NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.nanomarkets.net

            Positioning Thin‐Film Photovoltaics for Success 
A NanoMarkets White Paper  March 2008   

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.nanomarkets.net

Positioning Thin‐Film Photovoltaics for Success   In  a  recent  report  titled,  Thin‐Film,  Organic  and  Printable  Photovoltaics  Markets:   2007‐2015,  NanoMarkets  predicts  that  the  reduced  cost  of  using  simple  printing  and  roll‐to‐roll  manufacturing  processes,  the  addition  of  new  capacity,  as  well  as technological  improvements  leading  to  increased  efficiency, will position thin‐film PV as a major player in the PV market.  As a result, the NanoMarkets  report indicates that thin‐film photovoltaic (TF PV) solar cells will become a mainstream technology in  markets currently served by traditional PV panels made from crystalline silicon.  The report predicts that the $1 billion TF PV market of 2007 will grow to $1.6 billion in 2008 before  climbing  to  almost  $3.4  billion  in  2010  and  $7.2  billion  in  2015.  The  TF  PV  share  of  the  overall  PV  market was less than 5 percent in 2005, but is expected to grow to about 50 percent by 2015. TF PV  will  penetrate  the  PV  markets  by  offering  a  more  cost‐competitive  solution  than  traditional  PV  for  many  applications,  as  as  by  opening  up  new  applications  though  TF  PV's  unique  properties,  which  include low weight, flexibility, and ability to be embedded into other materials.   The  most  crippling  limitation  on  conventional  PV  today  is  the  high  cost  of  producing  the  cells.  Conventional PV panels are are made using crystalline silicon via an expensive, step‐and‐repeat batch  process.   Thin‐film  technology  could  address  this  and  other  limitations  of  TF  PV  and  open  up  new  applications  for  solar  energy.  Even  so,  the  road  ahead  for  TF  PV  is  not  all  sunshine;  NanoMarkets  indicates  the  technology  will  face  challenges.  For  example,  the  recent  shortage  of  crystalline  silicon,  which initiated much of the excitement about alternative materials, is starting to subside, eliminating  one of the drivers of growing demand for TF PV.   The thin‐film technologies covered in this report include:  amorphous silicon (a‐Si), cadmium telluride  (CdTe),  Copper‐Indium‐Gallium‐Selenium  (CIGS),  Copper‐Indium‐Selenium  (CIS),  and  organic  and  organic‐inorganic  hybrid.  Each  material  approach  has  its  own  benefits  and  risks.    As  Exhibit  I  on  the  next page shows, wide variety of materials – thin films and not exhibit photoactive properties and may  be used for PV applications in a number of different environments, even if only in the lab.     

Page | 2 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.nanomarkets.net

Exhibit I:  Materials Used for PV  Approximate  Efficiency  (Percent)  35  In lab only  

Material 

Use  Page | 3 

Gallium Arsenide/Indium  Phosphide/Germanium  hybrid  Gallium Arsenide 

25  

Not widely used, except perhaps in some  aerospace applications and in other  applications where weight rather than cost is  an issue.  In lab only  The most common material used for PV today   Widely used  Growing share of the thin‐film market  Significant and growing share of the thin‐film  market, but mostly comes from one firm  The most common form of thin‐film PV.    Not in use, but several firms are actively trying  to commercialize it 

Indium Phosphide  Crystalline silicon  Multi‐crystalline silicon  CIGS  Cadmium telluride 

22  25  20  20  17 

Amorphous silicon   Organic materials  

10  4 to 8 percent 

  The  cost‐performance  balance:   Surging  energy  prices  are  driving  a  shift  toward  alternative  energy  technologies.  For  PV,  the  energy  source  is  free,  which  makes  solar  energy  attractive.  There  are  drawbacks,  however.  Conventional  PV  panels  are  heavy,  expensive  to  produce,  physically  inflexible,  and  susceptible  to  fluctuations  in  silicon  supply.  As  a  result,  PV  have  been  used  mostly  in  niche  markets  or  where  special  conditions  exist,  including  markets  where  subsidies  are  available,  markets  where  other  forms  of  electricity  are  not  widely  available,  and  markets  where  real  estate  is  not  at  a  premium  and  it  is  convenient  and  inexpensive  to  deploy  enough  panels  to  generate  the  required  amount of energy.   The  opportunities  for  thin‐film  technologies  lie  in  reducing  the  impact  of  these  limitations  and  expanding  the  markets  that  PV  can  serve.  Until  recently,  however,  low  efficiency  and  relatively 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.nanomarkets.net

undeveloped technology have prevented TF PV from capturing this opportunity. The tide is beginning  to change, though.   Changing landscape:  With skyrocketing energy prices combined with falling PV prices, the PV sector is  primed  for  growth,  with  some  observers  saying  that  PV  could  eventually  account  for  as  much  as  20  percent of U.S. energy needs.    TF  PV  is  less  expensive  because  less  material  is  used  to  produce  thin‐film  cells  compared  to  conventional  PV.  TF  PV  is  produced  by  depositing  thin  layers  of  photoelectric  material  onto  a  substrate, which enables significant reductions in the amount of raw material used. The emergence of  new  manufacturing  processes,  including  roll‐to‐roll  (R2R)  and  printing  technologies,  will  enable  even  further cost reductions.   On  the  performance  side,  trends  suggest  substantial  improvements  in  efficiencies  of  thin‐film  technologies  in  the  near  future.  CIS/CIGS,  for  example,  has  achieved  in‐field  efficiencies  fairly  comparable  to  crystalline  silicon  PV.  However,  while  there  has  been  progress,  a  gap  still  remains  between  the  efficiencies  of  thin‐film  technologies  and  that  of  conventional  PV,  in  some  cases  quite  significant  differences.  The  result:  TF  PV  must  compete  with  PV  on  a  cost‐basis  or,  where  TF  PV  are  creating new applications, on a property basis.   Shining light onto the right markets:  Where should producers of TF PV focus their efforts? Over the  forecast  period  of  2007‐2015,  all  the  applications  covered  by  TF  PV  are  expected  to  grow  strongly,  reflecting strong growth in the PV sector and the increasing penetration of TF PV into that sector.   TF  PV  will  have  the  greatest  competitive  advantage  in  markets  where  cost  and/or  weight  is  critical,  conversion efficiency is not a priority, or where a characteristic associated with a particular thin‐film  technology  is  a  factor.  The  fastest  growing  sectors  are  likely  to  be  in  the  consumer  electronics  and  residential markets, driven by price point improvements generated by TF PV. These will not necessarily  be the largest value markets, however.  A break out of opportunities for TFPV is provided in Exhibit II  on the next page.     

Page | 4 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets
 

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.nanomarkets.net

Exhibit II:  Opportunities for TF PV  Current  Future Opportunities  CIGS and s‐Si are likely to see more applications  as efficiencies rise.  Organic and hybrid  technologies do not seem likely to penetrate  this sector both because of efficiency issues and  stability issues 

Most installations use  traditional PV because  Large projects and  of high efficiency.  But  utilities  some using CdTe. 

Page | 5 

Some use of CdTe and a‐ All of the TF PV technologies have some  Commercial and  Si, especially in Germany  applications here.  This includes novel organic  industrial building  and Japan  materials which may be integrated with wall,  applications  roofing and window materials to maximize the  use of real estate/surfaces  Some use of CdTe and  possibly CIGS  Major opportunity for TF PV, because its light  weight makes it highly suitable for self‐ installation.  The ability to integrated with other  materials is also an advantage.  Rural areas in  developing nations may be especially attracted  to this solution.  This seems to be the area that some TF  manufacturers using organic materials are  aiming at in the belief that their low efficiencies  would not matter so much.  Some  manufacturers believe that there is really no  market here, beyond some niche solar battery  charger sales  The military continues to be an active funder of  TF PV technology and is looking at novel  applications, such as solar powered battlefield  dress.  Not necessarily a big market, but tends  towards the leading edge. 

Residential  building  applications 

Consumer  electronics 

a‐Si is widely used in  calculators and in other  small consumer  electronics items, while  CdTe has been used in  the past  

Military and  Emergency 

Use PV including TF PV  to service remote  locations and on the  battlefield  

  In value terms, commercial and industrial building applications will represent about 50 percent of the  demand for TF PV in 2008, with large projects and utilities accounting for the remainder of demand. By  2015,  TF  PV  demand  will  be  spread  across  a  broader  range  of  applications.  Residential  building  will 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.nanomarkets.net

account for about 15 percent, up from about 9 percent in 2008; and consumer electronics applications  will gain a larger share of the demand, reaching nearly 8 percent in 2015, up from 3.2 percent in 2008.  For  larger  projects  and  even  central  generation  of  electricity,  TF  PV  is  expected  to  soar  in  rooftop  deployment due to the lightweight factor as well as due to the focus on cost.   TF  PV  will  see  the  largest  opportunity  in  building  applications,  which  include  commercial,  industrial,  and  residential  markets.  Because  of  the  flexibility  inherent  in  thin‐film  technologies,  TF  PV  can  be  coated, laminated, or otherwise embedded, into roofs and walls. Integrating PV into building materials  has the potential to significantly lower costs. For example, the TF PV could be embedded into roofing  materials  in  an  in‐line  process,  offsetting  installation  costs  typically  associated  with  mounting  PV.  Several TF PV producers are developing products for this part of the market. For them it represents a  good  market  as  it  lacks  the  “winner  takes  all”  aspect  of  the  large  project  sector  while  potentially  accounting for a significant number of watts and hence using up available capacity.   One concern with integrating TF PV into rooftop materials is the ability of these materials to meet the  longevity  requirements  of  the  roofing  market.  Warrantees  measured  in  decades  for  roofs  are  not  unusual, and it is far from clear how well today’s TF PV products could live up to these requirements.  But another promising application for embedded PV is the PV‐enabled smart window, which doesn’t  have such concerns. In this application the PV cells are not only low cost but also add new functionality  to  the  window;  the  TF  PV  will  act  as  light  sensors  to  signal  when  to  change  the  transparency  of  the  window. This application will require a transparent PV and therefore is most suited for organic‐based  PV.  Although  not  yet  commercially  available,  organic  and  organic‐inorganic  hybrid  TF  PV  have  the  potential  to  achieve  very  low  costs  per  watt,  low  enough  perhaps  to  drive  PV  into  entirely  new  markets.  Demand  for  this  type  of  PV  is  expected  to  grow  from  $1  million  this  year,  to  about  $372  million in 2015.   Although  it  will  also  grow  during  the  next  eight  years,  and  will  probably  be  the  basis  for  many  cool  products, personal electronics will not represent a large‐value market for TF PV. TF PV has been used –  or  at  least  suggested  for  use  –  in  various  simple  applications,  including  headsets,  radios,  thermometers,  scales,  deodorizers,  wristwatches,  clocks,  stopwatches,  LED  flashing  lights,  sensor  lights,  remote  control  units,  testers,  battery  chargers,  educational  tools,  fans,  sunroof  car  fans,  and  many  others.  A  potentially  larger  area  of  interest  involves  helping  to  solve  the  power  problems  plaguing mobile phones and laptop computers. TF PV could be embedded into the battery—a sort of  small‐scale  version  of  the  integrated  building  products—to  extend  the  time  between  charging.  The  initial goal will be for TF PV to provide a power boost for the existing lithium‐ion batteries, with the  long‐term goal of replacing such batteries.  The problem here from a PV sales perspective is that each  PV array sold into the mobile phone market will be very small compared with a rooftop antenna, so  aggregate shipments of PV cells to this segment of the market end up be quite low  A  large  portion  of  all  TF  PV  applications  in  2007  will  be  dominated  by  a‐Si—the  most  mature  of  the  thin‐film technologies. As the other materials technologies mature, however, this is likely to change.  Page | 6 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.nanomarkets.net

Two of these technologies, CdTe and CIS/CIG, will contribute a total close to 45 percent of the overall  PV  energy  output  in  megawatts.  One  of  the  most  promising  technologies,  organic  and  organic‐ inorganic  hybrid  TF  PV,  will  represent  a  relatively  small  portion  of  overall  the  PV  industry  in  value  terms by 2015, but could be about the same size in megawatt terms as the entire TF PV market today.  Although not yet commercially available, organic and organic‐inorganic hybrid TF PV has the potential  to  achieve  very  low  costs  per  watt,  low  enough  perhaps  to  drive  PV  into  entirely  new  markets.  In  addition to costs, organic PV will perform relatively well indoors and has the advantage of being able  to be created on flexible substrate.  Demand for this type of PV is expected to grow from $1 million  this year, to about $372 million in 2015.  Weighing  the  risks:    Producers  could  be  concerned  that  some  of  the  drivers  for  TF  PV  demand  will  come to an end. As we have already mentioned, the silicon shortage, one of the initial factors driving  the development of thin‐film approaches to PV, is rapidly evaporating. In this forecast, NanoMarkets  has taken the view that TF PV will not be hurt significantly by the return of silicon abundance, mainly  because TF PV have too much to offer to be impacted by commodity supply.   The end  to the boom for  alternative  energy is something that  could impact the demand for PV. The  hype surrounding the alternative energy sector is too hot not to cool down, and as a result, rates of  market growth are expected to decline over the forecasting period.   There is also a risk that thin‐film technologies will not be able to deliver the predicted improvements in  efficiency. These concerns are real but will mainly impact the newer materials such as the organic and  organic‐inorganic hybrid technologies. And where TF PV enable new products, there will be the typical  high risks inherent in new product introduction.   Despite these concerns, the PV, and in particular the TF PV industry, is likely to experience significant  growth over the next eight years.       To obtain a copy of the NanoMarkets report, Thin‐Film, Organic and Printable Photovoltaics Markets:   2007‐2015, visit our website at www.nanomarkets.net or contact us at sales@nanomarkets.net or by  calling our offices at (804) 270‐7010.   

Page | 7 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful