LEARN MORE: www.boreal.com
beginning trails: 30%
intermediate trails: 55%
advanced trails: 15%
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M.
WWW.BOREALSKI.COM
TOP ELEVATION: 7,700 FEET
Vertical rise: 500 feet
Rideable acres: 380
Longest run: 1 mile
Terrain: 41 trails
Sledding
BASE ELEVATION:
7,200 FEET
FAST FACTS: BOREAL
Lifts: 3 quads, 3 triples, 1 double, 2 moving
carpets, 1 moving carpet at tube park
Average snowfall:
400 inches
Snowmaking:
75 to 80 percent
terrain coverage
Snowboarder Kyle Miller gets some air off a jump at Boreal Mountain Resort.
Photo: Abe Blair
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 63
resorts Donner Ski Ranch
6SD-644-PP11 / lNFO§HELlTAHOE.COh / WWW.HELlTAHOE.COh
0ame exp|are mare than 1UU,UUU aeres a| prtsttne pawáer stashes with sone
of the nost experienoed guides in the industry. Ouaranteed snowoat baokup during inolenent
weather for advanoed reservations. We offer winter adventures that oan be oustonized to
neet the wildest of inaginations or the nost nodest of budgets:
>> Helioopter Skiing/Snowboarding >> Eaokoountry Snowoat Adventures
>> Ouided hountaintop Snowshoe Tours >> Year-round Soenio Flights
Lake Tahoe`s
Ultinate Powder hissionl
0a|| aur
baaktnq a|hee
taáay ta reserve
yaur memary
a| a |t|ettmel
beginning trails: 25%
intermediate trails: 50%
advanced trails: 25%
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
ADULT LIFT TICKET: MIDWEEK $30
WEEKENDS/HOLIDAYS $40
TOP ELEVATION: 7,781 FEET
Acres: 460
Longest run: 1.5 miles
Terrain: 52 runs
BASE ELEVATION:
7,031 FEET
FAST FACTS:
DONNER SKI RANCH
Lifts: 1 chair, 5 double chairs, 1 Magic Carpet
Average snowfall: 396 inches
Amenities:
Rental shop, retail, full
bar, cafeteria, lodge
AT-A-GLANCE
Since the frst rope tow was built in 1937, Donner Ski Ranch has ofered
a family-friendly and historic skiing experience. One of California’s frst
ski resorts, Donner Ski Ranch is located on Historic US Route 40 high
atop Donner Summit. On Donner Summit you’ll fnd an atmosphere
that is relaxing and carefree, harkening back to times past. T
LEARN MORE: www.donnerskiranch.com
Located on Historic Route 40 high atop Donner Summit,
you will find a relaxing and carefree atmosphere at
Donner Ski Ranch. Photo: Amy Edgett/Tahoe Magazine
64 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Diamond Peak
beginning trails: 18%
intermediate trails: 46%
advanced trails : 36%
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
WWW.DIAMONDPEAK.COM
TOP ELEVATION: 8,540 FEET
Vertical drop: 1,840 feet
Skiable acres: 655
Longest run: 2.5 miles
Terrain: 30 runs, open
glades, tree skiing
BASE ELEVATION:
6,700 FEET
FAST FACTS:
DIAMOND PEAK
Lifts: 6 Snowmaking: 75% of developed terrain
Season: December to April
Amenities: Shuttle service
Terrain park:
Located on Spillway; family-friendly
terrain features on Penguin
WHAT’S NEW
Diamond Peak has invested $8.5 million in capital improvements over the past
couple years with a renovated Base Lodge and a new Skier Services Building. As
guests arrive at the resort they enter the plaza area located in front of the Skier
Services Building where they can purchase lift tickets, lesson packages and rental
equipment. The two award-winning ski schools are also located in this building.
Diamond Peak offers amazing views of Lake Tahoe and terrain for every type of skier.
AT-A-GLANCE
Diamond Peak Ski Resort is recognized for its family-friendly atmosphere,
incredible lake views and perfectly groomed runs. Diamond Peak has 655 acres
of terrain with a peak elevation of 8,540 feet and a professional and welcoming
staf. Now in its 45th season, Diamond Peak ofers a newly renovated $4 million
Base Lodge, a thriving Child Ski Center, new and exciting events, great ski and
snowboard school packages, and a variety of options to customize your day at
the resort. T
LEARN MORE: www.diamondpeak.com
A skier takes a perfectly groomed first run this past winter at Diamond Peak in Incline Village.
Photo: Tom Zikas
www.inclinerecreation.com
Incline
Village
Recreation
Center
bring in a 2011-2012 lift ticket and receive
1/2 of a one-day pass to the Incline Village
Recreation Center (up to a
$
7
50
value)
1/2 OFF
open daily
980 Incline Way
775.832.1300
• group and aqua ftness classes
• cardiovascular and strength workout room
• massage by appointment
• indoor aquatic center
• gymnasium
• holiday youth, family & senior programs
• pro shop & snack bar
• warm freplace & 50” tv
• closed Christmas Day
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 65
66 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Heavenly
beginning trails: 20% intermediate trails: 45% advanced trails: 35%
WWW.SKIHEAVENLY.COM | LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M. WEEKDAYS, 8:30 A.M. TO 4 P.M. WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS
TOP ELEVATION: 10,067 FEET
Vertical drop: 3,500 feet
Acres: 4,800
Terrain parks: 4
BASE ELEVATION: 6,540 FEET
FAST FACTS: HEAVENLY
29 Lifts: 1 eight-passenger gondola,
1 aerial tramway, 2 high-speed six-
passenger chairs, 7 high-speed
quads, 5 triple chairs, 3 double chairs,
6 surface lifts, 4 Magic Carpets
Amenities: Free photo sharing capabilities with
EpicMix Photo, ski & ride schools, 5 rental & 2
repair shops, 9 on-mtn. restaurants, 4 lodges.
Child care: 6 weeks to 6 years
WHAT’S NEW
A new 2,022-square-
foot kids’ ski and ride
school facility and a new
kids’ adventure zone at the top of the Gondola will continue to grow
Adventure Peak as a hub for family fun. Plus three new trails on the
California side bring the massive resort’s run count up to 97.
AT-A-GLANCE
Heavenly made improvements to every area of the guest experience
for the 2011-2012 ski and ride season.
On the mountain, riders and skiers can enjoy groomed runs, tree
runs in the backcountry and terrain park adventures. Off the mountain
Heavenly is located in the heart of South Lake Tahoe’s nightlife. T
LEARN MORE: www.skiheavenly.com
A skier shreds some powder
at Heavenly with Lake Tahoe
serving as a breathtaking
backdrop. Photo: Corey Rich
The Heavenly gondola offers spectacular Lake Tahoe views. Photo: Corey Rich
Certain restrictions apply. See store for details. Offer valid for 2011-2012 ski season. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Mention this
ad to receive discount offer.
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HEAVENLY SPORTS LOCATIONS:
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HEAVENLY’S BEST SKI & SNOWBOARD
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SAVE
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season. Cannot be combined with any other
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68 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Granlibakken
AT-A-GLANCE
Granlibakken features an intimate ski hill, perfect
for beginning through intermediate skiers and
snowboarders. It’s a great place to avoid the
crowds of larger Lake Tahoe ski resorts, while
enjoying a day of skiing right out your back
door. A rental shop, ski school, warming hut and
Ski Hut Snack Bar are also on the premises. The
ski hill, ski school and snack bar are open every
Friday through Sunday, every day Christmas/New
Years and mid-February holidays. The rental shop,
snow play area and warming hut are open daily all sea-
son. Granlibakken offers plenty of Sierra terrain to explore
on cross-country skis or snowshoes as well. Guests have easy
access to popular cross-country trailheads which provide
miles of ungroomed Lake Tahoe skiing and snowshoeing ter-
rain. And for the kids, Granlibakken has a machine-groomed
snow play area. Cost is $10 per person for saucer rental and
use of snow play area (no tubes or toboggans are allowed).
Granlibakken is a Norwegian name meaning a hill shel-
tered by trees. It was the site of the 1932 and 1936 West Coast
Olympic trials and 1954 Junior Olympics. Granlibakken is
family-owned, occupying 74 wooded acres in a picturesque
mountain valley. Spectacular Lake Tahoe is just minutes away.
Wallet- friendly, wintry getaways are possible at Granlibakken,
which offers intimate accommodations. T
LEARN MORE: www.granlibakken.com
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 69
resorts Homewood
WHAT’S NEW
Homewood Mountain Resort will offer the Magnestick
chair lift safety technology for kids. Installed on the Quail
triple chair, which is located to the Snow Rangers Academy
children’s ski and snowboard center. Included with full-
and half-day Snow Rangers packages, a Magnestick vest is
worn by a child, which is equipped with a metal disc which
adheres to a magnet on the chair lift’s seat back. Upon
boarding the chair lift, children are held securely in place
for the duration of the ride. When a child reaches the chair
lift deboarding area, the Magnestick vest is deactivated,
allowing for a seamless release from the seatback. Parents
with children not enrolled in the Snow Rangers academy
may also rent a Magnestick vest for the day.
AT-A-GLANCE
There’s nothing like the view from Homewood
Mountain Resort. Everyone — from new skiers to seasoned
snowboarders — stops to marvel at the azure perfection
of Tahoe’s great mirror atop Madden Triple Chair. As the
pride and center of the town of Homewood, California,
Homewood Mountain Resort is described as “the gem of
Lake Tahoe’s West Shore” by SKI Magazine.
Homewood’s classic ski and snowboard experience and
family focus have been enjoyed since 1962. New for winter
2011-12, Homewood’s all-inclusive “Family & Friends”
private lesson allows for up to five people — whether skiing
or snowboarding — to enjoy instruction together.
For guests in search of the ultimate lakefront dining
experience or winter getaway, Homewood’s West Shore
Café & Inn is situated mere steps from the ski slopes. The
menu at the West Shore Café draws from the best that
California has to offer — fresh, seasonal produce, seafood
and meats — prepared to accentuate the flavors inherent
in each item, and welcomes guests for lunch, après-ski,
and dinner. Accommodations at the West Shore Café & Inn
offer six lodge-inspired guest rooms and suites that provide
guests with luxurious comforts, lake and mountain views,
authentic Tahoe hospitality, and conveniences such as a
daily house baked continental breakfast, complimentary
car valet, and on-demand, door-to-door shuttle service to
nearby destinations.
Located on the West Shore of Lake Tahoe, Homewood
Mountain Resort is one of California’s first winter recreation
resorts. Offering a family-friendly atmosphere since 1962,
Homewood continues to offer premiere winter skiing and
snowboarding with a focus on top-level guest service and
custom vacation packages. Deemed the gem of Lake Tahoe’s
West Shore by SKI Magazine, the 1,260-acre mountain offers
unobstructed views of the lake and surrounding peaks. T
LEARN MORE: www.SkiHomewood.com
beginning trails: 15%
intermediate trails: 50%
advanced trails: 35%
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
WWW.HOMEWOOD.COM
TOP ELEVATION: 7,880 FEET
Vertical drop: 1,650 feet
Acres: 1,260
Terrain parks: 2
BASE ELEVATION:
6,230 FEET
FAST FACTS:
HOMEWOOD
Amenities: Children’s center, snow tubing,
ski/snowboard school, rental/repair shop, retail
shop, famous barbecue, West Shore Café &
Inn, high-speed internet.
Chair lifts:
1 high-speed quad,
2 triple chairs, 1 double
chair, 4 surface lifts
The famed view of
Lake Tahoe from
Homewood
Mountain Resort.
Photo: Matt Theilen
70 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Kirkwood
WHAT’S NEW
New joint passes with Alpine Meadows and Homewood
are on the menu for 2011-’12 as well as some exciting
new events including a Freeride Festival, an all-mountain
telemark competition and a Women’s Week. Look out for
some fantastic new signature items from the Wall Bar and
Monte Wolfe’s.

AT-A-GLANCE
At 7,800 feet, Kirkwood annually receives more snow-
fall than any of the other Lake Tahoe resorts. Skiers and
riders can expect 600 inches annually of the lightest and
driest powder in the area. From calm groomed beginner
runs to hair raising cornices, cliffs and the most high angle
grooming around, there’s something for everyone at the
’Wood. T
LEARN MORE: www.kirkwood.com
beginning trails: 15% intermediate trails: 50% advanced trails: 20% expert trails: 15%
TOP ELEVATION: 9,800 FEET
Vertical rise: 2,000 feet
Skiable acres: 2,300
Trails: 72+
Average snowfall: 600 inches
Longest run: 2.5 miles
Snowmaking: Top-to-bottom
on four runs
BASE ELEVATION: 7,800 FEET
FAST FACTS: KIRKWOOD
Lifts: 2 high-speed quads, 1 fixed quad
6 triple chairs, 1 double chair, 3 surface lifts
2 Magic Carpets
Amenities: 3 terrain parks, Skier/
Boarder X, Ski/Board School, Backcountry
Education, Cross Country area, tube hill, rentals,
repairs, retail, on-mountain restaurants & bars.
Child care: ages 2-6
WWW.KIRKWOOD.COM | LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
A skier shreds some
powder last winter at
Kirkwood Mountain
Resort. Photo: Rachid
Dahnoun
Moybe il`s of lhe legendory snow, o norning of fresh lrocks in lhree feel of powder, or
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72 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Mt. Rose
beginning trails: 20%
expert trails: 10%
intermediate trails: 30%
advanced trails: 40%
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
(BLAZING ZEPHYR: 8:30 A.M. TO 4 P.M.)
WWW.MTROSE.COM
TOP ELEVATION: 9,700 FEET
Vertical drop: 1,800 feet
Acres: 1,200
Longest run: 2.5 miles
Total trails: 60-plus
Avg. snowfall: 400 in.
BASE ELEVATION:
7,900 FEET
FAST FACTS:
MT. ROSE
Snowmaking:
28 percent coverage top to bottom
Chairlifts: 2 six-pack, high
speed detachable chairs,
2 quad chairs (fixed grip),
2 triple chairs (fixed grip),
2 surface lifts
Jared Dalen skis in the famed chutes at Mt. Rose this past winter.
Photo: Scott Sady
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 73
WHAT’S NEW
Mt. Rose completed the lower section of
the Silver Dollar snowmaking project, allow-
ing early season access to the Slide Bowl.
Also new for the 2011-’12 season, Mt. Rose
added new webcams on skirose.com. Mt.
Rose now features 4 webcam views on the
Main side and 4 views in the Slide Bowl.
Buy online to save! New online-only Daily
Specials include Bonus Mondays ($49 lift
tickets), Two-fer Tuesdays (2 lift tickets for
the price of 1), Ladies Day Thursdays ($49
lift ticket, clinic & retail discount), $138
Family Ticket Packs (2 lift tickets for adults
and lift tickets for ages 17 and under) and
more available to purchase through www.
skirose.com. Got an iPhone? Download the
Mt. Rose app for free in the iTunes Store and
check out new improvements that include
push notifications, events, special offers and
a more extensive snow report. T
LEARN MORE: www.skirose.com A skier slides a rail at the Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe terrain park. Photo: Scott Sady
74 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Soda Springs
beginning trails: 30%
intermediate trails: 50%
advanced trails: 20%
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
WWW.SKISODASPRINGS.COM
TOP ELEVATION: 7,325 FEET
Vertical drop: 625 feet
Acres: 200
Longest run: 2.5 miles
Total trails: 16
Avg. snowfall: 400 in.
BASE ELEVATION:
6,700 FEET
FAST FACTS:
SODA SPRINGS
Ski Lifts: 2
Moving Carpets: 3
WHAT’S NEW
Soda Springs expanded its Tube Town tubing area to nearly double its size,
and also added a new SuperTuber-Cross — a tubing run flled with berms,
banks and rollers. Tubing is included with every lift ticket purchased, so
you can enjoy a day on the slopes plus let it slide down one of Soda’s many
groomed tubing lanes.
AT-A-GLANCE
Soda Springs is located just off I-80 at the Soda Springs exit atop Donner
Summit. The welcoming small resort spirit and relaxed atmosphere is per-
fect for families. In fact, Soda Springs offers Planet Kids, a snow-play area
designed with children ages 8 and under in mind. Access to Planet Kids
includes tubing, skiing/riding, tube carousels, snow volcanoes and more.
Catch the free sleigh ride over to Planet Kids from the base lodge. T
LEARN MORE: www.skisodasprings.com
Soda Springs has expanded its Tube Town tubing area to nearly double its size;
and also added a new SuperTuber-Cross. Photo: Provided by Studio KYK
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 75
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76 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Northstar-At-Tahoe
beginning trails: 13% intermediate trails: 60% advanced trails: 27%
WWW.NORTHSTARATTAHOE.COM | LIFT HOURS: 8:30 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
TOP ELEVATION: 8,610 FEET
Vertical drop: 2,280 feet
Skiable acres: 3,000
Trails: 95
MID-MTN ELEV: 6,810 FEET
Average snowfall: 350 inches
Longest run: 1.4 miles
Terrain parks: 8
Superpipe: 1, Halfpipe: 1
BASE ELEVATION: 6,330 FEET
FAST FACTS: NORTHSTAR
Open: Mid-November to Mid-April
Total lifts: 20 2 gondola, 1 Six-Pack Express,
7 quad express chairs, 2 triple chairs,
1 quad chair, 2 surface lifts,
5 Magic Carpets
Snowmaking: 50 percent coverage
WHAT’S NEW
$30 Million in capital
improvement projects.
Plans include new gladed
terrain and ski trails that
will increase groomable
terrain by 10 percent, a new high-speed detachable quad chairlift on
“The Backside,” new snowmaking and a new on-mountain restaurant
near the top of the Tahoe Zephyr Express Lift with indoor seating for
500 and outdoor seating for 200. Two-time Olympic gold medalist,
Shaun White will make Northstar his primary training resort, and will
help design a 22-foot halfpipe for guests to enjoy. In addition, new
Patagonia and Burton retail shops and an expanded North Face store
in a new location will be added to the Village at Northstar™, bringing
additional energy to the popular mountain village. Completion of these
projects is expected for the 2011-’12 winter season.

AT-A-GLANCE
EpicMix, Vail Resorts’ award-winning online and mobile applica-
tion has been re-imagined and re-engineered for the 2011-2012 ski and
snowboard season, including new groundbreaking functionality and
user engagement, and will be fully operational at Northstar this season.
Highlights include:
• RF-enabled lift tickets and passes will now allow for automatic
delivery of professional photographs to guest accounts.
• Free professional photos will be made available to guests for shar-
ing on Facebook and Twitter.
• Guests can combine professional photos and their own photos
with vertical feet skied, digital pins earned and cumulative snowfall to
capture the ultimate snapshot of their mountain experience this season.
• Vail Resorts is replacing nearly all paper lift tickets with durable
and reusable “smart” lift passes at all six mountain resorts. T
LEARN MORE: www.northstarattahoe.com
A skier hits some fresh powder
at Northstar-at-Tahoe last
winter. Photo: Corey Rich
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 77
Located in the heart of the Village at Northstar, the 9,000
square foot skating rink is the perfect ending to your day on the
mountains. Enjoy a hot toddy or mulled cider by the outdoor fire
pits surrounding the rink or take a few laps to burn off any left
over energy. The skating rink is free for all, and for those who
have no skates, $5 rentals are available on location.
Photo: Corey Rich
78 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Sierra-At-Tahoe
beginning trails: 25% intermediate trails: 50% advanced trails: 25%
WWW.SIERRAATTAHOE.COM
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M. | 8:30 A.M. TO 4 P.M. WEEKENDS AND PEAK PERIODS
TOP ELEVATION: 8,852 FEET
Vertical rise: 2,212 feet
Acres: 2,000
Average snowfall: 480 inches
Longest run: 2.5 miles
Terrain: 46 slopes and trails
Terrain Parks: 5 ski and snowboard
Superpipe: South Shore’s only superpipe
BASE ELEVATION: 6,640 FEET
FAST FACTS: SIERRA-AT-TAHOE
Lifts: 3 express family-friendly quad chairlifts,
1 triple lift, 5 double lifts, 4 Magic Carpet
children’s surface lifts, 1 tubing surface tow
Amenities: Ski and snowboard school,
on-mountain cafeterias, mountain sports shop
and equipment rentals
Child care: 18 months to 5 years
WHAT’S NEW
Adding to the mountain experience this season Sierra Resort intro-
duces Huckleberry Cat Tours, The Burton Riglet Park, new additions
to Blizzard Mountain, and more value, which keeps Sierra Resort the
most affordable mountain in Lake Tahoe.
Sierra Resort’s new backcountry cat tours take expert skiers and
riders straight to the edge of Huckleberry Canyon, allowing back-
country enthusiasts to save energy, and 30-40 minutes, for those
deep powder turns, by-passing the one and a half mile hike out to the
gates.
Not sure you are ready to unlock the extreme, check out our gentle
beginner terrain easily accessible from the base area, with world-
class instructors, new Ski School Director, Robert “Booie” Alward,
and the new Burton Riglet Park.
In partnership with industry leader Burton Snowboards’ Sierra
Resort’s new Burton Riglet Park is a mini snowboard park designed to
introduce kids as young as three years old to the sport of snowboard-
ing. Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort is the place to learn to ski or snowboard in
Lake Tahoe.
AT-A-GLANCE
As the Highway 50 resort grows older so does its reputation as pro-
viding a family-oriented atmosphere. Te 42-year-old resort focuses
on family programs while ofering a wide range of on-the-mountain
activities with its multitude of well-received terrain parks and super-
pipe. T
LEARN MORE: www.sierraattahoe.com
Colby Albino gets some
major air at Sierra-at-Tahoe
Resort. Photo: Jorik Blom
At Sierra-at-Tahoe; it’s not all about big ski lines and hucking
huge tricks; family fun is a big deal as well. Photo: Carrie Reiter
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 79
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80 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Squaw Valley
beginning trails: 25% intermediate trails: 45% advanced trails: 30%
WWW.SQUAW.COM | LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M.
TOP ELEVATION: 9,050 FEET
Vertical drop: 2,850 feet
Acres: 4,000
Trails: 170+ Bowls: 16
Terrain Parks: 3
Average snowfall: 450 inches
Longest run: 3.2 miles
Uphill Capacity: 49,000 people/hour
BASE ELEVATION: 6,200 FEET
FAST FACTS: SQUAW VALLEY
Pipes: 2
Tabletops: 12+
Rails/Boxes: 30+
Amenities:
Scenic cable car rides
1960 Olympic Museum
Indoor climbing wall
Snowshoeing
Night skiing
Lifts: 34
Cable Car: 1
Funitel: 1
Pulse Gondola: 1
Express 6-pacs: 4
Express Quads: 3
Fixed-Grip Quad: 1
Triple Chairs: 8
Double Chairs: 10
Surface Lifts: 3
Magic Carpets: 2
WHAT’S NEW
This winter, Squaw welcomes new terrain
parks, new dining experiences and a host of
new amenities as part Squaw Valley’s five-year,
$50 million capital improvement plan called the
Squaw Renaissance. Squaw has partnered with
Snow Park Technologies (SPT), the builders of
world-leading terrain parks for the X-Games
and Dew Tour, to bring all new terrain parks and
a new half-pipe to Squaw Valley. In addition
to new terrain parks, guests can enjoy all new
dining experiences this winter. Rocker@Squaw,
the newest restaurant and bar in The Village at
Squaw Valley, will offer a fresh new take on clas-
sic mountain dishes including flatbread pizzas,
hot wings and
tasty burgers.
Squaw will also
offer a new
après ski experi-
ence at the KT
Base Bar, and a
new mountain-
top café called
Funi’s, will offer
new items for
skiers and riders
on the go. Other
improvements
include a new
day lodge, a new snowsports school, new snow-
board and demo rental center, new signage and
information boards, new grooming machines,
and North America’s first mountaintop ski-in/
ski-out coffee shop.
AT-A-GLANCE
Known for steep skiing and gorgeous views
of Lake Tahoe, Squaw Valley USA is one of the
jewels of the region. For locals and visitors alike,
it’s the place to race to on a powder day, and the
place to relax with family and friends at lively
restaurants or cozy firepits and enjoy all the
Sierra have to offer. T
LEARN MORE: www.squaw.com
Lynn Keenan enjoys skiing the steeps at Squaw Valley USA. Photos: Hank de Vre
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 81
82 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
resorts Sugar Bowl
WHAT’S NEW
Save big on lift tickets every day of the season
with Sugar Bowl’s CORE Daily Pass. Te Daily
Pass costs just $19 to join and ofers $15 savings
on an all-day rack rate lift ticket every day of the
season. Add resort charge and skip the lift lines,
enjoy direct-to-lift convenience and resort-wide
charging privileges. Members earn points every
time they ski or ride, and for every qualifying
dollar spent, that can then be redeemed for free
items across the resort. Also, progression is the
name of the game with Sugar Bowl’s General
Admission program, ofering free standard rentals
for the day and a free two hour group lesson at
any level for ticketed guests ages 13-69, and for all
season passholders age 4 and up.
AT-A-GLANCE
In 1938 Walt Disney was among the visionaries
who helped pick this picture-perfect location,
and placed upon it the frst chair lift in California.
What Mr. Disney and his fellow adventurers found
was a prime location near Donner Summit; a
place of precipitous peaks, steep narrow chutes
and wide open bowls.
But more than that,
they picked a spot that
receives more snow
than almost anywhere
in North America. On
average, it receives over
500 inches of snow per
year. T
LEARN MORE:
www.sugarbowl.com
beginning trails: 17% intermediate trails: 45% advanced trails: 38%
WWW.SUGARBOWL.COM | LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
TOP ELEVATION: 8,383 FEET
Vertical drop: 1,500 feet
Peaks: 4
Acres: 1,500
Trails: 84
Average snowfall: 500 inches
Longest run: 3+ miles
Grooming: 500 acres
Snowmaking: 375 acres
BASE ELEVATION: 6,883 FEET
FAST FACTS: SUGAR BOWL
Family Park: Nob Hill
Steepest Run:
The Palisades
Best Kept Secret:
Strawberry Fields
Terrain Park: Judah
Lifts: 12
5 High-Speed
Express Quads
2 Fixed Grip Quads
3 Fixed Grip Doubles
1 Gondola
1 Surface Lift
Sean Carey hucks it at the Sugar
Bowl terrain park. Photo: Courtesy
of Sugar Bowl.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 83
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84 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
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resorts Tahoe Donner
AT-A-GLANCE
Tahoe Donner Downhill
“The best place to begin.” Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area is com-
mitted to being the best place for family fun and learning in the
Tahoe region. We offer a unique family experience and are known
for our successful learn to ski program, one of the only in the area
that starts teaching kids as young as 3 years old. The combination of
our wide open bowls, excellent grooming and lightly traveled runs
make Tahoe Donner Downhill a gem for beginner skiers and riders.
We can’t forget the kid friendly menu in the cafeteria, an on-site
shop stocked with all things skiing and riding for little tykes, an im-
pressive rental shop stocked with equipment specifically made for
kids and beginners, plus a friendly, courteous staff trained to make
your experience fun and enjoyable. At Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski
Area, you will enjoy a small ski area that delivers a personal touch,
unique to the area.
Tahoe Donner Cross Country
Ski through pines and aspens, climb peaks and gentle rolling hills,
or glide along the flats of Euer Valley. Tahoe Donner Cross Country
is a premier cross country ski and snowshoe facility with over 100
kilometers of trails groomed daily for diagonal striding, skating and
snowshoeing. With a wide variety of terrain, there is something
to meet every skier’s need, from beginner to expert. We also host
many events and clinics throughout the season for skiers of every
level. From night skiing to great food and unparalleled trails, come
check out what Tahoe Donner Cross Country has to offer. “The ski-
ing is out there...”
LEARN MORE: www.tahoedonner.com
LIFT HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
WWW.TAHOEDONNER.COM
Lifts: 1 quad chair, 1 double chair,
1 surface tow
Amenities: Downhill sports
shop, open daily 8:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m., ski school,
lodge
FAST FACTS:
TAHOE DONNER
beginning trails: 40%
intermediate trails: 60%
Acres: 14
The downhill terrain at
Tahoe Donner is easy for
beginner skiers. Photo:
Courtesy of Tahoe Donner
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 85
Martis Valley Associates
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HISTORY
3 & * ( / c f 5 ) &
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F
or more than 160 years, unpredictable and overwhelming
snowstorms in the Sierra Nevada have challenged many who
dared to cross this mountain range during the winter months.
Hardy pioneers, burly railroad men, and modern motorists have all
dealt with the awesome power of the Sierra Storm King.
Although there are nearly a dozen trans-Sierra routes, Donner
Pass is the most notorious of all. Chief Truckee, a Paiute Indian, frst
pointed out the unnamed 7,239-foot pass to the Stephens Party in
1844. Heavy November snowstorms forced this group into a winter
survival camp along the Yuba River while some men went for help at
Sutter’s Fort. Bred for endurance and blessed with luck, all 50 men,
women and children survived the 11-month ordeal. Despite their se-
rious hardships, two women gave birth to healthy babies on the trail;
the second infant arrived during the winter encampment and was
named Elizabeth Yuba Murphy, the frst American born in the Sierra.
Te members of the 1844 Stephens-Murphy-Townsend party
became the frst American emigrants to haul wagons over the
mountains, thereby opening the long-sought Califor-
nia Trail. Two years later, the pass gained
perpetual notoriety as well as its infa-
mous moniker when the Don-
ner Party was caught east
of the summit by
early winter storms. Trapped for months with diminishing
food supplies, the starving pioneers were reduced to can-
nibalism. Nearly half of the 81 settlers stranded at the camps
died before reaching sunny California.
In 1850 California joined the Union as the Golden State.
Westerners believed that a transcontinental railroad was
needed to stitch the nation together, but Congress and
investors doubted that iron rails could be linked over the
Sierra Nevada. Teodore Judah, a young New York- trained
engineer who found a way to snake the tracks through the
snowbound mountains, persuaded Congress to pass the Pa-
cifc Railway Act. Te Sierra portion of the transcontinental
railroad required 37 miles of expensive wooden snowsheds
in order to protect track and trains.
VINTEF1890
Te transcontinental railroad made the Sierra
crossing safer, but hazards and danger continued to
plague winter train passengers.
By Mark McLaughlin
Tahoe Magazine
86 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
VINTEF-1952
During the winter of 1952,
powerful Pacifc storm systems
hammered the Sierra relentlessly.
By New Year’s Day, nearly 23 feet of
snow had already fallen on Donner
Pass. In the middle of January 1952,
Truckee-Tahoe residents were cop-
ing with a blizzard that would last
eight days. Despite the best eforts of highway crews,
all northern Sierra passes were closed due to deep
snow and avalanches. Southern Pacifc trains were
still crossing the Sierra, however, rumbling through
the snowsheds and tunnels that made their passage
possible.
On January 13, SP’s fnest streamliner rammed a
snowslide east of Yuba Gap, high in the mountains
and became stuck. Many passengers onboard the City
of San Francisco feared that another avalanche might
shove the entire train into the steep ravine below. Tir-
ty hours into their ordeal and with no rescue in sight,
the supply of diesel fuel ran out, pitching the train
into a cold eerie darkness. Even as the blizzard raged,
SP rescue trains were inching their way closer from
both east and west toward the stranded streamliner.
One train carried dogsled teams, while the Sixth Army
trucked in over-snow tractor vehicles and soldiers
trained in winter survival. Military doctors and nurses
were rushed to the likely rescue points. During a brief
lull in the storm, a Coast Guard helicopter managed to
drop medical supplies and food.
...continued on the next page
In January 1890, a relent-
less barrage of blizzards and
a derailed train shut down
the line for 15 days. Central
Pacifc used every weapon in
its arsenal to clear the line; a
rotary snowplow, an armada
of wedge plows, hundreds of
railroad personnel, and nearly 5,000 civilian shovelers hired
to augment CP crews. Despite their best eforts, the winter’s
66 feet of snow (4th snowiest on record), overwhelmed them
and passenger trains were snowbound throughout the high
country. For New York journalist Nellie Bly, the Sierra snow
blockade nearly stymied her attempt to circumnavigate the
globe in less time than novelist Jules Verne’s fctional voyage
Around the World in 80 Days.
Bly had shipped out from New York to London on No-
vember 14, 1889, later crossing Europe and Asia. By the time
she reached San Francisco, Nellie had used up 68 days and
Donner Pass was blocked by blizzards, avalanches and train
derailments. Central Pacifc Railroad of cials rerouted Nellie
Bly on a special express train south and she arrived back in
New York City on January 25, 1890, having circled the planet
in 72 days.
¨Thir|,hcvr·in|c|heircrdealandwi|hncre·cve
in·igh|,|he·vppl,cfdie·elfvelrancv|,pi|ching
|he|rainin|caccldeeriedarlne··.¨
¨De·pi|e|heirle·|effcr|·,
|hewin|er`·66fee|cf·ncw
+|h·ncwie·|cnreccrd,
cterwhelmed|hemand
pa··enger|rain·were
·ncwlcvnd|hrcvghcv|
|hehighccvn|r,.¨
L
Trains and passengers
became stranded in
Reno during the 1980
snow blockade.
Photo: Courtesy of
Nevada Historical
Society.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 87
88 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
When the storm fnally broke on January 16, relief
parties rushed in for the rescue. Te cold and weary
passengers hobbled to safety along the tracks while
the sick and weak were tobogganed or carried in
stretchers. Miraculously, all 226 passengers and crew
survived their three-day ordeal on the snowbound
train. Te dangerous rescue was staged during a
vicious blizzard; nearly 13 feet of snow blasted the
region that week. Te storms of ’52 dumped nearly 65
feet of snow on Donner Summit, the second snowiest
since 1878; the snowpack reached 26 feet deep, the
greatest depth recorded there.
¨One·,·|emin]anvar,lvriedM|.Fc·e
SliFe·cr|vnder75inche·cffre·h·ncw,
Netada`·all-|ime·ingle-·|crmreccrd.¨
VINTEF-1968-69
Te winter of 1968-69 opened up with cold, Gulf
of Alaska-bred storms. During the second half of
December, the storm track intensifed. Blizzards and
100 mph winds tore into the region, ravaging skiers
and residents alike. Te Storm King worked his magic
throughout January and February and snowfall totals
soared to nearly 300 percent of normal.
One system in January buried Mt. Rose Ski Resort
under 75 inches of fresh snow, Nevada’s all-time
single-storm record. By the end of January, ski areas
were reporting impressive depths of snow. Squaw
Valley boasted 23 feet and Mount Rose 25 feet, while
Boreal Ridge claimed to be buried under drifts 18
to 40 feet deep. On April 1, 1969, Squaw Valley ski
resort reported snow about 30 feet deep on the upper
mountain and declared they would keep their lifts
running until July 7. Te winter storms of 1968-69
dumped 50 feet on Donner Pass, the 13th snowiest
year on record.
¨A|IaleTahce,wherere·iden|·lcnged
fcr·vn·hine,i|·ncwedeter,da,frcm
April18-50,inclvding+0inche·cn|he
la·|weelendcf|hemcn|h.¨
VINTEF-1982-85
In 1983 the West endured one of the most brutal
winters in the annals of Sierra weather history. Nearly
67 feet of snow fell at Norden on Donner Pass, the
6th greatest total on record for that location. Te
incessant storm activity and heavy snowfall took
its toll on local residents and businesses, as well as
visitors looking to ski some of the deepest powder in
decades. All winter long storms battered the region
with rain, wind and snow. At Lake Tahoe, where resi-
dents longed for sunshine, it snowed every day from
April 18-30, including 40 inches on the last weekend
of the month. Snow depths on Donner Pass exceeded
17 feet. At the Sugar Bowl ski area, General Manager
Don Schwartz proclaimed the snowfall of ’83 to be
the greatest ever.
Te weather at Lake Tahoe has the ability to
change moods in a fash, so visitors and locals should
always pay attention to the forecast and keep their
eyes to the sky. Author Robert Heinlein got it right
when he wrote, “Climate is what you expect. Weather
is what you get.” T
— Tahoe weather historian Mark McLaughlin is a
nationally published author and professional speaker.
His award-winning books are available at local stores
or at www.thestormking.com. You can reach him at
mark@thestormking.com.
Storm King ... from previous page
L
L
Snow reached crushing
depths at South Lake
Tahoe in 1969.
Photo: Courtesy of
author’s collection.
The City of San
Francisco streamliner
became trapped by
an avalanche in January
1952. Photo: Courtesy of
Nevada Historical Society.

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90 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
You’ve probably heard of it
But what is it?
Stories compliments of Mark McLaughlin and The Truckee Donner Historical Society
T
he Donner Party was a group of American pioneers who set out
for California in a wagon train. Delayed by a series of mishaps,
they spent the winter of 1846–47 snowbound in the Sierra Nevada.
Some of the emigrants resorted to cannibalism to survive, eating those
who had succumbed to starvation and sickness.
Te journey west usually took between four and six months, but the
Donner Party was slowed by following a new route called the Hastings
Cutof, which crossed Utah’s Wasatch Mountains and Great Salt Lake
Desert. Te rugged terrain and dif culties later encountered while
traveling along the Humboldt River, in present-day Nevada, resulted in
the loss of many cattle and wagons and contributed to divisions within
the group.
By the beginning of November 1846 the group had reached the Sierra
Nevada where they became trapped by an early, heavy snowfall near
Truckee (now Donner) Lake, high in the mountains. Teir food supplies
ran low, and in mid-December some of the group set out on foot to ob-
tain help. Rescuers from Sacramento attempted to reach the emigrants,
but the frst relief party did not arrive until the middle of February 1847,
almost four months after the wagon train became trapped. Forty-eight of
the 87 members of the party survived to reach Sacramento.
Historians have described the episode as one of the most spectacular
tragedies in Californian history and in the record of western migration.
A FRIGHTFUL STORY
Te following article is transcribed from the First Published account
of the Donner Party found in the Truckee Tribune newspaper issue
dated December 22, 1869. A copy of which can be found in the Joseph
Research Library Sierra Nevada County N.Y. Journal of Commerce
In 1846 a company of emigrants, among whom was a Mr. Dunbar,
with his wife and four children, stopped here to rest after a long and
toilsome march. Te clouds looked heavy and threatening, and their
guide, an old trapper, seeing the danger, urged him forward. Mr. Donner
refused to go, having a drove of cattle which needed rest. Te main por-
tion of the company decided to proceed, and Mrs. Donner intrusted here
children to their care and remained with her husband. A Dutchman also
stayed with him. Tat night the snow storm came on and continued for
two or three weeks, abutting these three persons in for the winter. Teir
HISTORY
U
... .continued on page 92
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 91
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cattle stampeded, and they were left with but little provision. Early in
the spring their friends made their way to the lake, found the hut in
which they had sheltered themselves, entered it, and saw a sicken-
ing sight. Tere sat the Dutchman gnawing the fesh from a human
arm, which he had roasted in the fre. He stated that Mr. Donner had
frst died, afterward his wife, and he had been compelled to eat there
fesh to keep from starving. From certain evidence, however, they
gathered the impression that Mr. Donner had been murdered, his
wife violated, and subsequently killed and buried in the snow. Want
of reliable evidence prevented the mystery ever being solved. Te
Dutchman is said to be still living.
— A photo copy of this page can be found in the archives at the
Truckee Donner Historical Society Joseph Research Library 10115
Donner Trail, Truckee, CA 96161 For more information about our
archives and artifacts send an email to: history@truckeehistory.org
Promises of health led Donner Party, others, West
For many of the emigrants traveling the California Trail before the
gold rush, a common reason for heading west was to improve their
health. Tat included members of the 1846 Donner Party.
In his 1845 guidebook, “Te
Emigrant’s Guide to Oregon and
California,” promoter Lansford
Hastings described California
as if it were a biblical Garden of
Eden. He painted a picture of
an idyllic landscape blessed by
perfect weather.
He promised, “Tere will be
no land on earth that can com-
pare with California with respect
to its wonderful climate, the
excellent health of its inhabit-
ants.”
Hastings also claimed, “No
fres are required, at any season
of the year, in parlors, of ces
or ships, hence fuel is never
required, for any other than culi-
nary purposes. It may be truly
said of this country [California],
December is as pleasant as May.
He at least clarifed his state-
ment with: “Te remarks are
applicable only to the valleys
and plains, for the mountains
present but one eternal winter.
Hence it is seen, that you may
here enjoy perennial spring, or perpetual winter at your option.”
Early emigrants drawn to California were inspired by economic
opportunity and free land, but there is no doubt the lure of better
health was a major factor. One of the tragic ironies associated with
the Donner Party is that the attraction of a life free of disease in the
“salubrious and healthful climate” of California was one of the reasons
for the journey west. Unfortunately for many of them, severe winter
weather and starvation preempted that California dream.
Health-seeking immigrants were also inspired by reports that Cali-
fornia’s climate was so perfect that disease was non-existent. In his 1836
book, “Two Years Before the Mast,” Richard Henry Dana wrote that Cali-
fornia was “blessed with a climate which there can be no better in the
world; free from all manner of diseases, whether epidemic or endemic...”
In the early 1870s, the Los Angeles City Chamber of Commerce began
a climate promotion campaign to draw immigrants to the region. Health
and longevity were trumpeted to easterners and Europeans. One adver-
tisement boasted, “We sell the climate at so much per acre and throw in
the land; it’s $10 for an acre of land, and $490 an acre for the climate.”
One of my favorite quips about the health benefts associated with
the California climate is the story about a man from Missouri who had
moved to California in the gold rush. When he had become an old man,
he decided that he wanted to visit the “old country” to see his family
and friends one last time. While in Missouri, he contracted one of the
deadly diseases common in the region at that time and the doctor told
him he was about to die. Before he passed, he made his friends promise
they would take his body back to California so he could be buried in his
adopted state. A cof n was constructed and the Californian was loaded
into a wagon for the trip west. A month later, imagine everyone’s surprise
when, after they had buried him a coastal cemetery, their dead comrade
popped up alive, resurrected by the Golden State’s salubrious climate
and rich soil. T
—Weather historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published
author and photographer. His award-winning books are available at local
bookstores or at www.thestormking.com
92 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
“We sell the
climate at so
much per acre
and throw in
the land; it’s
$10 for an acre
of land, and
$490 an acre for
the climate.”
— Excerpt from a
1870’s advertisement
by the Los Angeles
City Chamber of
Commerce
THE DONNER PARTY
Long-time Donner Party Hike volunteer guide Greg Palmer points out geographic
features to a participant during the interpretive event held each year in October.
Photo: Courtesy of Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce.
Books about the Donner Party:
Dr. Hardesty, a professor of Anthropology
at the University of Nevada in Reno, teamed up
with colleagues to pen “Te Archaeology of the
Donner Party,” which ofers an interpretation
of the Donner Party story based on the careful
analysis of artifacts unearthed at the sites of the
Murphy Cabin in the State Park and the George
Donner campsite at Alder Creek.
Frank Mullen, Jr. compiled “Te Donner
Party Chronicles” from a year-long series of
day-by-day accounts of the Donner Party’s
westward journey which he wrote for the Reno
Gazette-Journal to commemorate the 150th
anniversary of the trek.
In his book “Te Donner Party: Weathering
the Storm,” weather historian Mark McLaugh-
lin adds to his recounting of the Donner Party
ordeal many details about the severe winter
weather conditions in California at that time,
and includes information about events which
were simultaneously unfolding in Mexico and
other parts of California.T
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 93
HISTORY BUFFS
On Dec. 6, 2009, the Truckee Donner Historical Society formally
dedicated the historic Gateway Research Cabin honoring early
Truckee citizen and philanthropist Dick Joseph as the Joseph
Research Library. The library is located on the west side of
Meadow Park at 10115 Donner Trail Road in Truckee.
Beginning in June 2009, this historical research library has
been open to the public every Thursday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Books, newspaper files, maps and photographs are available for
use within the library for researchers, genealogists, historians,
homeowners, and all who wish to study area history.
For more information visit truckeehistory.org
HISTORY Ice Harvesting
U
By Amy Edgett
Tahoe Magazine
A look back at a time before refrigerators — when the ice harvesting
industry dominated the Truckee region in the mid- to late-1800s
HARVEST. It evokes images of fruit-laden trees,
felds of green, farmers markets full of berry baskets, ripe
red tomatoes, yellow and green squash piled high.
To most, harvest is not a word associated with hardcore
men laboring in frigid temperatures on frozen ponds, saw-
ing and storing blocks of coveted Sierra ice from Donner
Summit in California to Verdi, Nev.
Ice harvesting is a hot topic in Tom Macaulay’s ancestry.
Macaulay, aka the Iceman, is the grandson of the illustri-
ous “Pioneer Tom,” a prominent player in the ever-shift-
ing ice industry from the late 1800s through the early 20th
Century.
Tese roots ignited a passion for history and research.
Macaulay began seeking information, fnding friends of
friends with stories and photos of the Truckee ice-age.
One source was born in Boca; another, Angie Birks, taught
school in the one-room school house in Floriston, Calif., a
few miles east of Truckee.
Macaulay continued his search, saying “I was fabber-
gasted people would let me take their photos to copy.”
A retired civil engineer living now in Reno, Macaulay
eventually joined the Truckee Donner Historical Society.
After awhile, folks there would ask, “has the Iceman talked
to you yet?”
“He was the Iceman,” said Macaulay of his grandfather
Tom MacAuley (the spelling was later changed by family
members). “He could build a plant and start producing ice
in no time.”
WHAT’S SO COOL ABOUT ICE?
Ice was a precious commodity before modern refrigera-
tion. Te frst American ice harvest occurred in Boston in
1806. In the summer of 1850, 275 tons of ice and 50 refrig-
erators were delivered by ship to San Francisco from Boston
Lake Ice, distributed to upscale hotels and the richest of
rich in San Francisco.
Te price was dear. In 1851 the American Russian Com-
mercial Company contracted with the Russian-American
Colonies, with the frst shipment at $75 a ton made to San
Francisco in 1852.
Tis ice, frst obtained from Sitka, Alaska, was king on
the West Coast until 1869, when the Central Pacifc Railroad
was completed, and ice from the Sierra Nevada became
readily available to neighboring states, even globally to
China and Australia.
PIONEER TOM AND
H A R V E S T T I ME
Ice could freeze up to an
inch a night forming clear,
hard ice, or “blue ice.”
Horse drawn guides, saws
and scapers were used. The
crew pushed ice rafts into a
cleared pond.
Photo: Tom Macaulay
Collection
94 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
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Exp 12/1/2012
har•vest
noun, often attributive \här-vest\
1: the season for gathering in agricultural crops
2: the act or process of gathering in a crop
transitive verb
a : to gather in (a crop) : reap b : to gather,
catch, hunt, or kill (as salmon, oysters, or deer)
for human use, sport, or population control
It tamped down extreme heat in Virginia City, Nev., Com-
stock Lode mines. Rock temperatures could reach 125° F, with
water temps at 170° F. In 1872, the Consolidated Virginia mine
used 1,000 tons of ice.
Another breakthrough for the ice industry occurred when
the Central Pacifc Rail Road and Union Pacifc Rail road
joined track at Promontory Point, Utah, in 1869. California
growers began shipping fruits to Chicago and New York, frst
with small quantities, then full loads with natural ice refriger-
ated cars.
At Boca, on the confuence of the Little Truckee and
Truckee Rivers, ice was used by the Boca Brewery to brew lager
beer. It was cheaper to ship hops and ingredients from Sacra-
mento than natural ice to the valley. In 1883, the popular brew
was sent to the Paris Exposition, where it won awards.
EVOLUTION OF AN INDUSTRY
– AND THE ICEMAN’S ROLE
Te ice industry expanded at a ferce pace with cutthroat
competition in the Truckee area, and Tomas “Pioneer Tom”
MacAuley, Sr. was in the thick of it. At one point, 26 ice compa-
nies were harvesting full bore along the Truckee River at Truck-
ee, Polaris, Martis Creek, Prosser Creek, Camp 16, Bronco,
Floriston, Essex and Verdi.
Pioneer Tom’s father was a War of 1812 veteran who re-
ceived a land scrip in Mount Pleasant, Iowa. James MacAuley
operated a dairy farm there, but came west to the Mother Lode
in the Nevada City, Calif., area, leaving a wife and his four chil-
dren behind.
... continued on next page
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 95
96 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Tom MacAuley abandoned ice manu-
facturing; however, he still sold ice under
the Summit Valley Ice Co. name. He went
down to Cuba, then to modern Iceland, then
eventually to about 5 miles east of Truckee
proper, to run Mountain Ice Co.
“Tere is a great deal of confusion about
what happened here,” said Macaulay.
Tere were lawsuits, the records of which
were destroyed in the San Francisco earth-
quake. His grandfather disagreed with the
fnancing folks, and was left out in the cold.
A BATTLE OVER FROZEN GOLD
Ice wars occurred repeatedly, with companies hustling to
sell the frozen gold, at one time merging under the frst Pacifc
Ice Co., a marketing frm. Pacifc Ice co. set prices and ensured
each company had a market share and kept prices low enough to
encourage purchase, but high enough to allow expansion of ice
harvests. And increased competition.
Ten, another monopoly was formed, Te Pacifc Ice Co.
Later, the Union Ice Company, with Lloyd Tevis, president of
Southern Pacifc Railroad, Wells Fargo and interests in copper
mines in Butte, Mont., as president. MacAuley was supervisor
with the conglomerate, and still he had problems with manage-
ment. He wanted to be able to sell Summit Valley Ice Co. ice.
“He was hard to get along with — this is the way I’m going to
say it,” said Macaulay. “He didn’t sit well with fnancial people.”
Tom Sr. resigned from Union Ice Co., and went into partner-
ship to form the Truckee Ice Co. in 1884. Macaulay’s grandfather
built the plant at Martis Creek, put up $1,800 and didn’t get paid.
“It was the same old story,” said Reno’s Iceman. “Once the
plant was up and running, they didn’t need him anymore.”
In 1886, he formed the Tahoe Ice Co. with partners Warren
Richardson and Jonathan Moody, of hotel and stage line wealth.
Te three men and their wives got the plant up and run-
ning, and once again Tom Sr. was forced out. He sued and won
three diferent lawsuits, in the neighborhood of $30,000, but he
never collected a dime as appeals courts hung up payment and
increased legal fees. He lost everything.
Including his frst wife. Tey divorced in the late 1890s. Tom
Sr. married Mary Louise in 1894, and had Tom Jr. in 1986. By
1901, they had no money left and moved to Hobart Mills, where
MacAuley worked as a night watchman. In 1906, the family
relocated to Spanish Springs, Nev., bought lots, and built a house
from a chicken coop and wagons. Tom Sr. worked as a night-
watchman, and died a pauper.
In 1852, Pioneer Tom, then 22, his older sister Margaret and
younger sister Eliza led the dairy herd across the plains to Califor-
nia. Tey sent the herd to Sacramento, where it was destroyed in
a cattle plague.
Te entire family landed in the mining industry, where the
ingenious Tom MacAuley helped develop hydraulic mining from
1852-1860, securing three mining patents for hose coverings and
waterwheels. Due to health issues, MacAuley went to San Fran-
cisco, where he worked with the Union Foundry. He would travel
to mining country, fnd out what they needed, make a sale and go
back to San Fran to manufacture, then back to the mine to install.
He wrote articles for the prominent Mining and Scientifc Press
tabloid, staying with the industry until 1867.
In 1868, MacAuley began work in the ice industry, where he
fgured he could make money.
“He could bring money home by the bucketful, but couldn’t
hold on to it worth a darn,” said the present-day Iceman, of his
grandfather. “My father said he (Tom Sr.) made and lost his for-
tune three times: dairy, mining and ice.”
Tom Sr. started the Summit Valley Ice Co. on Donner Summit.
He patented an ice-making process. In a big barn, with a foor of
packed snow, water was poured in from the top, which trickled
down strings and froze. Ice formed on the strings and was sawed
of for sale.
Two other outfts operated on the summit, the Nevada and
Mountain Lakes Ice Company out of Nevada City and the Sacra-
mento-based Summit Ice Company. When the railroad tunnel
was completed, joining rail lines from the East and West, the wild
ice ruckus began.
Summit Ice Co. moved down to Prosser Creek, where the
Truckee Basin harvest was cheaper, with colder weather and a
lesser battle with snow.
ICE HARVEST ... from previous page
The Truckee ice industry relied on manpower.
The labor-intensive work, shown here at the Boca Ice
Pond, was dangerous but badly needed work.
Crews of 30-100 men were employed by companies.
Photo: Courtesy of Truckee Donner Historical Society
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 97
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Both Macaulay’s father and grandfather were great sto-
rytellers, and the tales got young Tom interested in history
and the ice business.
Most ice workers were lumbermen in the summer, and
grateful for the week or month of winter employment. It
was grueling work, rising at dawn and handling ice until
dusk or later if warm weather or a storm threatened. Tey
started the harvest by marking of the ice pond into per-
fectly perpendicular grids with a hand plow.
A horse-drawn marker was used to scribe the ice, with
deep cuts made as one harvester led the horses and one
guided the marker from the rear. Once the ice was cut, an
open area was punched out at the edge for open water. Ten the
harvest began, with men using splitting forks and long pikes to ma-
neuver the rafts of ice to the warehouse.
“One guy was very careless, and he would fall of the end of the
ice into the pond. Te others would pick him up, clothes and every-
thing would freeze,” said Macaulay. “As he walked by, he’d crinkle,
and people would say ‘Uh oh, there goes Swish Swish Muldoon.’”
When the logging industry petered out, and men were needed
for winter ice harvesting, advertisements in Sacramento guaranteed
you could keep company clothes, gloves and galoshes.
Newspaper was stufed as insulation in boots, pants and jackets.
“A lot of them never lasted a week,” said Macaulay. “Tey’d drop
their gloves and galoshes and walk.”
Which is testament to Pioneer Tom’s ice industry tenacity, if not
his business savvy. T
“Iceman” Tom Macaulay, center with wife
Betty, is surrounded by the valley clan,” family
from his ice harvesting grandfather’s first wife,
Emma Elizabeth. The E.E. clan was in Truckee
to visit ice harvesting areas and houses of old.
Photo: Amy Edgett/Tahoe Magazine
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Kings Beach, CA 96143
530.546.3834
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Visit our new
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 99
Rändi Jorgensen Productions
Wedding Planner & Consultant
Of ce 530.550.9428
Cell 530.386.2862
www.yourtahoewedding.com
RändiJorgensenProductions@gmail.com
Specializing in Destination
Weddings in Lake Tahoe
475 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
530-583-1580
www. Co b b l e s t o n e Ta h o e . c o m
Dining
Evergreen
(530) 581-1401
Cinema
Cobblestone Cinema
(530) 546-5951
Shops
Bluestone Jewelry
(530) 581-4298
The Bookshelf
(530) 581-1900
Alpine Heritage
(530) 583-2431
Exotic Nails
(530) 581-0503
Kalifornia Jean Bar
(530) 583-5326
Kunst Furniture
(530) 386-3968
Lather & Fizz
Bath Boutique
(530) 583-9900
Pablo’s Gallery
& Frame Shop
(530) 583-3043
Ruffes & Ruffnecks
(530) 583-1128
Tahoe T-Shirtery
(530) 581-0993
Salon Bella Vita
(530) 583-1364
Royal Forever
Women’s Clothing
(530) 580-4028
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(530) 581-0662
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(530) 581-1106
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WWW. J A C K R A B B I T MO ON . C O M
100 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Here’s a sampling of some
Tahoe bands
to catch this winter:
O Martin and Vargas, nuevo flamenco
ODead Winter Carpenters, Americana
OBison, bluegrass
OJesse Kalin and the Cool Black Kettle,
singer-songwriter, classic rock
OThe Cash Only Band,
Johnny Cash, outlaw country
OHeadphone Union, jam
OThe Mark Castro Band, classic rock
OThe Jason King Band, blues
DINING & NIGHTLIFE music
ROCKIN’
TAHOE
Te music scene at Lake Tahoe is a
tremendous one, ofering some of the
country’s coolest venues — and some of
the best bands you’ve never heard of
Dead Winter Carpenters
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 101
By Tim Parsons
Tahoe Magazine
Jesse Kalin
Jesse Kalin and the Cool Black Kettle
Singer-songwriter Jesse Kalin likes to joke he was “almost famous.”
He was on the cusp for a while, especially those days working in
New York with a longtime partner, David Musser.
Te bandleader of Jesse Kalin and the Cool Black Kettle is famous in
Tahoe and is popular in Italy, where he annually performs.
Kalin’s style is Americana roots with a country favoring. His big-
gest infuence these days is Zac Brown.
He started his band in 1998, named for a melting pot of musical
styles. It plays covers at tourist-populated venues like Harveys Tahoe
Live Stage and the Cabo Wabo Cantina.
“Tis is almost the best lineup I’ve ever had,” Kalin said.
A longtime accomplished Tahoe guitarist, Mark Wilson, is joined
by Chris Gustofson on drums and Jonathon Barton on bass.
Kalin also performs solo, sometime in a duo with Wilson and
sometime with the full band at South Shore’s Fresh Ketch and the
Beacon and Incline Village’s Big Water Grille. He will also tour North-
ern California and at recent years has developed a following in Italy
and Switzerland.
“Tey like a lot of the good American artists,” he said.
Kalin has recorded three albums, a DVD and wrote a song for a
television program on ABC. A four-song EP, “Back on Track,” sold well
over the summer.
Cash Only Band
Casual listeners might believe punk rock and country music are
sonic opposites.
Tey are actually quite similar, just adjust the guitar tones from
fuzz to twang.
“I can make any Ramones song sound country,” said Davin Kangas,
the founder of Cash Only Band, which pays tribute to Johnny Cash.
Lake Tahoe is not just a place for extravagant
concerts at the big casinos. Tere are venues all
around the lake that each night feature outstanding
local bands.
A coveted location is the Crystal Bay Casino Red
Room, which has an ambiance of a cozy blues bar in
a historic North Shore venue. Some bands do so well
in the Red Room, they are promoted to the larger
Crown Room, which often features major national
artists. Mama’s Cookin’ did it in 2010, and last
year the Dead Winter Carpenters made the leap.
For weekly band features and calendar listings,
check out Lake Tahoe Action, circulated Tursdays
all across the lake, Truckee and the Reno-Tahoe
International Airport.
Here’s a look at some of Tahoe’s most popular bands chosen
from a variety of musical styles:
Dead Winter Carpenters
When this band is not on tour in the dead of winter, it is a reason to
celebrate if you happen to be at the lake.
Dead Winter Carpenters could be the fastest rising group from
Tahoe these days.
Te band coalesced less than two years ago, combining members
from Truckee Tribe, Rusty Strings and Montana Slim. With individuals
known by promoter Brent Harding, one of the band’s frst shows was in
the Crystal Bay Casino’s Red Room.
“Brent gave us a shot,” Dunn said. “We did two shows as the after-
party for Yonder Mountain String Band. It was only our third or fourth
shows as a band. We were thrown into a situation and it worked out
well. It created a buzz and we’ve been going strong ever since.”
Dead Winter Carpenters had extensive tours the last two sum-
mers, but were home in the dog days of late August to headline Squaw
Valley’s Peaks and Paws.
“Tey are ripping,” said Andy Hatch of the South Shore band Bison.
“Te Dead Winter Carpenters are really killing it all over ‘Cali.’ Tey
are defnitely on the rise. Tey have a great bluegrass sound but fuse it
with electric guitar and drums.”
Members include Dave Lockhart on double bass, Jenni Charles,
fddle, Sean Duerr, electric guitar and Ryan Davis, drums. Everyone
lives at Tahoe except Lockhart, who commutes from Oakland by train,
bus or Craigslist networking.
“You can call it Americana rock,” said acoustic guitarist Jesse
Dunn. “We have a touch of bluegrass and roots country and play
mostly original tunes. Depending on the night, we can play covers.”
Dunn said his main infuences are Neil Young and Strangefolk, a
band from his native Vermont. Its self-titled (acronym) debut album is
“D.W.C.”
Te band travels in a green Ford van named Willy the Pimp.
... .continued on next page
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102 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Before he went country, Kangas
was in a couple of punk rock bands,
Anxiety and the Marones, a Ra-
mones tribute.
Cash Only Band plays about 60
to 70 percent Johnny Cash along
with a couple originals and outlaw
country covers by artists such as
David Allen Coe and Hank Wil-
liams and his son.
“I wanted to ofer something
other than ‘Brown Eyed Girl’
and ‘Sweet Home Alabama,’
said Kangas, who mostly
performs at South Shore
haunts like the American
Legion, Sierra-at-Tahoe, the
Beacon and, on Mondays and
Tuesdays, the Cabo Wabo Cantina, downstairs at
Harveys Resort and Casino.
“It’s funny, but I thought the Marones would
have gotten into Cabo before Cash Only,” Kangas
said.
Te music of Johnny Cash transcends country
music. Everyone can related to his every-man stories
occasionally favored with humor.
Kangas grew up like a West Coast kid, but he was
in New Hampshire. He surfed, skated and wind-
surfed and came to California in 1991 to ski at Tahoe.
Just as comfortable with a hunter as he is with a
snowboarder, Kangas has found an ideal home. And
a transition to country music is conducive to raising a
family who can attend shows.
While stardom would be nice, Kangas likes playing
in his hometown, where he works full time at Lake
Tahoe Community College. When he turned 40, he
treated himself to a Harley Davidson.
He has been told on many occasions his voice
sounds like country singer Chris LeDoux. Kangas, who
often plays solo, has four band mates: keyboardist Low-
ell Wilson, drummer Tom Parodie, multi-instrumental-
ist Raybob Bowman and double bassist Nate Alcorn.
Mark Castro Band
Mark Castro Band proves rockin’
music inspires toe tapping, even
when wearing ski or snowboard
boots.
Te Reno-based group often plays
Kirkwood, Sierra, Northstar and Mt.
Rose’s annual Taco Ski Run. Te band
can also be heard in the Cutthroat
Saloon in the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe
in Incline Village.
“I fnd that the ski crowd tends to be
educated and defnitely healthy, and they
appreciate what we do,” said singer-bass-
ist Satia, whose real name is Doris Runcie.
“For years I used to say, ‘Tis is
Doris and I have a rock band,’
and nobody believed me be-
cause everybody has an Aunt
Doris or a Grandma Doris. I
had to come up with some-
thing a little more exciting.”
Te Mark Castro Band
plays what Satia calls “male-
oriented rock” — music from
the late 1950s through the
mid-’70s.
“We do a lot of Hendrix,
Beatles, Santana, Cream,
Led Zeppelin and Jef Beck,”
Castro said. “We’ll take an
original version of a song
and then we’ll add to it.”
Castro played in the
Bay Area for several years,
opening for artists such
as Robin Trower, Ronnie
Montrose, Roy Buchanan
and Tommy Castro, who is
not related to Mark.
... from previous page
Tahoe bands
Mark Castro Band
Davin Kangas of Cash Only Band
... .continued on page 104

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104 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
He moved to Reno, and in 2003 with Satia began his trio. Jeremy
Kluck has been the drummer for the past eight years, although others,
such as Mike Adam, have flled in.
Castro and Satia often play as a duo. For some restaurant shows,
they will just play instrumentals.
“Mark practically wakes up and goes to sleep with a guitar in his
hand, and he has for about 30 or 40 years,” Satia said. “He doesn’t stop.
He can go faster than anybody, anywhere. He can play anything in just
about any kind of style.”
A career highlight for Castro was touring and recording with Inner
Circle, a reggae band best known for “Cops” theme song “Bad Boys.”
Inner Circle needed a guitarist after Neal Schon began playing
full time with Journey. Castro appears on Inner Circle’s 1982 album
“Something So Good.”
“Tey play pop songs,” Castro said. “You can’t tell it’s reggae until
you put the drum on it.”
Bison
Fallen Leaf Lake is known for
a lot of things: its spectacular falls which pour
out from the Glen Alpine Valley, being a place where John Stein-
beck once worked, a heroic job by frefghters during the Angora fre, a
treacherous road flled with unskilled SUV drivers and a knucklehead
who once killed a black bear with a .22.
It also has Stanford Camp where a couple of alumni were reunited.
When Andy Hatch realized Tahoe was also the home of fddle play-
er and singer Antja Tompson, he decided to form a band. Hatch, who
had been an eclectic group called Grand 58 playing saxophone, guitar
and mandolin, decided to focus on mandolin and play bluegrass.
Bison coalesced in 2009. Chris Seal sings and plays guitar, Will
Richardson is on dobro and banjo and Raybob Bowman is on bass.
Playing mostly originals, Bison has been performing about twice
a month, but plans to increase the pace playing in Tahoe and its sur-
rounding area, and possibly making a record this winter.
“Bluegrass has always been mountain music,” Hatch said. “It’s
great to play because you can practice on your porch. It’s fun to play
and listen too, and the hippies and cowboys both like it.”
Not only providing bluegrass with their own music, Tahoe Hatch
and his wife, Jenny, have put on a bluegrass festival three years. Te
frst two featured Tahoe bands and were held at Mt. Tallac Brewery.
Last summer, Bluegrass and Beyond was at Sand Harbor at the site of
an annual Shakespeare festival and it included national bands like
the Peter Rowan Band, Keller and the Keels, Danny Barnes and Hot
Buttered Rum.
Jason King Band
Credit Jason King for putting Reno blues on the worldwide
map.
Te singer-guitarist of Jason King Band pretty much insisted
last year the Reno Blues Society take advantage of the opportunity
to send a representative to the International Blues Challenge in
Memphis.
More than 160 band and solo/duo representative from blues clubs
from all over the globe compete each winter in Memphis. Te top
fnishers usually get a record deal, and all of the participants have
the chance to perform at historical Beale Street clubs in front of the
industry’s top movers and shakers.
Te Jason King Band had a rousing frst-night set in the Rum Boo-
gie Cafe (Lake Tahoe Action covered the event), but were eliminated
along with half the feld.
Te following day, the band and a reporter were inspired with a
visit to the Stax Records Museum. Drummer Michael Patrick Moore
bought new equipment and King kindled new song ideas.
Te highly talented King has surrounded himself with seasoned
band mates. Tommy Stiles plays lap guitar and Paul “Paulie Walnuts”
is on bass. Tey will record a second album this winter. Te debut,
“Blue Skies and Black Shoes,” won a readers’ choice honor from Blues
Revue magazine.
An inspiring performance during last summer’s Mammoth Lakes
... from previous page
Tahoe bands
Bison
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Happy Hour Daily 3-6 pm
Customized Catering
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Where the Locals Eat & Play
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IN CHRISTMAS TREE VILLAGE • 868 TAHOE BOULEVARD, INCLINE VILLAGE, NV
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 105
Bluezapalooza featured several new songs, indicating Jason King
Band is still very much on the rise.
A former football star at Bishop Manogue High School in Reno,
Jason King Roxas dropped his last name for stage purposes because
people had a hard time pronouncing it. Moreover, King is the most
recognizable name in blues, e.g., Freddie, B.B. and Albert.
King was disappointed to not go further in the IBC, but he had the
pleasure of sitting in during a pro jam, playing his Stratocaster onstage
with Karen Lovely, Bill Wax, Stiles, and Moore in the historic New
Daisy Teater.
In what is now an annual competition, six Reno bands competed
this fall (after this magazine’s press time) to go to Memphis this winter:
Jason King Band, Blues Monsters, Blue Haven, Rick Hammond Band,
Schall Adams Band and VooDoo Dogs.
Blues fans should watch for all of those bands when they come to
Tahoe, most commonly at the Crystal Bay Casino’s Red Room.
Martin and Vargas
Lake Tahoe area music lovers are fortunate to have a talented
nuevo famenco duo, Martain and Vargas, as regular performers.
Te genre frst made popular by Germany’s Ottmar Liebert is a
combination of Spanish classical, traditional famenco and bossa
nova. Traditional famenco is Middle Eastern scales on the Spanish
classical guitar melded with Moroccan percussion. Bossa nova comes
from Brazil and is a mixture of samba and bebop jazz.
Dan Vargas plays rhythm and Julian Martin is lead.
Te duo met six years ago at Gardnerville’s Rancho del Grande,
where Vargas was performing solo. Martin took note of Vargas’ unusu-
al technique, which reminded him of famenco player Paco Delucîa.
Martin asked if he could play a song during a break. When he covered
Spanish classical guitarist Francisco Tarrega, Vargas was intrigued.
“We decided to have a practice jam together,” Vargas said. “After a
while, we looked at each other and knew we had something.”
“La Viña” was released by the nuevo famenco duo in 2010, and
Martin and Vargas are set for another winter season performing at
Lake Tahoe restaurants, ski resorts and the Mark Twain Cultural
Center.
“Martin and Vargas are a staple at the Mark Twain Cultural Center,”
the proprietor, McAvoy Layne, said. “We highlight them at least once a
month. Heck, I fell in love with a girl while listening to their music, and
married her.”
Jason King Band
... continued on next page
106 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Guitarists Martin and Vargas are
the yin and yang of nuevo famenco.
Classically trained, Vargas is mel-
low and an afcionado of Spanish and
bossa nova, while Martin, a former
heavy metal band member, plays by
ear and can be intense.
“Te evolution of Martin and Vargas
has just been tremendous in the last
three years,” said “La Viña” engineer
Bruce Brown. “It seems like they write a
song every time they get together. Tey
are always thinking of how they can bet-
ter themselves.”
“It’s a nice chill album,” said Tarius
Macara, who played djembe drum on
some of the tracks. “It’s great if you are
having a relaxing evening with a glass of
wine. It’s a nice ride. It’s a mellow ride but
it’s a nice roller coaster.”
Jonathan Sills plays cello and Scotty
Johnson added percussion. South Shore’s
Shelley Hocknell-Zentner painted the cover art.
Brown’s mantra during the recording was “Less
is more.”
“I can phrase my parts and not play as much
and let Dan’s melodies breathe,” Martin said.
Macara agreed, explaining his contribution.
“Tere was a minimalist approach in the end
mix,” he said. “I turned the wheel that needed to
be turned but not to overpower what was going on
with what Dan and Julian were doing.”
... from previous page
Tahoe bands
Martin & Vargus
“The evolution
of Martin
and Vargas
has just been
tremendous in
the last three
years...
They’re always
thinking of
how they
can better
themselves.”
— Bruce Brown
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 107
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Headphone Union
When you see this band you will remember the faces. After a while
the name should stick — that is if they stick with the latest handle.
Formerly Subjektochange and STC, Headphone Union was selected
from about 150 names on a Facebook contest. Dan Parslow, who came
aboard early last summer, is a former guitarist for Nervous Sheep.
Headphone Union played every Tuesday in July and August in
Squaw Village’s Auld Dubliner after the Bluesdays! shows. It’s also
headlined at the Commons Beach Sunday Concerts.
“We’re all ‘Tahoe-Truckeeites,’” said keyboardist Eric Matlock.
Parslow lived in Hawaii for 10 years before moving back to Tahoe,
where Nervous Sheep played and shared venues with Cosmic Free
Way. Frank “Fletch” Fletcher, Headphone Union’s drummer, played
with the Free Way and recruited Parslow to join the band.
“He is a monster on the guitar who has adapted many styles,” band
leader Nick DeNoia said. “He plays anywhere from blues to surf to
totally jam master.”
With a new name comes a subtle change in genre. Formerly pur-
veyors of “CosmiCallyFunk,” Headphone Union now plays progressive
electro funk, its website says.
A more generic description is funk and jam.
“Each of us brings a diferent element,” Matlock said. “And Fletch a
great groover.”
As Subjektochange, the band had original tracks comprise the
album “Stuf,” released in February 2010. T
Headphone Union
108 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
DINING & NIGHTLIFE food & drinks
By J.M. HIRSCH
The Associated Press
Crafing your own
hot cocoa is slightly more
work than popping open a can
of powder and mixing it with hot
milk (or worse … water).
But it’s so worth the efort.
If nothing else, at least doctor the
powdered stuf with a dash of cin-
namon, a spoonful of marshmal-
low Fluf, a spoonful of whipped
cream or a quick grate of nutmeg
(or ever better, all of them). If
you’re willing to go to a bit of extra
trouble, there are numerous ways
to crank out a fantastic cocoa that
will still have you snuggled in front
of the fre in no time.
FIVE WAYS
to make better
HOT COCOA
1
2
3
4
5
NUTELLA CINNAMON HOT COCOA
Start to fnish: 5 minutes
Serves: 1
1 cup whole milk
1⁄3 cup Nutella
Pinch cinnamon
Pinch salt
In a small saucepan over
medium heat, heat the milk
until hot, but not boiling. Whisk
in the Nutella, cinnamon and
salt. Whisk until the Nutella is
completely melted.
FIVE-SPICE GINGER HOT COCOA
Start to fnish: 5 minutes
Serves: 1
1 cup whole milk
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons cocoa powder
¼ teaspoon ground ginger
Pinch fve-spice powder
In a small saucepan over medium
heat, heat the milk until hot,
but not boiling. Whisk in the
honey, cocoa powder, ginger and
fve-spice powder. Whisk until
completely smooth.
SAFFRON VANILLA HOT COCOA
Start to fnish: 5 minutes
Serves: 1
1 cup whole milk
Pinch safron threads
½ cup dark chocolate chips
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
In a small saucepan over medium
heat, heat the milk and safron
until hot, but not boiling. Whisk
in the chocolate chips and vanilla
extract. Whisk until completely
smooth.
FLUFFERNUTTER HOT COCOA
Start to fnish: 5 minutes
Serves: 1
1 cup whole milk
½ cup Fluf (marshmallow
sandwich spread), plus extra for
topping
1⁄3 cup chocolate chips
1⁄3 cup peanut butter chips
In a small saucepan over medium
heat, heat the milk until hot, but
not boiling. Whisk in the Fluf,
chocolate chips and peanut butter
chips. Whisk until completely
melted and smooth. To serve, top
with additional Fluf.
WHITE PEPPERMINT HOT COCOA
Start to fnish: 5 minutes
Serves: 1
1 cup whole milk
½ cup white chocolate chips
½ teaspoon peppermint extract
In a small saucepan over medium
heat, heat the milk until hot, but
not boiling. Whisk in the chocolate
chips and peppermint extract.
Whisk until completely smooth.
611 Highway 50
Zephyr Cove, NV
775.588.2844
South Shore’s
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Bar & Grill
Meet your friends at everyone’s
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Great beer selection, happy hour specials on
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Southern Fried Chicken and
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 109
F
rom the mid-mountain Snowfake Lodge at Diamond Peak in
Incline Village, guests can enjoy the beautiful views of Lake
Tahoe while tasting fne wines and appetizers.
Diamond Peak creates a diferent menu for each Last Tracks,
pairing appetizers with the diferent wine selections. For example:
Sauvignon Blanc served with smoked salmon; Chardonnay served
with warm crab, cheese and artichoke heart dip; Merlot served
with a variety of pork sausages; and Cabernet Sauvignon served
with freshly baked chocolate brownies.
Guests ski, telemark or snowboard down a freshly groomed
corduroy run to the bottom. All guest must stay till the end of the
event and go down as a group.
Last Tracks is held on Saturdays until the end of the season.
Events start about 4:30 p.m., but participants can pick up a Last
Tracks ticket at 2:30 p.m. to get some runs in before the event
starts. Te event ends about 6 p.m. or at sunset, whichever comes
frst. Space is limited, so reservations are recommended.
Single event tickets are $29, which include a ski lift
ticket valid from 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. Reserve your space online at
www.diamondpeak.com. Participants must be 21 or older and must
ski or snowboard down from the event and must be at least at the
intermediate level. T
WINERIES FOR THE 2012 SEASON:
February 4 Wild Horse Winery
February 11 Ste. Michelle Wine Estates
February 18 Francis Coppola
February 25 Treasury Wine Estates and Beringer
March 3 TBA
March 10 White Hall Lane
March 17 Rodney Strong
March 24 TBA
March 31 Wente
April 7 Banfi
April 14 TBA
110 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
GOOD LIBATIONS O

Lone Eagle Grille Bar’s Tony Tartaglio’s
favorite winter cocktail.
1 ounce Malibu Rum
1 ounce Disaronno Amaretto
6 ounces hot chocolate
Topped with whipped cream
“It’s really similar to the actual candy almond joy, which is
one of my favorite candies that i ate when I was
growing up,” Lone Eagle Grille Bar’s
Tony Tartaglio said.
“All the flavors melt together nicely.”
Almond
Joy
Dirty
Snowman
A perennial favorite at
Northstar-at-Tahoe Resort.
8 ounces hot chocolate
1.5 ounces Absolut Vanilla
1 ounce Baileys
1 ounce Frangelico
Topped with whipped cream
“It came from around the ice rink,” said Ted McDowell, of Northstar-
at-Tahoe Village food and beverage. “Parents who were roasting s’mores
with their children wanted an adult version of hot chocolate.” The Village
sells about 5,000 Dirty Snowmans each winter season.
Classic
Snuggler
01
A favorite at Twenty-Two Bistro & Bar
at Squaw Valley USA.
12 oz of hot chocolate
1.5 oz of peppermint schnapps
Topped with whipped cream
“It’s an easy cocktail to keep you warm,” said Alex Cox,
Twenty-Two Bistro & Bar at Squaw Valley USA.

DINING & NIGHTLIFE drinks
You can find it in South Lake Tahoe
1032 Al Tahoe Blvd.
South Lake Tahoe, CA
(530)544-5253
www.thecorkandmore.com
Looking for the best in specialty
wines, gifts, foods and deli?
Look no further.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 111
A simple drink from The Beacon that tastes just like a
slice of apple pie. Perfect after being out in the cold, a
day on the slopes, cross-country skiing or snowshoeing.
1.25 ounces Tuaca Liqueur
8 ounces hot, spiced apple cider
Topped with whipped cream & grated nutmeg
A spicy, refreshing drink served at The Fresh Ketch
that will definitely warm you up.
1.5 ounces Corzo Tequila
1 ounce peach liqueur
2 ounces pineapple juice
1 ounce agave
1 ounce fresh lime juice
2 dashes chipotle powder strain
Garnished with a chipotle salt rim
“People swear they’ll never drink another margarita,” said
Brianne Price, Fresh Ketch Bar manager. “It warms you up
from the inside out. It’s something a little different.”
Bri
m th
Hot Apple
Pie
Smokey
Margarita
WARM UP FROM
THE INSIDE OUT
112 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
N
o matter how well you
can slice it, skiing is
a costly venture. The
lift ticket, the gear, the days
off, the price of gas — all ele-
ments out of your financial
control. What you can manage, however, is your dining budget.
Following are some restaurants that will leave you full and happy — while also
leaving you some change for the slopes.
1. The Biltmore Café, Crystal Bay.
Usually casinos and budget dining go hand-in-hand following that age-old
maxim: You get what you pay for. Not so with this great little cafe; it really delivers.
Not just quantity (ample) but quality. The setting is sunny and cheerful, with large
booths to accommodate the whole family. For breakfast, the Eggs Benedict at $8.95
with three eggs smothered in a flavorful hollandaise sauce (just the right amount of
lemon) with a large side of crispy hash browns is a must-do. Break up this ritual only
for Sunday brunch ($9.95 for adults, $6.95 for children 11 and under) served until
1:30 p.m. Great quarter-pound Angus beef burgers for lunch. (tahoebiltmore.com)
2. The Wagon Train Coffee Shop, Truckee.
A Truckee icon for more than 45 years, this classic diner offers a trip down mem-
ory lane, both in its décor and menu. At first glance, the prices seem a bit contem-
porary, but these folks are still cooking for people who work hard for a living. The
omelets are all four eggs and shareable, accompanied by potatoes and toast or bis-
cuits and a never-ending mug of farmers coffee. Adults are welcome to order off the
kids menu and the junior French (a big slice of French toast, with a strip of famous
sweet, salty and thick bacon and one egg) is plentiful at $5.95. For lunch, burgers
(try the Ortega) and sandwiches come with a salad bar, fries and a cup of owner
Brian Smart’s daily homemade soup or chili. And how about this: Wagon Train now
offers Early Bird Special, half off breakfasts, from 5:30-7:30 a.m., which is great for
people heading out to the resorts. Tip: Ask, always, to sit in Siobhan Smart’s section.
wagontraincoffeeshop.com, 10080 Donner Pass Road, across from the bus depot,
530-587-7574.
3. La Mexicana, Kings Beach.
If you can spend more than ten dollars per person at this rustic hole-in-the-wall,
you should get a free T-shirt or something. Amazing tacos at $1.50 a shot and a flank
steak meal with beans, avocado, tortillas and salsa for $7.95 are just the beginning.
It is a tiny place, with counter service and limited seating (part of its charm) but for
some reason there is always room, proba-
bly because it is a popular get-it-to-go stop.
Located next to a neat Mexican grocer
which sells bags of inexpensive spices and
delicious Mexican rolls, La-Mex (as the
locals call it) is just a fun place to poke
around while you wait for your order.
8115 Brock Ave., behind the Taco Bell.
530-546-0310.
4. Pine St. Café, Tahoe Forest
Hospital, Truckee.
Hospital food has been fodder for
many a joke, but this café, located in
the lobby of Tahoe Forest Hospital, is
no laughing matter — though you’ll
$AVING
IT FOR THE
SLOPES
So you’re in Tahoe
for the week, and
you don’t want to
spend too much on
food. Here’s a local’s
guide on how to save
as much money as
possible on eating,
so you can
spend it on fun
and adventure in
Lake Tahoe.
By Simone Grandmain
Tahoe Magazine
DINING & NIGHTLIFE food
Pine St. Café
Biltmore Café’s Steak and Eggs
Delivery Now!
7 Days A Week
Luigi’s Stromboli
Buffalo Chicken
Pizza Bianca
Thai Peanut Chicken
Italian Meatball
Also serving a variety
of fresh salads
including Caesar,
Greek & Spinach
Y
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ju
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a
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a
l…
y
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u
’ll m
a
k
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a
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m
o
ry
!
fun…
hip…
inviting
2660 Lake Tahoe Bl vd., Bl dg. E | South Lake Tahoe
(530) 544-5599 | www.OffTheHookSushi .com
¥cted
cn by
Beaders

From the freshest sushi & sashimi,
to over 40 creative & unique sushi rolls,
to the wide variety of cooked appetizers & entrees,
You’re sure to fi nd something for everyone at Off The Hook!
2005-2011
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 113
probably smile a lot. Breakfast, lunch or dinner, the food offers
home-style comfort with prices less than your Mom would charge,
and no dishes to wash. For breakfast there are always a couple
ready-made selections like hash and eggs, biscuits and gravy,
French toast or pancakes, all priced for around three dollars, or
omelets made-to-order for $3-$3.50. Lunch and dinner (burgers,
entrees like salmon, beef stroganoff, meatloaf, pork chops and
more) run around $5. There is a beautiful salad bar (34 cents an
ounce) available for lunch and dinner. Warning: The whole affair
shuts down at 7 p.m. tfhd.com, 10121 Pine Ave., off Donner Pass
Road, 530-587-6011.
5. Cottonwood Restaurant
and Bar, Truckee.
Voted North Lake Tahoe/Truckee’s
“Best Restaurant,” “Best Bar,” “Best
Deck” “Best Date Place” by Sierra
Sun and North Lake Tahoe Bonanza
readers. They really should add
“Best Appetizer/Meal Deal” to that
list. True, this establishment is not
known for being a haven for bargain
seekers (it does have high-priced
fine dining), but the Happy Hour
baby back pork ribs (grilled crispy
with a chipotle BBQ sauce) at
$8.95 ordered with the whole-leaf
Caesar salad for two (the best I
have ever had anywhere in the world, and
that is the truth) at $9.95 is an affordable treat. These prices are
available every day until 6 p.m. only, the exception being those days
when Mother Nature is in a low-pressure mood. The Happy Hour
is extended indefinitely when a winter storm watch is in effect.
Another good reason to pray for snow. cottonwoodrestaurant.com,
10142 Rue Hilltop Road, overlooking Truckee, 530-587-5711.
6. The Red Hut Cafés,
South Lake Tahoe.
Give yourself some down
time before any downhill after
breakfast at this local favor-
ite. The four-egg omelets are
served with hash browns
and toast and the price tag
($6.99-$8.99) may encour-
age you to throw in a stack
of banana pancakes. Don’t
do it! At least not in one sit-
ting. Think dinner (Ski Run location) for
your second round and try the Double Diamond Beef Burger.
This beauty consists of a half-pound beef burger topped with an
onion ring, bacon, cheddar cheese, jalapeños, pickles, thousand
island dressing and barbecue sauce, served with fries, for $9.90.
redhutcafe.com, 2723 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe,
530-541-9024; or 3660 Lake Tahoe Blvd., at the corner of Hwy. 50
and Ski Run Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, 530-544-1595.
... continued on next page
Cottonw
ood Restaurant
The Red Hut at Hwy 50 & Ski Run
• Open 24/7
• Full Bar
• 25 HDTVs
• Breakfast
• Lunch
• Dinner
SPORTS BAR & GRILL
930 Tahoe Blvd. • Raley’s Center • 775.831.9008 • www.rookieslaketahoe.com
UFC, NFL,
NBA, MLB,
SOCCER,
& MORE!
We’ve Got
Your Game…
Penny-Nickel Slots,
Video Poker, Blackjack,
Keno & More…
Hand Tossed Pizza…
Outdoor Dining, Catering,
Large Party Seating,
Daily Specials, Free Wi-Fi
8”- $5.99
14”- $10.99
Toppings – 79¢
Calzones – $6.99
$3.99
BREAKFAST
(7am-Noon Daily)
H
A
L
F
P
R
IC
E
BURGER
TUESDAYS
2
4
/
7
HAPPY
HOUR
W
H
E
R
E

E
V
E
R
Y
O
N
E

P
L
A
Y
S
!
$1.50
BEERS
Pabst, Miller
High Life and
Busch Light
FUN
FOR THE
W
HOLE
FAM
ILY
114 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
7. Steamers Bar and Grill, South Lake Tahoe.
Restaurants like this are so hard find these days, that are kick
back, with baskets of great fried, hot sizzling appetizers reasonably
priced, festive and busy, but not crazy. Here you can get a right-
sized, eight-ounce steak with a green salad, baked potatoes and
garlic bread for $12.95. The starters menu offers classics like chick-
en wings, mozzarella sticks, nachos, jalapeño poppers, onion rings
and potato skins ranging from $6-$7.25. The baked potatoes topped
with chili, cheese and onions are a meal all by themselves and a
bargain at $5.75. 2236 Lake Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, 530-541-8818.
8. Stone Soup, Truckee.
Every Sunday from 5-7 p.m., in mid-
January and running through March,
Truckee/Tahoe merchants serve up
home-made soup, bread, desserts and live
entertainment for a suggested donation of
$5 per person. Each week a different volun-
teer group is on-site to chop, dice and sauté,
to cook up a huge pot of soup to share with
anyone who walks in the door. Great commu-
nity event and spirit, proof that these are the
good old days. Community Arts Center, 10046
Church St., in downtown Truckee. For more
info call Stephanie Bloom, 530-582-4079.
9. Soule Domain,
Stateline, North Lake Tahoe.
For more than 26 years this luxurious log cabin
has been synonymous with romantic dining,
special occasions, and “just a real treat.” Well,
your dream just got more affordable with its
four-course, Prix Fixe menu, running $23 per
person. That price includes a choice of entrée
(i.e., linguini with beef, pork and parmesan marinara or
macaroni and cheese with truffle oil and bacon) soup, salad and
dessert. souledomain.com, 9983 Cove St., Brockway, across from
the Tahoe Biltmore, 530-546-7529.
$AVING... from previous page
$
5
H
o
t S
o
u
p
Soule Domain
PERFECT PLACE TO EAT
AFTER A DAY ON THE
SLOPES...
12277 Deerfield Dr. • Truckee
(off I-80 next to Chevron) • 550-9330
Open Daily 10am-9:30pm
Seven Days a Week
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 115
10. Paddle Wheel Saloon,
Incline Village.
We can’t forget about the liba-
tions after a day on the slopes, so
be sure to check out the Paddle
Wheel for the cheapest drinks
in North Tahoe. And that’s not
just a blanket statement — the
Wheel (as locals call it) truly
does have the cheapest drinks
around. Not to mention free
popcorn. But here’s the best
locals tip: Looking for a place to
watch some football on Sundays
and enjoy cheap food? Go to the Wheel and
watch the games on its many flat-screen TVs — and
then enjoy a burger, sausage or chicken sandwich, along with a
classic homemade side dish, for just 5 bucks, all made to order on
the grill outside (even in January). Just tell Wendy what you’d like.
One disclaimer: Smoking is allowed at the Wheel, so if that bothers
you, feel free to skip. 120 Country Club Dr., across from the Hyatt,
Incline Village, 775-831-2022. T
— Simone Grandmain is a Truckee resident, a regular food colum-
nist for the Sierra Sun and North Lake Tahoe Bonanza and a lover of
all things food. Got a great recipe tip for her, or just have some gen-
eral feedback? Email her at simone_grandmain@hotmail.com.
$
5
G
rille
d
C
h
e
e
se
B
u
rg
e
r
THE SOULE DOMAIN
Creative American Cuisine in Elegant Log Cabin
Best Place to
Take a Date
15 Years
Running

Dinner
from 6 p.m.
Stateline Road • North Lake Tahoe
(next to Tahoe Biltmore Crystal Bay)
Please Make Reservations • 530.546.7529
souledomain.com
HUNAN GARDEN
O F L A K E T A H O E
DELUXE LUNCHEON BUFFET
ALL YOU CAN EAT SOUP, SALAD, APPETIZERS, AND ENTREES
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
11AM - 9:30PM • 530-544-5868
900 EMERALD BAY RD • SO LAKE TAHOE, CA
Gourmet Pizza, Pasta & Salad
775-833-2200
Eat In • Take Out
Delivery to Incline
Open 5pm-9pm Daily
Closed Wednesday
In the Country Club Center (Across from the Hyatt)
!...| ;|..i.!· I.i!,
Seafood Specialties • Live Maine Lobster
Dungeness Crab • Vegetarian Dishes
Thai Dishes • Combination Dinners • Full Bar
Ii.. c|i..·.
'\.:.. L.·: c|i..·. I...''
120 Country Club Drive, #62
Incline Village, NV, Across from Hyatt
Open Seven Days
Mon - Sat: 11:00 a.m.- 10:00 p.m.
Sun: Noon -10:00 p.m.
(..¸) ¬¸¸¸..¸
116 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
DINING & NIGHTLIFE cuisine
In the fashion world, the French “Prêt-à-Porter”
means “ready-to wear.” So why not a “Prêt-à-
Manger” (pronounced “mahn-jay) or “ready-
to-eat” in the culinary world? I am referring to
the good-to-go delights available at our local
Truckee/Tahoe delis, restaurants and general
stores. The following list contains finds of the
miraculous variety. They are right up there with
finding that sock lost somewhere between washer
and dryer. Or the one round lid servicing the six
round Tupperwares. Or finding the sock in the
Tupperware drawer. Yes, they are that good.
1. Bread dough for pizzas from Safeway. A home-
made pizza is a beautiful thing and also fun to do with the little
guys. Making the dough in high altitude, on a busy schedule,
maybe in a strange kitchen (if you are a visitor) is another
story. Stop by Safeway’s bakery and purchase an un-baked
French or white bread dough, roll it out, top with pre-made
tomato sauce and your favorite pizza add-ons and bake at 400°
for about ten minutes or until edges of crust are golden brown.
Be sure to stop by Safeway’s antipasto bar and see what can be
enjoyed on your pizza creation i.e. artichoke hearts, sweet pep-
pers and stuffed olives. Visit a Safeway in Kings Beach, Tahoe
City, Truckee, Round Hill or South Lake Tahoe.
2. Tahoe House
Bakery & Gourmet
sauces and home-made
whole wheat English
muffins. When I hear a chef
say “The secret’s in the sauce,”
I think of all the times I served
pasta smothered with a Tahoe
House “Artichoke Pesto” and
just took a bow rather than
take the high road and share
my guilty store-bought secret.
Well fine — here it is! I served
my mother-in-law Tahoe
House’s “Creamy Tomato
Vodka” over penne! And remember those huge English muffins
you saw me pulling out of the oven on Easter morning? Tahoe
House: $1.95 each (call in advance for big orders). This Tahoe
City establishment has been impressing unsuspecting guests
since 1977. www.tahoe-house.com; 625 West Lake Blvd. (Hwy.
89), 530-583-1377.
3. Truckee Sourdough Company’s (TSD) roasted
garlic round. Found in just about every local grocery,
Truckee Sourdough has been bringing life to even the most
average sandwich since it hit shelves in 1995. Its garlic round,
however, with whole cloves of garlic baked right into the loaf,
is in a class by itself. When pressed for time, I make a French
onion soup in the microwave, the key to its success being the
chunks of TSD’s garlic round. Just microwave (combined) two
medium sliced onions, two tablespoons butter, two cans (14.5
ounces each), and one teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce covered
on high for 8-12 minutes or until boiling. Divide half of soup
into four bowels, top with half-inch thick slices of TSD garlic
round bread, pour remaining soup over bread, top each with a
handful of Swiss cheese. Serves four.
4. Glenshire General Store’s banana bread. I am
a sucker for a good general store and sadly they are a dying
breed. In the old days they were the hub of the neighborhood,
offering anything and
everything from tractor
parts, to jars of candy,
to feed. This little gem,
located in Glenshire,
the last Truckee com-
munity on your way
to Reno, is worth the
scenic 20-minute drive
along the Truckee River,
for (if nothing else) the
banana bread. I mean,
I make a good banana
bread, but this creation of Tina Zander Stull (the owner/propri-
etor) blew me away. I had to sample many varieties, many days
in a row to make sure it was not a fluke. In the end, I almost got
a tattoo that said “Blueberry Banana Bread” but I could just
have easily inked myself with “chocolate chip, peach, toasted
hazelnut or strawberry banana bread.” Fortunately for moi,
the general store does not offer skin illustrations — what they
By Simone Grandmain
Tahoe Magazine
Prêt-à-Manger
A local ’s guide to some of the region’s can’t-miss culinary delights
... .continued on page 118
Glenshire’s Banana Nut Bread
The Tahoe House has a great selection of
gourmet goodies to go.
Go to our website
for year-round coupons and deals!
CALL
530.587.6300
to place your
order!
Free Delivery
L
ooking for quality
pie in T
ruckee?
L
ook no further!
DELIVERY available to the greater
Truckee, Donner Lake, Glenshire and
Northstar areas
pizza
Truckeepizzadelivery.com
W
e offer a creative menu with homemade
sauces and dough. And we deliver!
Y
U
M
!
H
O
M
EM
A
D
E &
G
LU
TEN
-FR
EE!
That’s right! We offer gluten–free pizza crust

w/$20.00 minimum purchase
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 3-31-2012
Free Bread Sticks
w/$20.00 minimum purchase
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 3-31-2012
1/2 OFF
Equal or Lesser Value
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 3-31-2012
any 2 Foot
PARTY PIE
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 3-31-2012
Buy 1 pizza at
regular price
& get 2nd at
$
5
O
F
F

118 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
do offer is old-fashioned charm straight out of Little House on the
Prairie, minus Mrs. Olsen. The banana bread sells for $2.50 a slice
and $10 a loaf. The store only make four loaves a day, so call ahead
and place your order. 10095 Dorchester Drive, Glenshire/Truckee,
530-587-1819.
5. Obexer’s General Store’s brown sugar peppered
bacon. Says Obexer’s operations manager Scott Willers, “It’s all
about the bacon.” This general store’s lunch menu sports 10 differ-
ent sandwiches named or five generations of Obexer owners, but
the Kaleb Club sporting the famed sizzling strips is by far and away
the most popular — with good reason. The bacon is cured in-house
with caramelized brown sugar
and black pepper and cooked to
sweet/salty perfection just the
way Mother Bacon intended.
It is sold cooked, in “sides,” at
$2.75 a serving. It is not uncom-
mon to hear the guy in front
of you order a dozen helpings
to go — which is OK as long as
there is some left for you. obex-
ersgeneralstore.com; 400 yards
south of Homewood Mountain Resort, 5300 West Lake Blvd., 530-
525-1300.
6. Strudel from the Strudel Guy. This strudel is not like
the one Julie Andrews sang about in Sound of Music’s “My Favorite
Things.” It is better. It is indescribable — but I am going to try. It is
like a little piece of cheesecake heaven wrapped in Phyllo dough/
puff pastry but (again) better. My favorite is the lemon. No, make
that the Vanilla Bean. On second thought, the fresh cranberry. Well,
the chocolate is good… This is why the Strudel Guy, Alan Dennis,
has a sampler plate and family-sized rolls. Stop by the Coffeebar
(located in Truckee on Jiboom Street, 530-587-2000) or 22 Bistro in
the Village at Squaw Valley to test his wares, or call Alan (530-448-
2506) to order a long, 18-inch roll ($21-$28) in advance (they freeze,
pack in luggage, and travel beautifully) for parties. Be prepared
to get hooked — these strudels really should come with a 12-step
meeting schedule.
7. Earthly Delights’ Asian noodle salad, pumpkin
spice cookies, or anything else these folks offer.
This gourmet grocer/deli in Northstar is a must for any real foodie
who wants to be impressed by someone else’s cooking. Earthly
Delights offers more than a dozen salad/entrees in its deli case
and daily, extensive baked goods. It is mind-boggling the variety
and quality of menu items this establishment prepares. I have
narrowed my “gotta have its” down to the Asian noodles salad
(buckwheat noodles, peanuts, carrots, green onions, sesame seeds,
sweet/spicy, refreshing dressing) and pumpkin spice cookies.
earthlydelightstahoe.com, the Village at Northstar, 530-587-7793.
8. Duncan Hines apple caramel “Coffee Cake.”
Available at Safeway, in the baking aisle. I make this super moist
coffee cake in the early
mornings, pre-ski. It has
three easy steps and is
good to go as is, but I
usually top with a brown
sugar glaze/crumble. Just
melt half a cup of brown
sugar and a quarter cup
butter over medium heat
until combined. Add any
chopped nuts, spread onto
baked cake.
9. Cork and More’s
Rueben sandwich.
Finally, a place that offers
a real Rueben sandwich and
not just as a St. Paddy’s Day special. Plus, it’s a pastrami Rueben,
which is how I like it. I’m sure the other 15 selections on Cork and
More’s sandwich menu are great — but we are talking sauerkraut,
Swiss and (did I mention?) hot pastrami. For lighter fare, the turkey
& chutney salad with apples and raisins is a great choice. Fabulous
cheese case packed with domestics and imports. 1032 Al Tahoe
Blvd. South Lake Tahoe, 530-544-5253.
10. Dorinda’s Chocolates’ sea salt caramel. Made with
honey and dipped in chocolate, these award-winning candies are
too good for the kids. Or the husband. Keep a big stash close by at
all times and you will be a happy person. dornidaschocolates.com,
10009 W. River St., Truckee, 530-562-4415. T
— Simone Grandmain is a Truckee resident, a regular food
columnist for the Sierra Sun and North Lake Tahoe Bonanza and
a lover of all things food. Got a great recipe tip for her, or just have
some feedback? Email her at simone_grandmain@hotmail.com.
Prêt-à-Manger ... from page 116
Obexer’s Kaleb Club
The Strudel Guy’s Apple Strudel
Dorinda’s Chocolates




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"Tahoe's most recommended Ita|ìan
Restaurant for over 20 years"
Tradìtìona| & Creatìve Pasta | fresh Seafood Dìshes
£xtensìve Menu & Wìne lìst | Intìmate Dìnìng
Ca|| or vìsìt websìte for Reservatìons | Convenìent Parkìng
530-542-0100 | scusa|aketahoe.com
2543 lake Tahoe 8|vd, So lake Tahoe, CA Next to Push fìtness at Sìerra 8|vd & Hwy 50

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THE “Y” & EMERALD BAY
Alpina Coffee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.7449
822 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA alpinacafe.com
The Beacon Bar & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.0630
1900 Jameson Beach Rd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA camprichardson.com
Bert’s Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530.544.3434
1146 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA bertscafe.com
The Cantina Bar & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.1233
765 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA cantinatahoe.com
Evans American Gourmet Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.1990
536 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA evanstahoe.com
Getaway Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.577.5132
3140 Highway 50, So. Lake Tahoe, CA getawaycafetahoe.com
CENTRAL SOUTH SHORE
Big Daddy’s Burgers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.3465
3490 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA
The Cork & More . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.5253 / 866.544.1033
1032 Al Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA thecorkandmore.com
Echo Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.5400
4130 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA embassytahoe.com
The Fresh Ketch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.5683
2435 Venice Dr., So. Lake Tahoe, CA thefreshketch.com
Izzy’s Burger Spa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530.544.5030
2591 Highway 50, So. Lake Tahoe, CA izzysburgerspa.com
MacDuff’s Public House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.8777
1041 Fremont Ave., So. Lake Tahoe, CA macduffspub.com
Mandarin Garden Chinese Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530.544.8885
2502 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA tahoe.com/mandarin-garden
Nepheles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.8130
1169 Ski Run Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA nepheles.com
Nikki’s Chaat Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.3354
3469 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA nikkischaatcafe.com
Scusa! On Ski Run. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530.542.0100
2543 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA scusalaketahoe.com
Sno-Flake Drive-In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530.544.6377
3059 Harrison Ave., So. Lake Tahoe, CA
Tep’s Villa Roma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.8227 / 800.490.3066
3450 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe, CA tepsvillaroma.com
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JhelreshKetch.com ~ 530.541.5683
2435venlce0rlve- So. lakeJahoe, CA96150
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530-541-0630
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(530) 542-8777 • MacDuffsPub.com
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NEVADA / STATELINE
19 Kitchen • Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775-586-6777
Harvey’s Lake Tahoe, 18 Highway 50, Stateline, NV totalrewardstahoe.com
Brooks’ Bar & Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.2787
100 Lake Parkway, Stateline, NV edgewoodtahoe.com
The Cabo Wabo Cantina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.586.6611
Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Highway 50, Stateline, NV totalrewardstahoe.com
The Chart House Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.6276
392 Kingsbury Grade, Lake Tahoe, NV chart-house.com
Ciera Steak + Chophouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800.648.3353
Montbleu Resort, Casino & Spa, 55 Highway 50, Stateline, NV montbleuresort.com
Edgewood Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.2787
100 Lake Parkway, Stateline, NV edgewoodtahoe.com
Forest Buffet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.586.6611
Harrah’s Casino, 15 Highway 50, Stateline, NV totalrewardstahoe.com
Friday’s Station. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.586.6611
Harrah’s Casino, 15 Highway 50, Stateline, NV totalrewardstahoe.com
聚福樓 (Gi Fu Loh) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775-586-6611
Harrah’s Casino, 15 Highway 50, Stateline, NV totalrewardstahoe.com
Lanza’s Italian Restaurant & Deli . . . . . . . . . . .Rest: 775.588.4156 / Deli: 775.588.4157
177 Highway 50, Stateline, NV lanzaslaketahoe.com
Latin Soul Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.7777
Lakeside Inn & Casino, 168 Highway 50, Stateline, NV lakesideinn.com
Luigi’s Tahoe Pizza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.0442
209 Kingsbury Grade, Stateline, NV pizzalaketahoe.com
Sage Room Steak House. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775-588-2411
Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Highway 50, Stateline, NV totalrewardstahoe.com
Zephyr Cove Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-589-4906
760 Highway 50, Zephyr Cove, NV zephyrcove.com
Tahoe Eats A dining guide to the South Shore
Creative & Traditional Italian
& Fresh Seafood
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775. 588. 7777 | 800. 624. 7980
Lakes| de| nn. com
7ephyr Cove Resort
60 |.y 50 | 55894968
Vanaged by ARAVARK Parks and 0estlnatlons. Zephyr Cove Resort 8 Varlna
operated under a speclal u.S. lorest Servlce use permlt. All operatlons support
restoratlon and preservatlon of natural, cultural and hlstorlc resources.
530.544.8130
11ô9 Sk| 8un 8|vd. º So. Lake Tahoe
On the way to and from Heavenly
NEPHELES
Serving Creative
California Cuisine
Since 1977
As featured in:
Bon Appet|t Magaz|ne
W|ne Speotator
The New York T|mes
The San Frano|soo Ohron|o|e
and more.
392 Kingsbury Grade • Lake Tahoe • (775) 588-6276
Online Reservations at chart-house.com
Open 10am to 7pm Daily
1O32 Al Tahoe Blvd. · So. Lake Tahoe
Tel: (53O) 544-5253
Toll Free: (866) 544-1O33
www.TheCorkAndMore.com
F a l l / Wi n t e r 2 0 1 1
Your definitive guide to dining on the South Shore of Lake Tahoe.
Tahoe Tastes gives you detailed information on local restaurants along with a locator
map showing you where to find them, a listing of social media websites, diner reviews,
and scannable QR codes linking to even more online information and specials.
Pick up your copy today from one of the helpful Concierges at
Montbleu Resort & Casino, Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Harvey’s Lake Tahoe the
Embassy Suites Lake Tahoe Hotel & Ski Resort, or at the Tahoe Daily Tribune office.
122 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
what to do South Shore
LOCALS
D O A S T H E
do
W
hen in d
oubt
W
HEN YOU’RE IN A NEW PLACE AND YOU’RE HUNGRY, WHAT DO
YOU DO? YOU GO WHERE THE LOCALS ARE AT OF COURSE!
SO IF YOU ARE A TOURIST OR JUST NOT THAT FAMILIAR WITH THE
LOCAL HANGOUTS -- WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED!
S O U T H S H O R E
Burger Lounge
F
or high output sports liking
snowboarding and skiiing,
one must dive into high-energy
foods with a zeal approaching
senselessness. If a peanut butter
burger like Burger Lounge’s Jify
Burger won’t fll that grand canyon
in your stomach from the rigors of
the mountain, then you’ve got a
serious problem. Luckily, for the
healthier inclined, options like
the Heavenly Burger with bacon
and avocado can also send one
into that cloud nine coma only the
combination of snow sports and
good food can induce.
T
his local haunt went through a change of owners a few years ago
and hasn’t looked back. Steamers has a full bar and more
than a few tasty beers on tap, but it is probably best known
for its taco nights on Saturday, Sunday and Monday.
Tat’s three straight days of cheesy taco goodness,
and it may not be enough. Get there early be-
cause this cozy joint is bound to be packed
with a friendly, hungry, crowd.
Steamers Bar and Grill
A
new kid on the block, MacDuf’s has taken pub grub to new levels.
Located just of of Highway 50 in the middle of South Lake Tahoe,
MacDuf’s is known for its wood-fred pizzas, assortment of burgers
and delicious array of draught beers. Grab a Guinness, kick back
and enjoy the feel of a Scottish-style pub, South Shore style.
MacDuff’sPub
2236 LAKE TAHOE BLVD.
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, CA
OPEN DAILY V (530) 541-8818
STEAMERSBAR.COM
717 EMERALD BAY ROAD
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, CA
HOURS : SUMMER 11 - 9
WINTER 11-8
(530) 314-7036
TAHOEBURGERLOUNGE.COM
1041 FREMONT AVENUE V SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, CA
OPEN SUN.-SAT. 11:30 AM -2 AM V (530) 542-8777 V MACDUFFSPUB.COM
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 123
Hot Gossip
Lakeside Inn & Casino
T
here’s not much better than a cup of hot chocolate on a
snowy day, especially if it’s poured by a smiling local. Hot
Gossip owner Liz Hallen knows what her customers need:
soft couches, deliciously fresh pastries and a warm, cozy,
child-friendly atmosphere. If it’s something substantial your
stomach needs before a day on the slopes, they’ve got that too.
Look for big ol’ breakfast burritos filled with perfectly cooked
potatoes, bacon, eggs and cheese.
3447 LAKE TAHOE BLVD. SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, CA
OPEN DAILY 7 - 7 V(530) 541-4823
L
ocated just east of the South Shore’s larger casinos,
Lakeside takes pride in its smaller size and local
appeal. The masses nearly rioted when the prices for
most drinks went up from $1 to $2 awhile back. But, at $2,
Lakeside offers the most dependably low drink prices at
a South Shore casino. Friendly bartenders and more TV’s
than you could hope to watch add to the atmosphere and
make Lakeside a locals favorite.
168 HIGHWAY 50
STATELINE, NV
OPEN DAILY 24 HOURS
(530) 588-7777
(800) 624-7980
LAKESIDEINN.COM
530.542.1943 Tel
530.542.1976 Fax

1034 Emerald Bay Rd.
South Lake Tahoe
in the Raley’s & K-Mart Center
at the corner of Hwy 50 and Hwy 89
we
ship
all
it
Mail Boxes Copies Notary
Computer Rental
Passport Photos
Overnight and Ground Shipping
Ship to our location ahead
of your arrival ...
Luggage Ski & Snowboard
Camping Gear
Susan and Lothar Knieriemen, Owner Operators
mtnpostal.com
what to do North Shore
T
RAVELING AROUND THE LAKE CAN TAKE LONGER THAN YOU THINK!
ESPECIALLY ON A SNOWY DAY AFTER A HARD DAY OF SKIING OR
BOARDING ... SO IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A GREAT PLACE TO RELAX,
EAT & MAYBE ENJOY A COLD ONE -- GO WHERE THE LOCALS GO ....
N O R T H S H O R E
T A HO E C I T Y & T R U C K E E T O O
Tahoe
House
Fifty-Fifty Brewing Co.
Crosby’s Grill Pub
O
ne of the interesting aspects of the ski season, is
that is coincides with National Football League
schedule. Often, one can witness the die-hard football
fans rushing off the slopes to make kick-off. A good
place to throw back a fermented beverage in front of a
widescreen television is Crosby’s. The menu features
solid variations on standard pub fare, such as burg-
ers and chicken wings. An ideal spot to take in a game
before seeking aggressive lines on the hill.
868 TAHOE BLVD., INCLINE VILLAGE, NV
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 A.M. - 10 P.M. AND
WEEKENDS 9 A.M. - 10 P.M.
775-833-1030 V CROSBYSPUB.COM
N
estled on the
Northwestern
shore of Lake
Tahoe since
1977, Tahoe House is where locals repair both before and
after an adventurous day on the slopes. The coffee, which is
widely considered by locals to be the best in the Lake Tahoe
Basin, is brewed cup by cup from a Swiss coffee machine. The
European-style bakery features a panoply of confections, from
hearty breakfast pastries to decadent cakes, Tahoe House can
accommodate the full range of food and beverage needs.
625 WEST LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA
OPEN DAILY FROM 6 A.M. TO 6 P.M.
EXCEPT SUNDAY WHEN CLOSING TIME IS 4 P.M.
530-583-1377 V TAHOE-HOUSE.COM
W
edged between downtown Truckee and the road to Tahoe
State Highway 267 this bar and grill serves up a frothy batch o’
brew and rich American cuisine. The restaurant and bar boasts their
own house ales and beers and the casual climate is great for conver-
sation starters. Burgers, beer and good times, this is Fifty-Fifty.
11197 BROCKWAY ROAD IN TRUCKEE, CA
OPEN MONDAY TO THURSDAY 11:30 A.M. TO 9:30 P.M.,
FRIDAY 11:30 A.M. -10 P.M., SATURDAY, 8 A.M. TO 10 P.M.,
SUNDAY 8 A.M. - 9:30 P.M.
(530) 587-BEER V FIFTYFIFTYBREWING.COM
124 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
See the Event Schedule at
www.TahoeSnowFestival.com
For info: 530.583.7167
or email: info@tahoesnowfestival.com
For lodging:
www.GoTahoeNorth.com 1-888-434-1262

Dorinda’s Chocolates
F
or those looking to escape the ski scene with some hand
crafted coffees, teas and award winning chocolates, Dorinda’s
Chocolates in downtown Truckee is the perfect one-stop-shop for
an authentic café atmosphere. Owner Dorinda Vance has recently
spearheaded her new cafe and offers everything from sandwiches
to take home treats all within the earthy ambiance of her café’s his-
toric town building. Bring a book, a laptop for free Wifi access or
just your appetite for this must see chocolate shop.
1009 WEST RIVER STREET, SUITE B., TRUCKEE, CA
OPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY 8 A.M. TO 6 P.M.; SUNDAYS 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
(530) 562-4415 V DORINDASCHOCOLATES.COM
~
E
ST. 2007
~
BiteTahoe.com Incline Village, Lake Tahoe
775 • 831 • 1000
530-587-8852
10418 Donner Pass Rd.
www.burgermetruckee.com
CHECK OUT OUR SPECIAL DEALS
ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER!
Call Ahead for Speedy Service!
Open Daily
11am-9pm
FREE
PARKING
775-737-9404
6280 Sharlands Ave.
Unit 101
www.burgermereno.com
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 125
126 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
See how many vertical feet you can climb by taking part in the 2011
Lake Tahoe Backcountry Challenge this winter. Photo: Tom Zikas
What to do Truckee & North Shore Calendar of Events

NOVEMBER THROUGH APRIL
Te 2011 Lake Tahoe Backcountry Challenge spon-
sored by Alpenglow Sports. Alpenglow Sports has chal-
lenged the Tahoe backcountry community to a cumulative
goal of 15 million vertical feet of uphill, human-powered
travel. Whether via AT, telemark, split board, snowshoes
or boot pack, if the 15 million foot goal is met, Alpenglow
Sports will donate $3,000 to the Sierra Avalanche Center.
Prizes for top three men and women and swag for frst 30
participants. Please call 530-583-6917.
NOV. 23  JAN. 7
Magical Memories, Resort at Squaw Creek, seventh
annual holiday celebration with giant gingerbread village,
music, culinary events, festivities for the kids, stories with
Mrs. Claus, holiday recreational events in a magical holi-
day setting. Te of cial kickof begins with the Gingerbread
Village Unveiling and Grand Tree Lighting Ceremony on
Nov. 25. Visit www.magicalsquawcreek.com or call 530-
583-6300.
NOV. 26
Annual Holiday Fair and community tree lighting, 5
p.m., North Tahoe Event Center, Kings Beach. Refresh-
ments, music and holiday cheer. Call 530-546-7249 or visit
northtahoeevents.com
DEC. 1
Sierra Nevada College annual Community Tree Light-
ing, 4-6 p.m., Patterson Hall, SNC campus, Incline Village.
Call 775-831-1314 or visit www.sierranevada.edu.
DEC. 1
Lexy Eich artist reception, 5-7 p.m. BFA Exhibition. Ta-
hoe Gallery-Prim Library, Sierra Nevada College campus.
Call 775-831-1314 or visit www.sierranevada.edu.
NOV. 26  DEC. 23
Truckee Optimist Christmas Tree Lot, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Crossroads Shopping Center at the corner of Highway 89
and Deerfeld Drive, Truckee. All profts from the sales of
the trees goes to youth activity scholarships and grants for
Truckee youth. Call 530-559-1466 or visit www.truckeeop-
timist.com.
North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center
920 Southwood Blvd. • Incline Village • 775.831.1900
NOW a Wi-Fi Hotspot!!
TOUCHFREE
AUTOMATIC CAR WASHES
INCLINE
CAR WASH
910 INCLINE WAY • INCLINE VILLAGE, NV
775.831.1485
KINGS BEACH
CAR WASH
8775 NORTH LAKE BLVD
KINGS BEACH, CA
SELF SERVICE BAYS
WASHCARD SYSTEM
for savings & convenience
UPGRADED VACUUMS
TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU ...
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 127
DEC. 1  JAN. 2
Holly-Days Jubilee in Tahoe City, day and evening. Experience
the holidays throughout Tahoe City. Visit www.visittahoecity.
com.
DEC. 1
Noel Nights, Village-at-Northstar, 5-8 p.m. Enjoy s’mores by
the fre, free ice skating, hot cocoa, shopping specials, holiday
carolers, photos with Santa. Visit www.northstarattahoe.com,
call 800-466-6784.
DEC. 1, 3
Annual Holiday concert for Sierra Nevada College, 7:30 p.m.,
St. Patrick’s Church, Incline Village. Call 775-831-1314 or visit
www.sierranevada.edu.
DEC. 2
Baron von Remmel on saxophone, 7 p.m., Mark Twain Cul-
tural Center, 760 Mays Blvd., Ste. 10, Incline Village. Call 775-
833-1835 or visit www.marktwainculturalcenter.org.
DEC. 3
Sierra Nevada College Holiday Gala, 5-11 p.m. Hyatt Lakeside
Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe. Call 775-831-1314 or visit
www.sierranevada.edu.
DEC. 7
Toys for Tots Kickof Party, 6-9 p.m., Te Chateau Incline Vil-
lage. Cheryl Delahanty and her elves work tirelessly year after
year to provide new toys to children in Tahoe. Te kickof is the
beginning of the Incline Village holiday season. Santa visits with
the children. Admission to the event is one new unwrapped toy.
Call 775-833-6444 or visit http://inclinevillage-nv.toysfortots.org
... continued on next page
Burgers • Pizza • Sports
18 TVs • 12 Beers on Tap
NFL • NCAA • MLB • NBA • NHL • NASCAR
HAPPY HOUR
EVERY DAY 3PM-6PM
Winter Hours
Sun-Thu 11:30am-9pm
Fri.& Sat. 11:30am-10pm
Corner of Palisades Dr.
& Brockway Rd. (next to 7-11)
587-7777 • OPEN EVERY DAY
Join the fun during Noel Nights at Northstar.
128 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do Truckee & North Shore Calendar of Events
... from previous page
DEC. 8
Sierra Nevada College
artist reception for Kath
Irwin McGaughey, 5-7
p.m. Tahoe Gallery, Prim
Library, SNC campus.
Call 775-831-1314 or visit
www.sierranevada.edu.
DEC. 8
Chautauqua, 7 p.m.,
Mark Twain Cultural
Center, 760 Mays Blvd.,
Ste. 10, Incline Village.
Tomas Hart Benton
portrayed by Doug
Mishler. Call 775-833-
1835 or visit www.mark-
twainculturalcenter.org.
DEC. 10
Brunch with Santa, at Te Chateau in Incline Village.
Family event features brunch, a magic show, arts and crafts
and a photo with Santa. For tickets and information call 775-
298-0004 or go to www.cciv.org.
DEC. 10
Frank Sinatra Birthday Bash, 7 p.m., Mark Twain Cultural
Center, 760 Mays Blvd., Ste. 10, Incline Village. Call 775-833-
1835 or visit www.marktwainculturalcenter.org.
DEC. 10
Full Moon Snowshoe Adventure. Join Tahoe Adventure
Company for a Full Moon Trek through Lake Tahoe’s pris-
tine forests. Travel by moonlight with professional, knowl-
edgeable guides. Discuss natural history and astronomy
topics as well as fascinating facts about the moon. Full Moon
Snowshoe Trips are popular with all levels of nature enthu-
siasts. Tahoe Vista, call 530-913-9212 for time. Full Moon
Snowshoe Trek with all gear, hot drinks, trail snacks, profes-
sional guides, natural history discussions, and permit fees.
Cost: $65 per person, letsgo@tahoeadventurecompany.com,
www.tahoeadventurecompany.com.
DEC. 17  24
Holiday Festivities, Northstar-at-Tahoe will have live
music in the Village and Santa will be in a diferent Village
location each day noon-2:30 p.m. to take pictures with kids.
DEC. 8
Noel Nights, Village-at-Northstar, 5-8 p.m. Enjoy s’mores
by the fre, free ice skating, hot cocoa, shopping specials,
holiday carolers, photos with
Santa. Visit www.northstaratta-
hoe.com or call 800-466-6784.
DEC. 8
Alpenglow Sports Winter Film
Series. Location TBD. Andrew
McLean: Norway’s Wild West
(benefciary: Sierra Avalanche
Center). Join Andrew McLean
for a three-part trip to Norway’s
Spitsbergen archipelago in the
Arctic Circle for world-class
skiing, trekking, sailing and
adventure. Incredible raf e
prizes. Please call 530-583-6917.
DEC. 8
Squaw Valley Lunafest, Olym-
pic Village Inn, 6-9 p.m., $35.
Film festival featuring award-
winning short flms by, for
and about women. Appetizers,
wine, live and silent auction
and flm viewings. All proceeds for the event beneft Girls
on the Run Sierras and the Breast Cancer Fund. Visit www.
girlsontherunsierras.org/lunafest or call 530-567-2144.
DEC. 15
Noel Nights, Village-at-Northstar, 5-8 p.m. Enjoy s’mores
by the fre, free ice skating, hot cocoa, shopping specials,
holiday carolers, photos with Santa. Visit www.northstarat-
tahoe.com or call 800-466-6784.
DEC. 17
Snow God’s Ball, Olympic House, $20 at the door or $15
in advance, 21 and older only. A beneft for the Squaw Valley
Avalanche Awareness Education Fund. Live music, door
prizes, raf e prizes and silent auction items. Visit www.
squaw.com or call 530-452-7260.
DEC. 18
Customer appreciation day, everyone skis for $5. Tahoe
Donner Downhill Ski Area. Events are weather permitting
and subject to cancellation. Visit www.skitahoedonner.com
or call 530-587-9444.
DEC. 17  JAN. 2
Celebrate the holidays this season at Squaw! Two weeks
packed full of events for the whole family to enjoy. Find
Santa around the mountain and in the Village. Also enjoy
the magical sight of the holiday torchlight parade. Squaw
decorates the mountain with mini stockings flled with
all sorts of little presents for the children. Listen to joyful
sounds of Christmas carolers under the festive lights at Te
Village at Squaw Valley. Visit www.squaw.com.
Children always enjoy the annual Brunch With Santa event in Incline.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 129
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DEC. 23, 24 AND 25
Santa takes to the slopes of
Diamond Peak to greet skiers
young and old. Don’t miss this
opportunity to have some fun
with Santa, 1210 Ski Way, In-
cline Village. Call 775-832-1177
or visit www.diamondpeak.
com.
DEC. 25
Christmas with Santa at
Tahoe Donner. Join Santa for
a half day of skiing and riding
fun. Te ski hill will open at
noon. Tahoe Donner Downhill
Ski Area. Events are weather
permitting and subject to
cancellation. Visit us at www.
skitahoedonner.com or call
530-587-9444.
... continued on next page
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130 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do Truckee & North Shore Calendar of Events
DEC. 31
Torchlight Parade on New Year’s Eve, for intermediate
skiers and riders ages 10 or older who can ski or ride unas-
sisted in the dark on our Race Course run. Come early to
ensure you secure a spot in the parade. A DJ and snacks will
be provided in the bar area prior to the parade. Sign-up is
4:30-5:45 p.m. with a 6 p.m. start time. Tahoe Donner Down-
hill Ski Area. Events are weather permitting and subject to
cancellation. Visit www.skitahoedonner.com or call 530-
587-9444.
DEC. 31
New Year’s Eve at High Camp. A fabulous night on the
mountain with entertainment for the family. All-ages soiree
begins at 6 p.m. and includes a starry-night Cable Car ride
(guests should upload the 5 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 5:30 p.m. or 5:45
p.m.), spectacular bufet dinner and music and dancing.
Ring in the new season with a 9 p.m. East Coast New Year’s
champagne toast (sparkling apple cider for the youngsters).
Ride the Cable Car back down to the Village for the 9:30
p.m. New Year’s Eve freworks display. Adult: $50 includes a
Cable Car ticket. $36 for those with tickets or passes already.
Child (12 and under): $34 includes a Cable Car ticket. $26 for
those with a lift tickets or passes already. Tis event does sell
out and reservations are required. Please e-mail abarker@
squaw.com for reservations.
DEC. 31
New Year’s Eve in Squaw Valley USA’s Olympic House.
Party at Squaw Valley’s Olympic House with two DJs and a
live band spread across the lodge’s 5 bars. Entry is $10 at the
door (cash only) and guests must be 21 and older with a valid
ID. Doors open at 9 p.m. Drink service until 1:30 a.m.
DEC. 31
Fire & Ice New Year’s Eve Celebration, Village-at-North-
star, 9 p.m. Live music, fre dancers, ice skating, hot cocoa,
s’mores and a freworks show. Visit www.northstarattahoe.
com or call 800-466-6784.
JAN. 6
Full moon snowshoe hike at Diamond Peak. Enjoy the
moon light as you hike to Snowfake Lodge. Diamond Peak,
1210 Ski Way, Incline Village. Call 775-832-1177 or visit www.
diamondpeak.com.
JAN. 7
Alpenglow Sports 5th Annual Telemark and Alpine Tour-
ing Demo Event. Alpine Meadows Ski Resort, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Demo the latest and greatest from Black Diamond, Dynaft,
Scarpa, G3, Rossignol, Marker, Volkl, Fritschi and more.
Valid day ticket or season pass required. Credit card and
license required for deposit. Please call 530-583-6917.
JAN. 7
Join Tahoe Adventure Company for a Full Moon Trek
through Lake Tahoe’s forests. Travel by moonlight with
professional, knowledgeable guides. Discuss natural his-
tory and astronomy topics as well as fascinating facts about
the moon. Full Moon Snowshoe Trips are popular with all
levels of nature enthusiasts. Tahoe Vista, call 530-913-9212
for time. Full Moon Snowshoe Trek with all gear, hot drinks,
trail snacks, professional guides, natural history discus-
sions, and permit fees. Cost: $65 per person, letsgo@tahoe-
adventurecompany.com, www.tahoeadventurecompany.
com.
A torchlight parade rings in the New Year at Tahoe Donner.
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The Village at Squaw Valley
530
584-6001
The Cobblestone in Tahoe City
530
583-9900
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 131
JAN. 7, FEB. 4 & MARCH 3
Full Moon Snowshoe Hikes along Tahoe’s West Shore at Sugar
Pine Point State Park. Reservations are required and can be
made by calling the program sponsor, West Shore Sports at 530
525 9920. $20 includes snowshoe rental, park entrance fee and
guided ranger-led interpretive program. Children 12 and under
are $5. Meet at 6:30 p.m. for an introduction to snowshoeing a
begins at 7 p.m. and last 1 1/2 hours. Proceeds beneft the Sierra
State Parks Foundation. For more information call: 530-525-
3345 .
JAN. 813
U.S. Revolution Tour,
Northstar-at-Tahoe.
Athletes from across the
country identify the top
juniors in halfpipe, slope-
style, and cross events.
Te U.S. Revolution Tour
is also used to qualify
athletes for World Juniors,
U.S. Open, U.S. World
Cup, USASA Nationals
and Project Gold camps.
Visit www.northstaratta-
hoe.com or call 800-466-
6784.
JAN. 12
Adrian Ballinger: 3
Weeks, 3 Climbers, 3
8,000-meter Summits
(benefciary: High Fives
Nonproft Foundation).
Location TBD. In the
spring of 2011, local Tahoe mountain guide Adrian Ballinger be-
came the frst person to summit three 8,000-meter peaks within
a three week period. Please join Adrian for a night of humor,
motivation and stunning images from the roof of the world. In-
credible rafe prizes. Please call 530-583-6917.
... continued on next page
Learn how to snowshoe and prepare yourself for a variety of full moon
tours offered this winter.
Brandon Cocard of Truckee floats a backflip
during a competition at Northstar-at-Tahoe.
VILLAGE CENTER 797 Southwood Blvd. 775-831-2204
Open M-F 9-5 Sat. 9-2
Free Deslgn ConsulIaIlon
(775) 831-2204
20% OFF AND FREE INSTALLATION
Full 5ervlce Deslgn CenIer
Window Treatments
Furniture
Lighting
Accessories
Floor Coverings
Professional Staging
132 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do Truckee & North Shore Calendar of Events
JAN. 1921
Tird annual Ullr Fest held at Diamond Peak, 1210 Ski
Way, Incline Village. Features a torchlight parade, bonfre
and activities. Call 775-832-1177 or visit www.diamondpeak.
com.
JAN. 12 FEB. 9
LA Group Show curated
by Autumn Beck, Sierra Ne-
vada College, Tahoe Gallery,
Prim Library, SNC campus.
Call 775-831-1314 or visit
www.sierranevada.edu.
JAN. 12
Remember the 1960
Olympic Winter Games,
Squaw Valley and Lake
Tahoe, 7 p.m., Mark Twain
Cultural Center, 760 Mays
Blvd., Ste. 10, Incline Village.
Presentation by David Anto-
nucci. Call 775-833-1835 or
visit www.marktwaincultur-
alcenter.org.
JAN. 19
Te Donner Party:
Weathering the Storm, 7
p.m. Mark Twain Cultural
Center, 760 Mays Blvd., Ste. 10, Incline Village. Tis presen-
tation is by Mark McLaughlin. Call 775-833-1835 or visit
www.marktwainculturalcenter.org.
JAN. 21
Snow Carnival, participate in a day of events for kids.
Events will include: match time race, a sled pull, a bounce
house, ice cream and more. Te fun begins at 10:30 a.m., Ta-
hoe Donner Downhill Ski Area. Events are weather permit-
ting and subject to cancellation. Visit www.skitahoedonner.
com or call 530-587-9444.
FEBRUARY THROUGH
MARCH
Te Rahlves’ Banzai Tour. Open to
all ski, snowboard, men and women for
$125 or $100 if you’ve got a resort season
pass. Battle it out in four competitor heats
down a wide open course set over natural
terrain in of piste conditions at four of
Tahoe’s premier resorts.
Alpine Meadows, Feb. 4-5; Kirkwood,
Feb. 11-12; Squaw Valley USA, March
3-4; Sugar Bowl Resort, March 17-18, tour
fnals. Amazing action for spectators as
competitors throw it down for the Banzai
title, $80,000 cash prize purse and prizes. Saturday practice
/ qualifcation, Saturday Rahlves’ Banzai Apres Party and
Sunday fnals. Show up and see what you’ve got or hang out
at the sponsor vendor village and catch the action. Check
out the 2011 Rahlves’ Banzai Tour in Warren Miller’s ski
flm “Like
Tere’s No
Tomorrow.”
For more
info and
to register,
visit www.
rahlvesban-
zai.com.
FEB. 7
Join
Tahoe
Adventure
Company
for a special
Full Moon
Trek. Travel
by moon-
light with
professional,
knowledge-
able guides.
Discuss
natural his-
tory and astronomy topics as well as fascinating facts about
the moon. Full Moon Snowshoe Trips are popular with all
levels of nature enthusiasts. Tahoe Vista, call 530-913-9212
for time. Full Moon Snowshoe Trek with all gear, hot drinks,
trail snacks, professional guides, natural history discussions
and permit fees. Cost: $65 per person, letsgo@tahoeadven-
turecompany.com, www.tahoeadventurecompany.com.
FEB. 10
Full moon snowshoe hike at Diamond Peak. Enjoy the
moon light as you hike up to
Snowfake Lodge, Diamond
Peak, 1210 Ski Way, Incline Vil-
lage. Call 775-832-1177 or visit
www.diamondpeak.com.
FEB. 18
Black Tie & Tails Gala, Ritz-
Carlton Highlands at Northstar,
6-11 p.m. Guests and canine
companions. Hollywood-style
red carpet, bubbly champagne
reception, dining, live music
and entertainment. Proceeds
to beneft Humane Society of
Truckee-Tahoe. Visit www.hstt.
org, 530-587-5948.
An ice skater performs through the Olympic rings during the 1960 Winter Olympics at Squaw.
Photo courtesy Bill Briner.
Daron Rahlves shreds downhill at a past Banzai Tour.
Your Quest for Perfection...
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You envision it, we seek it. From quaint cabins to lakeshore estates
with sweeping views, all our homes meet the most demanding criteria.
They look beautiful. More importantly, they feel wonderful.
Setting that journey in motion is no more complicated than
picking up the phone or logging on to your computer.
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1-800-841-7443
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Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 133
FEB. 25
Children’s Glowstick Parade and Carnival, a kid’s version of the
Torchlight Parade with glowsticks for children 10 or younger who
can ski or ride unassisted in the dark on the Snowbird run. Arrive
early to secure a spot in the parade and get glowsticks by playing
carnival games for free. Music and snacks provided in the bar area
prior to the parade. Sign-up and carnival starts at 4:30-4:45 p.m.
with the parade starting at 6:30 p.m. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski
Area. Events are weather permitting and subject to cancellation.
Visit www.skitahoedonner.com or call 530-587-9444.
... continued on next page
The Tahoe Donner Downhill Glowstick Parade.
134 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do Truckee & North Shore Calendar of Events
MARCH 2
SnowFest! Opening Night Ceremonies, Squaw Valley USA.
Laser show, torchlight parade, freworks display. Live music
on the KT22 Sundeck. Presented by the Squaw Valley Busi-
ness Association. Visit www.tahoesnowfestival.com or call
530-583-7167.
MARCH 211
SnowFest! Various venues throughout the North Shore.
Numerous winter carnival activities. Visit www.tahoesnow-
festival.com or call 530-583-7167.
MARCH 3
Winter Beach Party, tropical fun including live music,
food and games. A great time for the whole family that
starts at noon. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area. Events are
weather permitting and subject to cancellation. Visit www.
skitahoedonner.com or call 530-587-9444.
MARCH 3
Celebrity Winterfest. Te ski events are held at Diamond
Peak Ski Resort, 1210 Ski Way, Incline Village and other
events at Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe in Incline Village. Call
Diamond Peak at 775-832-1177 or the Hyatt at 775-832-1234.
MARCH 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Last Tracks at Diamond Peak, 1210 Ski Way, Incline Vil-
lage. Enjoy a glass of wine at Snowfake Lodge and then
ski down on fresh powder. Tis is a favorite for visitors and
guests. Call 775-832-1177 or visit www.diamondpeak.com.
MARCH 9
Join Tahoe Adventure Company for a Full Moon Trek.
Travel by moonlight with professional, knowledgeable
guides. Discuss natural history and astronomy topics as well
as fascinating facts about the moon. Full Moon Snowshoe
Trips are popular with all levels of nature enthusiasts. Tahoe
Vista, call 530-913-9212 for time. Full Moon Snowshoe Trek
with all gear, hot drinks, trail snacks, professional guides,
natural history discussions, and permit fees. Cost: $65 per
person, letsgo@tahoeadventurecompany.com, www.tahoe-
adventurecompany.com.
MARCH 9
Full moon snowshoe hike at Diamond Peak. Enjoy the
moon light as you hike up to Snowfake Lodge, Diamond
Peak, 1210 Ski Way, Incline Village. Call 775-832-1177 or visit
www.diamondpeak.com.
MARCH 10
Fifth annual Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Poker Run at Dia-
mond Peak, 1210 Ski Way, Incline Village. Call 775-832-1177
or go to www.diamondpeak.com.
MARCH 10
Food for Tought Tamale Dinner. You won’t want to miss
Adventure Risk Challenge’s Fourth Annual Food for Tought
Tamale Dinner. Good people, good food and all for a good
cause. Saturday, March 10, at the Boys & Girls Club of North
Lake Tahoe in Kings Beach, 6-9 p.m. Homemade tamales,
with all proceeds benefting ARC’s outdoor programming for
local high school youth. For more information, visit www.ar-
cprogram.org or e-mail Shelley Gorin at slgoring@berkeley.
edu.
MARCH 1215
Science Expo. Hours vary. UC Davis, Tahoe Center for
Environmental Sciences (TCES) on the campus of Sierra Ne-
vada College. Call 775-881-7566 or visit www.sierranevada.
edu.
MARCH 1825
Kid-O-Rama, Squaw Valley, USA. Costumed skating par-
ties, family ski racing, street parties and scavenger hunts.
Visit www.squaw.com or 530-452-7123.
MARCH 2324
Pain McShlonkey Classic, Squaw Valley, USA. On and
of-mountain event. Costumes, music, drinks, snowlerblade
Chinese downhill, celebrity judges. Visit www.squaw.com or
530-583-6955.
MARCH 24
Uphill Race at Diamond Peak, 1210 Ski Way, Incline Vil-
lage. Call 775-832-1177 or go to www.diamondpeak.com.
MARCH 2425
Spring Magic. Squaw Valley USA. Te High Camp Swim-
ming Lagoon & Spa opens for the season with an outrageous
pool party. Visit www.squaw.com or 530-583-6985.
... from previous page
The Polar Plunge is just one of many amazing SnowFest! events.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 135
MARCH 31
Underwater egg hunt, 10:30 a.m., IVGID Recreation Center,
980 Incline Way, Incline Village. Fun for children in the pool.
Call 775-832-1310 or go to www.inclinerecreation.com.
MARCH 31
Cultural Festival, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Patterson Hall, on the Sierra
Nevada College Campus. Call 775-831-1314 or visit www.sier-
ranevada.edu.
MARCH 31APRIL 1
Peaks & Lagoons Spring Party Weekend, Squaw Valley USA,
High Camp. DJ, pool
party, skiing and
riding. Visit www.
squaw.com or 530-
583-6985.
APRIL 1
Te 12th annual
Dummy Downhill at
Diamond Peak, 1210
Ski Way, Incline Vil-
lage. Watch the heads
roll as the dummy’s
take to the mountain.
Call 775-832-1177 or
visit www.diamond-
peak.com.
APRIL 6
Join Tahoe Ad-
venture Company
for a Full Moon Trek.
Travel by moonlight
with professional,
knowledgeable guides. Discuss natural history and astronomy
topics as well as fascinating facts about the moon. Full Moon
Snowshoe Trips are popular with all levels of nature enthusiasts.
Tahoe Vista, call 530-913-9212 for time. Full Moon Snowshoe
Trek with all gear, hot drinks, trail snacks, professional guides,
natural history discussions, and permit fees. Cost: $65 per per-
son, letsgo@tahoeadventurecompany.com, www.tahoeadventu-
recompany.com.
APRIL 7
Spring Eggstravaganza Egg Hunt, 11 a.m., Incline Beach,
Incline Village. Te fastest event of the spring. Arrive early for
photos with the Easter Bunny. Call 775-832-1177 or go to www.
diamondpeak.com.
APRIL 15
Downhill Dummy Contest and Rail Jam, please visit www.
skitahoedonner.com for more information. Tahoe Donner
Downhill Ski Area. Events are weather permitting and subject
to cancellation. Visit www.skitahoedonner.com or call 530-587-
9444.
MAY 2627
Truckee Home & Building Show, Truckee High School, 10
a.m.-5 p.m., $6. Call 530-587-3477. T
The 12th annual Dummy Downhill is April 1, 2012.
Medical
Surgical
Dental
Daytime Emergency
Services
2933 Lake Forest Rd
Tahoe City
530.583.8587
Monday–Friday
8 am–5 pm
Meadow Brook Dr
N. Lake Blvd
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Fabian Way
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28
28
South Lake Tahoe
Ice Arena
South Lake Tahoe
Ice Arena
530-542-6262
Now Under
New Management
Public Skating
Skate School
Figure Skating
Private Lessons
Youth In-House Hockey
Travel Hockey - STAHA
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Special Events
Amenities include ...
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PUBLIC SKATING SCHEDULE*
Mon. - Thurs. 9:30-4:00
Fri. 1:00-4:00 & 7:30-10:30
Sat. 1:00 - 5:00 & 7:00-10:00
Sun. 12:00-3:00
* subject to change, call
530-542-6262 to confirm hours
www.tahoese.com
136 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do South Shore Calendar of Events
DEC. 131
Heavenly Village Synchronized Light Show
Nightly with 30 minute shows beginning on
the half hour from 6-9 p.m. Shows are synchro-
nized to music being payed on outdoor speakers.
Heavenly Village, 1001 Heavenly Village Way.
775-586-7000.
DEC. 14
Festival of Trees and Lights, MontBleu Resort
Casino & Spa at Stateline. Multi-day, family-
oriented festival. Family night 5-9 p.m. Dec. 3;
Teddy Bear Breakfast 9 a.m. Dec. 4; Gala 6-12
p.m. Dec. 4; Fashions in a Winter Wonderland
champagne brunch and fashion show, 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Dec. 5; Polar Express 3-5 p.m. and 6-8
p.m. Dec. 5. Sponsored by the Barton Founda-
tion to beneft the Barton Community Clinic.
Call 530-543-5614 or visit www.festivaloftreesla-
ketahoe.org.
DEC. 2
Community Holiday Tree Lighting, 5 - 7 p.m.
Dec. 2., Lake Tahoe Visitors Center, 3066 Lake
Tahoe Blvd. Join Santa, Mrs. Claus and their elves
for this annual community celebration. Spon-
sored by the Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority. Call
530-544-5050.
DEC. 3
Valhalla Holiday Gala, 5:30-10:30 p.m. Valhalla
Grand Hall. Spend an elegant evening of cham-
pagne, hors d’ouevres, fne wines and catered din-
ner while enjoying the ambiance of the historic
Valhalla Grand Hall, decorated in the festive win-
ter holiday mode. Te roaring fre in the 40’ high
natural stone freplace will be in the background
as we listen to the soothing and festive music
provided by local artists. A silent
auction will be held
before the conclu-
sion of the evening.
Evening attire is
recommended.
Each ticket
includes a
personal-
ized Tahoe
Silverwood
handcrafted
Bear Orna-
ment. Call
530-541-4975
or visit www.
valhallatahoe.
com.
The nurses and
doctors at the Teddy
Bear Clinic at the
Festival of Trees
and Lights handle a
massive teddy bear
trauma situation at
MontBleu Resort
Casino & Spa.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 137
DEC. 4
Ride the
Polar Express, 3
p.m. and 6 p.m.,
buses depart
for MontBleu
Resort Ca-
sino & Spa for a
reading of “Te
Polar Express.”
For informa-
tion, visit festi-
valoftreeslake-
tahoe.org or call
530-543-5614.
DEC. 10
Tahoe Adventure Film Fest, 6:30 p.m., MontBleu Casino Resort
& Spa. Featuring the best adventure sports flms of the year and the
best talent in the action sports world. For information and a sched-
ule, visit www.laketahoeflmfestival.com.
DEC. 10
Breakfast with Santa, 9-11 a.m., Kahle Community Center, 36
Kingsbury Grade, Stateline. Enjoy a pancake breakfast and have
your picture taken with Santa. $2 For ages 3-6. Call 775-586-7271.
... continued on next page
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Sean Sweeney, playing the part of a train conductor, takes
tickets on “The Polar Express” from Leighton Sweeney,
Tinley Sweeney and Ella Hirschfield (from left) on a
previous Polar Express trip.
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138 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do South Shore Calendar of Events
DEC. 15
Phone call from Santa, 4:30-6:30
p.m. For ages 3-6. Register starting
Dec. 1 at Kahle Community Center, 236
Kingsbury Grade, Stateline. Free. Call
775-586-7271.
DEC. 1617
Daniel Tosh. $45/$55 (Plus Tax &
Fees). Montbleu Resort, Casino and
Spa. 888-829-7630. Doors at 8 p.m.,
Show at 9 p.m.
DEC. 16
Holiday party at Edgewood Restau-
rant, 6-11 p.m., Edgewood Restaurant,
100 Lake Parkway, Stateline. Tickets
are $79 per person and sold in groups of
4 or more up to 10 people (groups of 10
will receive a price of $700). Bufet and
complimentary house wine, champagne and premium draft
beer. Dancing and entertainment will be provided by Lake DJ.
Call 775-588-2787.
DEC. 18
Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus presents Messiah
Concert series, St. Teresa Catholic Church, 1041 Lyons Ave.
3 p.m. Toccata kicks of its 2010-11 Winter MusicFest with a
program featuring selections from Handel’s Messiah along
with many holiday favorites. Call 775-313-9697 or visit www.
toccatatahoe.com for information.
DEC. 2131
Holidays at Heavenly Village. A series of family friendly
events and activities, holiday carolers, light shows, concerts,
activities for children that culminates in a New Year’s Bash on
Dec. 31 at 9 p.m. Call 775-586-7000.
DEC. 2324
Celebrate the season at Sierra-at-
Tahoe! Kids, come create your own
ornament to hang on the Sierra-at-Tahoe
Christmas tree. Visit Blizzard Moun-
tain for a visit from Ralston the Polar
Bear, sack races and snowmen build-
ing. Families, join the Sierra family and
celebrate the holiday season with warm
hot chocolate and candy canes across
the resort!
DEC. 2931
SnowGlobe Music Festival. Tis thee-
day music festival at on the Lake Tahoe
Community College soccer feld will
host bands like Pretty Lights, Bassnectar,
Tievery Corporation and the Glitch
Mob.
Joining the headliners will
be more than 40 other acts. Te
music selection is meant to
attract skiers and snowboard-
ers. Up to 10,000 people are
expected to attend the event.
Tickets are $149.95 for the
festival.
Te three-day festival will
ofer three main stages and
musicians will likely play from
2 to 10 p.m. each day.
Attendees are recommend-
ed to dress warm. A shuttle
from the Stateline area will
run back and forth between
the LTCC site and Stateline
throughout the festival.
Find more information at
snowglobemusicfestival.com.
DEC. 31
New Years Eve Perfection Party at MontBleu Resort Casino
& Spa. 55 Highway 50, Stateline. Call 775-586-2000 for VIP
table and bottle service. For tickets, call the MontBleu Box Of-
fce at 775-588-3515 or at Ticketmaster.com.
JAN. 7
Volcom Peanut Butter & Rail Jam at Sierra-at-Tahoe Snow-
sports Resort, Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, 1111 Sierra-at-Tahoe
Rd., Twin Bridges. Te jam is open to all snowboarders, free of
charge. Check out volcom.com for more details and to regis-
ter. Call 530-659-7453.
JAN. 78
USASA Slalom and GS at Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, 1111 Si-
erra-at-Tahoe Road. USASA brings their South Shore Series to
Sierra-at-Tahoe for this amateur slalom and GS competition.
Visit www.usasa.org for details.
Comedian and Comedy Central star Daniel Tosh appears at
MontBleu Resort Casino and Spa, Dec. 16-17.

The Glitch Mob will
headline SnowGlobe
Music Festival in
South Lake Tahoe
over New Year’s Eve
weekend.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 139
JAN. 1821
Tahoe Snowcial at Heavenly Mountain
Resort and Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.,
Heavenly and Harrah’s Lake Tahoe. Te worlds
of digital storytelling, snowsports and technol-
ogy will converge to unite and celebrate a global
community of enthusiasts who live their passion
on the snow and tell their stories online. Visit
www.tahoesnowcial.com.
JAN. 21
Fifth annual Buckle Up Big Air for GTS at
Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, 1111 Sierra-at-Tahoe Rd.,
Twin Bridges. Skiers and snowboarders unite
to throw down in memory of Sierra Team Rider
Greg Smith in a community-based event to
spread seat belt safety awareness. Call 530-659-
7453.
JAN 2121
Chinese New Year at Heavenly Mountain
Resort. Celebrate the year of the dragon with on
snow events, activities and an on snow parade.
Call 775-586-7000.
... continued on next page
Don’t miss the Sierra-at-Tahoe Buckle Up Big Air event on January 21. Photo: Kyle McCoy

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140 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do South Shore Calendar of Events
FEB. 45
Gatorade Free Flow Tour. Sierra-at-Tahoe. Flow to Pro. Te
GFFT is the of cial amateur tour of the Dew Tour. Open to all
amateurs under 21 years in slopestyle and superpipe, with a
Junior Jam contest for competitors 13 and under. Spots are
limited so register online at gatoradefreefowtour.com. Regis-
tered riders will be competing for a pre-qualifed spot in the
2012-2013 Winter Dew Tour.
FEB. 1316
Snowsports Week at Sierra-at-Tahoe. Sierra donates 2,000
lift tickets to the Barton Foundation to beneft the Sierra Edu-
cation Foundation. Discount lift tickets can be purchased for
$35 at select locations throughout in South Lake Tahoe.
FEB. 18
2011 Winter Green Horn games at Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort,
10 a.m., 1111 Sierra-at-Tahoe Rd., Twin Bridges. A day’s worth
of slalom gate racing, pipe jamming and obstacle course. Free
event for all ages. Call 530-659-7453.
FEB. 26:
Women’s Camp at Sierra-at-Tahoe. A woman specifc camp
aimed at improving & building confdence, camaraderie,
comfort as well as reviewing women’s specifc equipment.
Packages are available for coaching, lift ticket & rental
MARCH 24
Special Olympics Celebrity Winterfest at Heavenly Moun-
tain Resort, 3860 Saddle Rd. Hollywood celebrities, top busi-
ness leaders and Special
Olympics athletes will
compete for bragging
rights while raising
money for Special
Olympics in a spectacu-
lar day of alpine racing.
Past celebrities include
Kate Walsh (Dr. Addison
Sheppard from “Grey’s
Anatomy” and “Private
Practice”) and Zachary
Levi (Chuck
from “Chuck”).
Call 775-586-7000.
MARCH 311
Women’s Week. Kirkwood Mountain Resort, 1501 Kirk-
wood Meadows Dr. Call 209-258-6000.
Kirkwood will offer a variety of special ski clinics for women during March.
Sierra-at-Tahoe
will host a variety
of amateur
contests this
winter.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 141
Limo and bus service
for any special occasion
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Weddings • Parties • Birthdays
Airport Service • Tours to the Wine Country
Barefoot Limousines of Lake Tahoe LLC
South Lake Tahoe, CA • 530-277-3018 • 1-530-277-8465
info@barefootlimousines.com • barefootlimousines.com
MARCH 410
Fifteen annual Lake Tahoe WinterFest Gay and Lesbian Ski
Week, presented by the Nevada Gay and Lesbian Visitor & Conven-
tion Bureau. Skiing, boarding, casino action. Various locations. Call
775-720-9160.
MARCH 10
Ralston Cup at Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, 1111 Sierra-at-Tahoe Rd.,
Twin Bridges. Annual snowskate, slopestyle and slalom contest
hosted by Ralston Snowskates. Open to all. Call 530-659-7453.
MARCH 911
Expedition Kirkwood Women’s Weekend. Kirkwood Mountain
Resort, 1501 Kirkwood Meadows Dr. Call 209-258-6000.
MARCH 11
Girl Powder, Queen of the Park. Kirkwood Mountain Resort, 1501
Kirkwood Meadows Dr. Call 209-258-6000.
MARCH 11
Banked Slalom. Kirkwood Mountain Resort, 1501 Kirkwood
Meadows Dr. Call 209-258-6000.
MARCH 25
Women’s Camp at Sierra-at-Tahoe. A woman specifc camp
aimed at improving & building confdence, camaraderie, comfort as
well as reviewing women’s specifc equipment. Packages are avail-
able for coaching, lift ticket & rental.
MARCH 31
Billabong Flaunt it at Sierra-at-Tahoe. An all girls amateur
slopestyle and rail jam snowboard contest that is designed with fun
in mind and giving girls from all levels a change to “faunt it.” Cash
purse and prizes for the winners. Tis event is the season fnals after
six qualifers across North America. Competitors can pre-register at
http://www.billabong.com/fauntit/
... continued on next page
(530) 544-1112 • 1-800-247-4333
142 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
What to do South Shore
MARCH 31  APRIL 15, 2012
Springloaded, Heavenly’s spring festival, features live
entertainment, parades and on-mountain concerts the
whole family will love. Also included will be the return of the
ever-popular Dummy Gelande event where teams build and
launch home-made dummies for distance and style points.
Gunbarrel 25 Hosted by Glen Plake.
MARCH 31
Billabong presents Flaunt It Finals at Sierra-at-Tahoe Re-
sort, Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, 1111 Sierra-at-Tahoe Rd. Te all-
girls snowboard series makes a wrap at Sierra-at-Tahoe. Girls
will faunt their skills in a slopestyle and rail jam. To register
and for more information, visit www.billabong.com/fauntit/.
MARCH 31  APRIL 1
Twisted sisters. Kirkwood Mountain Resort, 1501 Kirkwood
Meadows Dr. Call 209-258-6000.
APRIL 7
Ski legend Glen Plake challenges Heavenly Mountain
Resort to ski or ride Gunbarrel, the infamous mogul run, 25
times! It’s a marathon not a sprint! Call 775-586-7000.
APRIL 8
9th Annual Telegrass Festival at Sierra-at-Tahoe. A day
devoted to telemark clinics, free equipment demos, telemark
races, exhibitions and live Bluegrass music.
APRIL 7
Ski Patrol Foundation Concert. Heavenly Mountain Resort
Ski Patrol throws a “thank you” party for the community with
drink specials, great food, raf e prizes and outdoor concerts!
Call 775-586-7000.
APRIL 8
Telegrass Festival at Sierra-at-Tahoe Snowsports Resort,
1111 Sierra-at-Tahoe Rd., Twin Bridges. Celebrate spring with
live Bluegrass music, telemark clinics and equipment demos
and beer tasting. Call 530-659-7453.
... from previous page
Ski legend Glen Plake challenges Heavenly Mountain Resort to ski or
ride Gunbarrel 25 times.
Cello player Dave Hubner performs with the Sweet Water String Band at a
previous Sierra-at-Tahoe Telegrass Festival.
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 143
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Call 530.559.1839 or visit our website
www.serendipityoga.org for more details
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APRIL 1415
Funky costumes are encouraged for this Heavenly Mountain Resort chilly tradition! Contestants
attempt to ski or board across a pond of water on the mountain top! Spectators enjoy the splashes and
mountain top music near Tamarack Lodge. Call 775-586-7000. T
Heavenly High Roller Team member Myles Hallen skims across a body of water on his snowboard with ease and style during the 2009 Pond Skimming contest on Heavenly
Mountain. Photo: Jonah M. Kessel
144 Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine
Altitude Salon & Spa 137
Alpine Mini Storage 49
Ann Nichols & Co. 97
Aramark Cruises - Tahoe Queen & M.S. Dixie 51
Austin’s Restaurant 107
Avalon Lodge 77
Barton Memorial Hospital 22
Barefoot Limo’s 141
Barifot/Baricolor 34
Backstreet Framers 85
Beacon Bar & Grill 3
Big Pines Mountain House 143
Bite 125
Blue Coyote 127
Bluestone Jewelry 35
Bowl Incline 127
Buckingham Properties 21
Burger Me 125
Burton Creek Veterinary Clinic 135
California State Parks 31
CalNeva Resort 133
Camp Richardson 3
Cedar House Sport Hotel 10
Chart House 17
China Wok 115
Chapel of the Bells 141
Chase International 61
Chase North Shore Ofces 89
Ciera Steakhouse - MontBleu (South) 2
Coldwell Banker Select Realty 11
Coldwell Banker Select Realty, Incline Village 75
CBs Pizza 105
Cork & More 111
Cottonwood Restaurant 111
Cobblestone Shopping Center 99
CZYZ’S Appliances 91
Crosby’s 105
Diamond Peak 65
Dickson Realty (North) 147
Edgewood Tahoe (South) 148
Elk Grove Subaru 55
Eskaton Village in Placerville 32
Flight Deck Restaurant & Bar 102
Fresh Ketch Restaurant 3
Gateway Urgent Care 25
Geared for Games 34
Glow 129
Granlibakken 31
Harrah’s & Harvey’s Lake Tahoe 47
Hartnett, Marynell 31
Heavenly Resort 5
Heavenly Valley Sports 67
Holiday Inn Express 45
Hunan Garden Restaurant 115
Incline Vacation Rentals 85
IVGID/Rec. Center 65
Jack Rabbit Moon 99
Jason’s Landing 107
Jax Diner 129
Jenay Aiksnora Yoga 57
Kirkwood Mountain Resort 71
Lakeshore Realty Stacy 6
Lakeside Inn & Casino 23
Lakeside Pizza 57
Lake Tahoe Night Transit 129
Lake Tahoe Specialty Stove & Fireplace 91
Lake Tahoe School 19
Lake Tahoe Digital Photo Institute 33
Lake Tahoe Educational Foundation 26
Lake Tahoe Snowmobiling 21
Lake Valley Properties 33
Lather & Fizz 131
Lauren’s Gardens 97
Law Ofce of Adam Spicer 45
Luigi’s Tahoe Pizzeria 113
MacDuf’s Pub 11
McKinney & Associates 38
Mountain Home Center (North) 2
Mountain Postal Pack & Ship 123
McKinney & Associates 43
McKinney & Associates, Te 3 Sisters 49
MontBleu Resort, Casino & Spa 103
Mt. Rose 73
Mountain Postal Pack & Ship 123
Mumbo’s Mountain Outftters 35
New & Used Tahoe Sports 38
Night Rider 91
Northstar at Tahoe 77
North Lake Dog Camp 27
North Lake Tahoe Express 129
North Lake Tahoe Historical Society 34
North Tahoe Business Association 53
North Tahoe Snow Festival 125
Obexer’s General Store 31
Of Te Hook 113
Opal Ultra Lounge - MontBleu 103
Overland Meat Seafood Deli 104
Pacifc Crest Heli Ski Guides 63
Pacifc Crest Restaurants 4
Paco’s Truckee River Bicycle 68
Paradise Timeshare 139
Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation 26
Pete N Peters 35
Plumpjack Cafe 79
Randi Jorgensen Wedding Planner 99
Mary Reimer, Realtor 27
Refections Spa at Harrah’s 47
Reno Gallery of Furniture 146
Resorts at Squaw Creek 81
Ritz Carlton (North) 148
Rookie’s Sports Bar 114
7800 Grill in Kirkwood 43
Sam’s Place 109
Sassafras 35
Scraps Dog Bakery 35
Scusa! Italian Restaurant 119
Sears Authorized Store in Truckee 53
Serendipity Yoga 143
Shoreline Sports 77
Sidestreet Boutique 9
Sierra At Tahoe 79
Sierra Mountain Sports - Snowmobiles 37
Sierra Verde Home Design Center 131
Smokey’s Kitchen & Catering 117
Sorensen’s Resort 37
Soule Domain 115
South Tahoe Parks & Recreation 137
South Lake Tahoe Ice Arena 135
Sowing Basil Flooring & Window Design 123
Squaw Valley Sports 80
Squaw Valley USA 7
Suddenlink Comm 25
Sugar Bowl 83
Sweet Pea Florist 129
T’s Mesquite Rotisserie 107
Taco Bell 115
Tahoe.com 98
Tahoe City Downtown Association 34
Tahoe Sports & Entertainment 131
Tahoe Sport Fishing Co. 37
Tahoe Tastes - South Lake Dining Guide 120
Tahoe Real Estate Group 31
Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area 68
Tahoe Dave’s Skis & Boards 79
Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center 57
Tahoe Donner Resort 84
Tahoe Forest Hospital 29
Tahoe Gateway Realty Inc. 41
Tahoma Lodge 31
Taqueria La Mexicana 95
Te Treat Box 102
Te Treehouse 75
TNT TMA 91 & 129
Tomaato’s Pizza, Pasta, Salads 115
Truckee Donner Lodge 45
Truckee Pizza 117
Vacation Resorts International 83
Vacation Station 133
Village Center (South) 147
Viva Tahoe Spanish Kids Camp 26
West Shore Association 31
West Shore Sports 31
Advertisers Directory
Winter 2011/2012 TAHOE magazine 145
W
hen I moved to the Lake Tahoe Basin
four years ago, I really didn’t know
what to expect. Growing up in mid-
Michigan, I know all about snow and
cold. I know about below-zero wind chills, lake efect
snowstorms and snowdrift-covered, icy roadways. I’m used
to that, so I knew what and what not to do once this basin
got covered in the white stuf (although I must say, I never
had to use chains or snow tires before, so seeing those
signs in July was kind of interesting).
No, the environment and climate didn’t make me
wonder.
What I was unsure of during my 2,000-mile drive on
Interstate 80 from Chicago to Reno was what the culture
is like here in the basin. How diferent are people near
the West Coast than the people I grew up around in the
Midwest? What are the diferent lifestyles out here, in this
place so foreign from where I lived my youth?
While there is a myriad of diferent people out here,
from American to foreign, rich to poor, ambitious to
lackadaisical, Realtors to snowboard enthusiasts (and
some Realtors who ARE snowboard enthusiasts), there’s
one group of people I constantly fnd myself sitting back
and marveling about.
Tey’re called “bro-bras.”
Your typical “bro-bra” is male, around 21 to 30 years
old or so, has long hair, is poor and can’t spend longer
than an hour without mentioning something about a new
snowboard video premiere this weekend, the new bindings
he is putting on his board or an update about how close the
snow is to “dumping” all over the basin.
Te best part about “bro-bras” is their linguistic skills.
It’s as if somewhere
between puberty
and the frst hint of
snow each winter
they received
an invigorating
jolt to their voice
boxes, making
everything they
say mandatorily
accompanied by
extended vowel
sounds, while at the same time rising steadily in pitch with
each uttered word.
Tese are words I’ve never heard before until moving
here, words I had always heard of but fgured were just a
myth.
Here’s an example of a pretty common exchange
between bro-bras:
Bro-bra A: “You should check out this killer rail I found
today bro-o-o.”
Bro-bra B: “No way bro-o-o? Is it hella-sweet bra-a-a?”
Bro-bra A: “Yeah bro-o-o. I was super stoked when I hit
it duuude. I mean, it was hella-sketchy the way I landed,
bra-a-a, but it was sooo rad, duuude bro-o-o.”
Bro-bra B: “No way bra-a-a? Tat’s so steezy, duuude.”
Confused? Here’s a quick translation. “Killer” has
nothing to do with dying. It generally means “cool” or
“awesome.”
“Hella” is a unique adjective “bro-bras” use to further
emphasize their interest in something. It generally means
“more” or “really,” and has nothing to do with fames or
persecution. By the way, those of you from the Boston area
may confuse this term with “wicked.”
“Stoked” is a bit more common, as it’s used universally
in extreme sports.
It essentially means “excited.”
“Sketchy” refers to an “awkward” or “not fuid” landing.
Again, nothing to do with drawing.
And fnally, “steezy.” Tis is a portmanteau generally
combining the words “style” and “ease.”
Sick.
Anyhow, these “bro-bras” are quite the phenomenon,
as most somehow will manage to do nothing but party and
snowboard each winter, while unemployed or just working
at the resort they ride at, and have an absolute great
time at life doing it.
I give this rare species loads of credit for doing
what they love and having a great time doing it,
while at the same time having absolutely zero
responsibilities. It truly is an amazing feat.
And despite my general dislike for the snow or the
cold, the prospect of mingling with these people and
their language each winter is pretty intriguing — I
actually look forward to it.
Now, if I only had a dictionary... T
Kevin MacMillan is co-editor of Tahoe Magazine.
By Kevin MacMillan
Tahoe Magazine
New to Tahoe? Here’s some help with the lingo...
... these “bro-bras”
are quite the
phenomenon, as most
somehow will manage
to do nothing but
party and snowboard
each winter...
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