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COURSE SPECIFICATIONS Bachelor of Science in Ceramics Engineering I. TECHNICAL COURSES

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A. MATHEMATICS Course Name COLLEGE ALGEBRA Algebraic expressions and equations; solution sets of algebraic equations in one variable: linear, quadratic, polynomial of degree n, fractional, radical equations, quadratic in form, exponential and logarithmic equations; decomposition of fractions into partial fractions; solution sets of systems of linear equations involving up to three variables. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture None After completing this course, the student must be able to: 1. Operate and simplify algebraic expressions; 2. Determine the solution sets of all types of algebraic equations, exponential and logarithmic equations; and inequalities; 3. Use the manipulative and analytical skills acquired in Objectives 1 to 2 to solve word problems; and 4. Identify the domain and range of a given relation/function. 1. The Set of Real Numbers 1.1. Integer Exponents 1.2. Polynomials, Operations, Special Products 1.3. Binomial Expansion (Binomial Theorem) 1.4. Factoring Polynomials 2. Rational Expressions 2.1. Rules of Exponents; Simplification of Rational Expressions; Operations on Rational Expressions 2.2. Properties of Radicals; Simplification of Radicals 2.3. Operations on Radicals 2.4. Complex Numbers 3. Equations in One Variable 3.1. Linear Equations; Literal Equations 3.2. Quadratic Equations in One Variable 3.3. Word Problems 3.4. Other Equations in One Variable: Radical, Fractional, Quadratic in Form 3.5. Polynomial Equation of Degree n 4. Functions 4.1. Inverse Functions 4.2. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions 4.3. Exponential and Logarithmic Equations 5. Systems of Linear Equations (by Elimination Methods) 6. Decomposition of Rational Expressions into Partial Fractions None

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Dugopolski, Mark. College Algebra, 3rd ed. Addison-Wesley, 2002. Leithold, Louis. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Massachusetts: AddisonWesley, 1989. Mijares, Catalina. College Algebra. Swokowski, Earl W. and Jeffrey A. Cole. Algebra and Trigonometry with Analytic Geometry, 10th ed. Brooks/Cole Publishing Co., 2001.

Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisites

ADVANCED ALGEBRA Matrices and determinants; arithmetic and geometric series; solution sets of different types of inequalities and systems involving quadratics; solution of linear equations using determinants and matrices. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture College Algebra After completing this course, the student must be able to: 1. Determine the solution sets of inequalities; 2. Determine the solution sets of systems involving quadratics; 3. Use the manipulative and analytical skills acquired in Objective 2 to solve word problems; 4. Operate and manipulate matrices and determinants; 5. Solve systems of linear equations using matrices and determinants; and 6. Determine the indicated sum of the elements in an arithmetic and geometric sequence. 1. Inequalities 1.1. Linear, Quadratic, and Polynomial Inequality 1.2. Linear Inequalities with Absolute Value 2. Ratio, Proportion, and Variation 3. Determinants 3.1. Expansion by Minors 3.2. Solution of Linear Systems by Cramer’s Rule 4. Matrices 4.1. Identity Matrix 4.2. Cofactor Matrix 4.3. Transpose of a Matrix 4.4. Adjoint Matrix 4.5. Inverse of a Matrix 4.6. Algebra on Matrices (Sum and Difference, Scalar Multiplication, Matrix Multiplication) 4.7. Solution of Linear Systems Using Matrices 5. Sequence and Series 5.1. Arithmetic and Geometric Means 5.2. Arithmetic and Geometric Sequences 5.3. Arithmetic and Geometric Series 5.4. Infinite Series 6. Combinatorial Mathematics 6.1. Sequences 6.2. The Factorial of a Number 6.3. Fundamental Principles of Counting, Permutation, and Combination 6.4. Binomial Theorem 6.5. Mathematical Induction None

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Dugopolski, Mark. College Algebra, 3rd ed. Addison-Wesley, 2002. Leithold, Louis. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Massachusetts: AddisonWesley, 1989. Swokowski, Earl W. and Jeffrey A. Cole. Algebra and Trigonometry with Analytic Geometry, 10th ed. Brooks/Cole Publishing Co., 2001.

Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite

PLANE AND SPHERICAL TRIGONOMETRY Trigonometric functions; identities and equations; solutions of triangles; law of sines; law of cosines; inverse trigonometric functions; spherical trigonometry 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture None After completing this course, the student must be able to: 1. Define angles and how they are measured; 2. Define and evaluate each of the six trigonometric functions; 3. Prove trigonometric functions; 4. Define and evaluate inverse trigonometric functions; 5. Solve trigonometric equations; 6. Solve problems involving right triangles using trigonometric function definitions for acute angles; and 7. Solve problems involving oblique triangles by the use of the sine and cosine laws. 1. Trigonometric Functions 1.1. Angles and Measurement 1.2. Trigonometric Functions of Angles 1.3. Trigonometric Function Values 1.4. The Sine and Cosine of Real Numbers 1.5. Graphs of the Sine and Cosine and Other Sine Waves 1.6. Solutions of Right Triangle 2. Analytic Trigonometry 2.1. The Eight Fundamental Identities 2.2. Proving Trigonometric Identities 2.3. Sum and Difference Identities 2.4. Double-Measure and Half-Measure Identities 2.5. Inverse Trigonometric Functions 2.6. Trigonometric Equations 2.7. Identities for the Product, Sum, and Difference of Sine and Cosine 3. Application of Trigonometry 3.1. The Law of Sines 3.2. The Law of Cosines 4. Spherical Trigonometry 4.1. Fundamental Formulas 4.2. Spherical Triangles None Dilley, et al. Algebra 2 with Trigonometry. D.C. Heath & Co., 1990. Leithold, Louis. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Addison-Wesley, 1992. Sobel, Max A. and Norbert Lerner. Algebra and Trigonometry, 4th ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Inc., 1995.

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Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisites ANALYTIC GEOMETRY Equations of lines and conic sections; curve tracing in both rectangular and polar coordinates in two-dimensional space. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture College Algebra Plane and Spherical Trigonometry After completing this course, the student must be able to: 1. Set up equations given enough properties of lines and conics; 2. Draw the graph of the given equation of the line and the equation of the conic section; and 3. Analyze and trace completely the curve, given their equations in both rectangular and polar coordinates, in two-dimensional space. 1. Plane Analytic Geometry 1.1. The Cartesian Planes 1.2. Distance Formula 1.3. Point-of-Division Formulas 1.4. Inclination and Slope 1.5. Parallel and Perpendicular Lines 1.6. Angle from One Line to Another 1.7. An Equation of a Locus 2. The Line 2.1. Point-Slope and Two-Point Forms 2.2. Slope-Intercept and Intercept Forms 2.3. Distance from a Point to a Line 2.4. Normal Form 3. The Circle 3.1. The Standard Form for an Equation of a Circle 3.2. Conditions to Determine a Circle 4. Conic Sections 4.1. Introduction 4.2. The Parabola 4.3. The Ellipse 4.4. The Hyperbola 5. Transformation of Coordinates 5.1. Translation of Conic Sections 6. Curve Sketching 6.1. Symmetry and Intercepts 6.2. Sketching Polynomial Equations 6.3. Asymptotes (Except Slant Asymptotes) 6.4. Sketching Rational Functions 7. Polar Coordinates 7.1. Polar Coordinates 7.2. Graphs in Polar Coordinates 7.3. Relationships Between Rectangular and Polar Coordinates None

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Fuller, Gordon and Dalton Tarwater. Analytic Geometry, 7th ed. AddisonWesley, 1993. Protter, Murray H. and Philip E. Protter. Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 4th ed. Quirino and Mijares. Plane and Analytic Geometry, 2nd ed. Riddle, Douglas F. Analytic Geometry, 6th ed. Swokowski, Earl W. and Jeffrey A. Cole. Algebra and Trigonometry with Analytic Geometry, 10th ed. Brooks/Cole Publishing Co., 2001.

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SOLID MENSURATION Concept of lines and planes; Cavalieri’s and Volume theorems; formulas for areas of plane figures, volumes for solids; volumes and surfaces areas for spheres, pyramids, and cones; zone, sector and segment of a sphere; theorems of Pappus. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture College Algebra, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry After completing this course, the student must be able to: 1. Compute for the area of plane figures; 2. Compute for the surface areas and volumes of different types of solids; and 3. Determine the volumes and surface areas of solids using other methods such as the theorems of Pappus. 1. Plane Figures 1.1. Mensuration of Plane Figures 2. Lines and Planes in Space 2.1. Typical Proofs of Solid Geometry 2.2. Angles 3. Solids for which V = Bh 3.1. Solid Sections 3.2. Cubes 3.3. Rectangular Parallelopiped 3.4. Cavalieri’s Theorem 3.5. Volume Theorem 3.6. Prism 3.7. Cylindrical Surface 3.8. Cylinder (Circular and Right Circular) 4. Solids for which V = Bh 4.1. Pyramids 4.2. Similar Figures 4.3. Cones 4.4. Frustum of Regular Pyramid 4.5. Frustum of Right Circular Cone 5. Sphere 5.1. Surface Area and Volume 5.2. Zone 5.3. Segment 5.4. Sector 6. Theorems of Pappus None

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Notion of the Derivative 4. Definition of Slope as the Derivative of a Function 5. The Slope 5. differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions involving one or more variables. Inc.2. Determination of the Slope of a Curve at a Given Point 6. and approximation. 4 units lecture 4 hours lecture Advanced Algebra Analytic Geometry Solid Mensuration After completing this course. Differentiation Rules 5. Definition 2. Willis F.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Suggested Reference Course Name Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Kern. Domain and Range of a Function 1. Definitions 1. Graph of a Function 1. and approximations.4. partial differentiation and transcendental curve tracing.10. Have a working knowledge of the basic concepts of functions and limits.11.2.3.6. applications of differential calculus to problems on optimization.3.3.8. 3. Functional Notation 1. Functions 1.1. Unbounded Functions 4.1. One-Sided Limits 3. Evaluation of a Function 1.5. rates of change. related rates. Operations with Limits 3. Continuity 2. Limits 3.1.2. related rates.7. tangents and normals.5. Solid Mensuration. continuity and differentiability of functions. Differentiate algebraic and transcendental functions with ease.1. 2nd ed. 2. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Basic concepts of calculus such as limits. Special Function Types 1.1. Notion of a Limit 3. Rate of Change 6. the student must be able to: 1.2. Properties of Limits 3. Evaluation of Limits 3.4.6.2. New York: John Wiley & Sons. One-Valued and Many-Valued Functions 1. and 4. The Derivative 4. Definition 4. Bland.7. Properties of Continuous Functions 3.1.4.9. and James R. Functions as Mathematical Models 2. Determination of the Derivative by Increments 4. 1. Classification of Functions 1. Odd and Even Functions 1. Apply the concept of differentiation in solving word problems involving optimization. Combinations of Functions 1. Average Rate of Change Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 6 . Definition 3. Analyze and trace transcendental curves.

1. Graphs of Inverse Trigonometric Functions 15.3. 14. 1987 Ellis. Larry J. 1993. 2nd ed.1. Howard. Tangents and Normal to Curves 10.6. 9. Applications Derivatives of Logarithmic and Exponential Functions 16. Newton’s Method of Approximation 18. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 1990.5..C. Elementary Properties 14.2.1. D. Concavity and the Second Derivative Test 10. Dennis D.2.3. Heath & Co. Goldstein. Harsbarger. Reynolds.3. Multivariable Calculus. Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 11. Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 7 .4. Applications of the Differential—Comparison of ∆x and dx 13.1. Definition 16. Definition 15. Prentice Hall.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents 7. Elementary Properties 17. Robert and Benny Gulick. Sketching Polynomial Curves Applications of the Derivative: Optimization Problems Applications of the Derivative: Related Rates The Differential 13. and Richard D. Ronald J.2.2. 10. Mathematics with Calculus.4. 16. Graphs of Trigonometric Functions 14. Stanley J. Elementary Properties 15. 1990. Error Propagation 13. Porter.4.. David C. Applications Derivatives of Hyperbolic Functions 17. Points of Inflection 10. Graphs of Hyperbolic Functions 17. Calculus with Analytic Geometry. Lay and David I. 8. Berkey.2. Applications Derivatives of Inverse Trigonometric Functions 15.4.3.2. Inc. 15.3.. 6th ed. Newton-Raphson Law Transcendental Curve Tracing 19. Saunders College Publishing. Inc. 12.4.1. McGraw-Hill Publishing. Definition 13. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Logarithmic and Exponential Functions Parametric Equations Partial Differentiation None Anton. Calculus for Management and Social Sciences. Heath & Co.. Approximate Formulas Derivatives of Trigonometric Functions 14. Generalities About Straight Lines 10. 17. Margaret B. Graphs of Logarithmic and Exponential Functions 16. Elementary Properties 16.1. Applications Solution of Equations 18. 4th ed. Calculus and Its Application.C.3. Schneider.1. 1990 Cozzens. Definition 14. Laboratory Equipment 6. 20. Farlow.2. 21. Instantaneous Rate of Change The Chain Rule and the General Power Rule Implicit Differentiation Higher-Order Derivatives Polynomial Curves 10. Calculus and Its Application. 1990. and James J.1. 13. 18. Extrema and the First Derivative Test 10. Calculus with Applications. Definition 17. 1992. 19.2. D.4..

1987. and 4. and force. Calculus with Analytic Geometry. Heath & Co.3. Calculus. Integration Concept / Formulas 1. volumes of revolution. Trigonometric Substitution 2. 1989. Simple Power Formula 1..Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Hoffman. General Power Formula 1. Coughlin. 1988. Integration Techniques 2. Leithold. Improper Integrals 3. Zill. fundamental formulas and various techniques of integration applied to both single variable and multi-variable functions. and Bruce H.7. Rationalizing Substitution 3. David E. and Raymond F.2. Louis.9. 3.6. Wadsworth Publishing Co. Addison-Wesley. 4th ed. Roland E. 5th ed. Finite Mathematics and Calculus with Application. Calculus for Business. Swokowski. Inverse Trigonometric Functions 1. Earl W. Margaret L. Leonard L. volumes. Exponential Function 1. 3rd ed.1. Plane Area Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 8 . Simple Trigonometric Functions 1.2. Logarithmic Function 1. Foresman and Company. Rational Functions 2.2. Integration by Parts 2. D. tracing of functions of two variables. Correctly apply the concept of integration in solving problems involving evaluation of areas. 1987. 1988. A Primer for Calculus.C. Economics and the Social and Life Sciences. Sketch 3-dimensional regions bounded by several surfaces..5. Trigonometric Integrals 2. the student must be able to: 1. and Charles D. Evaluate volumes of 3-dimensional regions bounded by two or more surfaces through the use of the double or triple integral. Course Name INTEGRAL CALCULUS Concept of integration and its application to physical problems such as evaluation of areas. Laurence D. Sanders College Publishing. 3rd ed. Murray H.10. Properly carry out integration through the use of the fundamental formulas and/or the various techniques of integration for both single and multiple integrals. Dennis G. PWS-Kent Publishing.4. 2001. Finite Mathematics with Calculus. Miller. Anti-Differentiation 1. Constant of Integration 1. Application 3. Calculus with Analytic Geometry. 2. 1991. 4 units lecture 4 hours lecture Differential Calculus After completing this course.3. Holder. work. Larson. Lial. 1989. 7th ed.4. Hyperbolic Functions 1. McGraw-Hill Book Co..8. Zitarelli.1. 1989. PWS-Kent Publishing. and work. 1. Finite Mathematics with Calculus: An Applied Approach.5. Protter. James & Barlett. Scott. The Calculus. Definite Integral 2. force. Edwards.1.

3. Variable Separable 2. 1992. 1st Degree D.1. Calculus for Management and Social Sciences.2. Goldstein. and linear differential equations of order n. Surfaces Multiple Integral as Volume 5.5. Calculus with Analytic Geometry. Cylinders 5. Farlow. Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite Course Objectives DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Differentiation and integration in solving first order.1. Multiple Integral as Volume 6. 1987. 7th ed. D. and Richard D. and 2. Calculus and Its Application. The Calculus. Howard. Surface Tracing: Planes 5. Saunders College Publishing. Calculus with Applications.1.. 1. (General and Particular) 2. Berkey.2. Larry J. Ronald J. Stanley J. Definitions 1. Solution of a D. Porter. Apply differential equations to selected engineering problems. Multivariable Calculus. Solve the different types of differential equations. Homogeneous Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 9 . Areas Between Curves 4. / Linearity 1.1.E.2.2. Hoffman. the student must be able to: 1. Laurence D. Order Degree of a D. Robert and Benny Gulick. Heath & Co. Inc. Schneider. 1993.2. Laplace transforms in solving differential equations. 2nd ed. 1990. New York: John Wiley & Sons.4. 2001. Cozzens. Reynolds. David C. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.3. Work 4.E. Hydrostatics Pressure and Force 5.) 1. Dennis D. 1989. 2.. Calculus and Its Application. Mathematics with Calculus. 3rd ed.6. Definition and Classifications of Differential Equations (D. Other Applications 4. Prentice Hall.. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Integral Calculus After completing this course. Triple Integrals None Anton. Addison-Wesley.E. Lay and David I. Solution of Some 1st Order. Leithold. Volumes 4.C. Double Integrals 6. Margaret B. 1990. 4th ed.C.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 3. 1990. McGraw-Hill Publishing. first-degree differential equations. Calculus for Business. Louis. McGraw-Hill Book Co.1. Triple Integrals 6. Heath & Co. Inc. 6th ed.3. Ellis.E.. Spheres 5. Quadratic Surfaces 5.. Economics and the Social and Life Sciences.. D. and James J.3. Double Integrals 5. Harsbarger. 1990.

1.E. mode.1. 6. Feliciano and Uy. 1999. 2. 3. Discuss competently the following concepts: 2. Textual Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 10 . Normal distribution 2. Basic Concepts 1. Differential Operators 4.4. General Solution 5.5. Decomposition / Growth 3. Presentation of Data 3.1. normal curves and applications. Steps in Conducting a Statistical Inquiry 3. Exact 2. Inferential statistics 3. Frequency distribution 2. National Book Store.2.2.4.E. 1991.E. median. Bernoulli’s Equation Applications of 1st Order D. Newton’s Law of Cooling 3. application to engineering problems. Apply accurately statistical knowledge in solving specific engineering problem situations. regression analysis and correlation.2. Define relevant statistical terms. Mixing (Non-Reacting Fluids) 3.E.4. Dela Fuente.3. Suggested References Course Name PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Basic principles of statistics. Auxiliary Equation Non-Homogeneous D. presentation and analysis of data.1. 2.1.1.3. Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 4. deviations. National Book Store. Importance of Statistics 2.2. averages.5. the student must be able to: 1.6.4. Standard Form of a Linear D.E. Electric Circuits Linear D.3. with Constant-Coefficients 6. Elementary Differential Equations. 4. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture College Algebra After completing this course. Definition of Statistical Terms 1. Linear Independence of a Set of Functions 4. of Order n 4. Form of the General Solution 6.2. Solution by Method of Undetermined Coefficients 6. Probability distribution 2. 5. Measures of central tendency 2. Homogeneous Linear D.2. Linear 2.3.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents 3. Equations Linear in a Function 2. Differential Operator Form of a Linear D. Solution by Variation of Parameters Laboratory Equipment None Asin.E. 1. Ricardo C.1.3. Elementary Differential Equations. with Constant Coefficients 5. probability distributions.

4. Range 6. 2. 4. Normal Distributions Inferential Statistics 8. mass relationships in chemical reactions.2. Classify matter. 1982. Coefficient of Variation Probability Distributions 7. Suggested References B.2.5. and solids. Saunders College Publishing. quantum theory and electronic behavior.4. Goodness-of-Fit Test Analysis of Variance Regression and Correlation None Sellers. Ronald E.3.1. 5. Apply significant figures and appropriate units in all measurements and calculations. Mean 5. and Proportion 8..1. 4 units: 3 units lecture. 3 hours laboratory None After completing this course.4. Probability 7. 3. NATURAL/PHYSICAL SCIENCES Course Name GENERAL CHEMISTRY Basic concepts of matter and its classification.3. and Stephen A. Tabular 3. Variation. et al. Elementary Statistics. 2002. and solutions. average atomic mass. molar mass and perform calculations involving these.1. Mean Absolute Deviation 6. Prentice Hall. mole. Graphical Sampling Techniques Measures of Central Tendency 5. 7. the student must be able to: 1. Counting Techniques 7. Gene R.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents 4.3..3. Skewness and Kurtosis Measures of Variation 6. liquids. Define and explain the concepts of atomic mass. 7th ed.3. Standard Deviation 6. Walpole. concepts of thermochemistry. Median 5.2. Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 6. Vardeman. Mathematical Expectations 7.4. periodic relationship of elements in the periodic table. 2nd ed. Laboratory Equipment 3.1.5.2. Contingency Tables 8.2. Mode 5. properties of gases. Test of Hypothesis 8. 9. Inc. Variance 6. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists. distinguish between physical and chemical properties/changes. intramolecular forces. Test Concerning Means. 1 unit laboratory 6 hours: 3 hours lecture. Test of Independence 8. 8. 10. Balance and interpret chemical equations and perform stoichiometric Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite Course Objectives Course Specification BSCerE 11 .

Introduction to Chemistry 1.8. Distinguish different types of solutions.7. discuss the Bohr model.5. Atoms. and Chemical Properties 1. Introduction to Thermodynamics 5. Deviation from Ideal Behavior 5. Quantum Theory and the Electronic Structure of Atoms 6.3. 14. Molar Mass of an Element and Avogadro’s Number 3.4.3. Mass Relationships in Chemical Reaction 3. Distinguish between crystalline and amorphous solids 15.4. States. contrast the Bohr’s orbits with orbitals in the quantum theory. The Gas Laws 4. hybrid orbitals. Chemical Formulas 2. Naming Compounds 3.1. The Periodic Table 2. Define enthalpy. The Study of Change 1.6. Chemical Reactions and Chemical Equations 3. Physical. Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure 4. The Dual Nature of the Electron Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 12 . Understand the effect of temperature and pressure on solubility.and intramolecular forces.7.2. Substances That Exist as Gases 4. and explain the line spectra of hydrogen.6. Distinguish between inter. 10.7. Trace the various atomic theories. Gas Stoichiometry 4. argue the differences between ideal and non-ideal gas behavior. Atomic Number.1. The Ideal Gas Equation 4. Explain valence bond theory.2. 6.1. Energy Changes in Chemical Reactions 5.4. The Atomic Theory 2. Discuss various physical changes and interpret phase diagrams. Isotopes 2. Matter: Classification.3.3. Thermochemistry 5.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages calculations. 7.3.2. Gases 4.1. 8. 16. and 17.2. Pressure of a Gas 4. Atomic Mass 3. Limiting Reagents 3. and hybridization in common compounds 13. explain and apply the gas laws. Use the periodic table to classify elements and predict trends in properties. Write electron configurations and orbital diagrams for multi electron atoms.6. Discuss the kinetic molecular theory (KMT) of gases and use the KMT to qualitatively explain the gas laws. Enthalpy 6.1.5. 11.2. 12. Molecular Mass 3. Explain and apply colligative properties to determine molar mass. Molecules.1.3. Molecules and Ions 2. 5. Measurement and Handling of Numbers 2. Mass Number.8. give examples of intramolecular forces and how they relate to physical properties. Discuss the concept of electron density. work with different concentration units. and Ions 2. Write Lewis dot symbols and Lewis structure. Reaction Yield 4. From Classical Physics to Quantum Theory 6. classify common processes as exothermic or endothermic and know the sign conventions. The Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases 4. 9. The Structure of the Atom 2. Bohr’s Theory of the Hydrogen Atom 6. Percent Composition of Compounds 3. 1. Write. Amounts of Reactants and Products 3.5.2.

Crystalline vs.5. 2004. Electron Configuration 6... Phase Diagrams Physical Properties of Solutions 11.5. 9th ed.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents 7. Amorphous Solids 10.2.4. Silberberg.4.8.4. 5th ed. kinematics. and power. Hurley.2. and oscillation. Molecular Geometry 9.3. Chemistry. dynamics. Ionization Energy 7. New York: McGraw Hill.6. Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 8. Writing Lewis Structure 8. 9.2. 2003.3. James E. Chemistry: Principles and Reactions. Canada: Thomson Brooks/Cole. 4 units: 3 units lecture. The Ionic Bond 8. energy. The Covalent Bond 8. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. 10. 2006.2. Types of Solutions 11. Periodic Variation in Physical Properties 7.1.).4. Martin S. and Cecile N. Colligative Properties Laboratory Equipment Chemistry Laboratory(see attached) Chang. rotation. Intermolecular Forces 10.6. 6. The Concept of Resonance 8. Bond Energy Chemical Bonding: Molecular Geometry and Hybridization 9. Theodore L.2. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solubility 11. 2005. 1 unit laboratory Course Specification BSCerE 13 .3.7. 5th ed. (International Ed. et al. Periodic Classification of the Elements 7.1. (International Ed.1.4. dynamics of rotation.). 3rd ed. The KMT of Liquids and Solids 10. New Jersey: 2003. The Valence Bond Theory 9.7. Atomic Orbitals 6. Concentration Units 11. Masterton. Electron Affinity Chemical Bonding: Basic Concepts 8. Hybridization in Molecules Containing Double and Triple Bonds Intermolecular Forces in Liquids and Solids 10. Inc. Properties of Liquids 10. 11. Chemistry: Matter and Its Changes. Eubanks. and Fred Senese. Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals 9. Boston: McGraw Hill. impulse and momentum.5. 4th ed. William L.3. Raymond. et al. A Molecular View of the Solution Process 11. Brady.4.1.5. Electronegativity 8. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change. Chemistry: The Central Science. New York: McGraw Hill. 2004. Quantum Numbers 6.6. Chemistry in Context. 8th ed. Dipole Moments 9.5.1. Quantum Mechanics 6. Brown. elasticity. Lucy P. work. The Building-Up Principle Periodic Relationships Among the Elements 7...3. Suggested References Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory PHYSICS 1 Vectors. Lewis Dot Structure 8. Phase Changes 10.

1. Definition of Work.1. Determine the resultant of concurrent vectors. Definition of torque 9.2.2. Conservation of Energy 8. 7. Energy and Power 7.2. Center of Gravity 11. Dynamics of Rotation 10. Definition of Vibration Motion and Simple Harmonic Motion 12. Equations of Kinematics 5. Collisions. Kinematics of Simple Harmonic Motion Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 14 . 10. Energy and Power 1. 6.3.2. Solve problems involving centripetal force for horizontal and vertical curves. 5.3. Stress and Strain 11. Energy and Power 1. Solve problems by applying the law of conservation of energy.3. Differentiate a vector from a scalar. 4. Hooke’s Law 11.2. Dynamics of Rotation 10.1.2. 3. 9.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Prerequisites Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Number of Contact Hours per Week 6 hours: 3 hours lecture. Second Condition of Equilibrium 9. Energy and Power 7.1. Vector 3.2. Work.3.2. Newton’s Laws of Motion 6.2.3. Impulse and Momentum 2. Elasticity 11. Graphical Method 3. 1. Rotation 9.1. Determine the gravitational force between different masses. Determine the period of a body in simple harmonic motion. Definition of Impulse and Momentum 8. Impulse and Momentum 8.3. Solve problems in kinematics. 11. Apply Newton’s Laws of Motion. Projectile Motion 6. Determine the stress and strain on a body. Oscillations 12. 2.1.3. Definition of Work.1. Friction 6. Compute the work done on a given body. Conservation of Momentum 3. Definition of Impulse and Momentum 2. 8. Conservation of Momentum 8. Freely Falling Bodies 5. Solve problems in impulse and momentum and collisions. Modulus of Elasticity 12.1.2. Vectors and Scalars 3. Dynamics 6. Kinematics 5. Conservation of Energy 2. Coefficient of Restitution 9. the student must be able to: 1.1. Relate work and energy. 3 hours laboratory College Algebra Plane and Spherical Trigonometry After completing this course.1.2. Center of Gravity 10.1. Kinematics of Rotation 10. Vector Subtraction 5. and 12. Work. Analytical Method 4. First Condition of Equilibrium 7.

W. 13. Discuss the properties of waves. Compute the pressure and flow speed of a fluid at any point in a flow tube. and image formation by thin lenses. 12. John Wiley & Sons. Simple Pendulum Physics Laboratory (see attached) Cutnell.D. 4. 6. Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker. 10.. 5. and John W. Describe the modes of vibration of strings and air columns. the student must be able to: 1. Determine the amount of expansion of a given material in relation to temperature change. 5th ed. Describe the three methods of heat transfer. Johnsons. 7. 9. Brooks/Cole Publishing Co. 11. Young. 4th ed. Solve problems on Doppler Effect. Compute the electric field due to electric charges. waves. Fundamentals of Physics.1. Heat Transfer 4. 8. Define electric current. Compute the magnetic field of a given current-carrying conductors. Jewett Jr. Archimedes’ Principle 1. 3. Rate of Flow and Continuity Principle 1. thermal stress. Addison Wesley.1. Bernoulli’s Principle 1. 2. 2003. Compute the buoyant force on an object immersed in a fluid. Compute the electric potential due to a charge and electric potential energy of charges.3. electricity. Thermal Expansion. Specific Gravity. image formation by plane and curved mirrors. Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite PHYSICS 2 Fluids. Solve problems on resistance and cells in series and parallel. heat transfer. and Roger A.4. Fluids 1. magnetism. thermal expansion. Calorimetry 4. Specific Heat Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 15 . 1996. Thermal Stress 3. 6th ed. State Kirchhoff’s rules and apply them in a given circuit. 10th ed. J. and K. 1. Determine the change in temperature of a given amount of material that loses or gains. Pressure. Halliday. 3 hours laboratory Physics 1 After completing this course.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 12. electrostatics. 1 unit laboratory 6 hours: 3 hours lecture. Solve problems about the law of heat transfer.2. Compute the electric force between electric charges.3. electric resistance and voltage. Serway.. Raymond A.5. calorimetry. David. Describe image formation by mirrors and lenses. 16. optics. 18. and 19. 14. 15. Freedman. Hugh D. Physics for Scientists and Engineers. Inc. 17. Compute the magnetic torque on a current conductor in a magnetic field. Describe the characteristics of fluids at rest and in motion. Physics. Density 1. Torricelli’s Theorem 2. 4 units: 3 units lecture. University Physics.

Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 7. 2004.5. Electric Field Intensity 6. 9. and units of measure. Magnetic Filed of Current Element 8. Fundamentals of Physics. Freedman. 10. Superposition Principle 6. application of drafting instruments.1. Mirror Equation Image Formation by Thin Lenses 11.5. Resistance 7. Ohm’s Law 7. 4th ed. Hugh D. Jewett Jr. Physics for Scientists and Engineers. dimensioning.6. and Roger A. Charge 6. and John W. J..4.2. John Wiley & Sons. Capacitors. Law of Heat Exchange 4.1.1.7.4.1.2.2.6. 5th ed. 11. and K. sectional views. Suggested References C. Biot-Savart Law 8.6.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents 5. 10th ed. and assembly and exploded detailed drawings.3. Graphical Methods 10. 1996. Types of Waves and Their Properties 5. Force on a Moving Charge in a Magnetic Field 8. David. BASIC ENGINEERING SCIENCES Course Name ENGINEERING DRAWING Practices and techniques of graphical communication. 6. Change of Phase Waves 5.2. auxiliary views. lettering scale. Young. Series and Parallel Connections 7.D. 1 unit laboratory Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Course Specification BSCerE 16 .4. Dielectrics Electricity 7.3. orthographic projections. Graphical Methods 11. Johnsons. Light as Electromagnetic Waves 9. EMF 7. Raymond A.3. Serway. Physics.5.2. Motion of a Charge in a Magnetic Field 8. 8.W. Energy and Power in Circuits 7. Magnetic Field of Moving Changes 8. 6th ed. 4. Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker.1. Kirchhoff’s Rules Magnetism 8. Addison Wesley.2.2. Torque on a Current-Carrying Loop Optics 9. Halliday.1. descriptive geometry. Lens Equation Laboratory Equipment Physics Laboratory (see attached) Cutnell. Properties of Reflection and Refraction Image Formation by Plane and Curved Mirrors 10.3.1. Sounds Electrostatics 6. University Physics. requirements of engineering working drawings. Coulomb’s Law 6. Work and Potential 6. pictorial drawings. Current 7. Inc.2.

2. Acquire proficiency in algorithm development using a high-level programming language. 4. Luzadder.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Prerequisite Course Objectives Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Number of Contact Hours per Week 3 hours laboratory None After completing this course. Understand basic information technology concepts. 4. 7. 2. et al. Frederick E. Frederick E. 2002. and Jon M. 1. Drafting table 2. Giesecke. 14th ed.2. 8. Apply the basic concepts of technical drawing and sketching. Inc. Vierck and Robert J. Warren J. Luzadder. Giesecke. 1993. Prentice Hall.3. 5. Introduction to Engineering Drawing. Prepare technical drawings. 1992. Suggested References Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS AND PROGRAMMING Basic information technology concepts.. 11th ed. McGraw-Hill. high-level language and programming applications. 1992. 3. One 45 degree triangle 2. computer solutions of engineering problems. Technical Drawing. Warren J. Inc.. Fundamentals of Engineering Drawing. 3. 2nd ed.1. 6. One 30-60 degree triangle 2. 12th ed. Duff. 9. Drawing instruments 2. Foster. Understand the importance of technical drawing knowledge and skills as applied to the various areas of engineering. Use the computer as a tool in engineering practice. 2. Engineering Drawing and Graphic Technology. Use application software and the Internet properly. Course Objectives Course Specification BSCerE 17 .. 2nd ed. the student must be able to: 1. Thomas E. 2 units laboratory 6 hours laboratory Second Year Standing After completing this course.. Engineering Lettering Instrumental Figures Geometric Construction Orthographic Projection Dimensioning Orthographic Views with Dimensions and Section View Sectional View Pictorial Drawing Engineering Working Drawings Assembly and Exploded Detailed Drawings Course Outline Laboratory Equipment 1. Principles of Engineering Graphics.4. and 3. 10. Prentice Hall. the student must be able to: 1. Charles J. fundamentals of algorithm development. One technical compass 2. 1993. One protractor French.

Appreciate the usefulness of the knowledge and skills in computer aided drafting as applied in his/her professional development. Identify the important tools used to create technical drawings in CAD. Robert L. 1996.1. Inc. Printer or plotter CAD Software User’s Manual. Define the terms related to computer-aided drafting systems. Programming Fundamentals 1. 1999. Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 18 . and 4. 7.1. and the general operating procedures and techniques in entering and executing basic CAD commands. introduction to the CAD environment. Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING Concepts of computer-aided drafting (CAD). Operating system 1. Personal computer with: 1.2. 6. AddisonWesley Publishing Co.1. 3. the student must be able to: 1. Bruce P. PC Upgrade and Repair Bible.. High-level programming language 1. CAD software 2.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Outline Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 1. Concepts of Programming Languages. 4.2. Word processing software 1.4. Algorithm Development 2. Robert W. Kruse.1. 2. Introduction to Computers 1. Barry and Marcia Press. Introduction to CAD Software CAD Drawing Snapping. Construction Elements Dimensioning Plotting. Build Your Own Server. Application Software: Word Processing and Spreadsheet 1.3. Personal computer with: 1. Desktop Edition.3. Programming 2. 2nd ed.. 2. Inc. 1. Leung and Clovis L..2. The Internet 2. Press. Operating system 1. Inputting Images 3D and Navigating in 3D Rendering Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment 1. Prentice Hall. Sebesta. terminologies. McGraw-Hill. 2004.. John Wiley & Sons. Number Systems and Data Representation 1. 2003. Internet browser and Internet connection Caputo. Data Structures and Program Design in C. Computer Organization 1. Tony C.4. 5.5.2. Create electronic drawings (e-drawing) using CAD. Spreadsheet software 1. 4th ed. 1 unit laboratory 3 hours laboratory Third Year Standing After completing this course. Tondo. 3..

Mass Moment of Inertia Trusses. SI ed. 1. 4. Wedge and Belt Friction Centroid. the student must be able to: 1. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture Statics of Rigid Bodies After completing this course. 4. structure analyses. Understand kinetics of particles in particular energy and momentum methods. Determine moment of inertia. 7th SI ed. Understand the principles of equilibrium of particles. Inc. work energy method. 2002. Cables Moment of Inertia. Analyze the stresses of trusses. Suggested References Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite DYNAMICS OF RIGID BODIES Kinetics and kinematics of a particle. 9. 5. Determine forces of 2D and 3D structures. 8. Understand the principles of Newton’s Second Law and its applications. 3. Russell Johnston Jr. Understand the principles governing the motion of particles. center of mass and center of gravity of objects. and Center of Gravity Distributed Loads and Hydrostatic Forces. Statics of Rigid Bodies. Understand the principles of static. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Physics 1 Integral Calculus After completing this course. 10. and E. and moments of inertia.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisites STATICS OF RIGID BODIES Force systems. beams and frames. Anthony and Wallace Fowler. Ferdinand P. Internal Forces Beams. centroids and centers of gravity. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics. mass moment of inertia. Introduction to Mechanics. 3rd ed. 3. Frames and Machines. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Moment of a Couple Equivalent Force Systems in 2D and 3D Dry Static Friction. Beer. and impulse and momentum. Undertake vector operations such as vector cross and dot product. Shear and Bending Moment Diagrams Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment None Bedford. and 7. 2. 3. velocity and acceleration.. and Course Objectives Course Specification BSCerE 19 . Edgardo S. 7. Center of Mass. 11. 6. wedge and belt friction. kinetics and kinematics of rigid bodies. 2. 2. Engineering Mechanics: Statics. 12. the student must be able to: 1. 5. Pacheco. friction. Vector Operations Force Vectors and Equilibrium of Particles Vector Cross and Dot Product Moment of a Force Couples. Determine centroids. 6.

Principle of Work and Energy 14. Work-Energy Principle.12.11.4. Equation of Motion 13.9.2. Kinetic Energy of a System of Particles 15.3.11. Application of Newton’s Second Laws to Motion of a System of Particles 15. Three-Dimensional Motion of a Particle Relative to a Rotating Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 20 . Applications of the Principle of Work and Energy 14.7. 5.8. 1. Introduction to Dynamics Position. 3.5. Angular Momentum of a System of Particles About Its Mass Center 15. 2. Newton’s Second Law of Motion 13.5.10.5. Motion of Mass Center of a System of Particles 15. Equations Defining the Rotation of a Rigid Body About a Fixed Axis 16. and Acceleration Determination of the Motion of the Particles Uniform Rectilinear Motion Uniformly Accelerated Rectilinear Motion Position Vector. Impulsive Motion 14. Linear Momentum of the Particle. Work of Force 14. 7. System of Units 13.10.5. General Motion 16. its energy and momentum.3. General Plane Motion 16. Equations in Terms of Radial and Transverse Components 13.1. Motion Under a Central Force 14.6.4.1.2. Absolute and Relative Acceleration 16. 13. and Acceleration Derivatives of Vector Functions Rectangular Components of Velocity and Acceleration Motion Relative to a Frame in Translation Tangential and Normal Components Radial and Transverse Components Motion of Several Particles (Dependent Motion) Kinetics of Particles: Newton’s Second Law 13. Dynamic Equilibrium 13.1. Conservation of Energy for a System of Particles 15.3. Kinetics of Particles: Energy and Momentum Methods 14. Rate of Change of a Vector with Respect to a Rotating Frame 16.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 4. Rate of Change of Angular Momentum 13. 11. Translation 16. Oblique Central Impact 14. 4.2. Instantaneous Center of Rotation in Plane Motion 16. 9. Linear and Angular Momentum of a System of Particles 15. Rate of Change of Linear Momentum 13. 10. Velocity. 12. Principle of Impulse and Momentum 14. Rotation About a Fixed Axis 16.1.6.7.6. Conservation of Momentum for a System of Particles 15.8. Motion About a Fixed Point 16. 8. Plane Motion of a Particle Relative to a Rotating Frame.3. Principle of Impulse and Momentum for a System of Particles 16.2. Potential Energy 14.7. Problems Involving Energy and Momentum 15. Coriolis Acceleration 16. Velocity. Systems of Particles 15. Understand kinematics of rigid bodies. Impact 14.6. Kinetic Energy of a Particle. 6. Direct Central Impact 14.7.4.8.8. Conservative Forces 14. Angular Momentum of Particle. Conservation of Energy 14.12. Kinematics of Rigid Bodies 16.9. Absolute and Relative Velocity in Plane Motion 16.4.

7th SI ed. 14. McGraw-Hill. Determine the elastic stability of columns. 15. Normal and Shear Stress Stresses under Centric Loading Stress Concentration Plane Stress Principal Stresses for Plane Stress Mohr’s Circle for Plane Stress Deformations. 1.9 Eccentric Impact None Beer and Johnston. Angular Momentum of a Rigid Body in Plane Motion 17. Load Classification Concept of Stress.3. Plane Motion of Rigid Bodies: Forces and Accelerations 17.4.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Frame. 9. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Statics of Rigid Bodies After completing this course. Constrained Plane Motion 18. and elastic instability.5. the student must be able to: 1. indeterminate beams. and 4. 2. shears.13. Coriolis Acceleration 16. beam deflections. Systems of Rigid Bodies 17. Plane Motion of a Rigid Body. 5.2. 2. 16. 3. 4. 17. Kinetic Energy of a Rigid Body in Plane Motion 18.7 Conservation of Angular Momentum 18. combined stresses. Laboratory Equipment Suggested Reference Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE BODIES Axial stress and strain. D’ Alembert’s Principle 17.6 Principle of Impulse and Momentum 18. Equation of Motions 17.6. 3. 7.5 Conservation of Energy 18. 12. Understand the concepts of stress and strain. 10. stresses for torsion and bending. Principle of Work and Energy for a Rigid Body 18. 6. 11.1. Work of Forces Acting on a Rigid Body 18. Normal and Shear Strains Material Properties Working Stresses Deformation in a System of Axially Loaded Members Temperature Effects on Axially Loaded Members Statically Indeterminate Members Thin-Walled Pressure Vessel Torsional Stresses.4 Systems of Rigid Bodies 18. 13.8 Impulsive Motion 18. and torsion under plain and combined loading. Power Transmission Flexural Stresses by the Elastic Curve Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 21 . 2003. Analyze statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Elastic Torsion Formula Torsional Deformation. Solution of Problems involving the Motion of a Rigid Bodies 17.1. 8.2.3. Calculate stresses due to bending. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Dynamics. Plane Motion of Rigid Bodies: Energy and Momentum Methods 18. Frame of Reference in General Motion 17.

David and Wilton M.1. Andrew and Singer. 5th ed. Archie.. 1. McGill. Present Economy Studies 2.2. Interest and the Time Value of Money 2. Engineering Economy and the Design Process 1..4.3. 27. 23.1. The Future Worth Method 3. Russell C. Inc. John Wiley & Sons.2. 2002.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 18.3. King.6. Engineering Mechanics. The External Rate of Return Method 3. Mechanics of Materials. Higdon.2. The Minimum Attractive Rate of Return 3. Strength of Materials.8. Cost Concepts for Decision Making 1. Deal with risk and uncertainty in project outcomes by applying the basic economic decision making concepts. The Annual Worth Method 3. 1987 Suggested References Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite ENGINEERING ECONOMY Concepts of the time value of money and equivalence.1.4. The Concept of Equivalence 2. Singer. 3rd ed. Ferdinand Leon. Mechanics of Deformable Bodies. et al. 26. 2. Definitions 1.3. PWS Publishing Co. Introduction 1. 24. Cash Flows 3. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Third Year Standing After completing this course. 25. 4th edition. 20. the student must be able to: 1. Basic Economy Study Methods 3. and decisions admitting uncertainty. 4th ed. 22. Evaluate project alternatives by applying engineering economic principles and methods and select the most economically efficient one. Solve problems involving interest and the time value of money.5. Principles of Engineering Economy 1. The Internal Rate of Return Method 3. 1989. The Benefit/Cost Ratio Method Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 22 . 19. basic economy study methods. 21. decisions under certainty. An Introduction to Dynamics. Money-Time Relationships and Equivalence 2. Prentice Hall.7. The Payback Period Method 3.5. and 3. decisions recognizing risk. The Present Worth Method 3. Moment Equation Using Singularity Function Beam Deflection by the Double Integration Method Area Moment Theorems Moment Diagram by Parts Beam Deflection by Area Moment Method Statically Indeterminate Beams Buckling of Long Straight Columns Combined Loadings Analysis of Riveted Connections by the Uniform Shear Method Welded Connections Laboratory Equipment None Hibbeler. 1995.

2. Managing the Marketing Function 6.. Decisions Admitting Uncertainty 6. Eschenbach. McGraw-Hill.1. Leland T. Decision Analysis Models None Blank. the student must be able to: 1...J. Contemporary Engineering Economics. Grant. 3rd ed. Fabrycky.1. Replacement Studies 4. Inc. the functions of management. 2. and W.6. 2002.5. Riggs. 2002. Break win Analysis 5. Communicating 3. Engineering Economy.4. Thuesen.. John Wiley & Sons. Essentials of Engineering Economic Analysis. 2001. 9th ed. 2nd ed. Eugene L. Expected Monetary Value of Alternatives 5. 2001. and Anthony J. et al. et al. Engineering Economics. Tarquin.3. Jerome P Lavelle and Ted S. Addison Wesley. Prentice Hall. th Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisite Course Objectives ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT Decision-making. Planning / Coordinating 3. Inc. Functions of Management 3..2. Luxhoj.2. Elin M. Evaluation of Mutually Exclusive Alternatives 4. Decisions Recognizing Risk 5. 1. 6 ed. Know and apply the different functions of management. Oxford University Press. Principles of Engineering Economy. Sullivan. James L. Newman. Depreciation and After-Tax Economic Analysis 4.. managing production and service operations. Inc.. Engineering Economy. 2005. Park. Decision Making 3. Evaluation of Independent Projects 4. Introduction to Engineering Management 2.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 4.2. Understand the field of engineering management. William G. and managing the finance function. 1996.. Leading 3. 12th ed. Inc. Managing the Finance Function Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 23 . 4th ed. Decisions Under Certainty 4. Staffing 3.. Chan S.1. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Third Year Standing After completing this course. Engineering Economy. Donald G. Managing Product and Service Operations 5. Prentice Hall. 1990.1.4. managing the marketing function. Organizing 3.. Sensitivity Analysis 6. Controlling 4. Wicks and James T. McGraw-Hill. Gerald J.. 8th ed. Motivating 3.7.5. Discounted Decision Tree Analysis 6.3.

Robbins. 2nd ed. Management. Essentials of Project and System Engineering Management. Stephen P. An Introduction to Management.2. 3. Inc. the student must be able to: 1. Limited. Ecology of Life 1.. 6th ed. Know the existing laws.3. 2. Identify. and Mary Coulter. Prentice Hall. 1990. government legislation. Thomas F. and management.1.1. and regulation related to the environment and waste management. Course Name ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Ecological framework of sustainable development. and environmental management system. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture General Chemistry After completing this course. Understand the various effects of environmental pollution. Solid Environmental 2. and regulations of the government on environmental issues. rules. McGraw-Hill. Ecological Concepts 1. disposal..4.2. and solid. 1990.2. Harold A. Toxic and Hazardous Waste Treatment 3.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Expanded Features Unlimited Pages None Eisner. Gram. 2000. rules. and 4. Wheeler. Inc. Air Environment 2. air. Computer and Engineering Management. Oberlender. waste treatment processes. McGraw-Hill. Gerold D.3. 2nd ed. 1999. Holt. Introduction to Environmental Engineering 1. Pollution Environments 2. Environmental Management System 3. Project Management for Engineering and Construction. Howard. Ecosystems 2.4.1. Environmental Impact Assessment 3. 2002. and select appropriate design treatment schemes for waste disposal. Understand the importance of waste management and its relevance to the engineering profession. Rinehart and Winston of Canada. John Wiley & Sons. Environmental Clearance Certificate None Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Course Specification BSCerE 24 . plan. Water Environment 2. 1. pollution environments: water. Biogeochemical Cycles 1.

Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Specification BSCerE 25 . Mackenzie L.Traditional and Hazardous Pollutants. Environmental Engineering. Understand the importance and the value of safety. 2. Nemerow. Strategies of Industrial and Hazardous Waste Management. safety terminology. Leonard. McGraw-Hill.. et al. 1991. J. N. M. Wark. and 4. Inc. Masten. C.. Course Name SAFETY MANAGEMENT Evolution of safety management.. Environmental Regulation and Impact Assessment. Wastewater Treatment. 1998. Air Pollution . S. McGraw-Hill. Treatment and Disposal. Addison-Wesley. Howard. 2000. John Wiley & Sons. McGraw-Hill. techniques in hazard identification and analysis in workplaces. and F. Inc. Ruth and Roger Guzmar. off-the-job safety. Rower and G. Guzmar. 1991. 1 unit lecture 1 hour lecture Third Year Standing After completing this course. 1998. International Thomson Publishing Company. Metcalf and Eddy. gas and power plants.Its Origin and Control..F. and other engineering industries and how to prevent or mitigate them. and incident investigation. disaster prevention and mitigation. 1999. manufacturing. Indoor Air Pollution. Miller. Berlin: Springer Verlag. 1996. Inc.. 2004.L. G. D. Davis. Kay. Heisketh. K. Small and Decentralized Wastewater Management Systems. 3.. Ortolano. John Wiley & Sons. Environmental Engineering. Technomic Publishing Co. Principles of Environmental Engineering and Science. Perry. Hazardous Waste Site Remediation. Gerard. Warner and W.E. Wastewater Engineering . Henze. Wisdom Advocate Publishing. safety programs adopted by high risk industries. Keller and J. Mihekic. Kiely. Air Pollution Control .. the student must be able to: 1. McGraw-Hill. 1998. 1997. Inc. Agardy. Davis. O’Brien. James. Crites.Collection. 1997. Michigan: Lewis Publishers.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Suggested References Bellardi. Tchobanoglous. 1997. and Susan J. Inc. 1985. Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering. Ron and G. 1995. John Wiley & Sons. hazards in the construction. Environmental Education for Sustainable Development. McGraw-Hill. Chelsea. Tchobanoglous.. Know the health hazards and their prevention.G.. Identify and mitigate or prevent hazards. Apply the concepts and principles of safety in engineering practice.

Safety as Related to Health Practices 4. The course focuses primarily on chemical calculations frequently performed by ceramic engineering students pertaining to concentration. Ray. titration.3. reactions involving standard solutions.2. Planning for Emergencies 4. 2nd ed. Safety as a Value.1. Industrial Hygiene 2. New York: McGraw-Hill. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. rate of chemical reactions. Inc.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Outline 1. Hopf.2. Peter S. Causal Analysis.7. Value Based Safety and Off-the-Job Safety 3. Procedure in Hazards Analysis in the Workplace 2. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Specification BSCerE 26 . Industrial Safety and Health Management. Confined Space Entry 2. C.3. Accident Escalation. colligative properties of solutions Course Description No.4. Determine rates. as well as balancing of oxidationreduction reactions. Designer’s Guide to OSHA. Compliance 3. Recognition of Root Cause 5. solutions. values of various equilibrium constants.1.9. orders and rate equations of chemical reactions 5. Overview of Safety 2. and electrochemistry. pH. pOH. Basic Safety Procedures in High Risk Activities and Industries 2.1. 1982. Off-the-Job Safety (Residences and Public Places) 3. Prentice Hall. Control of Hazardous Energies 2. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture General Chemistry 1 At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1.2. Laboratory Equipment Suggested References D.3. Department of Labor and Employment.1. Choice vs. Incident Investigation and Reporting 5. chemical equilibrium. and heats of reactions 3. Barricades and Scaffolds 2.6.3. dilution. Fire Safety and the Fire Code 2. Incident Investigation and Reporting 5. Emergency Response Procedures 5. Identification of Corrective or Preventive Actions None Asfahl.5. Solve problems concerning methods of expressing concentration. Fall Protection 2. Perform simple stoichiometric calculations 2. Basic Electrical Safety 2. Perform basic thermodynamic calculations 4. ALLIED COURSES Course Name GENERAL CHEMISTRY 2 (FOR CERAMIC ENGINEERS) A course designed to instill in ceramic engineering students the fundamental principles of thermodynamics. Hazard Communication and Chemical Safety 3. colligative properties. 5th ed. solutions. 2003. and chemical and ionic equilibrium. Disaster Prevention and Mitigation 4. Rationale for Disaster Prevention and Loss Control 4.2. dilution.. pH and pOH.8. Occupational Health and Safety Standards. Apply stoichiometric principles in calculations involving gases.

5th Edition. L. Chemistry: The Central Science R. Student’s Guide to Chemistry: A Modern Introduction Brescia. actual yield and percent yield 2. 1 unit laboratory 6 hours: 3 hours lecture. Calculations in chemical equilibria: precipitation equilibria 7. The Principles of Chemical Equilibrium: With Applications in Chemistry and Chemical Enigneering. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Identify analytical chemistry methods for substances and simple mixtures especially those involving ceramic systems 2.E. Mortimer. Chemistry Seinko and Plane. Electrochemistry: basic concepts and applications 8. A Conceptual Approach Masterton. Basic stoichiometric calculations from chemical reactions. colorimetric and potentiometric methods. Chemistry. Hurley. Pellegrini. Calculations in chemical equilibria: ionic and acid-base equilibria 6. Gravimetric.. Perform stoichiometry calculations as part of analytical methods 4..Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 6. S. Publisher: Brooks Cole Denbigh. College Chemistry Schaum and Rossenberg. First Edition Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. K. Analysis of substances and simple mixtures. Hess’s law) 4. 3. F. Calculations in electrochemical and electrolytic cells None Brescia.. Fundamentals of Chemistry Brown. Chemical Principles.G. latent heat and heat of reaction. W. Calculations in chemical kinetics 5. theoretical yield. F.. Chemistry:Principles and Reactions. 2. P. LeMay and Bursten.B. Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of College Chemistry J. Solve typical problems in analytical chemistry 3. Introduction to thermodynamics of chemical reactions (sensible heat. Mehlman. Chemistry Harwood and Petrucci. Chang. C. Principles of chemical analysis Volumetric methods of analysis Gravimetric methods of analysis Colorimetric methods of analysis Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 27 . 3 hours laboratory General Chemistry 2 At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. 4. excess and limiting reagents. Survey of common instrumental methods. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Principles and techniques of analysis with emphasis on volumetric methods and stoichiometry. Identify the common instrumental methods for chemical analysis of substances and mixtures 1. Publisher: Cambridge University Press Atkins.N. Caldwell and William. Perform electrochemical calculations 1. Perform chemical equilibrium calculations 7. 4 units: 3 units lecture. General Chemistry C.L.. General Chemisry King. and Jones.. Russel. Stoichiometric calculations in reactions in gas mixtures and aqueous solutions 3.

6th edition Quantitative Chemical Analysis. burettes. oven. Harris.. mineral and rocks 2. 21 ed. John Wiley & Sons. Hurlbut. Identify theories of the origin of the earth. Christian. and rocks.H.G. Analysis of substances 8. Origin of the earth. H. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References ELEMENTS OF MINERALOGY Fundamentals of crystallography. 2000 Course Name Course Description No. Bunsen burner Analytical Chemistry by Gary D. Global tectonics 5. Differentiate different minerals and rocks 3. porcelain crucible. Philippine tectonics None F. Endogenetic processes 3. glass beakers. 7th Ed. McGraw Hill. Harvey. Publisher: W. minerals. Freeman Modern Analytical Chemistry by D. volumetric flasks. 3 hours laboratory Principles of Geology At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Analysis of simple mixtures Pipettes. 3 units: 2 units lecture. Manual of Mineralogy. Exogenetic processes 4. classification..Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Laboratory Equipment Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Suggested References 5. natural mineral and crystal drawings. Potentiometric methods of analysis 6. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites PRINCIPLES OF GEOLOGY A discussion of the origin of the earth.S. Erlennmayer flasks. Inc. A Geology for Engineers. Study of the different endogenetic and exogenetic processes which are responsible for the formation of physiographic/geologic features. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Blyth. minerals and rocks 2. Identify various minerals and their structures To follow outline of a standard course on Elements of Mineralogy Crystal models st C. 1 unit laboratory 5 hours: 2 hours lecture. NY Course Name FUNDAMENTALS OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Course Specification BSCerE 28 . Hardcover: 848 pages Publisher: Wiley. Hardcover: 928 pages. designation and methods of depicting crystal forms based on models. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Identify different physiographic/geologic features especially those found in the Philippine setting 1. 1974 Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. Identify the different endogenetic and exogenetic processes 4. Edward Arnold. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture General Chemistry At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Discussion on global and Philippine tectonics. The principles underlying the identification. Identify and classify various crystals 2. Survey of common instrumental methods 7. Sixth Edition by Daniel C. mortar and pestle. 1st edition. Mettler balance.. Identify the different symmetry elements in crystal models 3. London.

Select the appropriate material(s) for a given application 6. Materials selection and design considerations (3) None Elements of Materials Science by Van Vlack Electronic Properties of Engineering Materials by Livingston. 1999 The Science and Design of Engineering Materials by Schaffer 4. Electronic structures and processes (3) 6. Determine the ways by which material properties can be engineered or modified to meet certain requirements related to their intended use 5. crystal growth. Role of kinetics in the development of microstructures. Metals and their properties (4) 7. Ceramics and their properties (4) 9. Polymers and their properties (2) 8. sintering. grain growth. third order reactions Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 29 . of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites KINETICS OF MATERIALS Reaction rates. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Thermodynamics of Materials At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Atomic arrangement in solids (4) 4. Atomic structure and interatomic bonding (2) 3. ceramics and composites). Kinetic Theory of Gases (3) 1.1 Simple chemical reactions 2. Fundamentals of Ceramics by Michel Barsoum. properties and behavior in service environments. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. John Wiley & Sons. polymers. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Structure and composition of materials (metals. precipitation. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Physics 2. grain growth. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No.2 Number of molecules 1. John Wiley & Sons. Applications to nucleation.3 Velocity of gases 2. NY Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. phase transformations. Composite materials (3) 10. Evaluate feasibility of designs based on material considerations 1. Integral Calculus At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1.1 Dimensions and shapes of molecules 1. Elements of Ceramic Kinetics (8) 2. mechanisms and transport phenomena in materials from a phenomenological and atomistic point of view. Identify the different material properties and how these are affected by the composition and structure 4. Introduction (1) 2. Identify the importance of materials to mankind through specific examples of materials which have had significant impact to civilization 2. Processing.2 Order of molecularity of reactions (first order reactions. nucleation and crystal growth from melts 2. recrystallization.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Description No. Identify the different ways of classifying various materials 3. second order reactions. Identify the factors governing the kinetics of ceramic reactions such as high temperature phase transformations. Identify the mechanisms of material transport in solid and liquid systems 1. Structural imperfections and diffusion (5) 5. Solve fundamental problems in kinetics 3.

dislocations. Inc.6. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Dalton’s law of partial pressure 1. unimolecular reactions) 2.12.2.5 Consecutive reactions 2. boundary and surface diffusion 4. liquids and solids with particular emphasis on the thermodynamic properties of solids 2. Calculations involving ideal gas law 1.1 Diffusion and Fick’s law 3.3.7.5. Application in phase diagrams. Gay-Lussac’s law 1.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Laboratory Equipment Suggested References 2.1 Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions 4. Kinetic theory of ideal gases Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 30 . Integral Calculus At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. John Wiley &Sons. Molecular weight of gases 1.4 Precipitation in crystalline ceramics 4.2 Diffusion of a thermally activated process 3. Boyle’s Law 1. Solve Physical Chemistry problems which have relevance to Ceramic Engineering.13. phases and phase transitions with emphasis on ceramic materials.3 Pseudo-molecular reactions 2. NY USA Course Name Course Description No. Reactions with and between solids (9) 4. Charles Law 1. 1 unit laboratory or 3 units lecture (if no lab) 5 /3 hours: 2 hours lecture (if with lab).4 Nomenclature and concepts of atomistic processes 3.2 Reactant transport through a planar boundary 4. Kinetics of High Temperature Processes by Kinger. Description of the macroscopic properties of various material systems such as equilibrium states. McGraw-Hill Book Company. John Wiley & Sons. van der Waals equation of state 1. 3 hours laboratory or 3 hours lecture (if no lab) General Chemistry 2.9. Combined Gas Law 1. Bowen and Uhlman. 1.10.11. 3 units: 2 units lecture (if with lab).6 Diffusion in glasses. and free energy.. Atom Mobility (11) 3.8. Gas Constant 1. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS Fundamental thermodynamic principles including energy.5 Diffusion in crystalline oxides 3. Identify the physical characteristics of gases.5 Non-isothermal processes None Introduction to Ceramics by Kingery. Graham’s law of diffusion 1. Gases and Liquids (6) 1. Amagat’s law of partial volumes 1. 2nd edition.6 Effect of temperature on reaction velocities 2.4 Reversible or opposing reactions 2.9 Absolute reaction theory 3. Ideal and real gases 1.4. entropy.8 Collision theory ( bimolecular reactions.7 Activation energy 2. Inc.3 Temperature and impurity activated process 3. NY Diffusion of Solids by Shewmon.1.3 Reactant transport in particulate system 4.

of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. two and three components to determine the stable phases and relative amounts at a given temperature and composition 2. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture Thermodynamics of Materials At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. The Phase rule of condensed system 5.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Laboratory Equipment Suggested References 1. Use phase diagrams to address problems in quality control. The Two Component system – Class A – Type III. Perform isoplethal analysis to predict microstructures after cooling of ceramic products 4.2 Le Chatelier-Braun principle 4. The Two Component system – Class A – Type IV.3 Third law 3. Use phase diagrams of one.3 Effect of inert gases on equilibrium 4. thermometer. the two component system: Class A – Type I. Quantitative applications to systems of interest to ceramic engineers.14. Electrochemistry (6) For those with lab option: Bomb calorimeter. Free Energy and Equilibrium (6) 3.6 Effect of temperature 5. hot plate. two and three components. Perform quantitative calculations dealing with phase diagrams 3. David R.1 Equilibrium constant 4.2 Enthalpy for reactions 3. analytical balance. Gaskell.4 Equilibrium constant for heterogeneous reactions 4. Ordinary phase rule.1 First law 2. 4th Edition.5 Properties and significance of free energy change 4. Heat capacity of gases 2. Determination of phase diagrams. design and characterization studies in the development and formulation of ceramic batches. Taylor and Francis Publishers Course Name Course Description No. Foundation in the study of chemical equilibria (11) 2. Develop and formulate ceramic batches based on knowledge of phase equilibrium 1. Use of phase diagram to predict phase transformations 5.1 Helmholtz free energy 3.5 Effect of pressure on heterogeneous equilibria 4. Simple eutectic diagram 6. Use of phase diagram as a tool for quality control. data logger Introduction to Thermodynamics of Materials. Formation of Compound with Congruent Melting Point 7.4 Gibb’s free energy 3. The Two Component system – Class A – Type II. Complete Miscibility in Solid State Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 31 .2 Second law 2.3 Free energy change for reactions 3. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites PHASE EQUILIBRIUM IN CERAMIC SYSTEMS Phase equilibrium in ceramic systems of one. Statement of the rule. Chemical Equilibrium (6) 4. Laws of Thermodynamics (7) 2. Compound Formation as Result of Peritectic Reaction 8. The Phase rule 3. design and characterization studies 6. one component system 4.

System Composed of Two Solids and Liquids – Type I. The Two Component system – Class C. American Ceramic Society. The Three Component System – Type I. Partial Miscibility in liquid state 12. American Ceramic Society. 1984 Course Name Course Description No. Statics of fluids 3. Levin. Columbus. ed. Marcel Dekker. II by Levin. energy and momentum in fluid flow. Columbus. System Composed of Two Solids and Liquids – Type III. Robbins and McMurdie. Formation of Ternary Compounds 21. Identify the properties of fluids 2. Fluid statics and kinematics. Partial miscibility of Solid phase None Phase Diagram for Ceramist. Formation of one pair partially miscible liquids 16. Academic Press Principles of Phase Diagrams in Materials System by Gordon Phase Rule and Heterogeneous Equilibria by Ricci Introduction to Phase Equilibria in Ceramic by Hummel. Partial Miscibility in solid state with Eutectic 10. Ohio Theory. Formation of complete series of liquid solutions 22. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Vol I to Vol. Crystallization of Pure Components only (10) 19. Ohio Phase Diagram for Ceramist. Properties of fluids 2. Ceramic and Cement Technology 3b. System Composted of Two Solids and a Liquid – Type IV. The use of Phase Diagram in Electronic Materials and Glass technology by Alper. Fluid flow in open and closed channels. The Two Component system – Class B. Robbins.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Laboratory Equipment Suggested References 9.. System Composed of Two Solids and a Liquid – Type III. Kinematics of fluids 4. System Composed of Two Solids and Liquids – Type II. The Two Component system – Class A – Type VI. Solve typical problems in fluid mechanics especially those relevant to ceramic engineering 4. Partial Miscibility in solid state with Peritectic (10) 11.a The use of Phase Diagram in Metal. Partial Miscibility in Solid and Liquid State 13. The Three Component System 15. The Three Component System – Type II. Forces in fluid flow Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 32 . McMurdie. The Two Component system – Class A – Type V. Pergamon Press Phase Equilibria by Reisman. Formation of two pair partially miscible liquids 17. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites MECHANICS OF FLUIDS Properties of fluids. Refractory. Formation of Binary Compounds 20. Principles and Techniques of Phase Diagram: 3. Differentiate mechanics of fluid flow in open and closed channels 5. Identify the methods in fluid measurements 1. Fluid measurements 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Dynamics of Rigid Bodies At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. The Three Component System – Type III. Identify the governing equations in fluid statics and kinematics 3. Formation of three pair partially miscible liquids 18. 1969 Supplement. Forces. Composite Diagram 14.

2004. R.G.USA.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Laboratory Equipment Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Suggested References 5. Hanif Chaudhry. 2005 edition. Solve typical problems in basic electrical engineering 2. Roberson. Fifth Edition. Joseph B. J. Wisler and J. Krieger Publishing Company. USA. Hayt and Jack E. Identify the governing equations for different types of electric and magnetic circuits 4. Joseph B. Power Series. John J.O. E. H. Fundamentals of electric circuits 2. Linsley. Second Edition. Freyberg and David L. 2002. AC machinery 5. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Specification BSCerE 33 . It covers the study of Complex Numbers. Fourth Edition. Direct and alternating current machinery. Hydraulic Engineering. Daugherty. Fuid mechanics with Engineering Applications. Fluid flow in open channels 7. Kemmerly. Identify elementary distribution systems 5. Water Resources Engineering. Vector Analysis and Numerical Methods. Identify important considerations in electrical wiring 6. Fluid measurements Hydraulic Bench Software: WaterCAD Flowmaster Pondpack Mays. Cassidy and M. Engineering Circuits Analysis Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References E. Woodburn. Franzini. Differentiate DC and AC machinery 3. Elementary distribution systems 6. Matrices and Determinants. 1988. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture None At the end of the course the student must be to: 1. Water Resources Engineering. King. Hydraulics. SI Metric Edition. USA Ray K. 1980.W. 1992. david L. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Tchobanoglous. Franzini and E. Fundamentals of magnetic circuits 3. John A. Course Name Course Description No. DC machinery 4. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Differential Equations Course Description No. Apply important electrical engineering concepts to ceramic engineering problems 1. Laplace and Inverse Laplace Transforms. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Fundamentals of electric and magnetic circuits. Energy and momentum in fluid flow 6. USA Robert l. John Finnemore. Fourier Series. PROFESSIONAL COURSES Course Name ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS FOR CERAMIC ENGINEERING A study of selected topics in mathematics and their applications in ceramic engineering. Larry W. Elementary distribution systems and electrical wiring. Electrical wiring None Williams H.

Identify the important physical. Numerical Analysis. chemical and thermal properties of ceramic raw materials 3. Laplace and Inverse Laplace Transforms 3. Erwin. Chemical Properties of Clays 6. Arthur. red clays. Perform laboratory exercises pertaining to the beneficiation of ceramic raw materials 1.g. Composition of Clays 5. Bernard. 1953 Kolman. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Rationalize the properties based on the ceramic formulation 4. kaolins. 1996 Kreyszig.). 3 hours laboratory Analytical Chemistry At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Silica (2) 12. Virgilio. MS Office 2000 Course Name Course Description No. and how these influence the physical and chemical properties of ceramic products. theorems and the different methods of solutions in advanced mathematics. Effect of Heat on Clays (2) 8. according to uses) 10. Advanced Engineering Mathematics. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites CERAMIC RAW MATERIALS AND PROCESSES Comprehensive discussion on the different ceramic raw materials used in the ceramic industry (e. 1968 MatLab Manuals Rel 12. ball clays. Dolomite and Related Materials (2) 16. Fourier Series 5. Identify the different raw materials for the ceramic industry such as various types of clay and non-clay minerals 2. John Wiley and Sons Publishing. Advanced Mathematics in Physics and Engineering. etc. 3 units: 2 units lecture. Lime. Magnesia. 1972 Bromwell. Familiarize themselves with the different parameters. Fluorine Minerals 18. alumina. Introduction to Ceramic Raw Materials 2. 1. feldspar. McGraw Hill Publishing. McMillan Publishing House.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Objectives Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. methods and theorems particularly in complex problems related to the field of ceramic engineering. Firing Properties of Clays 9. Alumina 13. Classification of Clays (e. Anhydrous Alumina-Silica Minerals 15. Develop their abilities on how to apply the different laws. Advanced Engineering Mathematics. flint. the processing techniques involved. 1991 Scheid. Linear Algebra.. Power Series 4. 1 unit laboratory 5 hours: 2 hours lecture. Numerical Methods None Dulay. Francis. Complex Numbers 2. 2. laws. Physical Properties of Clays 7. Vector Analysis 6. Sedimentary Clays 3. Magnesium Silicate Minerals 17. silica. Feldspar 14. Further Groupings of Clays 4. McGraw Hill Publishing. Refractory Raw Materials (2) Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 34 .g. Alkali Minerals and Compounds 19. Technical Study and Design of Clay Beneficiation Plant (2) 11.

Freiburg i. oven. The Institute of Ceramics – Pergamon Press. Inc. space. Pyrometric Cone Equivalent II. by Kingery. Inc. NY USA. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture Course Specification BSCerE 35 . Water of plasticity of clays 3. Plastic Materials 1. USA. 1982 Course Name Course Description No... Relationships of structure and chemistry with various crystal properties. Pergamon Press. The Institute of Ceramics – Pergamon Press. 1976 Ceramic Monographs: Handbook of Ceramics by Bilke and Paetsch. nd Ceramic Raw Materials. 1952 Introduction to Ceramics by Kingery. eds. 2nd edition. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. 2 revised edition by Worall. 1927 Introduction to Ceramics. Mass. 2nd Edition. USA Elements of Ceramics by Norton. Germany. Maguire and Wood Journals and Bulletins of the American Ceramic Society Ceramic Raw Materials. McGraw-Hill Book Co. Germany. 2nd Edition by Ryan. Strength test of clays (fired and unfired) (2) 11. Freiburg i.. eds. Cambridge. Volume change (fired and unfired) 8... The Institute of Ceramics – Pergamon Press. Softening Range 2. NY. (2) 21. 1982 Rheology and Rheometry of Clay-Water System. Verlag Schmid GmbH. Br. 1952 Ceramics: Clay Technology by Wilson. John Wiley & Sons. NY USA.. etc. 1978 Properties of Ceramic Raw Materials. balance. True Specific Gravity 3. Inc. Addison-Wesley Press. Petrographic Analysis (optional) Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Sieves and sieve shaker.. Effect of water in the viscosity of suspended clays 4. Inc.. NY. Technical Study and Design of Feldspar Beneficiation Plant (2) Laboratory Experiments for Ceramic Raw Materials and Processes I. Sieve analysis of various clays (2) 2. firing shrinkage and warpage) (2) 7. Ryan. Technical Study and Design of Silica Beneficiation Plant (2) 22. USA. 1982 Properties of Ceramic Raw Materials. Bulk specific gravity of clays 10. Bowen and Uhlman. Apparent specific gravity of clays 9. NY. USA.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 20. Inc. John Wiley &Sons.. Other Ceramic Raw Materials – Binders.. Adison-Wesley Press. kiln. Effect of electrolytes on the viscosity of suspended clays 5. caliper. USA. NY Ceramic Monographs: Handbook of Ceramics by Bilke and Paetsch. 2nd revised edition by Wornal. 2nd Edition. Phelps. Drying behavior of various clays 6. of Contact Hours per week CERAMIC CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY Basic principles and theories in ceramic crystals with emphasis on symmetry. Non-plastic Materials 1. Br. Bowen and Uhlmann. NY USA. 1978 Elements of Ceramics by Norton. Behavior in firing of various clays (color. point-.and lattice groups essential to the understanding of crystalline solids such as silicates and glass-ceramics including other related structures. Verlag Schmid GmbH.

John Wiley & Sons. NY Introduction to Crystal Chemistry by Evann. W.4 Cesium chloride structure 7.C. John Wiley & Sons.3. crystal parameters. John Wiley & Sons.5 General mathematical relations (axial ratio. NY Fundamentals of Ceramics by Michel Barsoum. Crystal Structures 3. Periodic relationships 2.4 Zirconia 5. NY Elements of Mineralogy by Mason and Berry.1. Identify the structure of ceramic crystals in terms of symmetry. Bowen and Uhlman.5 Perovskite 5. Bohr atoms 1. 2nd edition by Kittel. Pseudomorphism (1) 5. 1971.2. 2nd edition.7 Derivative structures None Introduction to Ceramics by Kingery.6 Spinel 5. Secondary bonding 3. 1978.3 Al2O3 5. John Wiley & Sons. 4th Edition. Other Structures (8) 7. San Francisco A Textbook of Mineralogy. NY Manual of Mineralogy. Oxide Structures (10) 5. E.3 Space lattice (linear. MIT Press Elements of X-ray Diffraction. Longman Publishing Elementary Crystallography by Buerger. point groups. NY An Introduction to Crystallography. Atomic Bonding in Solids (2) 2.2 SiO2 5.2 Wurtzite structure 7. Metallic 2. Covalent 2. Determine structure-property relationships 3.2.1 Rock salt structure 7. 4th edition. Phillips. Electron orbits 1.3 Zinc blende structure 7.1. 2nd Edition by Cullity Course Specification BSCerE 36 . symmetry combination) (2) 3.1 Rock salt (MgO) 5.6 Antifluorite structure 7. Solve typical problems in crystal chemistry 1.7 Rutile 5. Silicate Structures (4) 7.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Prerequisites Course Objectives Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. space groups and lattices 2.4 Three dimensional point groups (repetition theory. Isomorphism.1 Radius ratio coordination principles 3. basic rotational symmetries. planar and space lattices) 3.H. Cambridge University Press Introduction to Solid State Physics. Polymorphism. Ionic 2.3. John Wiley & Sons. zones) (2) 4.4. Atomic Structure (1) 1.5 Fluorite structure 7. Freeman.2 Pauling’s rule (1) 3.8 Ilmenite 6. 19th edition by Hurlbut and Klein.

2 units: 1unit lecture. water bath. Chemical resistance test (1) Optical microscope. pycnometer.3 DSC 3. SEM-EDAX) 3. porosity. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Microstructural Analysis (2) 4. Compression testing of bricks (1) 5. Compositional Analysis (2) 2.2 Scanning electron microscopy 4.3 Hardness and Fracture Toughness 6.1 Dilatometer 3. moisture analyzer.1 Dielectric constant 6.3 Porosity 1. shrinkage or expansion. Understand the principles behind basic testing methods useful for the ceramic industry 2. XRF.2 Bulk density 1.1 Specific Gravity 1.1 Compressive strength 5.2 Modulus of rupture 5. bulk density. 3 hours laboratory Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. whiteness or color) (8) 2. analytical balance. Physical testing (2) 1.3 Magnetic permeability 7.2 Resistivity 6. Identify which method is appropriate for measuring a specific ceramic property 3.1 Optical microscopy 4. calculations and evaluation of acquired data. Determination of physical properties of clay bodies before and after firing (specific gravity. XRD. sieves and sieve shaker. Thermal shock testing (3) 6. Mechanical Properties (1) 5.5 Whiteness or color 1.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Name Course Description No. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Expanded Features Unlimited Pages CERAMIC TESTING Methods of testing basic properties of ceramic materials and products with emphasis on procedures. Electrical and Magnetic Properties (1) 6. oven.3 Transmission electron microscopy 5. Other Properties (1) Laboratory 1.8 Sieve analysis 2. kiln.4 Shrinkage or Expansion 1.1 Wet Chemical Methods 2. viscometer.4 TMA 4. vernier caliper. Thermal Analysis (2) 3. 1 unit laboratory 4 hours: 1hour lecture. 3rd Edition by Wesley Win Wedlandt Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 37 .6 Permeability 1. micrometer caliper Thermal Analysis.g. Acquire exposure and/or hands-on experience in the basic testing methods through actual laboratory exercises and/or visits to other facilities 1.2 Instrumental methods (e. Optical microscopy of ceramic products (3) 3. Determine the advantages and limitations of each method 4.7 Viscosity 1.2 TGA-DTA 3. Modulus of rupture determination (1) 4. hardness tester.

Academic Press. The American Ceramic Society. Potter’s wheel. 9 by Mangels and Messing (eds. Throwing of clay body (2) 5. Treatise on Material Science and Technology. 3 hours laboratory Ceramic Raw Materials and Processes. Pressing of clay body (1) 8. Processes and Products by Dinsdale. Slip casting of clay body (3) 6. Vol. Mixer. Course Name Course Description No. Identify the most appropriate manufacturing technique for a given ceramic product 4. Vol. John Wiley & Sons. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. 1978 Emergent Process Methods for High-Technology Ceramics. 1984 Ultrastructure processing of Ceramics. Determine local practices in ceramic forming technology 5. John Wiley & Sons. Firing of clay body (1) Extruder. Plenum Publishing. 1 unit laboratory 4 units: 1 hour lecture. Ceramic Testing At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. 2 units: 1 unit lecture. Develop hands-on skills in the various ceramic forming techniques Lecture: 1. Throwing 3. 1982 Manual of Industrial Instrumentation Ceramic Industrial Processing and Testing by Jones et al. Pressing Equipment Forming of Ceramics. Advances in Ceramics Vol. Identify the different forming techniques used in the manufacture of various ceramic products 2. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites CERAMIC FORMING TECHNOLOGY Study of different forming techniques used in the manufacture of various ceramic products with emphasis on structure-property-processing relationships. Palmar and Porter.. Preparation of clay materials (3) 2. Pressing (1) 7.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Ceramic Monographs by Interceram JACS Ceramic Tests and Calculations by Andrews Research Techniques in Non-destructive Testing by Sharpe. Glasses and Composites by Hench and Ulrich. Understand the effects of processing on the structure and properties of ceramic products 3. Jiggering (1) 4. Materials Science Research. Molding (3) Laboratory 1. Hand forming (1) 2. Kiln. 17 by Davis. Hand forming of clay body (1) 3. To include examples of several ceramic components. Materials. Noyes Publications. 9 by Wang. 1976 Ceramic Processing Before Firing by Onoda and Hench. Casting (4) 5. John Wiley Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 38 . Extrusion of clay body (1) 7.). 1984 Pottery Science. 1984 Ceramic Fabrication Processes. Jiggering of clay body (1) 4. Inc. Academic Press. Extrusion (1) 6. 1984 Ultrastructure Processing of Advance Structural and Electronics Materials by Hench. Making of mold (4) 9.

1 unit laboratory (optional) or 3 units lecture (if no lab) 5/3 hours: 2 hours lecture (if with lab). 3 hours laboratory (optional) or 3 hours lecture (if no lab) Ceramic Raw Materials and Processes. Brooks Cole Publishing Company Course Specification BSCerE 39 . of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. MacMillan Publishing House.3 Central composite design 4.1 Sections of the Research Proposal 5.3 Analysis of Variance of factorial experiments 3.2 Hypothesis testing of means and variances 3. Optimization Methods (8) 4.3 Major considerations in DOE 2.4 Simplex method 4. Write a research proposal on the undergraduate thesis 4. Design of Experiments (2) 1. 3 units: 2 units lecture (if with lab).2 Fractional factorial experiments 3. Ceramic Testing At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Pitman Publishing Corporation Course Objectives RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING Research and development methodologies applicable to study of ceramic engineering systems.1 Fundamental considerations 4..1 Confidence intervals 2. Variable Screening Designs (15) 3. tables and fitted regression models 1. Perform statistical analysis of experimental results using techniques such as ANOVA 6.2 Method of steepest ascent 4. Probability and Statistics. Inc. Present results in appropriate form using graphs. Hypothesis Testing (4) 2.2 Stages of investigation where DOE is useful 1. Apply design of experiment (DOE) fundamentals to assigned problems 5. Preparation of the Research Proposal (2) 5.1 Major benefits of using statistical experimental design 1. Writing of research proposals on assigned topics.4 Interaction plots of significant effects 4. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Expanded Features Unlimited Pages & Sons. Identify appropriate research and development methodologies pertaining to ceramic engineering systems 2.5 Analysis of optimization experiments (finding parameters in first order and second order models) 4.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Name Course Description No. NY 1978 Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists by Hayter Statistical Methods for Engineers by Vining.1 2k Factorial Design 3.2 Major Considerations in Writing the Proposal Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References None Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists by Walpole and Myers. 1986 Ceramic Whitewares by Newcomb.6 Test for goodness of fit 5. Determine appropriate methodologies to an assigned research problem 3.

coal.1 Metallurgical furnaces 8. Combustion (5) 8.2 Storage of Coal 4.2 Pertinent Calculation (composition & heat value) based on the analysis of the flue gas 6.1 Preparation of gaseous fuels 7. Coke and coke making (2) 4.3. Calorific Value of Coals using Dulong’s Formula 3. Select the most appropriate fuel for a given application 1.3 Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels 8. oil and LPG. Energy Resources 1.2 Fuel Oils 6.2 Coke Ovens 4.2 Calorific value of gaseous fuels 7.1 Metallurgical coke 4. 3 units: 2 units lecture. Make stoichiometry and energy calculations pertaining to principal fuels used in ceramic engineering 3. Secondary fuels (2) Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 40 .1 Properties of liquid fuels 6. 3 hours laboratory Analytical Chemistry At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Understand the general principles of combustion 4.5 Calculation based on the analysis of the flue gas 7. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites FUELS AND COMBUSTION Study of the principles of combustion including stoichiometry and energy calculations of the principal fuels used in ceramic engineering such as coke.5 High pressure gas generators 7.2. oil and LPG 2.4 Manufacture of producer gas 7.1 Pertinent Calculation (composition & heat value) based on the combustion of coal and coke 5.4 Calculation based on the combustion of coal and coke 6.6 Fluidized bed gasification process 7.4 Formed coke 5. Identify the different fuels used in ceramic engineering such as coke. Analysis of Coal (1) 1. Classification of Coal (1) 3.9 Calculation based on the combustion of coal and coke Calculation based on the analysis of the flue gas 8.1 Grade of Coal 3.3 Calorific Value of liquid fuels 6.2 Material balances in combustion 8.7 Dilute phase or entrained-suspension gasification 7. 1 unit laboratory 5 hours: 2 hours lecture. Proximate Analysis 1.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Name Course Description No.3 Properties of coke 4.5. Gaseous fuels (6) 7.4 Maximum adiabatic flame temperature 8. Introduction (1) 1.3 Gasification of solid fuels 7.4. coal.1. Solid fuels (4) 5. Liquid fuels (4) 6. Ultimate Analysis 1.5 Performance of metallurgical furnaces 9.8 Substitution by natural gas 7. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Coal Resources 2.

3 hours laboratory (if with lab) or 3 hours lecture (if no lab) Phase Equilibrium in the Ceramic System Ceramic Raw Materials & Processes Ceramic Raw Materials & Processes Laboratory Properties of Ceramics Products At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Determination of kindling temperature of solid.1 History and Identification of white wares and Structural products 1. 1unit laboratory (if with lab) or 3 units lecture (if no lab) 5/3 hours: 2 hours lecture (if with lab). Identify the different production. firing.3 Quality Control for Green ware production. Whiteware body Preparation Operation (5) 5. Testing. Drying of White wares (4) Course Specification BSCerE 41 .2 Plasticity 2. Quality Control and Beneficiation of Raw Materials (4) 4. packaging and control of properties.(3) 4.2 Combustion 10. Phase Diagrams of Target Products and their Role in Product formulation (2) 5. finishing and packaging techniques for ceramic whitewares 3. production. Introduction (1) 1. Suggest procedures necessary for control of properties 4.3 Refractory Industry 10.4 Whiteware and Structural Industry 10. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Perform case studies of manufacturing problems 1. Flame temperature measurement (3) 5.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 9. 3 units: 2 units lecture (if with lab). Determination of the caloriFc value of kerosene and bunker oil. Orsat analyzer Industrial Stoichiometry by Lewis. Combustion and Furnaces by John Griswold Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No.4 Deflocculation. Radasch and Lewis Industrial Stoichiometry by Williams and Johnson Industrial Chemical Calculations by Hougen and Watson Chemical Calculations by Anderson Industrial Chemistry by Raymond Riegel Fuels .2 Rheology and Rheometry 5. bomb calorimeter. firing techniques.2 Functions and Limitations of Products.2 Cement Industry 10. Energy balances (2) Laboratory 1. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Outline WHITEWARES Technology of whitewares manufacture with emphasis on product formulation. Determination of the calorific value of coal. Raw Materials for Whitewares production (7) 2.5 Artware Industry 11. Apply principles of product formulation in connection with whitewares 2. 6. (3) 3. Fuels and Combustion Application in (3) 10. Determination of the calorific value of LPG. liquid and gas fuels (4) Kiln.3 Colloidal Chemistry 2. 3.1 Glass Industry 10.1 Methods of Fabrication 5. 2.1 Sources and properties of the raw materials 2. finishing. Case studies of actual manufacturing problems.1 Production 9. rice hull and coconut shell (4) 2.

Testing and quality control of plaster of paris (heat treated vs. and time 4. sieve and sieve shaker. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites PROPERTIES OF CERAMIC PRODUCTS Influence of composition. Finishing and Packaging of Wares (3) 7. viscometer. temperature. vernier caliper.6. Thermal properties (6) 2. oven.3 Finishing techniques on green wares 6. extruder Whitewares Production.1987 Rheology and Rheometry of Clay-Water Systems by Phelps. Effect of heat (vitrification) on green wares 7. 7. Testing and quality control of products from various product formulations (5) 7. blunger. Identify methods of modifying properties through a change in microstructure 1. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. optical. chemical.3.4 Quality Control of drying of green wares. magnetic properties of ceramic products.2 Effect of various salts and electrolytes on the drying properties of clay 6. Identify the different properties of ceramic products such as thermal. mechanical. Sampling of raw materials.2. optical. pot mill and roller. Thermal expansion and heat conduction Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 42 .2 Density 2. electrical. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 6. commercial plaster) (2) 5. Production of chosen wares (5) Kiln.1952 Ceramics Clay Technology by Hewitt Wilson Introduction to Ceramics by Kingery.1 Definition and fundamental principles of heat capacity. Melting. Kilns and Settings (5) 7.1. Bowen & Uhlmann Introduction to Phase Equilibria in Ceramic Systems by Hummel Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. Beneficiation of plastic and non-plastic raw materials (1) 4. Kelly & Wood Elements of Ceramics by Norton. Testing and quality control of plastic and non-plastic raw materials (2) 6. (1) 3. Physical properties (2) 1. Testing and Quality Control by Ryan & Radford. fusion and crystallization of silicates 7. Particle size distribution. Quality control of fired wares. Laboratory inventory (materials and equipment) (1) 2.1 Melting point 1. Rationalize the properties in terms of the microstructure 3. time and other controllable parameters on the microstructure and resultant thermal. Moisture content on delivery. temperature. Ceramic Crystal Chemistry At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. pug mill. Relate the properties and microstructure to controllable parameters such as composition. Maguire.5. Research and Development Tools 7. pressure. 8.4.1 Effect of heat on Plastic clay and on green wares 6. balance. Advanced Finish Technology. mixer. Laboratory Option 1. electrical and magnetic properties 2. chemical. Different periods in vitrification 7. mechanical.

Fundamentals of Ceramics by Michel Barsoum. polarization.10 Polycrystalline ferrites 7.8 Ilmenites 7.5 Spinel ferrites 7..8 Classes of dielectrics 6.2 Plasticity in ceramics (dislocation theory for ceramic materials.4 Electronic conduction in crystals and glasses 5.5 Absorption and color 3. Kingery.9 Ferroelectric ceramics 7.R.3 Fracture Mechanisms (Brittle fracture and crack propagation.3 Magnetic domains 7. John Wiley & Sons.D.5 Dielectric loss factor for crystals and glasses 6.1 Magnetic phenomena 7.4 Strengthening and fracture toughening of ceramics 5.3 Ionic conduction in crystals and glasses 5.1991 Handbook of ceramics and composites.11 Effects of temperature 7. inductance. Uhlmann.4 Hysteresis 7.C.7 Mixed conduction in poor conductors ad polycrystalline ceramics 6. Failure mechanisms in semiconductors.. Toughening Mechanism in Quasi-brittle materials. Magnetic Properties (3) 7. creep.1 Electrical conduction and mobility 5.3 Effect of heat treatment 2.2 Charge carriers 5.5 Effects of composition 5. elastic moduli) 4.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 2.4 Opacity and translucency 3.3 Boundary reflectance and surface gloss 3.5 Thermal conduction mechanisms 2.1 Electromagnetic waves in ceramics 3.2 Refractive index and dispersion. Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 43 . Optical properties (3) 3.12 Effects of composition.6 Rare earth garnets 7.1 Elastic and anelastic behavior of ceramics (stress-strain curves. Inc.6 Thermal stress.1 Definition of capacitance. grain size and porosity None Introduction to Ceramics by W.2 Diamagnetic and paramagnetic materials 7. valency-controlled semiconductors) 5.3 Dielectric constant of crystals and glasses 6.7 Dielectric conductivity 6. Bowen.6 Conduction in semiconductors (non-stoichiometric and solute controlled electronic conduction. thermal shock resistance and thermal spalling 3. fatigue. Dielectric properties (3) 6. John Wiley and Sons. viscous flow in liquids and glasses. H.2 Mechanisms for polarization in a dielectric field 6. reflection and refraction 3.4 Effect of polymorphic transformations 2. Electrical properties (7) 5. D. deformation mechanism maps. dependence of plasticity on temperature and composition) 4.6 Ceramic stains 4. loss factor and dielectric strength 6.9 Hexagonal ferrites 7. glasses and composites 2.2 Density and thermal expansion of crystals. effects of microstructure on fracture behavior) 4.K.7 Orthoferrites 7.4 Effects of frequency and temperature 6. Mechanical properties (7) 4. NY Ceramic Materials for Electronics by R. Buchanan.

sieves and sieve shaker. processing and formulation of glazes and enamels including body-and-glaze compatibility. firing and/or sintering of ceramic products with emphasis on study of kiln construction and operations. Borax Consolidated Limited. Batch preparation for glazes and enamels (5) 3.Solymar and D. Callister. Pergamon Press.H. Testing of final ceramic products. pouring) (4) Kiln. Application and firing of glazes (spraying. th Lectures on Electrical Properties of Materials. NY. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites GLAZES AND ENAMELS Study of the raw materials. Ravaglioli Ceramic Glaze Technology by Taylor and Bull. Defects in Glazes and Enamels (5) Laboratory 1. 3 units: 2 units lecture. Raw Materials for Glazes and Enamels (2) 2. pot mill. 1 unit laboratory 5 hours: 2 hours lecture. Firing of Glazes and Enamels (2) 6.. Institute of Ceramics. Identify the governing principles and theories behind each method Course Specification BSCerE 44 . of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Solve problems on formulation of glazes and enamels 3. Develop hands-on skills in the preparation of glazes through the laboratory experiments Introduction (1) 1. autoclave or equivalent Ceramic Glazes by Parmelee. 1 unit laboratory 5 hours: 2 hours lecture.. Jr. Mechanism of Melting and Cooling (3) 7. Identify the raw materials for glazes and enamels 2. dipping. 3 hours laboratory Ceramic Raw Materials and Processes.. 3 hours laboratory Kinetics of Materials. Walsh Course Name Course Description No.1994 Elements of Ceramics by F. 5 edition by L. mixer.D. painting. Determination of glaze slip properties (4) 4. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Objectives THERMAL PROCESSES AND PYROMETRY Principles and theories involved in drying. Formulation of glazes (4) 2. Industrial Publications. 3 units: 2 units lecture. oven. Identify appropriate testing methods for final ceramic products especially those used in local practice 5. Formulations and Phase Diagrams of Glazes and Enamels (7) 3.Norton. 1986 Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Colors in Glazes and Enamels (3) 8. firing and/or sintering of ceramic products 2. Identify methods of drying..Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Materials Science and Engineering by W. Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. balance. Applications of Glazes and Enamels (3) 5.Inc. Batch Preparation of Glazes and Enamels (5) 4. 1965 Ceramic Glazes: Science Technology. Assess body-and-glaze compatibility based on formulation 4. Inc. 1951 Vitreous enamels. Phase Equilibrium in Ceramic Systems At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Fuels and Combustion At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1.

Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Outline Laboratory Equipment 3. 2 units: 1 unit lecture. Environmental and economic considerations. Economic considerations (2) 5. The Kanthal Corporation.Material Specifications and Construction by Olsen Kilns: Design. 1951 Kiln Building by Gregory The Kiln Book. lay-out. Firing techniques and temperatures of ceramic bodies (6) 9. Cambridge. Pennsylvania. Determine environmental and building regulations needed for plant design 5 Identify major economic factors in the design 5 Conduct general evaluation and assessment of an existing ceramic plant design based on lay-out and other major considerations 1.. Develop skills in the design and construction of kilns and furnaces 5. Structure of kiln (5) 4. USA. Basic material handling concepts (2) Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 45 . Laboratory Activities 10. 1975 Kaiser Refractories Handbook. I and II. 1 unit laboratory 4 hours: 1 hour lecture. Fuels and Combustion (2) 3. Mass. location. Actual Operation and Control of Furnaces and Kilns (7) 12. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Harbison-Walker Refractories Company. McGraw-Hill Book Co. kiln Elements of Ceramics by Norton. Kaiser Refractories Corporation Modern Refractory Practice. Inc. Connecticut. Engineering Economy At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Actual Design of Laboratory Furnace and Kiln (7) 11. 3 hours laboratory Regular 5th year standing . Identify the different components of plant design 2. Determine machine specifications of major equipment in plant 4. Trinks. energy balance. Heat retention and transfer (3) 5. Pyrometric cone equivalent (3) Thermocouple and pyrometer. Refractory for kiln materials (2) 6. John Wiley & Sons. determination of machineries and equipment specifications. Acquire knowledge about high temperature measurements and control 1. Addison-Wesley Press. Building regulations (2) 4. 1961- Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. Inc. Measurement and control over temperatures (2) 8. Solve computational problems on heat transfer 4. Introduction (2) 2. Plant lay-out and design (3) 2. Industrial Furnaces. 1952 Fundamentals of Ceramics by Osborn Fine Ceramics by Norton.. Kiln design (9) 7. Vol. Construction and Operation by Rhodes Journals and Bulletins of The American Ceramic Society The Kanthal Handbook. Apply principles of material balance and energy balance in plant design 3. USA. Environmental considerations (2) 3. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites CERAMIC PLANT DESIGN Basic principles of plant design with emphasis on basic material handling.

. 1980 National Building Code Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. McGraw-Hill Book Company Modern Refractory Practice. Finalization of plant design output (1) Computer facility with design software Ceramic Monographs by the German Ceramic Society Plant Design and Economics for Chemical Engineers. Refractory formulations (7) 6. Samsonov et al. Properties of Ceramic Products At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Ceramic Raw Materials and Processes . Identify the different refractory raw materials and products 2. Computer aided layouting (4) 2. Identify the processes and operations involved in the manufacture of refractories 3. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites REFRACTORIES Study of the processes and operations in the manufacture of refractories with emphasis on raw materials and product formulations which could affect mechanical. Processes and operations in the manufacture of applicable products (6) 7. Mass. New Developments in Monolithic Refractories by Fisher (ed. 1964 Handbook of Refractory Compounds. Transportation (2) 7. Computation of tonnages. Sources of raw materials (natural and synthetic) (4) 3. Introduction to refractories (2) 2. 3rd edition by Peters and Timmerhaus. NY. Identify physical and chemical characterization methods for raw materials 4.) Raw Materials for the Refractory Industry by Cooper and Dickson Refractories: Production and Properties by Chesters Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 46 . Benchmarking activities (5) 5. Plant location (2) 8.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 6. Physical characterization of raw materials (5) 4. Lay-out analysis of existing manufacturing plant (2) Laboratory Activities 1. Select the appropriate refractory for a given application 5. McGraw-Hill Book Company. thermal and chemical properties of refractory materials 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture Phase Equilibrium in Ceramic Systems. Harbison and Walker Refractories Company The Technology of Ceramics and Refractories by Budnikov. Understand the degradation behavior of refractories 1. The MIT Press. Chemical characterization of raw materials (5) 5. Literature and library search of design related data (4) 3. capacities and energy requirements (3) 4. Properties and application of finished products (3) None Refractories by Norton.

4 FTIR 3. Ceramic Society of Japan. R.R. Identify important methods of characterizing advanced ceramics 4. AES.1991 Handbook of ceramics and composites. CMC Press. C. (in Japanese) 1998. NY Ceramic Materials for Electronics by Relva C. 13. Suggest ways of modifying the microstructure of advanced ceramics to control certain properties 1. Bowen.2 Ferroelectric ceramics 4. characterization. its application to self-cleaning.J. 1995 *Compiled literature from the internet.2 AFM 3.Brinker and G.4 Hydrothermal methods 2. 68-130p Introduction to Ceramics by Kingery.3 Thermoelectric ceramics 4.C. Scherer. D. Hashimoto and A. Identify various methods which can be used in the synthesis of advanced ceramics 3.6 Planetary Ball Milling 3. 3.1 Superconducting oxides and borides 4. Inc. Bowen.D.5 STM 3. Alum Press. Special Characterization methods for advanced ceramics (9) 3. Discussion of special properties of selected advanced ceramics (9) 4. 357p Earth Resources. RBS 3. John Wiley & Sons.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Name Course Description No. Uhlmann.2 Co-precipitation 2.1 Sol-gel processing 2.J.6 Fracture-toughened ceramics None Present State of Mineral Resources. Introduction to Ceramics. Chapter 1-3. Tokyo. Buchanan. Uhlmann Fundamentals of Ceramics by Michel Barsoum. 2nd Ed. 177p Sol-gel Science. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No.Skinner. Identify examples of advanced ceramics and their applications in high technology 2. Kingery. Introduction (3) 1. H. K.3 Raman 3. Kyoritsu Press.3 CVD 2. Chapter 2.4 Semiconducting ceramics 4. Handbook of Ceramics. 1989. T.Nishiyama. Fujishima. B. Academic Press Inc.2 Raw materials for high technology ceramics 2. 1982. and microstructure-modification of advanced ceramics consisting of high purity oxides and non-oxides used in high technology applications 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture 4 year standing At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Expanded Features Unlimited Pages ADVANCED CERAMICS I Study of the synthesis. Ceramic Materials for Electronics.5 MBE 2. Giho-do Press (in Japanese) 2002. Synthesis of advanced ceramics (10) 2.* W.1 High technology ceramics 1.7 Ellipsometry 4. Buchanan Ceramic Processing by Terpstra.1 TEM 3.6 ESCA or XPS.W. TiO2 Photocatalysis. 1990. 2nd edition (Ouyou-henn) Ed. th Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 47 .. and 14. Pex and de Vries..K. anti-bacterial and air purifying materials. John Wiley and Sons.5 High-K and low-K dielectrics 4.

Mechanism of Melting and Cooling (4) 8. Callister. Walters-Noodhoff Publishing. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites GLASS TECHNOLOGY Review of the raw materials. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Make formulations of glasses and glass-ceramics based on phase diagram information 3. th Solymar and D. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites CEMENT MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY Comprehensive discussion on the unit processes and operations in cement manufacture including raw materials. 1952 Glass Science by Doremus. Glass-Ceramics. The Structure and Mechanical Properties of Inorganic Glasses by Bortenev. Acquire an overview of the technology of glasses and glass-ceramics 2. Addison-Wesley Press. Mechanical and chemical properties of cement products. 1941 Elements of Ceramics by Norton. Defects in Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (4) None Glass: The Miracle Maker by Philips.. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture Ceramic Raw Materials and Processes. Reinhold Publishing Corporation. Rationalize procedures and formulations in terms of their effects on various properties 1. Raw Materials for Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (2) 3. Batch Preparation of Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (4) 5. W. Forming of Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (3) 7.1994 F. Applications of Glasses of Glass-Ceramics (4) 6. NY Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No.. fuel and combustion. Identify best practices especially in local plants 4.Norton. optical and electrical properties. Formulations and Phase Diagrams of Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (6) 4. kiln characterization. 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture Ceramic Raw Materials and Processes. McMillan Physical Properties of Glass by Standworth. Introduction (1) 2. characterization and processing of glasses and glass-ceramics with emphasis on mechanical. Walsh. Inc. Lectures on Electrical Properties of Materials 5 ed. Course Name Course Description No. thermal.Inc. machineries and equipment used. Inc.H. Pitman Publishing Corporation. Properties of Ceramic Products At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. Phase Equilibrium in Ceramic Course Specification BSCerE 48 .D. Inc.Elements of Ceramics. Materials Science and Engineering. product formation.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Toughening Mechanism in Quasi-brittle materials. Jr. Oxford University Press Handbook of Glass Manufacture Vo1. Ashlee Publishing Company Glass: Its Industrial applications by Phillips. Failure mechanisms in semiconductors. John Wiley & sons. I and II by Tooley. Colors in Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (3) 9.

(2) 1.2 Hydration of Cement. Cement formulations (7) 3. Develop awareness about environmental concerns in cement manufacture 1.2 Physical and Chemical properties of phases 2. 2 units laboratory 6 hours laboratory Fifth year standing Course Specification BSCerE 49 .5 Different types of cement 2.1 Hydration of calcium silicate. Identify the unit processes and operations in cement manufacture 3.1 Physical characterization 5. Presentation of undergraduate thesis output and submission of final report. Cement Chemistry. Reinhold Publishing Corporation. Identify the different machineries and equipment used in cement manufacture 4.1 Phase diagrams of various kinds of cement 3.W. (3) None nd H. 2 Edition. Uses and applications of various kinds of cement 7. aluminate phase. NY Course Name Course Description No. ferrite phase) 2.6 Chemistry of cement manufacture 4. Lime and other Alternative Cements. Condensed Silica Fume in Concrete Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites Plasticity in Reinforced Concrete. Characterization of Cement (6) 5. Holmes. Environmental concerns on Cement Production (3) 8.3 High temperature chemistry of cement clinker 3.3 Manufacture of various kinds of cement clinker 3. 1992 Fibre & Micro-concrete Roofing Tiles.1 Phases in cement clinker (albite. aluminate.3 Cement raw materials and deposits in the Philippines 1. properties and functions) 3.1997 Hill. Cement clinker (4) 2. Introduction. nd The Chemistry of Portland Cement.2 Cement industries of the Philippines 1.1 History of Cement manufacturing 1. ferrite and sulfate phases 4.5 Cement additives (source. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No.F.4 Finish millings of various kinds of cement clinker 3. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites UNDERGRADUATE THESIS Individual/group research study of the student with supervision of a faculty leading to the application of the different concepts and principles in the field of ceramic engineering.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Objectives Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Systems At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Mather.2 Chemical characterization 6. 2 edition by Bogue. 5.2 Batch preparation of various kinds of cement 3. Taylor. Recent Developments in the Manufacture of cement and Cement Products. Identify the raw materials for cement manufacture and their sources 2. belite.4 Imported raw materials for cement manufacture 1. Properties of Cement Clinker and Cement (5) 4. Identify important mechanical and chemical properties of cement products and how they are affected by the cement formulation 5. Gain familiarity with local cement manufacturing practices 6.

mechanical and chemical properties of structural clay products during the manufacturing process 3. 3 hours laboratory or 3 hours (if no lab) Phase Equilibria in the Ceramic System Ceramic Raw Materials & Processes Ceramic Raw Materials & Processes Laboratory Properties of Ceramics Products At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Control of physical. Testing and quality control of products from various product formulations (6) 6. Laboratory Equipment Course Specification BSCerE 50 . Develop writing and presentation skills 4. Submit a written report output Not applicable (progress to be monitored based on Gantt chart in the submitted undergraduate thesis proposal) Multimedia facility Depends on the selected topic Course Name Course Description No.2 Forming 4. mixer. Defend the results of the study in an oral presentation 5. Introduction (1) 2. (1) 3.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Course Objectives Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Production of chosen wares (6) Kiln. Perform actual formulation and manufacture of a structural clay product in the laboratory (applicable to those with laboratory option) Lecture 1. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No.4 Finishing 4. Raw Materials for Structural Clay Products (2) 3. sieve and sieve shaker. Chemical Characterization (5) 7.6 Testing and Quality Control 5. oven. Identify means of controlling the physical. Manufacturing Processes of Structural Clay Products (8) 4. Laboratory inventory (materials and equipment) (1) 2. viscometer.5 Firing 4.3 Drying 4. Physical Characterization (5) 6. Conduct an individual or group research study on an appropriate topic in the field of ceramic engineering 2. Moisture content on delivery. mechanical and chemical properties of structural clay products. Beneficiation of plastic and non-plastic raw materials (1) 4.1 Batch Making 4. Product Formulation using Phase Diagram (8) 4. Uses and Applications (2) Laboratory (for those with lab option) 1. Identify the unit processes and operations in the manufacture of structural clay products 2. Particle size distribution. Testing and quality control of plastic and non-plastic raw materials (2) 5. Sampling of raw materials. balance. blunger. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Outline STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS Unit processes and operations in structural clay manufacture. Apply different concepts and principles previously learned on a research project 3. 1unit laboratory or 3 units (if no lab) 5/3 hours: 2 hours lecture (if with lab). 3 units: 2 units lecture (if with lab).

335-358 Standardization and Plant Control as Applied to Body Making by Riddle and Twells. 6(4). Frechette (ed. McGraw-Hill Book Co. eds. pp. ACS Bulletin vol. ANOVA and lot-by-lot acceptance sampling. extruder. ACS Bulletin Vol. Control charts 8. Sampling Methods (3) None ISO 9000 Series Quality Assurance in Ceramic Industry. 132-134 Quality Control as Applied to Fire Clay and Aluminum-Diaspore Fire Clay Bricks by Hunt and Lesar. pp. ACS Bulletin Vol. ANOVA and lot-by-lot acceptance sampling 1. pug mill. Philippine National Standards 5. pp. Structural Clay Products by Brownell Course Name Course Description No. ACS Bulletin vol. Identify the basic principles in quality assurance 2. IEC) 4. pp.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Suggested References Expanded Features Unlimited Pages vernier caliper. ACS Bulletin Vol. 149-152 Works Control of Uniformity of Refractories by Hannah. 313-318 Quality production by Bach.ISO.g. ACS Bulletin vol. International Standards (e. 23 (10). Other National Standards (e. 121-132 Control Testing of Borax and Soda Ash Stocks used in the Smelting of Enamel Frits by Knowles.. pot mill and roller. Prescribe procedures to control the quality of manufactured ceramic products 3. Identify the most relevant quality standards such as ISO parameters 4. ACS Bulletin vol.g JIS) 6. 10(10). Chemistry of Engineering Materials by Leighou. pp. ANOVA 9. vol. 162-163 Statistical Quality Control in the Glass Container Industry. pp. Inc. 74-77 Raw Materials Control by the Talc Producer by Gaskins. 333-340 Quality Control system in a Porcelain Insulator Plant by Fritz. 14 II. pp. pp. ASTM.. Verlag Schmid GmbH. 11 (5).. Inc. 1982 Brick Manufacture in Developing Countries by Keddie et al. Statistical Tools for Quality Control (5) 7. 32(3). ACS Bulletin vol. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. JACS vol.) Quality Control for Profit by Lester. 6(4). Present and Future by Toulouse. 1 unit lecture 1 hour lecture Probability and Statistics At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1.k pp. Enrick and Mottley Quality Control by Thorman. Freiburg I Br. Past. Quality Control Requirements in the Ceramic Industry (4) 2. pp. ACS Bulletin. ACS Bulletin. pressing equipment Elements of Ceramics by Norton. 32 (4). Addison-Wesley Press. vol. 10(4). pp. 281-291 The Necessity for Operating Standards and Procedure Controls in the Enameling Industry by Landrum. 70-73 Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 51 . 32 (10). Germany. 370-372 Control System Problems with Semisilica Brick by Bicekly Remmrey. 32 (3). Ceramic Monograph: Handbook of Ceramics by Bilke and Paestch. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites QUALITY ASSURANCE Study of the basic principles of quality assurance using established quality techniques based on statistical tools such as control charts for variables and attributes. Quality Standards (5) 3. Make proper use of statistical tools such as control charts.

pp. Make visits to plants in the ceramic industry 2. and 14. 34(9). 31 (10). Research challenges in nanotechnology (7) None Nanochemistry: A Chemical Approach to Nanomaterials by G. ACS Bulletin vol. ACS Bulletin Vol. 34(10). 13. characterization and microstructure-modification methods for nanoceramics 2. Academic Press Inc. Arsenault Nanophysics and Nanotechnology: An introduction to modern concepts in nanoscience by E. 26 (6). Wolf The Chemistry of Nanomaterials: Synthesis. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Properties of nanomaterials (8) 3.Brinker and G. 1 unit Laboratory 3 hours Laboratory Senior standing At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Observe actual process and operations in these plants Course Specification BSCerE 52 . Identify the synthesis. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Objectives CERAMIC PLANT VISITS Plant visits to ceramic industries with emphasis on observation of actual process and operation. Ozin and A. 32(3). Rao Nanobiotechnology: Concepts. pp. JACS Vol. 403-411 Applications of the Apparent Specific Gravity Test to Ceramic Whiteware by Thiemann.R.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Improvement of Analytical Control for Silica Brick by Rozca. pp. Properties and Applications by C. Scherer. Submission and presentation of reports of the visits. Gather information from literature about the latest research and development efforts and challenges pertaining to nanoceramic systems 1. 181-183 Statistical Quality Control for Enameled Steel Production by Stevan. Synthesis of nanomaterials (8) 2.. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. 34 (10). 325-327 PNS 154 Course Name Course Description No.generation of advanced ceramics focusing on nanotechnology 2 units lecture 2 hours lecture Advanced Ceramics I At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Chapter 2. pp. 280-283 Product Quality Specifications by Powell. ACS Bulletin vol. ACS Bulletin vol. C.W. Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. 3. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites ADVANCED CERAMICS II Continuation of the study of the new. Applications and Perspectives by C. pp. 1990. Potential applications of nanomaterials (8) 4. 279-282 A Method for Determining Shot in Refractory Fibers by Hoeman. ACS Bulletin vol. pp. Niemeyer Sol-gel Science. 340-341 Quality Control as Applied to Stiff Mud Manufacture by Lesar and McGee.J.N.

4. San Miguel (glass containers) 13. 3. Republic Asahi (glass) 2. Identify current trends in ceramic engineering research and development 6. Ceramic Art Ware 2. Make oral presentations during seminar 8. Enamels and Glazes 6. Bio-ceramics 7. Nakayama Technology ( floor & wall tiles) 3. Sunpower (solar cells) None None Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. Grinding media and Abrasives 8. Glass. Siam Mariwasa Toto (sanitary wares) 11. Refractories 5. Rationalize observed practices during the visit Write and submit a report about the plant tour Deliver an oral report about the plant visit in a seminar General orientation on plant tours Plant visits to various ceramic plants Report writing and submission *Student will make a report or presentation about the plant visit. RCP (Refractory) 8. Asia Brewery (glass containers) 14. HolCim (Cement) 6. Identify relevant topics for research proposals Presentations and discussions in the suggest fields below: 1. Solid Waste Incineration plants 10. High Technology Ceramics None No particular textbook is recommended but the students can consult papers and articles from the following suggested publications: Journals of the American Ceramic Society Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 53 . 2. 5. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites SEMINAR Seminar with emphasis on technical papers on different topics involved in the current trends of ceramic engineering research and development 1 unit lecture 1 hour lecture 5th year standing At the end of the course the student must be able to: 5. Stoneware ( tableware & artwares ) 5. HCG (sanitary) 12. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 3. 1. Structural Clay Products 4. Fairchild (semiconductor) 9. Ceramic Whitewares 3. ICC (Cement) 7. Attend seminar presentations 7. Suggested Plants which can be visited 1. Electrical/Electronics Ceramics 9. Ask questions after presentations 9. Keramos ( tablewares & artwares ) 4.

Recognize possible areas for improvement and innovation in the existing company set-up 6. Suggested Special Topics: Materials Selection. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites CERAMIC ON-THE-JOB TRAINING (SUMMER) Minimum of 240 hours None (however school may have option of assigning units if to be formally enrolled) 4th year standing in the Ceramic Engineering program At the end of the training the student must be able to: 1. Surface Technology. site geography. of Contact Hours per week Prerequisites Course Objectives Course Outline Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Name Course Description No. Advanced Microscopy Techniques. Marketing Strategies. Surface Science. Submit a written technical report following the prescribed outline describing the company operations. Title Page 2. Ceramic Arts and Design 2 units Lecture 2 hours Lecture Consent of instructor At the end of the course the student must be able to: 1. Entrepreneurship.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages American Ceramic Society Bulletin Materials Research Society Publication Proceedings of Technical and Scientific Conferences Advances in Ceramics Other Sources of Scientific and Technological Information on Ceramics Course Name Course Description SPECIAL TOPICS Specialization topics of interest to ceramic engineers. Accumulate minimum of 240 hours work experience in the company or facility 2. Failure Analysis and Reliability. personal work experiences in the company and assessment of the company including recommendations for improvement 4. organizational structure and company affiliations (if any) 3. reports of projects conducted (if any). Write a profile of the company which includes thrusts/visions. Specialize in a topic of interest 2. Apply theories learned from previous courses to rationalize certain observed practices 5. Technological Innovation. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Acquire special skills on the topic 3. Results of exams (if any) Suggested Final Technical Report Format 1. Degradation of Materials. of Units for Lecture and Laboratory No. Materials in Microelectronic Packaging. Table of Contents Course Objectives Course Outline Course Specification BSCerE 54 . X-ray Diffraction. Submit prescribed documents as evidence of training such as Certificate of Completion. Instrumentation. Gain competitive advantage over other graduates To be developed according to specialization topic selected None To be determined according to specialization topic selected No.

Write a research paper on a technical topic. skills and strategies for reading and writing literature reviews. 3. Not applicable Not applicable Laboratory Equipment Suggested References II.e. etc. test and quality control. NON-TECHNICAL COURSES A. and 5. Prepare an oral presentation on a technical topic.1 Company Product(s) – description and uses or applications 4. Technical Report 4. location map. Acknowledgements Appendix – Copy of Certificate of Completion. Write a summary and review of a journal article. rehabilitation/reclamation services. materials handling and storage. mementos of training (optional) such as ID card.. 1996) C. SOCIAL SCIENCES (Please refer to CMO 59. Introduction 3. making oral presentations. s. Deliver properly an oral technical presentation. machines and equipment. waste treatment/environmental section 5. 2. human resource department. and 7. personnel involved 4. salary slip. industry/community relation. thrusts/visions. s. accessibility. reports of projects conducted (if any). shipping or transportation.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 3. organizational structure. LANGUAGES (Please refer to CMO 59.3 Support Services – administration. Differentiate technical writing from other types of writing.). Properly acknowledge sources by using a prescribed citation format. 4. recommendations 7. Assessment of the Company – observations. waste management. comments and reactions. and technical reports. 6. time card. Engage him/herself critically in the reading of a specialized text. quality assurance department. etc. Personal Work Experiences . pictures. HUMANITIES (Please refer to CMO 59. journal articles.narration of work/tasks undertaken at different sections 6. site geography (i.2 Processing Line – process flowsheet. 1996) B. Course Objectives Course Specification BSCerE 55 .. results of exams (if any). affiliated companies (if any) 3. the student must be able to: 1.2 The Company – company profile. safety department.. 1996 for English 1 and 2) Course Name Course Description Number of Units for Lecture and Laboratory Number of Contact Hours per Week Prerequisites ENGLISH 3 (TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION) The nature of technical communication. 3 units lecture 3 hours lecture English 2 After completing this course. s.1 The On-the-Job Training Program – description and objectives 3.3 Schedule of Training 4.

12. Delivering the Technical Presentation None American Psychological Association. Cincinnati: South-Western College Publishing.J. Technical Writing 2. Writing Up Research: Experimental Research Report Writing for Students of English. 1990.. J. Carreon.7. Introduction to Technical Writing 2.11.1. Rasberry and R. New York: Longman.4. Manila: DLSU Press. Word Choice 2. Myers.Click Here & Upgrade PDF Complete Documents Expanded Features Unlimited Pages Course Outline 1. Preparing and Interpreting Non-Prose Forms 2. Balarbar. Skills and Strategies for Reading and Writing Journal Articles.10. 1997. Series in English for Specific Purposes: Engineering. K. Introduction to Research: Choosing a Topic. R. Preparing the Presentation Materials 3. DC: American Psychological Association.2. Technical Writing: Formal Schema/Style. Advanced Business Communication. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Independent Study 3. Inc. 1994.8. Laboratory Equipment Suggested References Course Specification BSCerE 56 . 2003.M.2. Guide to College Reading.6. Outlining 2. E. Library Orientation 2. Preparing the Different Parts of the Research Paper or Technical Report 2. McWhorter. Summarizing and Analyzing a Journal Article 2. Evaluating Sources and Preparing a Preliminary Bibliography 2. Washington.9. Oral Technical Presentations 3. Weissberg. and C. Literature Reviews. Writing Bibliographies Using a Prescribed Format 2. and Technical Reports 2. 1995. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 4th ed. and S. R. Types of Text Structure in Technical Writing 2. Penrose.1.W. The Nature of Technical Communication 2. Buker.5.3..