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VERBAL ANALOGIES

Write the word or prefix that best completes each analogy. For example, in the analogy MAN : WOMAN :: ANDRO- : ?, the best answer would be GYNO-. 1. STRIP : MBIUS :: BOTTLE : ? 2. THOUGHT : ACTION :: OBSESSIVE : ? 3. LACKING MONEY : PENURIOUS :: DOTING ON ONE'S WIFE : ? 4. MICE : MEN :: CABBAGES : ? 5. TIRE : RETREAD :: PARCHMENT : ? 6. ALL IS ONE : MONISM :: ALL IS SELF : ? 7. SWORD : DAMOCLES :: BED : ? 8. THING : DANGEROUS :: SPRING : ? 9. HOLLOW VICTORY : PYRRHIC :: HOLLOW VILLAGE : ? 10. PILLAR : OBELISK :: MONSTER : ? 11. 4 : HAND :: 9 : ? 12. GOLD : MALLEABLE :: CHALK : ? 13. EASY JOB : SINECURE :: GUIDING LIGHT : ? 14. LEG : AMBULATE :: ARM : ? 15. MOSQUITO : MALARIA :: CANNIBALISM : ? 16. HEAR : SEE :: TEMPORAL : ? 17. ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS : ASTROPHYSICS :: HISTORY AND STATISTICS : ? 18. JEKYLL : HYDE :: ELOI : ? 19. UNIVERSE : COSMO- :: UNIVERSAL LAWS : ? 20. SET OF SETS NOT MEMBERS OF THEMSELVES : RUSSELL :: DARKNESS OF THE NIGHT SKY IN AN INFINITE UNIVERSE : ? 21. TEACHING : UPLIFTING :: PEDAGOGIC : ? 22. LANGUAGE GAMES : LUDWIG :: PIANO CONCERTI FOR THE LEFT HAND : ? 23. IDOLS : TWILIGHT :: MORALS : ? 24. SWEETNESS : SUFFIX :: BOATSWAIN : ?

SPATIAL PROBLEMS

The design to the right is made up of three squares of different sizes, lying one on top of another. What is the minimum number of squares that would be sufficient to create each of the following patterns?

25.

[cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 2]

26.

27.

28. If each side of a tetrahedron is an equilateral triangle painted white or black, five distinct patterns are possible: all sides white, all black, just one side white, just one black, and two sides white and two black. If each side of an octahedron is a white or black equilateral triangle, how many distinct patterns are possible? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 7] Suppose 27 identical cubes are glued together to form a cubical stack as illustrated to the right. If one of the small cubes is omitted, four distinct shapes are possible; one in which the omitted cube is at a corner of the stack, one in which it is at the 29. middle of an edge of the stack, one in which it is at the middle of a side of the stack, and one in which it is at the core of the stack. If two of the small cubes are omitted rather than just one, how many distinct shapes are possible? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 19]

Suppose a diagonal is drawn across each side of a cube from one corner to the other (see illustration to the right). How many distinct patterns are 30. possible, considering all possible orientations of the diagonals, including all six sides of the cube in each pattern? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 29]

SLICE AND DICE


31. A perfectly spherical onion is sliced by six perfectly straight knife strokes; the pieces thereby formed never having been moved from their original positions. What is the maximum number of pieces into which the infinitesimally thin outer skin of the onion can thus be divided? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 10] A tetrahedral lump of clay is sliced by six perfectly straight cuts, the pieces never moving from their original positions. What is the maximum number 32. of tetrahedral pieces that can thus be formed, counting only pieces that are not further subdivided? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 11]

Consider the torus, a doughnut-shaped solid that is perfectly circular at each perpendicular cross section, and a Mbius strip, which has a single 180-degree twist and a uniform curvature throughout its length. Suppose a torus is sliced three times by a knife that each time precisely follows the path of such a Mbius strip. What is 33. the maximum number of pieces that can result if the pieces are never moved from their original positions? Note: Each of the Mbius strips is entirely confined to the interior of the torus. [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 13]

INTERPENETRATIONS

Three interpenetrating circles yield a maximum of seven pieces, not counting pieces that are further subdivided, as shown to the right. What is the 34. maximum number of pieces, not further subdivided, that can be formed when three circles and two triangles all interpenetrate? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 4] 35. Suppose two right circular cones and one right circular cylinder mutually interpenetrate, with the base of each cone and both bases (i.e., both ends) of the cylinder sealed by precisely fitting flat circular surfaces. What is the maximum number of pieces (i.e., completely bounded volumes) that can thus be formed, considering only the surfaces of these three figures as boundaries and counting only pieces that are not further subdivided? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 27] 36. If a cube and a tetrahedron interpenetrate, what is the maximum possible number of solid pieces (i.e., completely bounded volumes not further subdivided)? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 25]

PROBABILITIES
37. Suppose you are truthfully told that ten marbles were inserted into a box, all of them identical except that their colors were determined by the toss of an unbiased coin. When heads came up, a white marble was inserted, and when tails came up, a black one. You reach into the box, draw out a marble, inspect its color, then return it to the box. You shake the box to mix the marbles randomly, and then reach in and again select a marble at random. If you inspect ten marbles in succession in this manner and all turn out to be white, what is the probability to the nearest whole percent that all ten marbles in the box are white? [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 31] Suppose there is an ant at each vertex of a triangle and the three ants simultaneously crawl along a side to the next vertex. The probability that no two ants will encounter one another is 2/8, since the only two cases in which no encounter occurs are when the ants all go left (clockwise) -- LLL -- or all go right (counterclockwise) -- RRR. In the six other cases -- RRL, RLR, RLL, LLR, LRL, and LRR -- there will be an encounter. For the following five problems, imagine there is an ant at each vertex and that the ants all simultaneously crawl along an edge to the next vertex, each ant choosing its path randomly. What is the probability that no ant will encounter another, either en route or at the next vertex, for each of the following regular polyhedrons? (Express your answer as a reduced fraction; e.g., 2/8 = 1/4.) 38. A tetrahedron [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 21] 39. A cube [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 22] 40. An octahedron [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 23]

41.

A dodecahedron (illustrated to the right) [cf. Hoeflin Power Test, problem 24]

42. An icosahedron (illustrated to the right)

NUMBER SEQUENCES
Determine the value of ___ in each of the following sequences. For example, in the sequence 1 4 9 16 25 ___ 49 64, the value of ___ is 36. 43. 4/10 ___/100 168/1,000 1,229/10,000 9,592/100,000 78,498/1,000,000 44. 1 4 17 54 145 368 945 ___ 45. 0 6 21 40 5 -504 ___ 46. 2 15 1,001 215,441 ___ 47. 7 8 5 3 9 8 1 6 3 ___ 48. This concludes the test.