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CordovaRecreation&ParkDistrict ParksandRecreation StrategicMasterPlan

PREPAREDBY: FEBRUARY2011

CordovaRecreation&ParkDistrict

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Parks&RecreationStrategicMasterPlanDRAFTReport

Acknowledgements

TableofContents
CHAPTERONEEXECUTIVESUMMARY........................................................................1
1.1INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................1

CHAPTERTWOCOMMUNITYINPUTRESULTSANDDEMOGRAPHICANDTRENDS ANALYSIS.......................................................................................................................2
2.1COMMUNITYINPUTSUMMARY......................................................................................2 2.2COMMUNITYINTERESTANDOPINIONSURVEY............................................................15 2.3DEMOGRAPHICSANDTRENDSANALYSIS......................................................................34

CHAPTERTHREEPARKANDRECREATIONASSESSMENT..........................................44
3.1PARKANDFACILITYASSESSMENT .................................................................................44 . 3.2PARKANDFACILITYSYNOPSIS.......................................................................................45 3.3FACILITY/AMENITYSTANDARDS....................................................................................61 3.4SERVICEAREAANALYSIS/EQUITYMAPPING..................................................................63

CHAPTERFOURPRIORITYRANKINGS.......................................................................95 CHAPTERFIVEOPERATIONALASSESSMENT.............................................................98
5.1CURRENTSTAFFINGLEVEL.............................................................................................98 5.2ORGANIZATIONALSTRUCTURE......................................................................................99 5.3LEADERSHIP..................................................................................................................100 5.4STRATEGY/DIRECTION..................................................................................................101 5.5BRANDANDIMAGE.....................................................................................................102 5.6INTERNALCOMMUNICATIONS/INTERDIVISIONALRELATIONSHIPS............................102 5.7FINANCIALSYSTEMS....................................................................................................103 5.8TECHNOLOGY...............................................................................................................104 5.9SUSTAINABILITY...........................................................................................................104 5.10HUMANRESOURCESANDWORKCULTURE ..............................................................105 . 5.11IMPROVINGEFFICIENCYANDEFFECTIVENESS..........................................................107

CHAPTERSIXCONCESSIONSASSESSMENT.............................................................110
6.1SOFTBALL/BASEBALLCOMPLEX...................................................................................110 6.2INDOORACTIVITYCENTER...........................................................................................111 6.3GOLFCOURSEPROSHOPANDFOODSERVICE.............................................................111 6.4CORDOVASHOOTINGRANGE......................................................................................114

CHAPTERSEVENFINANCIALANALYSIS...................................................................116
7.1INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................116 7.2GENERALFUND............................................................................................................117 7.3INDEPENDENCEATMATHERLIGHTINGANDLANDSCAPEDISTRICT...........................121 7.4VILLAGEOFZINFANDELANDCAPITALVILLAGECOMMUNITYFACILITIESDISTRICT...123 7.5SUNRIDGEPARKCOMMUNITYFACILITIESDISTRICT....................................................125 7.6CORDOVAGOLFCOURSEFUND...................................................................................128 7.7PARKMAINTENANCEANDRECREATIONIMPROVEMENTDISTRICT............................131 7.8FINANCIALSTRENGTH..................................................................................................133 ii

7.9POLICIESFORCONSIDERATION...................................................................................134 7.10FUNDINGPLAN..........................................................................................................136

CHAPTEREIGHTIMPLEMENTATIONPLAN..............................................................142
8.1VISION..........................................................................................................................142 8.2FINANCE.......................................................................................................................142 8.3MAINTENANCEANDOPERATIONS..............................................................................142 8.4RECREATIONPROGRAMS............................................................................................143 8.5LAND/FACILITIES........................................................................................................143 8.6MARKETING/BRANDING............................................................................................144

CHAPTERNINECONCLUSION .................................................................................145 .

Appendix:
Appendix1 Appendix2 Appendix3

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CHAPTERONE EXECUTIVESUMMARY

1.1 INTRODUCTION
TobeaddedafterDraftReportApproval

CHAPTERTWO COMMUNITY INPUT RESULTS AND DEMOGRAPHIC AND TRENDSANALYSIS

2.1 COMMUNITYINPUTSUMMARY
OneofthemostimportantelementsoftheStrategicMasterPlanprocessisthecommunity input, which provides residents with an opportunity to express their perspectives of the CordovaRecreationandParkDistricts(District)services.PROSConsulting,LLC(PROS) facilitated a series of focus groups, key leader interviews, and a public meeting. These groups were organized by the District and the invitations to attend were sent out accordingly.Thesemeetingswereheldin2008andassuchreflecttherealityofthattime. PROSrecognizesthatmayoftheissuesmayhavechangedfromthatpointbutstillneedsto documentwhatthecommunityhasexpressedatthattime. Specifically,thisincluded: Fourteenkeyleaderinterviews Twofocusgroups,theCommunityCouncilandtheSeniorAdvisoryBoard,consisting ofnineattendees Apublicmeeting

The following represents a summary of the information provided. Each question is listed withasummaryoftheresponses. 2.1.1HAVE YOU USED ANY OF THE PARKS AND RECREATION AMENITIES OFFEREDBYTHEDISTRICT?IFSOWHATHAVEYOUUSED? When asked which of the parks and recreation amenities offered by the District that they used,therespondentsprimarilynamedHaganPark.Otherwise,theypredominantlynamed outdoor activities such as sports and events. They have used rental facilities and taken advantageoftheSeniorCenter. Soccer Tennisprogram SeniorCenter Bigcommunityevents o o 4thofJuly,Christmastreelighting,etc. Peoplewouldparticipateinotherlargeevents

Thereisadesiretoseepositiveactivityintheparks Bikeridefundraiser HaganParkforpicnicsandbiking Buildingrentalsareutilizedformeetings Allofthespaceforasteamersmuseumisnotutilized 2

There is some area around it that could be developed for senior activities suchasagardenclub

2.1.2WHAT ARE THE STRENGTHS OF THE RECREATION DISTRICT THAT WE NEED TOBUILDONFORTHISMASTERPLAN? When asked about the strengths of the District, respondents cited the staff as a strength. They also cited the abundance of parks and their locations as a definite strength. The maintenanceoftheparksisalsoviewedpositively.Respondentsalsorespondedfavorably aboutthe SeniorCenter. Theyappreciatedthenewattitudepresentamongthestaffand thewillingnesstoworkwiththeseniors. TheDistrictrepresentsalotofdifferentcommunities TheDistricts50yearhistoryisastrength Longtimededicatedmaintenancestaff ThereisgoodcommunicationatDaveRobertsPark Creatingparkrenovationfeeswasagoodideatohelpexistingparks ActivitiesGuidehasgoodreadership Thenumber,sizeandlocationofparks o o o Adjacencyofparkstoschoolsisgreat Thereareparksineveryneighborhood Locatingtheparksnexttoschoolsbecameamodelforelsewhere

Thepublicsupportisverygood,iftheDistrictwouldjustgetthepublicengaged Theparksaremuchbettermaintainedthanyearsago Thisseniorcenterisanicebuildingandsitsinapark o o Thereisacompletelynewattitudewithnewstaffmanagingthecenter There is a new willingness to work with the seniors, rather than be in oppositecamps

ThenewBoardismuchmoreproactive Thekidshaveaplacetogobecauseparksarecolocatednexttoschools Thereareinterestingprograms ThelocationoftheDistrictbytheAmericanRiverTrailisexcellent MatherComplexwasgiventotheDistrictandhasbeenagreatasset ItisalargeDistrictandwellestablished Thestaffisastrength Theprogrambrochureisgood Ranchoissmall;thereisalotofcommunitytokeepintouchwith 3

o o o

Theyareintouchwithmanyorganizations Theymaintainagoodrelationshipwithschools,county,socialorganizations, andthecity TheyevenhaveagoodrelationshipwithSacramento

AlotofIntergovernmentalagreementsexist The parks will play a large role in the economic development of the District with newparkstobebuilt Therearealotofnaturalresourcesavailable Therecreationprogramsandourparkmaintenanceareprettystrong Theyhaveagoodreputationwithintheparkcommunityintheregion

2.1.3WHAT ARE THE KEY ISSUES FACING THE DISTRICT AS IT APPLIES TO PARKS ANDRECREATIONTHATWENEEDTOADDRESSINTHISMASTERPLAN? When asked about the key issues facing the District, respondents named finance, internal and external communication, and marketing as three of the most major issues, with financesbeingthenumberoneissue.ThefinancialsituationinCaliforniaisaffectingevery agency, including the District. As a result of the lack of financial resources, the interview and focus group participants mentioned the lack of staff and the need for more staff. ReferencewasmadetounfilledkeypositionsintheDistrictthatareingreatneedofbeing filled. Public input participants feel there is not enough communication among the employees within the District or between the District and the public. Examples were given of groups usingaparkandnotgettingreturnedphonecallsornotreceivingthehelpandsupportthey were counting on from District staff. Safety issues, staffing issues, and leadership issues wereallalsomentioned.Theredoesnotseemtobeleadershippresenceinthecommunity, at community events, or establishing relationships with key players in the community. CommunityCouncilmembersexpressedconcernabouttheDistrictnotreachingoutenough tocommunitygroups. ThelackofDistrictmarketingwasalsomentionedasakeyareathatismissing.Thereisnot enoughpromotionaleffort,buildingrelationshipswiththebusinesscommunity,andpeople seem unaware of what the District is doing. There should be new signs at all parks, and signageatparksbeingdevelopedinorderforresidentstoknowthedevelopmentisbeing donebytheDistrict.Otherareasmentionedinclude: SomeADAcomplianceissuesattheparks o Someoftheparkinglotsdonothavehandicappedspots

TheBoardandstaffneedtofurtherenhancetheirrelationshipwiththecommunity andarticulatewhattheirvisionis Resources TheDistrictisunderstaffed 4

Thisisduetohighstaffturnover

Thereismorefocusonlandandlessonprograms Atriskkidsarethebiggestissue Physicalhealthandwellnessforthecommunityarekeyissues Operatingwithoutamasterplanisanissue o o Theyhavenoideawheretheyaregoing Theyarereactiveinsteadofproactiveintheirapproach

Thereisaconsistentfailureoftherightpeoplewiththerighttrainingtoholdtheir jobs Moneyandpersonnelcutbacksarekeyissues Threatsofcutsinprogramsandservicesarekeyissues o Seniorprogramsarebeingthreatened

Gangsituationisakeyissue ThehomelesspeoplehavecampgroundsneartheriveronFolsomBlvd. Thenewparksarerundown Alotofoldareasarebuiltoutandthefacilitiesareaging o Itstoughtoretrofitbuildingsandfacilitiestokeepupwithchangingtimes

Theylackthefinancialresourcestodowhattheyneedtodo o RespondentswanttoDistrictstafftobemorecreative

Safetyisakeyissue o o Lightingattheparksisonesafetyissue Thereshouldbeanemergencyphonesystemthatyoucanpickupandcall emergencyservices

Leadershipandresponsivenessarekeyissues Accountabilitycanbeimproved MatherParkcomplexisakeyissue TheCityisconcernedabouttheDistrictsabilitytokeepupwiththepaceofgrowth anddevelopmentofnewparksandfacilities

2.1.4HOW BALANCED DO YOU THINK THE PARKS AND RECREATION SYSTEMS ARE IN THE DISTRICT IN TERMS OF PARK TYPES (NEIGHBORHOOD, COMMUNITY, REGIONAL,ANDTRAILS)? WhenaskedaboutthebalanceofthesystemsintheDistrict,respondentsrepliedthatthere wereamenitiesmissingatsomeparks,suchasrestroomsordrinkingfountainsandthatthe ones with these amenities, had nonfunctioning ones. Hagan Park was mentioned by 5

several respondents. They mentioned that the park closes early enough that several residents cannot utilize it. They alsomentioned the lack of programming as an issue that seems to need some balance. There was discussion of expanding the Senior Center and creating a Teen Center as well. Respondents feel as if there isnt an adequate balance of programsandtheywouldliketoseeabetterbalancebetweenoldandnewprograms. Alotofnewparksdonothavebathrooms Weuseparksformajorevents,andelectricalsupplyisamajorproblem Drinkingfountainsdontwork Thebasketballnetsareragged Parksneedtobeupdated There are no drinking fountains at Dave Roberts Park and the tennis courts are cracked Thereislotsofturf,butthereneedstobemorebuildingsforrecreation Thereisaseniorcenter,butnotactivitiesforalltheotherseniors Verylittleprogramsintheparks HaganParkwasclosedatduskinsteadofat10pmthoughtherearepeoplewhose workscheduleissuchthatalaterclosingtimewouldbebeneficial ThebasketballcourtatHaganisalwaysused,yetthekidsarechasedaway HaganParkissooverusedandtherearemanyparksthatareunderutilized Thereisnotabalanceofprograms;theyareallcontractedout o o Thebalanceistheneedtofeelsafe Thereneedstobebetterbalancewithnewerprogramsandoldprograms

Tryingtospreadprogramsalloverisabigchallenge o o o Sometimescostsofprogramsinhibitpeoplefromparticipating There are so many new ideas that could be developed, but not enough peopletodothem NeedsomeonewhoisrecreationorientedmanagingtheDistrict

There is a lot of time spent in developing parks, but not enough on recreation facilities Notenoughprograms o o o Theremaybealotofopportunitiesforprogramsforkidsthatpeopledont knowabout Usesocialnetworkingtoinformpeople ItisgoodthattheDistrictusesschoolfacilities AlsopartnerwithschoolDistrictsforafterschoolprograms 6

o o o

Notenoughinformationabouttheprogramsisavailable Thereneedtobemorelargeeventstobringpeopletogether Thereisnotenoughforkidstodo

Programscouldbemorerevenuedriven Ifthereweremorerevenuegeneratingfacilities,therewouldbemoreresourcesto workwith o Theprogramshaveimproved,butneedtokeepimproving

NewMatherFieldisaplus Thereisconcernaboutconcessions o o o o o Thereisneedtobringinmorestaff Thereisaneedforagoodfinancialofficer Thecontractswerepoorlywrittenbefore Wedonotgetgoodrentfromtheshootingrange Thereshouldbepartnershipswithprivateventures

Thereshouldbeopenspaceinapark Toomuchgrassthatisjustmowedandnotmaintainedaswellasitcouldbe Thereisunderutilizedspace Fairlygooddistributionoffacilities o Therearenotenoughathleticfacilities,thoughthathasbeenimprovedwith Mather

2.1.5WHAT TYPES OF RECREATION FACILITIES OR AMENITIES ARE MISSING IN THECOMMUNITYTHATTHISPLANNEEDSTOADDRESS? When asked what facilities or amenities were missing in the community, the main thing mentionedbyrespondentsisthattheexistingfacilitiesneedtoberenovatedandupdated. TheDistrictis50yearsoldanditseemsthatseveraloftheparksandfacilitieshavenotbeen updatedinover10years.Specificthingstoaddthatwerementionedwereadditionalskate parks, dog parks, urban campgrounds, and facilities with electricity. There is inadequate ADAaccessatsomeoftheparks,specificallyDaveRobertsPark. ThereisnowheelchairaccessatDaveRobertsPark TheskateparkiscrowdedatMather.Thiscanbeofferedatotherlocationstoo Dog Park was voted on last week, some thought this was a good idea, and others thoughttherewasprobablyabetteruseofthespace. Abilitytohavewalkingpathswouldbegreatlyappreciated o Someolderfolksonlyhavewalkingastheirformofrecreationandexercise

AMasterPlanthatisimplemented 7

ACommunity/recreationcenterwasmentionedbyseveralpeople Theparksareveryunderlit ThereisaneedforteencenterandtheDistrictcouldpartnerwiththeCity TheSeniorCenterneedstobeexpanded Contemporarysportingfacilities,suchasFrisbeegolfandextremesports Performingartscenter Agoodaquaticsfacility Urbancampground Rentals Parkswithelectricity Youthcenter Peoplewouldpaytaxesforthesefacilities Parkingisalwaysanissue Anotherplacetoholdtheclassesisneeded TheparkDistrictis50yearsoldandtheDistrictneedstorenovateeverything

2.1.6WHAT ARE THE RECREATION PROGRAM NEEDS YOU HEAR ABOUT THAT ARENEEDEDINRANCHOCORDOVA? When asked about recreation programs that could be added in Rancho Cordova, several respondents mentioned programs for youth, for youth at risk, in particular. Several participantscommentedthatthePoliceAthleticLeagueoffersprogramstheDistrictshould be offering. Programs for active seniors were also suggested, such as sports leagues. Participantswouldliketoseetheclassesandprogramsupdated,whichisataskthathasnot beenundertakensincethe1980s.Theyalsomentionedthatthereisdifficultyregistering for the existing classes and programs which could be causing attendance numbers to be down. Weneedpositiveactivityandprogramsintheparks Therearenoprogramsforatriskyouths Senioractivitiesapartfromtheseniorcenter o o Volleyballandseniorbasketballandotherseniorleaguesareneeded Bowlingleaguesareneeded

DistrictcoulddosomethingsimilartoPAL Groupexerciseclasses Restroomsinparks Activitiesforchildren 8

Trackandfield

Swimprogramcouldbeimproved Classeshavenotchangedsincethe80s Thereisdifficultyregisteringforclassesandprograms

2.1.7ARE THERE ANY OPERATIONAL OR MAINTENANCE ISSUES THAT NEED TO BEADDRESSEDINTHEMASTERPLAN? Themainoperationalandmaintenanceissuesthatrespondentsnamedwereupdatingand renovating related. There were a few comments on gopher holes in fields and security. Securityissuesincludedthemaintenanceyardandadministrativebuilding,whichhaveboth beenbrokeninto.Therehavealsobeenseveralrobberiesthatshouldbeaddressed.Also, therearecosmeticissuesinvariousplaces.TheSeniorCenterneedsalotofattentionsuch asadesignatedcrosswalk,designatedvanparking,moreparkingfortimesthatthepoolis inuse,andanewroof. Gopherholescauseasafetyproblemwiththerutsonfields In some of the parks there are thick clumps of grass from mowing that have not beencleared Signageatparksisoldandtherearemissingsigns Thewalkfromtheparkinglotoverthebridgeisanissue Thetenniscourtsneedtimelimits o o Postedruleswouldbehelpful Therealsoneedstobesignsthathelpwithenforcement

Thepicnicareasareinpoorshape Therearewaterandelectricityproblemsintheparks HaganPark o Nomaintenancestaffonweekendsanditisthebusiesttimeoftheweek

SeniorCenter o o o o Thereneedstobeacrosswalk Thereshouldbeamarkedparkingareaforvans Thereneedstobemoreparking,especiallywhenpeopleusethepool TheCenterneedsanewroof

Themaintenanceyardneedstobebigger Thereneedstobebettersecurity o o Therehavebeenbreakinsattheadministrationbuildingandmaintenance yard Locationshavebeenrobbedseveraltimes 9

Thereistremendousturnoverandalotofinstitutionalknowledgeisgone o TheDistrictisunderstaffed

Theequipmentisaging Computersandwebsiteareanissue They should do more maintenance inhouse or better monitor the maintenance contractors Thereneedstobemoretransparencyneededindesigningparks DistrictAdministratorshouldbeatcommunityeventsanddevelopingrelationships Newfacilitiesshouldbephasedin TheDistrictneedstostartpartnering TheDistrictshouldturffieldstoreducethecostofmaintenance,thoughinitialcost wouldbehigh Lackofclaritywithrespecttowhoshouldbemaintainingditches

2.1.8ARE THERE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PARTNERING FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OR DELIVERY OF PARKS, RECREATION FACILITIES OR PROGRAMS THAT THE RECREATIONANDPARKDISTRICTSHOULDBEWORKINGTOWARDS? When asked about partnership opportunities, many respondents mentioned private partnershipswithoutnamingspecificideas.Theyalsomentionedcloserpartnershipswith the City and with the School District. Another partnership type named was business partnerships. There is an existing partnership with the school District that respondents would like to see strengthened. They would also like to see all parks labeled with the DistrictsnametocreatemorevisibilityfortheDistrict.Thepartnershipmentionedthatis lacking in closeness and strength is with the Chamber and tourism people. Strengthening thispartnershipwillincreasetheabilitytohavetournamentsinthearea. Communitygroupsforoutreach o Thereshouldbeacommunityoutreachliaison

Thereisaneedtoidentifywhopotentialpartnerscouldbe TheDistrictneedstoinitiatepartnerships Theyneedapersontogoaftergrants Thebusinesscommunitycouldbeahelpatsomepoint Maybebusinessrelationshipswouldbegood ThereareopportunitiesformorepartneringwiththeDistrict o TheDistrictshouldworkmorecloselywiththeCitywhendoingprojects

Theschoolsandparksarecolocated o TheDistrictneedstostrengthenschoolpartnership,communitycouncil 10

o o

TheschoolDistrictsaystheDistrictwashardtocommunicatewith There is a total lack of communication with the school District regarding programs

Policeathleticleagueisgrowingbyleapsandbounds o o ItoffersprogramsbecausetheDistrictdoesntstepuptotheplate TheDistrictdidnotrespondtothis

Privatepartnershipswouldbegood ThereneedstobeabetterrelationshipwithChamberandtourismpeople o o Theyneedtohavetheabilitytoattractregionaltournaments Therehavebeensome,buttherecouldbemore

Thereshouldbearegionalapproachtopartnerships EveryparkshouldbelabeledCordovaRecreationandParkDistrict o Therewouldbemorevisibilitythisway

The District should partner more with the City. They currently seem to be more adversarial Wouldbegoodtopartnerwithmoreactiverecreationprograms

2.1.9HOW WOULD YOU ASSESS PUBLIC INFORMATION, COMMUNICATIONS, AND MARKETING OF PROGRAMS AND SERVICES FROM THE RECREATION AND PARKDISTRICT? Respondents assessed the public information, communication and marketing as needing significanthelp.Thecommunicationsaboutactivitieswerecitedasgood,butanythingelse, includingexpansionanddevelopment,iscitedasneedingimprovement.Therespondents would like to see more online communication and information in a consistently updated Websiteandsocialnetworkingsites.Theywereinfavorofamailednewsletter,citingthe useoftheCitynewsletter,andtheDistrictiscurrentlyintheprocessofdevelopingamailing list. This would predominantly be for the older citizens who do not have a computer or internetaccess. TheWebsiteisnottheonlymethodtocommunicatebecausesomepeopledonot havecomputers Thedogparkwasnotcommunicated Gettingthecommunityengagedisnotbeingdoneenough TheAdministratorisnotresponsive TheDistrictneedstohavemorecommunication TheyouthsportsareverytiedtotheschoolDistrict,andresidentshavetopaymuch moreforathleticfields o PeoplehavebecomereliantontheschoolDistrict 11

Littleornoinvolvementofparksstaffincommunityevents There have been community forums showing that drugs and childhood obesity programsarethemostimportantneeds o TheRecreationandParkDistrictarenotshowinguptotheseforums

TheParkDistrictshouldhavetheirmeetingsinCityHall ThereisnoappreciationandrecognitionforethnicdiversityofHispanicandRussian populations Theyshouldbeputtingadsinthepaperaboutevents Maybetheyshouldwriteacolumnlikewasdoneyearsbefore Newsletters o o Theystillhaveaproblemgettingthenewsletterouttotheseniors Theyareintheprocessofdevelopingamailinglist

Therearealotofnoticesthroughtheschools TheyshouldusetheCitynewsletter TheyneedamuchbetterWebsite o o o Thewebsiteneedstobecontinuouslyupdated Alotofseniorsdonothavecomputers,sotheyneedtobeaccountedfor StaffreportsshouldbeontheWebsite

Socialnetworking

2.1.10WHATOUTCOMESWOULDYOULIKETOSEEASARESULTOFTHISPLAN? Thechiefoutcomethatrespondentswouldliketoseeisapropermasterplanthatwouldbe achievableandfollowedthroughon.Therewereseveralthingsthattherespondentswould liketoseeasaresultofthisplan,amongthemmodernizedparks,improvedmanagement, andbettersafetyinalltheparksandfacilities.Theparticipantsreferencedpreviousmaster plansthatwerenotimplementedaswellastheywouldhaveliked.Theywouldliketoseea planimplementedthistime.Therespondentswouldliketoseebetterinclusionofpeople. There should be more services for the youth, both atrisk and the regular. The administrationneedstoworkonbeingtransparentmoreandbeingmoreavailabletotheir constituents. Thereneedstobefollowup Theyneedtosetdates,setbenchmarks,andlistwherewilltheygetthefundingfor it Theyneedtobetakingcareofliabilities Theyneedtotakeahardlookatourparksanddeterminewhatneedstobedone andhowitwillbepaidfor Theyshouldputsomethinginplaceandmakeitadoableplan 12

Whatcanwedoontheshorttermtomakeimprovements? o A lot of these improvements will take years, and there need to be some shortertermsolutions

There are a lot of retired people out there who would volunteer that could help withgrantwriting Therearenotenoughservicesfortheyouth Thereshouldbefestivalgroundsforalloftheevents Thereneedstobebetterinclusionofpeople There needs to be an aspirational vision for development of places that build community Managementneedstobeactivelyengaged Anadministrationframeworkshouldbestrengthened Parksneedtobemodernized Thereneedstobebettersecurity Theywouldliketoseeaplanthatgivesrealisticdirection Thereshouldbemorerecreationprogramsforadultsandchildren Thereneedstobebettercommunication Theyshoulddevelopprioritiesandresourceallocation Weneedtostrengthenouradministrationandrecreationprograms Theyneedgoodparkmaintenancestaff Theyshouldrenovateandupdateexistingparksinsteadofbuildingnewones ThereneedstobemorefacetofacewithRanchoandtheotherDistrictsaswell RespondentswouldliketohaveanawardwinningparkDistrict Thereneedstobebettercommunicationwiththeparks Thereneedstobearealisticmasterplanthatisaguideforthefuture Theadministrationneedstobemoretransparent Thereareopportunitiesforyouthcenters Matherpricingissohighthatourlocalorganizationscantaffordit Marketing Managementteamneedstobeinplace Longtermplans There should be some information about expanding the senior center and a teen center 13

Thereshouldbeacomprehensiveplantobeabletobuildandmaintaintheaward winningsystemofparksandprograms Theyneedabalancebetweenbuildingnewandmaintainingtheold Thereshouldbeapublicsafetyorientationtothesystem

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2.2 COMMUNITYINTERESTANDOPINIONSURVEY
2.2.1OVERVIEWOFTHEMETHODOLOGY The Cordova Recreation and Park District conducted a Community Interest and Opinion Survey during October and November of 2010. The purpose of the survey was to help establishprioritiesforthefutureimprovementofparksandrecreationfacilities,programs and services within the community. The survey was designed to obtain statistically valid resultsfromhouseholdsthroughoutCordovaRecreationandParkDistrict.Thesurveywas administeredbyacombinationofmailandphone. LeisureVisionworkedextensivelywithCordovaRecreationandParkDistrictofficials,aswell as members of the PROS Consulting project team in the development of the survey questionnaire.Thisworkallowedthesurveytobetailoredtoissuesofstrategicimportance toeffectivelyplanthefuturesystem. Leisure Vision mailed surveys to a random sample of 2,000 households throughout the Cordova Recreation and Park District. Approximately three days after the surveys were mailed each household that received a survey also received an electronic voice message encouragingthemtocompletethesurvey.Inaddition,abouttwoweeksafterthesurveys were mailed Leisure Vision began contacting households by phone. Those who indicated theyhadnotreturnedthesurveyweregiventheoptionofcompletingitbyphone. Thegoalwastoobtainatotalofatleast400completedsurveysfromCordovaRecreation andParkDistricthouseholds.Thisgoalwasaccomplished,withatotalof410surveyshaving beencompleted.Theresultsoftherandomsampleof410householdshavea95%levelof confidence with a precision of at least +/4.8%. The following pages summarize major surveyfindings. 2.2.2VISITINGCRPDPARKS,RECREATIONFACILITIES&SPORTSFIELDS Seventytwo percent (72%) of households have visited Cordova Recreation and Park District parks, recreation facilities, or sports fields during the past year (Figure1). 15 Figure1VisitingCRPDParks,RecreationFacilities&SportsFields

2.2.3FREQUENCY OF VISITING CRPD PARKS, RECREATION FACILITIES & SPORTSFIELDS Of the 72% of households that have visited Cordova Recreation and Park District parks, recreation facilities, orsportsfieldsduring the past year, 71% have visited them at least once a month. Thisincludes34%that have visited CRPD parks, recreation Figure2FrequencyofVisitingCRPDParks,RecreationFacilities&SportsFields facilities or sports fieldsatleastonceaweek,24%thathavevisitedthemafewtimesamonth,and13%that havevistedthematleastonceamonth(Figure2). 2.2.4RATING THE PHYSICAL CONDITION OF CRPD PARKS, RECREATION FACILITIES&SPORTSFIELDS Of the 72% of householdsthathave visited CRPD parks, recreation facilities, or sports fields during the past year, 63% rated the physical condition as either excellent (24%) or above average (39%). Thirtytwo percent (32%) of households rated the parks, facilities and sports fieldsasaverage,and only 5% rated them as below average
Figure3RatingthePhysicalConditionofCRPDParks,RecreationFacilities&SportsFields

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(4%)orpoor(1%)(Figure3). 2.2.5CONCERNS WITH CRPD PARKS, RECREATION FACILITIES AND SPORTS FIELDS Of the 72% of households that have visited CRPD parks, recreationfacilities,or sports fields during the past year, 36% indicated they have no concerns. The most frequently mentioned concerns respondents do have with CRPD parks, facilities, or sports fieldsare:securityand safety issues (24%) andparkmaintenance and cleanliness (22%) (Figure4). Figure4ConcernswithCRPDParks,RecreationFacilitiesandSportsFields 2.2.6FREQUENCYOFVISITINGVARIOUSCRPDFACILITIES Of the 72% of households that have visited CRPD parks, recreationfacilities,or sports fields during the past year, 24% havevisitedtheHagan Park Community Center at least once a month, and 19% have visited the Mather Sports Center at least once a month (Figure 5).

Figure5FrequencyofVisitingVariousCRPDFacilities

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2.2.7PARTICIPATIONINCRPDPROGRAMS/ACTIVITIES Twentyseven percent (27%) of households have participated in programs or activities offered by the CRPD during the past 12 months(Figure6).

Figure6ParticipationinCRPDPrograms/Activities

2.2.8RATINGOFTHEOVERALLQUALITYOFCRPDPROGRAMS/ACTIVITIES Of the 27% of households that have participated in CRPD programs/activities, 82% rated the overall quality of programs or activities theyve participatedinaseither excellent (37%) or above average (45%). Sixteen percent (16%) rated them as average, 2% rated them as below average, and no respondents rated them as poor (Figure 7). Figure7RatingoftheOverallQualityofCRPDPrograms/Activities

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2.2.9PARTICIPATIONINCRPDEVENTS Twentyone percent (21%) of households have participated in events offered by the CRPD during the past 12months(Figure8).
Figure8ParticipationinCRPDEvents

2.2.10RATINGOFTHEOVERALLQUALITYOFCRPDEVENTS Of the 21% of households that have participated in CRPD events, 81% rated the overall quality of the events theyve participatedinaseither excellent (44%) or above average (37%). Nineteen percent (19%) rated the events as average and no respondents rated them as below average or poor (Figure9).
Figure9RatingoftheOverallQualityofCRPDEvents

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2.2.11WAYSRESPONDENTSLEARNABOUTCRPDPROGRAMSANDACTIVITIES The most frequently mentioned ways that respondents have learned about CRPD programs and activities are: flyers/newsletter (47%), TriAnnual Activity Guide (44%), from friends and neighbors (29%), and newspaper (26%) (Figure10).
Figure10WaysRespondentsLearnAboutCRPDProgramsandActivities

2.2.12REASONS PREVENTING THE USE OF CRPD PARKS, FACILITIES, PROGRAMS MOREOFTEN Too busy/not enough time (17%) is the most frequently mentioned reason preventing households from using CRPD parks, recreation facilities or programs more often (Figure 11). Other frequently mentioned reasons include: program times are not convenient (16%), do not know what is being offered (11%),andfeesaretoo high(11%).
Figure11ReasonsPreventingtheUseofCRPDParks,Facilities,ProgramsMoreOften

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2.2.13LEVEL OF SATISFACTION WITH THE CUSTOMER SERVICE EXPERIENCE RECEIVEDWHENUSINGCRPDFACILITIESANDPROGRAMS Sixty percent (60%) of respondents are either very satisfied (35%) or somewhat satisfied (25%) with the customer service experience they receivewhenusingCRPD facilities and programs (Figure 12). Only 4% of respondents are somewhat dissatisfied or verydissatisfiedwiththe customer service experience they receive when using CRPD facilities and programs. In addition, 36% of respondents rated the Figure12LevelofSatisfactionwiththeCustomerServiceExperienceReceivedWhenUsing customer service CRPDFacilitiesandPrograms experience they receive asneutral. 2.2.14NEEDFORPARKSANDRECREATIONFACILITIES The parks and recreation facilities that the highest percentage of households has a need for are: walking, biking trails, and greenways (64%),smallfamilypicnic areasandshelters(60%), small neighborhood parks (59%), large community parks (46%), and playground equipment (44%) (Figure 13).
Figure13NeedforParksandRecreationFacilities

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2.2.15NEEDFORPARKSANDRECREATIONFACILITIESINTHECRPD Fromalistof27various parks and recreation facilities, respondents were asked to indicate all of the ones that members of their household have a need for. Figure 14 shows the estimated number of households in the CordovaRecreationand ParkDistrictthathavea need for various parks andrecreationfacilities, based on 34,300 households in the District. Figure14NeedforParksandRecreationFacilitiesintheCRPD 2.2.16HOWWELLPARKSANDRECREATIONFACILITIESMEETNEEDS For all 27 parks and facilities, 55% or less of respondents indicated that the park/facility completely meets the needs of their household(Figure15).
Figure15HowWellParksandRecreationFacilitiesMeetNeeds

22

2.2.17CRPDHOUSEHOLDSWITHTHEIRFACILITYNEEDSBEING50%METORLESS Fromthelistof27parks and recreation facilities, households that have a need for parks/facilities were asked to indicate how well these types of parks/facilities in the Cordova Recreation and Park District meet their needs. Figure 16 shows the estimated number of households in the Cordova Recreation and Park District whose needsforparks/facilities are only being 50% met orless,basedon34,300 households in the Figure16CRPDHouseholdswithTheirFacilityNeedsBeing50%MetorLess District. 2.2.18MOSTIMPORTANTPARKSANDRECREATIONFACILITIES Based on the sum of their top four choices, the parks and recreation facilities that households rated as the most important include: walking, biking trails, and greenways (34%), small family picnic areas and shelters (29%), small neighborhood parks (28%), playground equipment(24%),and outdoor swimming pools(20%).Itshould also be noted that walking, biking trails and greenways had the highest percentage of respondents select it astheirfirstchoiceas the most important park/facility (Figure 17). Figure17MostImportantParksandRecreationFacilities 23

2.2.19NEEDFORRECREATIONPROGRAMS The recreation programs that the highest percentage of households has a need for are: adult fitness and wellness programs (36%), communitywide specialevents(35%), swim lessons/aquatics programs(32%),and cultural programs (25%)(Figure18).

Figure18NeedforRecreationPrograms

2.2.20NEEDFORRECREATIONPROGRAMSINTHECRPD From a list of 26 recreation programs, respondents were asked to indicate all of the ones that members of their household have a need for. Figure 19 shows the estimated number of households in the Cordova Recreation andParkDistrictthat have a need for recreation programs, based on 34,300 households in the District. Figure19NeedforRecreationProgramsintheCRPD

24

2.2.21HOWWELLRECREATIONPROGRAMSMEETNEEDS For all 26 recreation programs, less than 45% of respondents indicated that the program completely meets the needs of their household (Figure20).
Figure20HowWellRecreationProgramsMeetNeeds

2.2.22CRPD HOUSEHOLDS WITH THEIR PROGRAM NEEDS BEING 50% MET OR LESS From a list of 26 recreation programs, households that have a need for programs were asked to indicate how well these types of programs in the Cordova Recreation and Park District meet their needs. Figure 21 shows the estimated number of households in the Cordova Recreation and Park District whose needs for programs are only being 50% met or less, based on 34,300 households in the District.

Figure21CRPDHouseholdswithTheirProgramNeedsBeing50%MetorLess

25

2.2.23MOSTIMPORTANTRECREATIONPROGRAMS Basedonthesumoftheirtopfourchoices,therecreationprogramsthathouseholdsrated asthemostimportant include:swimlessons/ aquatics programs (19%), adult fitness and wellness programs (19%), communitywide special events (16%), and senior programs (14%). It should also be noted that swim lessons/aquatic programs had the highest percentage of respondents select it as their first choice as the most important program to their Figure22MostImportantRecreationPrograms household(Figure22). 2.2.24MOST FREQUENTLY USED METHOD TO ACCESS CRPD PARKS & RECREATIONFACILITIES Seventypercent(70%) of households indicated that driving is their most frequently used method to access CRPD parks and recreation facilities (Figure 23). In addition, 24% of respondents walk to CRPD parks and facilities, and 11% bike to CRPD parks and recreation facilities.
Figure23MostFrequentlyUsedMethodtoAccessCRPDParks&RecreationFacilities

26

2.2.25LEVEL OF SUPPORT FOR DEVELOPING WALKING/BIKING TRAILS TO CREATE AN INTERCONNECTED COMMUNITY AND A SUSTAINABLE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Eightytwo percent (82%) of respondents are either very supportive (54%) or somewhat supportive (28%) of an effort to develop walking/biking trails to create an interconnected community and a sustainable built environment (Figure 24). Only 6% of Figure24LevelofSupportforDevelopingWalking/BikingTrailstoCreatean respondents are mildly InterconnectedCommunityandaSustainableBuiltEnvironment against or completely againstit,and12%indicatednotsure. 2.2.26SUPPORT FOR ACTIONS TO IMPROVE/EXPAND PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES There are four actions that over 45% of respondents are very supportive of CRPD taking to improve and expand parks and recreation facilities: renovate/develop greenways for walking and biking (55%), acquire land to use for greenways and trails (52%), acquire land to develop small neighborhood parks (49%), and renovate/ develop playgrounds
Figure25SupportforActionstoImprove/ExpandParksandRecreationFacilities

27

andpicnics(48%)(Figure25).

28

2.2.27MOST IMPORTANT ACTIONS TO IMPROVE/EXPAND PARKS & RECREATION FACILITIES Basedonthesumoftheirtopfourchoices,themostimportantactionsthatCRPDcouldtake to improve/expand parks and recreation facilities are: renovate/develop greenways for walkingandbiking(45%),renovate/developplaygroundsandpicnics(28%),acquirelandto develop for small neighborhood parks (28%), and acquire land to use for greenways and trails (27%). It should also be noted that renovate/develop greenwaysforwalking and biking had the highest percentage of respondents select it as their first choice as the most important park/facility to improve/expand.
Figure26MostImportantActionstoImprove/ExpandParks&RecreationFacilities

2.2.28ALLOCATION OF $100 AMONG VARIOUS PARKS AND RECREATION CATEGORIES Respondents would allocate $49 out of $100 towards the improvements/ maintenance of existing parks, trails, sports,andrecreation facilities (Figure 27). The remaining $51 were allocated as follows: development of new parks, trails, and sports facilities ($20),developmentof new community center/ recreation facilities ($16), and acquisition of new Figure27Allocationof$100amongVariousParksandRecreationCategories 29

parklandandopenspace($15). 2.2.29LEVEL OF SUPPORT FOR VARIOUS MONTHLY ASSESSMENTS TO FUND PARKS,GREENWAYS,OPENSPACE,ANDRECREATIONFACILITIES Fiftyone percent (51%) of respondents are either strongly supportive (39%) or somewhat supportive (12%) of paying $5 per month to fund the development and operations of parks, greenways,openspace, and recreation facilities that are most important to their household(Figure28). 2.2.30DEMOGRAPHICS 30 Figure29AgesofPeopleinHousehold

Figure28LevelofSupportforVariousMonthlyAssessmentstoFundParks,Greenways, OpenSpace,andRecreationFacilities

31


Figure30Gender

Figure31TotalAnnualHouseholdIncome

32


Figure32AreYourorMembersofYourHouseholdofHispanicorLatinoAncestry

Figure33Race/Ethnicity

33

2.3 DEMOGRAPHICSANDTRENDSANALYSIS
TheDemographicAnalysisprovidesabetterunderstandingofthepopulationcompositionof the Cordova CensusDesignated Place (CDP) as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. This analysis helps define the characteristics of overall population based on age segment, race andethnicity,andincomecharacteristicsoftheresidents. Allfuturedemographicprojectionsarebasedonobservedhistoricaltrends.Theprojections mustbeconsideredwiththecaveatthatunforeseencircumstancesduringorafterthetime oftheprojectionscouldhaveasignificantbearingonthevalidityofthefinalprojections. 2.3.1SUMMARY ThetotalpopulationoftheCordovaCDPserviceareahasexhibitedarapidgrowthpattern overthelastdecade.From2000to2009,theserviceareapopulationgrewby12.3%toa total population of 110,662. This entails an increase of 13,663 total persons at an annual growthrateof1.5%.Theprojectedpopulationgrowthis5.6%from20092014,5.6%from 20142019and5.5%from20192024respectively. Fromanagesegmentstandpoint,thehighestagegroupbynumbersisthe3554agegroup whichcomprises27%ofthepopulationor29,921individuals.Thisisaslightreductionfrom 28.8% in 2000 and it is projected to further decrease to 23.9% by 2024. This reduction is offsetbytheconsistentincreaseinthe55+agesegmentwhichisprojectedtoincreasefrom 22.3%currentlyto27.3%by2024. From a race standpoint, the Cordova CDP service area has racially and ethnically diverse populationandthisdiversemixisprojectedtoincreaseintheyearstocome.Themajority White Alone population is expected to reduce from 68% in 2000 to 50% by 2024. Effectively,oneoutoftwoindividualswithintheCordovaCDPwillnotbeclassifiedasWhite Alone. Another shift, from an ethnicity standpoint, is being witnessed in those being classifiedasbeingofHispanic/Latinooriginofanyrace.Thissegmentisexpectedtogrow significantlyfrom12%in2000to21%by2024. The income characteristics are average at best. The service areas current median householdincomeis$54,270anditisprojectedtogrowto$66,657by2024.Thepercapita income,too,isprojectedtoincreasefrom$24,792currentlyto$28,605by2024.However, theCordovaCDPsincomecharacteristicsarelowerincomparisonwiththatoftheStateand Nationalaverages. 2.3.2METHODOLOGY AlldatausedinthisanalysiswasobtainedfromEnvironmentalSystemsResearchInstitute, Inc. (ESRI), the largest research and development organization dedicated to Geographical InformationSystems(GIS)andspecializinginpopulationprojectionsandmarkettrends.All data was acquired in March 2010, and reflects actual numbers as reported in the 2000 Censusanddemographicprojectionsfor2009and2014asestimatedbyESRI;straightline linearregressionwasutilizedforprojected2019and2024demographics.TheCordovaPark Districtserviceareawasutilizedastheboundaryforthedemographicanalysis. 34

2.3.3CORDOVASERVICEAREA 2.3.3.1 POPULATION The Cordova CDP service area has exhibited a rapid growth pattern over the last decade. From 2000 to 2009, the service area population grew by 12.3% to a total population of 110,662.Thisentailsanincreaseof13,663totalpersonsatanannualgrowthrateof1.5%. In comparison, the U.S. population grew at an annual rate of 0.9% over the same time frame. Futureprojectionsindicatethatthegrowthrateisexpectedtoincreaseatadecreasingrate. The projected population growth is 5.6% from 2009 2014, 5.6% from 2014 2019 and 5.5% from 2019 2024 respectively. This would result is approximately 132,048 total residentsintheserviceareaby2024.Thenumberofhouseholdswouldalsoincreasefrom 42,413currentlyto51,311by2024(Figure34).
60,000 40,000 20,000 0 2000 Census 2009 Estimate 2014 2019 2024 Projection Projection Projection 140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 97,019 Total Population 117,240 110,682

Cordova,TotalPopulationTrends
132,048 124,783

Figure34TotalPopulationTrends

35

2.3.3.2 AGESEGMENT Evaluatingtheagesegmentbreakup,theCordovaCDPpopulationexhibitsaverybalanced agesegmentdistributionwithamildagingpattern(Figure35).

Cordova, PopulationbyAgeSegments
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2000Census 2009 Estimate 2014 Projection 2019 Projection 2024 Projection 55+ 3554 1834 <18

Figure35PopulationbyMajorAgeSegment

Currently,thehighestagegroupbynumbersisthe3554agegroupwhichcomprises27%of thepopulationor29,921individuals.Thisisaslightreductionfrom28.8%in2000anditis projectedtofurtherdecreaseto23.9%by2024.Thisreductionisoffsetbytheconsistent increase in the 55+ age segment which is projected to increase from 22.3% currently to 27.3% by 2024. While this entails a noticeable growth in the 55+ age group, it is less in comparisontonationaltrendsandthoseexhibitedbymanysurroundingcommunitiesinthe area. One potential reason for that is the high influx of younger families in the area. The rapid populationgrowthseemstohavebeendrivenbyyoungerfamilieswithchildrenmovinginto the Cordova Recreation and Park District area. This would explain the consistent 1834 populationmix(almost26%throughoutthestudyperiod)andalsotherelativelyhighrateof U18individuals(25%currently). Thus,theDistricttrulycaterstoaverywideanddiversepopulationbaseandtheprogram offeringwouldhavetofocusonyouthcenteredprogramsasameanstocontinueattracting younger families and fresh job seekers. Some programs types include youth based programming,learntoswimprograms,beforeandafterschoolprogramsaswellasyouth and adult sports leagues and tournaments catered to them. At the same time, the active adult population would certainly demand increased availability of fitness and wellness programs, life skill programs, aquatics aquarobics, therapeutic recreation and leisure activities. 36

Overall,inordertocreatethesenseofcommunityandtiethediversesegmentstogether,it would be beneficial to have a variety of special events and familybased recreation opportunitiesforamultigenerationalaudience. 2.3.3.3 GENDER The gender distribution does indicate a slight skew towards the female population. The ratiooffemalestomaleswithintheserviceareaisexpectedtobearound51%femalesto 49%malesovertheentirestudyperiod(Figure36) 140,000 120,000 100,000
80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0 2000Census 2009 Estimate 2014 Projection 2019 Projection 2024 Projection 49,500 47,522 54,171 57,464 61,139 56,511 59,777 Female 64,707 Male 67,340 63,643

Cordova:PopulationbyGender

Figure36PopulationbyGender

Recreationaltrendsfromthelastfewyearsindicatethat,onaverage,Americansparticipate in a sport or recreational activity of some kind at a relatively high rate (65%). Female participation rates, however, are slightly lower than their male counterparts 61% of femalesparticipateatleastonceperyearinasportorrecreationalactivitycomparedtoa 69%participationrateofmen.Accordingtorecreationaltrendsresearchperformedinthe industry over the past twenty years, the top ten recreational activities for females are currently: 1. Walking 2. Aerobics 3. Generalexercising 4. Biking 5. Jogging 6. Basketball 37

7. Liftingweights 8. Golf 9. Swimming 10. Tennis Thetoptenrecreationalactivitiesformalesare: 1. Golf 2. Basketball 3. Walking 4. Jogging 5. Biking 6. Liftingweights 7. Football 8. Hiking 9. Fishing 10. Hunting Whilemenandwomenhavesomecommonactivitiesamongthetopten,thefrequencyof participationintheirpreferredactivitiesishigherinmenthanitisinwomenoveraninety dayspan.Withmorewomennotonlycomprisingalargerportionofthegeneralpopulace during the mature stages of the lifecycle, but also participating in recreational activities furtherintoadulthood,arelativelynewmarkethasappearedoverthelasttwodecades. Thismaturefemaledemographicisoptingforlessteamorientedactivitieswhichdominate the female youth recreational environment, instead shifting more towards a diverse selectionofindividualparticipantactivities,asevidentinthetoptenrecreationalactivities mentionedabove. 2.3.3.4 RACEANDETHNICITY From a race standpoint, the Cordova CDP service area has racially and ethnically diverse population and this diverse mix is projected to increase in the years to come (Figure 37). The majority White Alone population is expected to reduce from 68% in 2000 to 50% by 2024.Atthesametime,theBlackAloneandAsianpopulationwillincreaseto11%and15% respectivelyby2024.Also,thosebelongingtotwoormoreraceswillcomprise13%ofthe population by 2024. This diverse racial composition also results in a varied program preferenceaswillbeseenbyParticipationTrendsbyRace/Ethnicitylaterinthissection.

38

Cordova, PopulationbyRace
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2000 Census 2008 2013 2018 2023 Estimate Projection Projection Projection
Figure37PopulationbyRace/Ethnicity

Allotherscombined BlackAlone Asian WhiteAlone

Another shift, from an ethnicity standpoint, is being witnessed in those being classified as beingofHispanic/Latinooriginofanyrace.Thissegmentisexpectedtogrowsignificantly from12%in2000to21%by2024(Figure38). PARTICIPATIONTRENDSBYRACE/ETHNICITY TheWhiteAlonepopulationasawholeparticipatesinawiderangeofactivities,including both team and individual sports of a land and water based variety; however, the White Alonepopulacehasanaffinityforoutdoornontraditionalsports. 39
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Cordova, Hispanic/LatinoPopulation

AllOthers

12.07% 2000

20.88% 2024

Hispanic/ Latino Origin (anyrace)

Figure38PercentageofIndividualsofHispanic/Latinoorigin

EthnicminoritygroupsintheUnitedStatesarestronglyregionalizedandurbanized,withthe exceptionofNativeAmericans,andthesetrendsareprojectedtocontinue.Differentethnic groups have different needs when it comes to recreational activities. Ethnic minority groups,alongwithGenerationsXandY,arecominginevergreatercontactwithCaucasian middleclassbabyboomerswithdifferentrecreationalhabitsandpreferences.Thiscanbea sensitive subject since many babyboomers are the last demographic to have graduated high school in segregated environments, and the generational gap magnifies numerous idealsandvaluesdifferenceswhich manybabyboomersareaccustomedto.This trendis projected to increase as more babyboomers begin to retire, and both the minority and youthpopulationscontinuetoincrease. Hispanic and Latino Americans have strong cultural and community traditions with an emphasisplacedontheextendedfamily,manytimesgatheringinlargerecreationalgroups where multiple activities geared towards all age segments of the group may participate. Largegrouppavilionswithpicnickingamenitiesandmultipurposefieldsareintegralinthe communalpastimesharedbymanyHispanics/Latinos. TheBlackAlonepopulationhashistoricallybeenanethnicgroupthatparticipatesinactive team sports, most notably football, basketball, and baseball. The AfricanAmerican populace exhibits a strong sense of neighborhood and local community through large special events and gatherings with extended family and friends, including family reunions. Outdoor and water based activities, such as, hiking, water skiing, rafting, and mountain biking,arenotmuchofafactorintheparticipatoryrecreationalactivities. The Asian population a very different yet distinct ethnic group compared with the three maingroupsintheU.S.Caucasian,AfricanAmerican,andHispanic.TheAsianpopulation has some similarities to the Hispanic population, but many seem to shy away from traditionalteamsportsandoutdoorandwaterbasedactivities. Utilizing the Ethnicity Study performed by American Sports Data, Inc., a national leader in sportsandfitnesstrends,participationratesamongrecreationalandsportingactivitieswere analyzedandappliedtoeachrace/ethnicgroup. A participation index was also reviewed. An index is a gauge of likelihood that a specific ethnicgroup willparticipateinanactivityascomparedto the U.S.populationasawhole. Anindexof100signifiesthatparticipationisonparwiththegeneralpopulation;anindex less than 100 means that the segment is less likely to participate, more than 100 signifies thegroupismorelikelythanthegeneralpublictoparticipate. ThemostpopularactivitiesforthoseclassifiedasWhiteAloneintermsoftotalparticipation percentage,thepercentagebywhichyoucanmultiplytheentirepopulationbytoarriveat activityparticipationofatleastonceinthepasttwelvemonths,are: 1. Recreational Swimming 38.9% participation rate (38.9% of the population has participatedatleastonceinthelastyear) 2. RecreationalWalking37.0%participationrate 3. RecreationalBicycling20.6%participationrate 4. Bowling20.4%participationrate 40

5. TreadmillExercise19.1%participationrate Highparticipationpercentagesinfreshwaterfishing(17.3%participationrate),hiking(17.2% participationrate),andtentcamping(17.2%participationrate)demonstratethehighvalue thattheCaucasianpopulationplacesonoutdooractivities.Sailing(Indexof124),kayaking (Indexof121),andgolf(Indexof120)arethreeactivitiesthattheCaucasianpopulationis morelikelytoparticipateinthanthegeneralpublic. ThefivemostpopularactivitiesforthoseofHispanic/Latinodescentare: 1. RecreationalSwimming33.2%participationrate 2. RecreationalWalking31.2%participationrate 3. RecreationalBicycling19.7%participationrate 4. Bowling18.5%participationrate 5. Running/Jogging18.0%participationrate In terms of participation index, the Hispanic populace is more than twice as likely as the generalpopulationtoparticipateinboxing(Indexof264),verylikelytoparticipateinsoccer (Index of 177), and more likely to participate in paintball (Index of 155) than any other ethnic group. For comparison reasons, although Hispanics are nearly twice as likely to participateinsoccerasanyotherrace,only9.0%oftheHispanicpopulationparticipatedin thesportatleastonceinthelastyear. The top five recreational activities for the Asian populace in regards to participation percentagesare: 1. RecreationalWalking33.3%participationrate 2. RecreationalSwimming31.9%participationrate 3. Running/Jogging21.6%participationrate 4. Bowling20.5%participationrate 5. TreadmillExercise20.3%participationrate TheAsianpopulaceparticipatesinmultiplerecreationalactivitiesatagreaterratethanthe general population, with lacrosse being the activity boasting the greatest index of 615. Squash (Index 0f 414), mountain/rock climbing (Index of 262), yoga/tai chi (Index 229), martial arts (227), artificial wall climbing (224), badminton (222), and rowing machine exercise (206) each represent an activity that Asians are more than twice as likely to participateinthanthegeneralpublic. AnalyzingthetopfiveactivitiesthattheBlackAlonepopulaceparticipatesinatthegreatest rateresultsin: 1. RecreationalWalking26.7%participationrate 2. RecreationalSwimming20.2%participationrate 3. Basketball19.8%participationrate 4. Bowling17.5%participationrate 41

5. Running/Jogging14.3%participationrate TheAfricanAmericanpopulation,liketheHispanicpopulation,ismorethantwiceaslikely toparticipateinboxing(Indexof208).Football(Indexof199)andbasketball(Indexof160) arealsoamongthehigherparticipatedinactivitiesamongtheAfricanAmericanpopulace. 2.3.3.5 HOUSEHOLDINCOME TheCordovaCDPsincomecharacteristicsaremoderateandprojectedtogrow,albeitata slowpaceintheupcomingyears. Theserviceareascurrentmedianhouseholdincomeis$54,270anditisprojectedtogrow to$66,657by2024.Themedianhouseholdincomerepresentstheearningsofallpersons age 16 years or older living together in a housing unit. The per capita income, too, is projectedtoincreasefrom$24,792currentlyto$28,605by2024(Figure39).

Cordova, HouseholdIncomeCharacteristics
$80,000 $70,000 $60,000 $50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $ 2000 Census 2008 2013 2018 2023 Estimate ProjectionProjectionProjection
Figure39CordovaIncomeCharacteristics

Median Household Income Average Household Income PerCapita Income

42

As seen in Figure 40, Cordova CDPs income characteristics are lower in comparison with that of the State and National averages. The median household income, the average householdincomeandthepercapitaincomearealllowerthanstateandnationalaverages. Partofthiscouldbeattributedtothepresenceofalargenumberofyoungerfamiliesthat arenewerintheworkforceandalsonotatthesameeducationlevels,thusdepressingtheir earnings.Giventhesecharacteristics,itwouldbeimportanttofocusonofferingsthattarget familiesbasedrecreationandprovideagoodvalueformoney.
CordovaComparativeIncomeCharacteristics
$90,000 $80,000 $70,000 $60,000 $50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $ Median Average PerCapita Household Household Income Income Income
Figure40ComparativeIncomeCharacteristics

Cordova

California,Est. 2008

U.S.Average, Est.2008

43

CHAPTERTHREE PARKANDRECREATIONASSESSMENT

3.1 PARKANDFACILITYASSESSMENT
3.1.1PARKANDFACILITYASSESSMENTOVERVIEW ThePROSTeamconductedthefacilityassessmentandvisitedeachparkandfacilitywithin theDistrictovera4daytimeframe.DuringthistimethePROSTeamassessedthecondition oftheparksandphotographedallsitesandassetswithinthesystemincluding:
NeighborhoodParks BikeTrails Benches CommunityParks Amphitheaters Bleachers SpecialUseAreas BasketballCourts Community/Activity Centers CoveredAreas DiamondFields; Mounded,Small MultipurposeFields; Large OutdoorPools RestroomBuildings DrinkingFountains DiamondFields; Mounded,Large MultipurposeFields; Small ParkingSpaces TennisCourts Multicourts DiamondFields;Non Mounded,Large SmallReservablePicnic Pavilion PicnicTables Trails;HardSurfaces OpenGrassFields DiamondFields;Non Mounded,Small LargeReservablePicnic Pavilions PlaygroundAreas Trails;SoftSurfaces OpenSpaces BBQPits ConcessionsStands

ThePROSTeamvisited38siteswithintheDistrict,comprisingatotalof630.20acres,and theoverallvalueofthesystemiseitherreallygoodorfair.Someoftheparkfindingsand recommendationsarelistedbelow.Thedetailedfacilityassessmentandrecommendations willbeprovidedintheAppendix. Overall,thereareseveralgoodparkswithinthesystem,withStoneCreekCommunityPark being a newer example and Hagan Community Park a classic example of an older park in good condition. Other great parks are Tuscany Park with an excellent design and assets usageandplacement,theVillageGreenParkwithitsurbanincorporationandMatherSports Complex with its assets quality and quantity. The quantity and quality of the bike trails within the District is also some of the premier assets in the region and long range goal shouldbetoextendtheseassetsthroughtheDistrict.Howevertherearealotofparksites andassetsthatareshowingwearandhavemetorexceededtheirlifecycle. Maintenanceisgoodoverallandtheolderparksarewelltakencareofdespiteagingassets. Brand inconsistencies exist throughout the system with respect to entrance signs, sign locations,colorschemes,directionalsignage,amenitysignageandparkfurniture.Signage shouldbeupdatedandmadeconsistentthroughtheDistrict,anddirectionalsignagealong trailsshouldbeaddedtoDistrictfacilities.Vegetativebedding,asseeninthenewerparks throughoutthesystemshouldbereplicatedintotheolderparkstocreateuniformity. 44

3.2 PARKANDFACILITYSYNOPSIS
3.2.1AHLSTROMPARK 3.2.1.1 OVERVIEW Ahlstrom Park is a 7 acre neighborhood park (6.8 acres irrigated) located adjacenttoanelementaryschool.Overalltheimagevalueoftheparkisclean andopen,withexcellentvisibility.Safetylightingisavailableintheparkandno safety issues were identified during the assessment. There is turf coverage throughout the park with the condition being classified as fair. The park has signage; however there is some damage to the signage and a need for design standards and uniformity. Parking is located along the street and the interior pedestriantrailallowsforgoodcirculation.Theparkisnotlocatedalongahike or bike trail. The vegetation throughout the park is mature and in good conditionwithsomeyoungertrees.Maintenanceatthesiteisgood. 3.2.1.2 MAJORASSETS PlaygroundArea1PlaygroundAreawithalifecycleoflevel1toearly level2.Itsapproximateareais48feetby55feetwithacurbandamow strip.Thereareplaystructuresforages6to12and2to6(Figure41). TheplayareadoeshaveanADAaccessibleramp;howeverthelipofthe ramp would be difficult for a wheelchair to maneuver (Figure 42). The surface of the play area is fibar, but additional material is needed as it doesnotmeettherecommended12inchminimumdepth.Theplayarea has1trashreceptacle. DiamondField;1NonMounded,YouthSmallbaseballfield(sixtyfoot base paths with a center field depth of 205 feet) with full 6 feet high dimensionalfencing(Figure43).Edgingofthefieldismarginal,andthe infield is partially skinned. Player areas are covered and have signs of graffiti(Figure44).Thereare6setsofspectatorseating;2aremetal3 rows bleachers and 4 are wooden 3 rows bleachers that are past their usefullifeandneedtobereplaced(Figure45). Benches2benchesaroundtheplaygroundarea Trail Area 515 feet of asphalt pathway (Figure 46)and 6 foot wide concrete pathway being 361 feet in length with safety lighting (Figure 47) PicnicArea1picnictableonaconcretepadsite Group Picnic Area 3 concrete picnic areas with one being ADA accessible.Padsitesareapproximately10feetby16feetwithonenew 45
Figure45DamagetoBleachers

Figure41Playground Structures

Figure42PlaygroundAreaLip

Figure43DiamondField

Figure44Graffiti

concretepicnictableandbarbequepit Park Bench Area 2 new metal park benches each on concretepadsof5feetby12feetinsize TrashReceptacle3newthirtygalloncansandfourthirty threegallonbarrels(Figure48) Water Fountain 1 new ADA accessible drinking fountain andoneolderdrinkingfountain(Figure49) DogWasteStationtwonewerdogwastestations Irrigation Pump House twelve feet by twelve feet irrigationpumphousewithtwopumpcontrollers WoodenParkSignDamagetotheleftside(Figure50)
Figure47SafetyLighting Figure46Trail

3.2.1.3 RECOMMENDATIONS Extend trail to neighborhood connector and to school facilities Park needs to be energized, recent improvements are a goodstart Designstandardsthroughouttheparkforfurniture,signage andassets Fixthelipontheplayground,replacebleachers,replacesign withdesignstandardsignage Graffitiremoval

Figure48GarbageCan

Figure49DrinkingFountain

Figure50SignDamage

46

3.2.2ALEXANDERBIKETRAIL 3.2.2.1 OVERVIEW TheAlexanderBikeTrailisanew2.49acrespecialuseareaalong thesideoftheAlexanderdevelopment(Figure51).Ithasa0.245 mile asphalt bike trail segment. It is richly landscaped and the overall aesthetic of the site is excellent. It will become a neighborhood connector to the Stone Creek Community Park. Safetylightingexistsandnosafetyissueswereobservedduringthe assessment.Maintenanceatthesiteisgood. 3.2.2.2 MAJORASSETS Trail0.245milesofdividedlaneasphaltbiketrail(Figure 52) Benches3metalbenches(Figure53)
Figure52TrailSegment Figure51SiteAerial

3.2.2.3 RECOMMENDATIONS ExtendthetrailtoStoneCreek 3.2.3ANATOLIABIKETRAIL TheAnatoliaBikeTrailisanewspecialuseareaalongthesideof partoftheAnatoliadevelopment,borderingtheAKTCommunities Wetland Preserve and is approximately 4.6 acres in size (Figure 54). It has a 1.078 mile asphalt bike trail segment that runs the length.Itisrichlylandscaped(Figure55)andtheoverallaesthetic ofthesiteisexcellent.Itservesasaneighborhoodconnectorto the Sandpiper Neighborhood Park. Safety lighting exists and no safetyissueswereobservedduringtheassessment. 3.2.3.1 MAJORASSETS Trail0.245milesofdividedlaneasphaltbiketrail(Figure 56) Benches4metalbenches(Figure57) 47 Designstandardsthroughoutthesiteforfurniture,signage andassets Add distance markers along the trail and directions to Districtfacilities

Figure53MetalBenches

Figure54TrailSegment

Figure55Landscaping

TrashReceptacle4metaltrashcans

3.2.3.2 RECOMMENDATIONS ExtendthetrailontheeasttoRanchoCordovaBoulevard, asamakeshifttrailhasbeencreatedbythetrailusers 3.2.4ARGONAUTPARK 3.2.4.1 OVERVIEW Argonaut Park is a new irrigated 5.9 acre neighborhood park (Figure58)locatedadjacenttoanelementaryschool.Overallthe park image is clean an open with, with excellent visibility. Safety lightingisavailableintheparkandnosafetyissueswereidentified duringtheassessment.Turfcoverageexistingthroughoutthepark andtheconditionisgood,thoughthereistoomuchturf.Thepark has signage however there is a need for design standards and uniformity.Parkingislocatedalongthestreetandtheinteriorand exteriorpedestriantrailsallowforexcellentcirculation. The park is not located along a hike or bike trail. Vegetation throughtheparkisyoungwithaneedformaturityandadditional trees(Figure59),butoverallisexcellentandrich.Throughoutthe park, all assets are lifecycle stage 1. The park is well utilized by theelementarystudentsduringthedayandiswellconnectedto theneighborhood.Maintenanceatthesiteisgood. 3.2.4.2 MAJORASSETS PlaygroundArea2playgroundareasexist,onewithplay equipmentforages2to6(Figure60)andtheotherwith
Figure60Playground Figure59YoungTrees

Designstandardsthroughoutthesiteforfurniture,signage andassets Add distance markers along the trail and directions to Districtfacilities Addwaterfountainsatendpointsalongthetrail Addadditionalinformationalsignageaboutthewetlands/ vernalpools Explore opportunities to expand natural trails into the vernalpool
Figure57BenchandCan Figure56DividedBikeLanes

Figure58EntranceSignage

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plasticrockclimbers(Figure61)andasinglebayswingsetwithstrapseats.Some graffitiexistsontherockclimbers

49

DiamondField;NonMoundedSmall1smallnonlighted, irrigated,andnonengineeredsoftballfieldwithabackstop and8feethighplayerareafencing.Nodimensionalfencing exists.Theinfieldisskinnedandtheplayerareaseachhave 2metalbenches Pavilion;Small1smallpicnicpavilionwith4metalpicnic tables8feetinlength(1ADA),andapoweroutlet.There arealso2largeBBQpitslocatedadjacenttothepavilion Trail 0.119 miles of concrete interior and exterior pedestriancirculationtrailthatis6feetand8feetinwidth Water Fountain 1 new ADA accessible drinking fountain andadogfriendlydrinkingfountainatthebase(Figure62)
Figure62SoftballField Figure61RockClimbers

Basketball Court Half court, painted concrete basketball courtwithanattachedmulticourt(Figure64) PicnicTables2metalpicnictables8feetinlength(Figure 66) Benches6greenmetalbencheswithconcretepads ParksignageConcreteparkentrancesignage BikeRack1bikerack TrashReceptacle4metal30gallontrashcontainers
Figure63WaterFountain

3.2.4.3 RECOMMENDATIONS Plantadditionalfastgrowingtreesinthepark Designstandardsthroughoutthesiteforfurniture,signage and assets, could immediately paint tales, benches and trashcansasimilarcolor Add distance markers along the trail to add fitness functionality Expand vegetative cover to the western portions of the park to match those along the school to reduce unused grassareas Additionalassets(suchasbistrotablessimilartoTheVillage GreenPark)couldbeplacedintheparkintheunusedarea

Figure64SportCourt

Figure65BenchandCan

Figure66PicnicTables

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3.2.5COUNTRYSIDEPARK 3.2.5.1 OVERVIEW Countryside Park is an older, irrigated 2 acre neighborhood park (Figure 67) that is located adjacent to an elementary school. The park is well connected with the neighborhood and is not connected toahikeorbiketrail.Parkingislocatedalongthestreetandanew concrete pedestrian circulation trail functions well connecting the interiorassets.Thereisalsoanearbytransitstop. Thereisasecuritylightandspilloverfromstreetlighting.Thereare afewtreesinthepark,butadditionalvegetationshouldbeexplored toreduceturfcoverage.Overalltheimageoftheparkiscleanand safe with good visibility, and the park is a good fit with the neighborhood.Maintenanceatthesiteisgood.
Figure68PlaygroundArea

Figure67EntranceSign

3.2.5.2 MAJORASSETS PlaygroundAreaOneplaygroundareaforages6to12that isinlifecyclestage2(Figure68).Entiresurfaceofplayground hasaneedforadditionalfibar(Figure69).Playgroundhasa concreteringandisapproximately75feetby40feetinarea Picnic Areas 3 picnic areas exist, 2 are individual concrete tables(Figure70)withconcretepadsand1(ADAaccessible) concrete table is located adjacent to the playground area. Picnic tables need to be painted and some damage exists. Overalllifecyclestage2.EachindividualtablehasaBBQpit infaircondition WaterFountain1ADAaccessibledrinkingfountainlocated adjacenttotheplaygroundarea Open Turf Area Large open turf area could be converted intoasmallmultipurposefield(Figure71) Trail313feetofconcretepathwaythathasbeenrecentlyinstalled Benches 1 Metal bench adjacent to the playground area lifecycle stage 2 (Figure 72 trail has been extended to fountain) Trash Receptacles 3 30 gallon barrel exist for trash containerandareunsightlyandshouldbereplaced
Figure70PicnicArea Figure69FibarNeeded

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Figure71OpenField

3.2.5.3 RECOMMENDATIONS The entire park needs to be reenergized. The addition of thetrailisagoodstart Design standards throughout the site for furniture, signage and assets, could immediately paint tables, benches and trashcansasimilarcolor Reducetheamountofturfwithlandscapingsimilartoother newerparksinthesystem Repaint the concrete picnic tables and bench but look to replace in the future, bollards also need to be painted, Replacetheplaygroundequipmentinthefuture Fixleakingwaterfountain
Figure73FountainLeak Figure72Fountain(pretrail)

3.2.6DAVEROBERTSCOMMUNITYPARK 3.2.6.1 OVERVIEW DaveRobertsCommunityParkisa13acreparksite(Figure74)with 11.85acresirrigatedthatislocatedadjacenttoaMiddleSchooland anelementaryschool(Figure75).Overalltheparkisfeelsdisjoined and the assets are misplaced. Connection to the neighborhood is fair and there is offstreet parking available. There is pedestrian circulationtotheadjoiningneighborhoods,howeverisconnectsthe neighborhoodsratherthantheparkassets.Additionaltrailsshould beinstalledatthislocation. There were many people using the park during the assessment, nearly all with dogs. Security lighting does exist in the park. The trailaroundtheplaygroundareaposesasafetyhazard.Vegetation ismatureandthereislotsofturf,infairquality.Visibilityacrossthe siteisgood. 3.2.6.2 MAJORASSETS PlaygroundAreaOneplaygroundareawithastructurefor ages6to12thatisinlifecyclestage1toearlystage2.The playground area is ADA accessible but needs additional fibar depth (Figure 76). The playground area is approximately52feetby62feetinsizeandwascompleted
Figure76PlaygroundArea

Figure74EntranceSign

Figure75SchoolsandPark

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in2002

53

Tennis Courts 4 tennis courts in lifecycle stage 3 that should be resurfaced or removed, as the fit within the parkisnotamenable(Figure77) Trail0.152milesofasphalttrailthatisinlifecyclestage3 andneedstobereplaced(Figure78).2Dogwastestations existalongthetrail DiamondField;NonMoundedLarge1largeirrigated, lighted, nonengineered softball field with backstop and players areas (Figure 79). The backstop needs to be replaced.Fencingexistsalongthebaselinesonlyand150 feet of the outfield. Edging along the field is marginal and needs to be recut. There is also a 5 rows metal bleacherinfaircondition Multipurpose Fields Large 1 regulation sized multipurposefieldwithsoccergoals.Theplayingsurface ofthefieldneedstoberegraded Parking Lot Asphalt parking area with space for 23 vehicles. The parking lot needs to be resurfaced and is approximately7,820squarefeetinsize. Water Fountain 1 working water fountain (Figure 80) and1nonfunctioningwaterfountain(Figure81)
Figure79DiamondField Backstop

Figure77TennisCourts

Figure78AsphaltTrail

3.2.6.3 RECOMMENDATIONS Goodcandidateforafitnesstrailandadogpark,replace theexistingtrail Remove or resurface the tennis courts and multipurpose field
Figure81OldWaterFountain Figure80WaterFountain

Work with school to create a signature diamond field complex Design standards throughout the site for furniture, signageandassets

54

3.2.7EAGLESNESTPARK 3.2.7.1 OVERVIEW Eagles Nest Park is a newer 3.7 acre Neighborhood Park (Figure 82)thatservesasacourtsportarea.Theparkisinlifecycle1and isagreatfittotheneighborhoodandclubhouse.Visibilityacross of the park is excellent. The park is well connected to the neighborhoodandisnotconnectedtoahikeorbiketrail.Thereis offstreetparkingavailableinconjunctionwiththeclubhouse. Securitylightsarepresentalongthecirculationtrailandnosafety issues were observed during the assessment. Vegetation in the park is good (Figure 83) and could be expanded, possibly to includeadditionaltrees.Overalltheimageoftheparkiscleanand safewithgoodvisibility,Maintenanceatthesiteisgood.
Figure83Vegetation

Figure82EntranceSignage

3.2.7.2 MAJORASSETS Basketball Court 1 full sized, lighted basketball court with fencing surround in excellentcondition(Figure84) Tennis Courts 2 lighted tennis courts in excellent conditionwithmetalbenches(Figure85) PlaygroundArea2playgroundareas,1eachforeachages 2 to 5 and 6 to 12 (Figure 86). Both are in excellent condition,ADAaccessibleandhaveanadequateamountof fibarsurface Pavilion;Small1smallpavilionwith4metalpicnictables and3BBQgrills(Figure87) WaterFountains2ADAaccessibledrinkingfountains Benches2newermetalbenches TrashReceptacles4newermetaltrashcontainers BikeRack1BikeRack ParkEntranceSignage1stuccoandbrickentrancesign OpenPlayField1openplayfield
Figure85TennisCourts

Figure84BasketballCourt

Figure86PlaygroundArea

55

3.2.7.3 RECOMMENDATIONS Designstandardsthroughoutthesiteforfurniture,signage andassetstomakeuniformwithallparksinthesystem Convert open field area into a dedicated small multipurposefield

3.2.8FEDERSPIELPARK 3.2.8.1 OVERVIEW Federspiel Park is an older 5 acre neighborhood park (Figure 88) that serves as essentially two parks separated by a roadway locatedadjacenttoanelementaryschool.Theparkisinlifecycle stage2andservesasagoodfitwithintheneighborhood.Overall it is a clean site with good visibility and no safety issues were observedduringtheassessment.Maintenancethroughoutthesite was good. Vegetation within the park is mature and in good health. Safety lighting does not exist at this site and pedestrian circulationthroughthesiteispoor.Signagethroughoutthesiteis also lacking. Parking is located along the street, and no transit stopswereidentified. 3.2.8.2 MAJORASSETS MultipurposeField;Small1multipurposefieldthatcould potentially accommodate regulation play. Field is unlit, nonengineered and is irrigated. Overall the turf quality of the field is uneven and in need of grading and reseeding(Figure89) PlaygroundArea1playgroundareawithequipmentfor ages2to6inlifecyclestage2(Figure90).Thesurfaceof the playground area is fibar and has been recently refilled.Additionallythereisadoublebayswingsetwith strap 2 seats and 2 bucket seats that is showing signs of typicalwearandneedofpaint.Theareaisinneedofa circulation trail and is part of the Districts improvement plan Trail0.19milesofasphalttrailinpoorcondition(Figure 91)linkingtheclosedrestroomfacilitieswiththeexterior sidewalk 56

Figure87SmallPavilion

Figure88EntranceSign

Figure89MultipurposeField

Figure90PlaygroundArea

Figure91Trail

Water Fountain 2 waters fountain located at the site, 1 notworking Picnic Areas 3 picnic areas on concrete pads with concretetablesand2withBBQpits(Figure92) BenchOnebenchlocatedneartheplaygroundarea TrashReceptacles4barreltrashcontainers Restroom 1 restroom area from former aquatic facility thatisclosed(Figure93)
Figure92PicnicArea

3.2.8.3 RECOMMENDATIONS Designstandardsthroughoutthesiteforfurniture,signage andassetstomakeuniformwithallparksinthesystem Improvethemultipurposefieldtoaregulationfield Removetheexistingtrailandbuildaconcreteloopingtrail totheplaygroundarea Landscape the area around the playground similar to other newer parks in the Districttoremoveexcessturf Removeorimprovetherestroomfacility
Figure93ClosedRestroom

3.2.9GOLDRIVERPARK 3.2.9.1 OVERVIEW Gold River Park is an older 4 acre neighborhood park (Figure 94) with3.79acresirrigatedthatislocatedadjacenttoanelementary school. The overall image value of the park is good and visibility throughout the park is fair. The site is located next to a Figure94EntranceSign neighborhood pedestrian trail link that enhances the connectivity totheneighborhood.Overalltheparkisinlifecyclestage2.Maintenanceatthesitewas good.Vegetationwithintheparkismatureandingoodhealthandtheturfqualityisfair. Safety lighting does exist around the playground area and along the trail. Information signage at the park is an excellent addition. Parking is located along the street with overflowparkingattheelementaryschoollot. 3.2.9.2 MAJORASSETS TrailOverallthereis0.104milesoftrailwithinthepark beingaconcretetrailfromtheschooltotheplayground8 feet in width, the exterior concrete trail and the asphalt trailtothebiketrailat10feetinwidth(Figure95).1dog wastestationexistsalongthetrail
Figure95Trail

57

Playground Area 1 Playground Area in lifecycle stage 1 (Figure 96) with play equipment for ages 2 to 6 with a doublebayswingsetwith2beltseatsand2bucketseats. A climbing gym and balance beam also exists within the area Picnic Areas 4 picnic areas with concrete pad sites and concrete tables in lifecycle stage 2 (Figure 97) with BBQ pits Multipurpose Field Small 1 Small multipurpose field withsoccergoals(Figure98) TrashReceptacles5trashcontainersexistandaremetal 33gallonbarrels BikeRacks2bikeracksexistonsite Bench1metalbench Water Fountain 1 older, functioning metal water fountain Informational Signage Exists heading to the bike trail (Figure99) 4concretepicnictablesonconcretepads10x16,1bench, Figure98SmallField 2bikeracks,1horseshoepits,4smallBBQs,533gal.Barrel trashcans,1doggypotstation,1largeLittleTykesplaystructure
Figure97PicnicArea Figure96PlaygroundArea

3.2.9.3 RECOMMENDATIONS Design standards throughout the site for furniture, signage and assets to make uniform with all parks in the system Reseedthemultipurposefield Landscape the area around the multipurpose similar to othernewerparksintheDistricttoremoveexcessturf Continueconcretetrailalongschooltomakealooptrailandadddistancemarkers
Figure99InformationSign

58

3.2.10GOLDSTATIONPARK 3.2.10.1 OVERVIEW GoldStationisa3acreneighborhoodpark(Figure100)with2.87 acres irrigated. The park is an excellent fit within the neighborhood and has a good pedestrian circulation trail on the insideandexteriorofthepark.Theimageoftheparkisexcellent andthelandscapingisgoodwithmaturetreesandgoodturf. Thesiteisnotconnectedtoahikeorbiketrail,thoughthereisa trailinthearea,andnotransitstopswereidentifiedduringthe assessment. Parking is streetside and internal to the neighborhood.Maintenanceatthesitewasfair,withissueson the water fountain, playground and picnic areas. Overall the park is in lifecycle stage 2, and while the assets are aging the designoftheparkisgood.Safetylightingexistsat theparkbut couldbeexpanded. 3.2.10.2 MAJORASSETS PlaygroundArea1playgroundareawithstructuresfor allages(Figure101).Thesurfaceoftheplaygroundarea isfibarandhasbeenrecentlyrefilled.Thelifecycleofthe playground is stage 2 and repairs should be made to rustedmetalonthestructureanditshouldberepainted Trail 0.311 miles of 5 feet wide concrete trail exists around the exterior of the park and surround the playground and multipurpose field (Figure 102). 2 dog wastestationsexistalongthetrail MultipurposeFieldSmall1smallirrigated,nonlighted and nonengineered multipurpose field with misaligned soccer goals exists (Figure 103) and the turf quality is good,thoughthefieldisnotlevelthroughout Picnic Areas 2 picnic areas with concrete pad sites, concrete tables, metal trash barrels and BBQ pits. The tableshavedamageandarelifecyclestage3andshould bereplaced(Figure104) Water Fountain 1 older ADA accessible metal water fountain that is leaking at the base and should be repaired(Figure105) 59
Figure104PicnicArea Figure102Trail

Figure100EntranceSign

Figure101PlaygroundArea

Figure103MultipurposeField

TrashReceptacles4barreltrashcansexistanddetractfromthevalueofthesite andshouldbereplacedwithpermanentmetalcontainers

3.2.10.3 RECOMMENDATIONS Design standards throughout the site for furniture, signage and assets to make uniform with all parks in the system Landscape the area around the multipurpose similar to othernewerparksintheDistricttoremoveexcessturf Adddistancemarkersalongthetrailforafitnesspath Repair and/or slate for replacement of the damaged assets
Figure105WaterFountain

60

3.3 FACILITY/AMENITYSTANDARDS
FacilityStandardsareguidelinesthatdefineserviceareasbasedonpopulationthatsupport investment decisions related to parks, facilities and amenities. Facility Standards can and willchangeovertimeastheprogramlifecycleschangeanddemographicsofacommunity change. PROSevaluatedparkfacilitystandardsusingacombinationofresources.Theseresources included: National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) guidelines, recreation activity participationratesreportedbyAmericanSportsDataasitappliestoactivitiesthatoccurin the United States and the Cordova Recreation and Park District area, community and stakeholder input, findings from the priority rankings report and general observations by PROS.ThisinformationallowedstandardstobecustomizedtotheCordovaRecreationand ParkDistrict(Figurexx). Basedonthe315.1acresofcurrentparklandandapopulationof110,621,thestandardfor parkacresis2.85acresper1,000persons.Therecommended2010standardis5acresper 1,000,whichmeanstheDistrictcurrentlyneeds238acresofparkland.Also,inlightofthe Districts population growth over the next 10 years, there is an anticipated need for 168 acresofparkland. Thesefacilitystandardsshouldbeviewedasaguide.Thestandardsaretobecoupledwith conventional wisdom and judgment related to the particular situation and needs of the community. By applying these facility standards to the population of District, gaps and surplusesinparkandfacility/amenitytypesarerevealed.

61

PARKS:

2010InventoryDevelopedFacilities

2010FacilityStandards

InProgress

2015FacilityStandards

Cordova 95.80 219.30 315.10 69.75 41.00 12.50 26.00 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 21.87 20.00 10.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 38,250.00 City 62,937 38,250.00 0.35 SFper Person 6&15 1.50 SFper Person NeedExists 37.75 5.00 2.50 2.00 5.50 1.00 5.00 7.50 0.50 13.00 41.00 50.25 31.00 7.50 6.00 9.50 5.00 34.87 25.00 17.50 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.50 3.00 1.00 1.00 structureper 2,698 1.00 courtper 2,201 1.00 courtper 3,568 14,749 1.00 fieldper 18,437 1.00 fieldper 11,644 1.00 fieldper 22,124 1.00 fieldper 0.32 milesper 1,000 4,425 1.00 fieldper 6,321 1.00 fieldper 1.00 structureper 27,655 1.00 structureper 36,874 1.00 siteper 55,311 1.00 siteper 31,606 1.00 siteper 36,874 1.00 siteper 110,621 4 19 16 20 20 24 23 1 22 22 12 2 25 5 8 7 1.00 structureper 3,500 1.00 courtper 5,000 1.00 courtper 5,000 1.00 fieldper 12,500 1.00 fieldper 20,000 1.00 fieldper 15,000 1.00 fieldper 15,000 0.40 milesper 1,000 1.00 fieldper 10,000 1.00 fieldper 7,500 1.00 structureper 20,000 1.00 structureper 7,500 1.00 siteper 50,000 1.00 siteper 40,000 1.00 siteper 20,000 1.00 siteper 40,000 MeetsStandard MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists NeedExists MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists NeedExists MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists NeedExists 1 2 9 2 12 0 3 2 Structures(s) Court(s) Court(s) Field(s) Field(s) Field(s) Field(s) Mile(s) Field(s) Field(s) Structures(s) Structures(s) Site(s) Site(s) Site(s) Site(s) 127,682 SquareFeet

Priority Other CurrentServiceLevelbasedon Rankingbased RecommendedServiceLevels; Schools Provider's Total population RevisedforLocalServiceArea onSurvey 95.80 0.87 acresper 1,000 3 1.50 acresper 1,000 9 3.50 acresper 1,000 219.30 1.98 acresper 1,000 315.10 2.85 acresper 1,000 n/a 5.00 acresper 1,000 acresper 1,000 n/a 2.00 acresper 1,000 69.75 1.11 acresper 1,000 n/a 0.00 acresper 1,000 MeetStandard/ NeedExists NeedExists NeedExists NeedExists NeedExists MeetsStandard AdditonalFacilities/ AmenitiesNeeded 70 Acre(s) 168 Acre(s) 238 Acre(s) 126 Acre(s) Acre(s) Total 2010 Cordova 2015 59.46 59.46 34.11 34.11 93.57 93.57

MeetStandard/ NeedExists NeedExists NeedExists NeedExists NeedExists MeetsStandard MeetsStandard MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists NeedExists MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists NeedExists MeetsStandard MeetsStandard NeedExists NeedExists NeedExists

AdditonalFacilities/ AmenitiesNeeded 18 Acre(s) 150 Acre(s) 168 Acre(s) 231 Acre(s) Acre(s) 2 3 11 2 12 0 3 2 Structures(s) Court(s) Court(s) Field(s) Field(s) Field(s) Field(s) Mile(s) Field(s) Field(s) Structures(s) Structures(s) Site(s) Site(s) Site(s) Site(s) 134,838 SquareFeet

Figure106Facility/AmenityStandards
District 110,621 115,392

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ParkType NeighborhoodParks(5Acresto12Acres)* CommunityParks(12AcresorMore) TotalParkAcres MandatoryOpenSpace(CityofRanchoCordovaonly) SpecialUseAreas OUTDOORASSETS: PlaygroundAreas BasketballCourts;Outdoor TennisCourts;Outdoor DiamondFields;MoundedSmall(60ftorunder) DiamondFields;MoundedLarge(75ftandlarger) DiamondFields;NonMoundedSmall DiamondFields;NonMoundedLarge Trails(HardandSoftSurfaceTrails) MultipurposeFieldsSmall MultipurposeFieldsLarge Pavilions;Large Pavilions;Small SkateboardParks OutdoorPools SplashPads/SprayGrounds DogParks IndoorMultipurposeRecreationSpaces (Community+Senior+Rec.Center+IndoorPool)

EstimatedPopulation:2010 ProjectedPopulation:2015

Notes: 1)NeighborhoodGreensarepartoftheCity'smandatoryopenspacerequirements 2)CitywideParksaredefinedbyafundingmechanism 3)MandatoryOpenSpaceStandardsarebasedonCityrequirementof1.75acres/1000 4)Servicelevelsandfutureneedshavebeendevelopedbasedon2009Citypopulationstatistics 5)Schoolinventoryisdiscounted50%toaccountforpublicaccessduringnonschoolhours 6)Census2000Blocksareutilizedinmappingandpopulationnumbershavebeenestimatedandprojectedtototheseboundaries *Theexistingparksystemcontainsneighborhoodparksthatarelessthan5acresinsize,buthavebeenaccountedforinthetotalNeighborhoodParkacreage.

3.4 SERVICEAREAANALYSIS/EQUITYMAPPING
Service area maps and standards assist management staff and key leadership in assessing whereservicesareoffered,howequitabletheservicedistributionanddeliveryisacrossthe Cordova Recreation and Park District service area and how effective the service is as it comparestothedemographicdensities.Inaddition,lookingatguidelineswithreferenceto population enables the District to assess gaps in services, where facilities are needed, or where an area is oversaturated. This allows District management to make appropriate capital improvement decisions based upon need for a system as a whole and the ramificationsthatmayhaveonaspecificarea. Figures4260showsthe servicearea mapsthatweredevelopedforeachofthefollowing majorassets: NeighborhoodParks CommunityParks PlaygroundAreas BasketballCourts;Outdoor TennisCourts;Outdoor DiamondFields;MoundedSmall DiamondFields;MoundedLarge DiamondFields;NonMoundedSmall DiamondFields;NonMoundedLarge Trails MultipurposeFields;Small MultipurposeFields;Large Pavilions;Large Pavilions;Small SkateboardParks OutdoorPools SplashPads/SprayGrounds DogParks IndoorMultipurposeRecreationSpaces

The source for the population used for standard development is the estimated 2010 populationandprojected2015populationsasreportedbyEnvironmentalSystemsResearch Institute,Inc.(ESRI).Estimatedpopulationfor2010is110,621;2015populationisprojected at 115,392. Projected 2015 service areas were compared for each asset mapped. The 63

shadedareasintheEquityMapsindicatetheservicelevel(e.g.thepopulationbeingserved bythatparktype/amenity)asoutlinedintheFacility/AmenityStandards.

64

Figure107NeighborhoodParksServiceArea

65

66

Figure108CommunityParksServiceArea

67

68

Figure109PlaygroundAreasServiceArea

69

70

Figure110BasketballCourts;OutdoorServiceArea

71

72

Figure111TennisCourts;OutdoorServiceArea

73

74

Figure112DiamondFields;MoundedSmallServiceArea

75

Figure113DiamondFields;MoundedLargeServiceArea

76

77

Figure114DiamondFields;NonMoundedSmallServiceArea

78

79

Figure115DiamondFields;NonMoundedLargeServiceArea

80

81

Figure116Trails(HardandSoftSurfaces)ServiceArea

82

83

Figure117MultipurposeFieldsSmallServiceArea

84

Figure118MultipurposeFieldsLargeServiceArea

85

Figure119Pavilions;LargeServiceArea

86

Figure120Pavilions;SmallServiceArea

87

Figure121SkateboardParksServiceArea

88

Figure122OutdoorPoolsServiceArea

89

Figure123SplashPads/SprayGroundsServiceArea

90

91

Figure124DogParksServiceArea

92

93

Figure125IndoorMultipurposeRecreationSpacesServiceArea

94

CHAPTERFOUR PRIORITYRANKINGS The purpose oftheFacilityandProgramPriorityRankingsis toprovideaprioritizedlist of facility / amenity needs and recreation program needs for the community served by CordovaRecreationandParkDistrict. This rankings model evaluated both quantitative and qualitative data in the. Quantitative data includes the statistically valid Community Survey, which asked respondents to list unmet needs and rank their importance. Qualitative data includes resident feedback obtainedthroughcommunityinputmeetings. TheserankingsareutilizedtodeterminetherecommendedLevelofServiceStandardsand EquityMappingwhichinturnwouldassistintheCapitalImprovementPlanningaswellas theoverallrecommendations. A weighted scoring system was used to determine the priorities for parks and recreation facilities / amenities and recreation programs. For instance as noted below, a weighted valueof3fortheUnmetDesiresmeansthatoutofatotalof100%,unmetneedsmakeup 30% of the total score. Similarly, importance ranking makes up 30% too while Consultant Evaluationmakesup40%ofthetotalscore,thussumminguptoatotalof100%. Thisscoringsystemconsidersthefollowing: CommunitySurvey o UnmetneedsforfacilitiesandrecreationprogramsThisisusedasafactor fromthetotalnumberofhouseholdsmentioningwhethertheyhaveaneed forafacility/programandtheextenttowhichtheirneedforfacilitiesand recreation programs has been met. Survey participants were asked to identify this for 27 different facilities / amenities and 26 recreation programs.Weightedvalueof3. ImportancerankingforfacilitiesandprogramsThisisusedasafactorfrom theimportanceallocatedtoafacilityorprogrambythecommunity.Each respondentwasaskedtoidentifythetopfourmostimportantfacilitiesand recreationprograms.Weightedvalueof3.

ConsultantEvaluation o Factor derived from the consultants evaluation of program and facility priority based on survey results, demographics, trends and overall communityinput.Weightedvalueof4.

Theseweightedscoreswerethensummedtoprovideanoverallscoreandpriorityranking for the system as a whole. The results of the priority ranking were tabulated into three categories:HighPriority(19),MediumPriority(1018),andLowPriority(1927). The combined total of the weighted scores for Community Unmet Needs, Community Importance and Consultant Evaluation is the total score based on which the Facility / Amenity and Program Priority is determined. Figure 61 and Figure 62 below depict the Facility/AmenityandRecreationProgramPriorityRankings. 95

Figure 61 shows that walking, biking trails and greenways, small family picnic area and shelters and small neighborhood parks were the top three facilities / amenities. These were followed by playground equipment, outdoor swimming pools and indoor running / walkingtrack.
Walking, biking trails & greenways Small family picnic area & shelters Small neighborhood parks Playground equipment Outdoor swimming pools Indoor / walking running tracks Off-leash dog parks Splash pads / spray grounds Large community parks Nature center Community gardens Large family picnic area & shelters Youth soccer fields Senior center Gyms / indoor recreation or comm. centers Outdoor tennis courts Amphitheaters Disc golf course Outdoor basketball courts Youth baseball fields Adult soccer fields Multi-purpose fields Adult softball fields Youth softball fields Skateboard parks Youth football fields Archery range
Figure126Facility/AmenityPriorityRankings

Cordova Rec. and Park District Facility/Amenity Priority Rankings

Overall Ranking 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

96

Figure62showsthatAdultfitnessandwellnessprograms,swimlesson/aquaticsprograms and community wide special events were the top three program priorities in the community. Seniorprograms,Visualandperformingartsprogramsand culturalprograms roundupthetop6.
Overall Ranking Adult fitness and wellness programs Swim lessons / aquatics programs Community wide special events Senior programs Visual and performing arts programs Cultural programs Youth sports programs Environmental education programs Trips / excursions Pre-School programs Martial arts Outdoor skills / adventure programs Youth fitness and wellness programs Adult life skill and enrichment programs Adult sports programs After school programs Gymnasium / tumbling programs Youth summer camp programs Youth life skill and enrichment programs Tennis lessons / leagues Youth and adult golf Teen events Birthday party package Programs for individuals with disabilities Before school programs Package parties
Figure127ProgramPriorityRankings

Cordova Rec. and Park District Program Priority Rankings

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

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CHAPTERFIVE OPERATIONALASSESSMENT One of the most critical components of the Strategic Master Plan is the Operational Assessment.Thequalityofinternaloperationsandtheconnectiontokeyinternalbusiness processesarecriticalcomponentsoftheeffectiveimplementationofthePlan.Thesuccess ofplanningeffortsisgreatlydependentupontheleadershipabilitywithintheorganization toadminister,manage,andmonitorthePlansrecommendations.Inaddition,theabilityof the District staff to learn, grow, and develop competencies, aligned with strategy, is paramount to the Plans success. The intent of the Operational Assessment is to provide feedbackandguidelinesabouttheDistrictsoperationsasawayofcontinuouslyimproving andstrengtheningoperations. Recognizing the importance of staff involvement in a strategic planning process, the Assessmentsignificantlyreliesonthoughtsandperspectivesfromstaffmembersandother individuals close to the District. The operational review included nine staff focus group meetings and a meeting with the Administrator. This resulted in approximately 30 staff membersparticipatingintheemployeeinterviews,representingallareasoftheDistrict.In addition, comments from the public input process, consisting of a series of key leader interviewsandfocusgroupsalsoprovidedinformationfortheAssessment.Again,itmust benotedthatthesemeetingswereconductedover18monthsagoandreflecttheopinions andperceptionofthetime. All of the staff members were involved in responding to a series of questions addressing internaloperations.Topicareasincluded: Staffing Workschedulesandworkloads Organizationalstructure Directionsetting Departmentalperformance Technology Resourcestodothejob Financialsystems Ensuringqualityofoperations Sustainabilitypractices Humanresourcerequirements

Inadditiontotheemployeefocusgroups,existingDistrictdocumentswerereviewedaswell, includingorganizationstructureandstaffing,policymanuals,parkinspectionforms,training schedule, the Park and Recreation Ordinance, and general forms, documents, policies and procedures.

5.1 CURRENTSTAFFINGLEVEL
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Employees had a difficult time assessing current staffing levels as a result of the vacant positions. However, since the time of the interviews, a Recreation Manager was hired, whichshouldsignificantlyhelpthedirectionforRecreationstaff.Inaddition,theDistrictis in the process of hiring a Resource Manager, overseeing finance, customer service, and humanresources.Manyofthepublicinterviewedduringthepublicinputprocessexpressed theopinionthattheDistrictisunderstaffed.Employeesdidcommentthatthereisaneed for more frontline employees dealing with the public. Park maintenance employees feel shortstaffed.MostoftheworkwithinParkMaintenanceisdoneinhouse,thoughtheydo contractoutforsomeHVACwork. Duringthepublicinputprocess,residentscommentedaboutthelackofmaintenancestaff availability after hours and weekends. This should be considered an area to review as having staff available when the residents use the parks and facilities is an important customerconsideration.Therecreationgroupfeelsunderstaffed.Theyhavesixstaffand the recommendation was 16 positions in a recent study. Six fulltime recreation staff members and the Mather Sports Center Director are a small staffing complement for recreationforacommunitythesizeoftheRanchoCordovaDistrict. Manyemployeesfeeloverwhelmedwithwork,butthisnotentirelyaresultofworkload,but more a function of waste in processes and inertia from a long cycle time for decision making. When asked about additional positions needed, responses included: someone to oversee technology,twoadditionalmaintenanceemployeesatMather,anotherlandscapearchitect, andmorerecreationprogrammers,includingateensupervisor.Currently,thereisnofull time staff position dedicated to overseeing technology. Public outreach and marketing is also a need, given the branding and image challenges of the District. The Parks staff mentionedtheneedfortwoadditionalmaintenancesupervisorsasstreetscapesandnewer parksarenowinhouse. 5.1.1RECOMMENDATION Asbudgetresourcesallow,continuetofillneededpositions,andaddatechnology position and human resources position. The technology area should include Web site development and improvement. The public outreach/marketing area should also include a graphic designer/marketing support position. Within recreation, additional lower level recreation program coordinators are needed to grow the recreationprogrammingarea.Thestructureforparkswillneedtobereviewedfor the addition of more maintenance employees as new parks are developed and comeonline

5.2 ORGANIZATIONALSTRUCTURE
Similarlytothequestionsaboutstaffinglevels,employeesalsohadadifficulttimeassessing theorganizationalstructureasaresultofthevacantpositions.Oneemployeecommented that the vacant positions could be filled, but the root cause of the problem will remain, whichisthingsseemslowingettingdone.Theunfilledpositionswerementionedinevery employeefocusgroup.Thiswasmentionedfrequentlyduringthekeyleaderinterviewsas well. 99

TheParkSuperintendenthasonedirectreport,whichdoesnotmeettheusualstandardfor efficient span of control. Most Park Superintendent positions oversee at least four to six direct reports. Maintenance has three specialized crews, (Irrigation, special projects, and contractmaintenance.Therewillbea4thcrew,overseeingstreetscapes. The planning area is staffed correctly and is helped with the presence and direction of a SeniorLandscapeArchitect.ThestructureforRecreationisstructuredeffectively,butmore frontlinerecreationprogrammingpositionsareneeded. Notablepositionsabsentfromthestructureareadedicatedtechnologypositionandhuman resourcesmanager.Currently,thehumanresourceareaisapartoffinance.Theremaybe opportunitytospendlessinlegalfeeswithahumanresourcesdirector.Ahumanresource director can also provide guidance in the establishment of a good organizational work culture.Thesepositionscanbeaddedinthefuture,asbudgetresourcesimprove. 5.2.1RECOMMENDATION Complete a human resource plan that includes the development of a future organization chart, based on continued population growth and alignment with communityneeds

5.3 LEADERSHIP
EmployeeshadlowregardfortheoverallleadershipoftheDistrict.Thiswasalsotruefor keyleadersduringtheirinterviewprocess.Thereisafeelingofalackoftrustandrespect between Administration and the employees. There is no strategic vision, direction, or commitmentanddeploymentofmissionandvision.Existingleadersarenotmentoredand coached to become better leaders. Future leaders are not groomed for positions of leadership. There is a feeling of inertia within the District as a result of decisions not being made. Employeesmentionedthelengthyamountoftimeittakesfordecisionstobemadebythe Administrator. As a result, employees take some initiative in making decisions, but they feel like they alwayshavetodefendtheirdecisions,andnooneisbackingthemup.Theotheradditional concern about leadership relates to the lack of senior leader positions in recreation and finance. However, since the time of the employee interviews, this situation has been improvedwiththehiringofaRecreationManager. Theorganizationculturedoesnotlenditselftowardhighperformanceandthedevelopment of a spirited, innovative, or engaged work force. In terms of implementing a Strategic Master Plan, improvement of the work culture must be done in advance of being able to successfully deploy a Strategic Master Plan, or the implementation of the plan will not be successful.Furthermore,theworkenvironmentisdrivenbyfear,whichhinderstheability tocreategooddialogueandrelationshipswithintheDistrict.Improvingtheworkcultureis ofparamountimportancetoimplementingthisPlan. 5.3.1RECOMMENDATIONS

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Establishment of a District culture, including the deployment of the mission, developmentofleadershipguidelines,developmentofvaluesandthedevelopment ofamoreopenandresponsibleenvironmentneedtobeimplemented AsafollowuptothedevelopmentofawelldefinedDistrictculture,anorientation program should be established that provides District, Department, and individual jobinformation AsanadditionalwayofimplementingthecultureoftheDistrict,asetofleadership guidelinesshouldbedevelopedasawayofmodelingdesiredleadershippractices

5.4 STRATEGY/DIRECTION
There is no formal process for strategy and direction, though the intent of the Strategic Master Plan process is to ensure strategy becomes an ongoing core competency of the District. The implementation of the Plan will be a focus within the overall recommendations.TheDistricthascompletedmasterplansinthepast,buttheyhavenot been fully implemented. There is cynicism associated with this Strategic Master Plan processasaresult.Part ofthedifficultyfortheestablishment ofdirectionistheongoing turnoveroccurringattheAdministratorlevel. In addition, budget difficulties have also resulted in the Districts inability to take a longer term view. There are no annual goals and objective setting process or a measurement systemtodetermineorganizationalperformance.SomeareasoftheDistricthavegoalsand objectives, but this is not a standardized, system wide process. As a result, the District is reactiveinitsapproachesandpursuesprojectswithrandomness,ratherthanasystematic approachtoprioritiesinestablishingfuturedirection. Maintenance employees commented about their putting out fires every day. Within maintenance, several employees expressed the opinion that they are headed in the right directionastheyhearfromresidentsthattheyaredoingwell,butthereisnooverallsense ofdirectionintheDistrict.Maintenancedoeshaveinternalgoals,withsafetybeingnumber one.Ensuringparksaresafe,cleanandgreenaretheirotherprimarygoals. WithinRecreation,theytoofelttheabsenceofdirection,particularlygiventheabsenceofa Recreation Manager. This should be an area of improvement now that a Recreation Manager has been hired. The staff expressed frustration about a lack of a plan or overall systemtodeveloprecreationprograms. Theemployeeshopethemasterplanprocesswillhelpshapethefutureandbeagreattool that needs to be implemented. There used to be direction, but with the growth, it is difficult to set direction. The current administrative positions that are vacant hurt the Districtsabilitytobestrategic.EmployeeswouldliketoseetheAdministratortobeableto developdirection. Employeesdonotfeelasthoughtheycancontributetostrategy.AspartoftheStrategic MasterPlanprocess,theDistrictshouldbecomemuchmorestrategic,ratherthantacticalin itsapproaches.Itisimportantforemployeestofeelengagedintheprocessandunderstand theirroleinimplementingstrategy. 5.4.1RECOMMENDATION 101

Develop and institutionalize a strategic planning process for the District that emphasizes strategic direction, rather than random tactics as is currently done. Implementing a strategic plan will help to provide discipline to the District and reduce the amount of time doing firefighting activities. This includes tracking strategicinitiativesandsharinginformationwithBoardmembersandstaff

5.5 BRANDANDIMAGE
Basedoncommentsfromthepublicinputprocessandstafffocusgroups,theoverallimage of the District is in need of improvement. There is a need to build credibility and public trust.ThisisparticularlytrueforrelationshipswithgroupssuchastheCommunityCouncil andtheCitygovernment.ThereisseriousconcernfromtheCityabouttheDistrictsability to competently develop future parks. The District staff members seem to be fighting for theirreputation. ThereisaneedfortheDistrict tomodelthemselvesafterbest practiceorganizationsthat offergoodtransparencyandcommunicationwithresidents.Thisincludesthedevelopment, design, and maintenance of content for the Website. This is difficult to do without labor resourcesbeingdedicatedtowardthiseffort.AsaresultoftheDistrictssignificantneedto build brand and image, a public outreach and marketing coordinator should be hired to developgoodexternalcommunications. 5.5.1RECOMMENDATION Improve the Districts brand and image through a grass roots advocacy campaign, development of an external and internal communication plan, and strengthen relationshipswithotheragencypartnersandgroups

5.6 INTERNALCOMMUNICATIONS/INTERDIVISIONALRELATIONSHIPS
Generally,therearenoDistrictwidestaffmeetings,thoughindividualDepartmentsdohave regular meetings. During the employee focus groups, there was a significant amount of pent up frustration during the meetings as a result of there not being regular ongoing methodsforgoodDistrictwidedialogue.Employeesappreciatedtheopportunitytoopen up.MatherSportsComplexwasbuiltwithoutanyinputfrommaintenanceandrecreation, though Planning now does a much better job communicating with operational employees duringparkdesign.Internalcommunicationneedssignificantimprovement. Ifcommunicationwerebetter,theamountoftimeperformingfirefightingactivitieswould diminish.Toomanytimescommunicationisdoneatthelastminute.Thereisntaprocess for internal communication. Staff mentioned the need to do a better job talking to each other.Itwouldhelpiftherewereregularstaffmeetingsamongdepartments.Forthefront deskteam,communicationworkswell,thoughtheydonothavetheinformationtheyneed, attimes. Therecouldbebettercommunicationbetweenleadershipandthelowerlevelemployees. Therearelotsofsidebarconversations.Peoplewanttogetalong,butthereisaphysical dividebetweenmaintenanceandtheadministrationbuilding.Staffmembersfeelgenerally uninformedaboutwhatisgoingon.

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In order to improve interdepartmental relationships, it may be helpful if the District implemented an internal customer satisfaction system to determine levels of satisfaction towardsupportfunctions.Thesupportfunctionsincludeareassuchastechnology,finance, marketing,andmaintenance.Theseareasprovideimportantservicestootheremployees. Having a satisfaction measurement system in place can help to improve the internal relationshipsoftheDistrict. Several employees mentioned the need for regular ongoing staff meetings. In previous years,therewerestaffmeetingsthatwereheldafterboardmeetings,whichwerehelpfulin keeping employees informed. The employees mentioned only hearing from the administratorwhenthereisanemergencyorwhensomethingiswrong.Thereshouldbean allhandsmeetingonaregularbasis.TheAdministratorneedstocommunicatewhereheis, asstaffreceivescallsaskingforhim,andthestaffisunsurehowtoanswer. 5.6.1RECOMMENDATIONS Internal communication processes should be developed. Ideally, a team could overseetheimplementationoftheworktobedoneinthisarea.Thiscaninclude developing guidelines for District wide and Departmental staff meetings, park design communication processes, leadership guidelines for desired leadership behavior,andmeasuringemployeesatisfactiontowardinternalcommunication.In order to effectively deploy good internal communication, it would be helpful to havecommunicationasaperformanceappraisaljobfactor. Internalcustomersatisfactionprocessshouldbedeveloped.Supportareassuchas finance, human resources, maintenance, and technology should have an annual employeesatisfactionreviewofthequalityofsupportprovided.Thiscanbedone withanannualinternalcustomersatisfactionsurvey.

5.7 FINANCIALSYSTEMS
Financialsystemsregisteredagreatnumberofconcerns.Someofthecommentsincluded: Aforensicaccountantshouldbehired,asthefinancialsystemsaresuchamess. We used to get information monthly. We have to beg to get the information we need Wereallyneedsomeonetooverseethefinancearea.Wedontevenknowwhats beenapprovedinourbudget Wedonotgettimelyreports Thecreditcardsystemdoesntwork Weneedtohavetheinformationweneedtobeabletomanagefinancesbetter WithDoug,IamgettingtheinformationIneedforthefirsttime Wearewastingmoneyoninefficientprocesses Someinformationisavailable,butitisspottyatbest Idontseethebills,andIhavenoideahowIamdoingcomparedtobudget.Itis veryhardsurmisingwhatthefinancesystemis.Ikeepmyownrecords 103

Invoicingsystemsdonotworkwelleither.TheCountypaysthebills,andthereisa lackofcommunicationbetweentheCountyandtheDistrict.Therearenofinancial policiesinplace.ThisspeakstotheDistrictrunninglikeyourgrandfathersDistrict I have the resources to do my job, but I am not able to assess them. I need a specificbudgetandaclearviewofwheretheprogramisheaded Moneyhandlingisinanopencubicle

In order to use budget resources efficiently and effectively, good financial accounting is needed.Currently,staffdoesnothavetheinformationtheyneedtomonitortheirbudgets, whichisasignificantproblem.WhentheResourceManagerpositionisfilled,therewillbe aneedtodevelopandimplementfinancialpoliciesandprocesses.

5.8 TECHNOLOGY
Thetechnologyareaisanotherareaofconcernasthetechnologysystemsareoutdatedand insufficient.Maintenanceemployeesmustbeintheshoptouseacomputer.Thereisno server supporting the system. On the positive side, there is online scheduling for sports programs.Centralizedirrigationandlightingcontrolsexistandarecontrolledbycomputer technology. TheITpositioniscurrentlybeingfilledbyastaffpersonwhoisnottrainedorcompensated forITwork.Employeesappreciatethehelphegives,butitisinsufficient.Employeesneed technologysupportsevendaysaweek,andthissupportisnotavailable.Someemployees havePCsandsomehaveMacs.Staffmentionedthatcomputersareunreliableandemailis unreliable.Thereisnocapabilitytocheckotherstaffmembersschedules.TheWebsiteis not properly developed or managed. The program registration system is also in need of improvement. Recreation staff uses their own cell phones. Maintenance does have cell phones, though sometimes,onlyacrewleaderwillhaveaphone.Whenthecrewleaderleavesapark,the restofthecrewmembersarewithoutcommunication.Thereisnoreplacementsystemfor cell phones. Within the planning area, there is a need for training in auto cad and GIS systems. Oneofthemostimportantcomponentstoexcellenttechnologysupportistheabilityofan agencytogenerategooddatafordecisionmaking.Asaresultofanabsenceofanoverall technology plan and outdated software, the District is not able to harness technology to supportsophisticationindecisionmakingbasedongooddata. 5.8.1RECOMMENDATION AshorttermstrategictechnologyplanshouldbedevelopedtoguidetheDistrictin implementingimprovements.Thisincludesidentifyingstaffpositionsdedicatedto technology, replacement schedules for computers and upgrades to software, improving the program registration process, and supporting employees with improvedfinanceinformation

5.9 SUSTAINABILITY

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In reviewing sustainable practices, the District can do much more in the area of reducing, reusing, and recycling. The District should be a leader in green practices, adopting an organizational approach including park design, operational practices, and general business practices.CurrentlytheDistrictdoesnothaveanagencywiderecyclingprogram,though there is recycling of lights and oil. In addition, there is some use of hybrid vehicles. Cleaningsupplieshavegonegreen,insomecases.Parkmaintenanceuseswoodchipsfor mulching.Waterconservationisasignificantissue,andthereisaneedtoreduceturfareas. WithinthePlanningDepartment,thereisaninterestinhavingaLEEDcertifiedstaffperson. The District should strengthen its practices, first by having sustainable practices as part of the organizational culture. This can be achieved through the adoption of a board policy statementrelatingtoacommitmenttogreenpractices.Secondly,theDistrictcanperform anoverallauditthatidentifiesareasofstrengthsandweaknesses.Anauditformisincluded intheappendixofthereport.Theinformationgeneratedfromanauditcanthenbeusedto developanactionplanoveracourseofthreetofouryears. Agencies around the country have developed success in deploying sustainable practices throughthedevelopmentofstaffgreenteamsandgreencitizengroups.Theseteamsexist toassistintheimplementationofsustainablepractices. 5.9.1RECOMMENDATIONS Developasustainabilityvisionanddefinesustainablegoals Complete a baseline analysis of current sustainability impacts, such as energy use, wateruse,andwastegeneration Establishsustainabilityindicatorsandtrackperformanceagainstsustainabilitygoals. Thistypeofeffortistypicallydoneaftervision,goalsandabaselineareestablished

5.10 HUMANRESOURCESANDWORKCULTURE
Several areas were explored in the human resources area. The human resource area is vitally important for the development of a healthy organizational culture. This includes creating leadership competencies for all supervisors, a hiring process that attracts employees who are a good fit and possess the right competencies for jobs in the District, growthanddevelopmentopportunities,andoverseeinghumanresourcefunctionssuchas salaryandbenefitadministration. During the employee focus groups, several employees mentioned the problem associated withsomestaffholdingjobsinwhichtheydonothaverequisitethecapabilities.Thereisno human resources department, but in the future, this is an important area to have a staff personoverseeingthisarea.Humanresourceseventuallyshouldbeacorporatefunction, reportingtotheAdministrator.Humanresourcesreviewincludesthefollowingareas: 5.10.1ABILITYTOBEANEFFECTIVEPERFORMER Inmaintenance,thestafffeelstheyareeffectiveasadepartment,buttobemoreeffective, they have a need for someone to provide some direction and have the power to make decisions. In maintenance, employees generally feel they have the proper tools and vehicles. There should be an evaluation of all the tools and vehicles in the inventory to 105

make sure it is allocated correctly. Some equipment is lacking and old. Within Maintenance,mostemployeesfeelliketheycanbeeffective,basedontheculture,asthe employeesworkwelltogether.ThisistrueinalltheotherareasoftheDistrictaswell,in Planning, Recreation, and Resource Management. If there were structure and policies, employees believe it would create greater efficiency. Also mentioned was staffs lack of timeinterferingwiththeirabilitytobeeffective.Thebiggestchallengesarewhenpeople callandwanttotalktotheAdministrator.Whentryingtocontacthim,employeesgenerally do not get a response. In addition, the Administrator second guesses a lot of decisions madebyemployees. 5.10.2TEAMWORKANDCOOPERATION AllDepartmentswithintheDistrictworkwellwithintheirworkgroups.Yet,therearesome relationship issues between departments. Some parts of the organization are more cooperative than others. There is no accountability for the need to be cooperative and workeffectivelyasateammember. A good leader would be able to work on developing cooperation within the District. The problemsassociatedwithteamworkandcooperationinparkandrecreationagenciesarea verycommonproblem,particularlybetweenparksandrecreation.Therelationshipworks wellwhenthedepartmentmanagersunderstandthegreatergoodoftheorganizationand workacrosstheirowndivisionstocreategoodhorizontalrelationships.Implementinga360 degree performance review, in which peer members are involved in the performance appraisaloftheirpeers,maybehelpfulinimprovingtherelationship. 5.10.3PERFORMANCEAPPRAISALPROCESS Belowthesupervisorlevel,employeesreceiveaperformancereview,butforsupervisorsthe performance appraisal process doesnt necessarily occur in a given timeframe. Some employees commented they have never received a performance appraisal. A few employees mentioned receiving regular performance appraisals and felt they work well. Someemployeesaremaxedoutintheirrangesanddonotreceiveappraisals.So,itappears theprocessisnotconsistentandstandardizedthroughouttheDistrict. These employees also mentioned it would be helpful to have employees reviewing the supervisors performance as a way of making them accountable to employees. There are inconsistent standards in accountability for work production. Examples were given of employees who are seen as not being effective or pulling their weight, and there are no consequences. In addition, general competencies of some employees were questioned. Staffwerenotsurewhysomeemployeesareinthepositionstheyareinastheydonothave thenecessaryqualifications. 5.10.4TRAININGANDDEVELOPMENT There is a program for reimbursing employees for training. Rainbird provides irrigation training for maintenance employees. The California Parks and Recreation Society offers a lotoftrainingthatemployeesattend.However,beyondtheseexamples,muchcanbedone to strengthen the training and development process. Core competencies should be identified,andtrainingshouldbealignedwiththeneedtodevelopthesecompetencies. 106

Examplesofcompetenciesincludeleadership,budgetandfinance,staffmanagement,and jobspecificcompetenciesincludingcustomerservice,recreationprogramdevelopment,and equipmentoperation.Currently,thereisarandomapproachtotraininganddevelopment. In addition, there is no standardization for training such as an orientation program, equipmentuse,chemicaltraining,andprogramdevelopmenttraining. 5.10.5WILLINGNESSTOEMBRACECHANGEANDINNOVATION This area was explored to determine the Districts ability to continuously improve and change processes in order to improve the work environment and the service delivery process.ItwasthegeneralbeliefofemployeesthattheDistrictdoesnotembracethisas partoftheculture.Theremaybeanappreciationandinterestinhavingthisaspartofthe culture,butseemingly,leadershipdoesnotknowhowtocreatethisaspartoftheculture. Onestaffpersonmentionedthatweaimatadartboard.Employeesarenotsurewhere theDistrictisheaded.Itisdifficulttogetstaffonboardforchange. There is an attitude of we have always done it that way. Recreation programs seem to stay the same. An organization cant do everything it needs to without enough people at thetop.Theemployeesbelievetheyareopentochange,butitishardtoimplementwhen theemployeesdonotknowwhatdirectiontheyaregoing.Employeesfeeltopleadership shouldpushchangemoreandhelpusimplementthechange. 5.10.6POLICIES Are in place, but do not seem to be adhered to by anyone. There are individual rules, depending on the division and the individual. Rules and regulations are written by the attorney,whichcreatesonerouslanguage.Thepolicymanualisoutdated.Thepersonnel policymanualisoutdated.Designstandardsdonotexist. Maintenancestandardsdonotexist.Policiesneedtobeimplementedforworkingwiththe development community. There are no standards for signage. Policies are not enforced consistently,whichcreatesanunfairworkingenvironmentfortheemployees. 5.10.7RECOMMENDATIONS Completion of a policy review, possibly with a team of employees to oversee this work project. This should include doing an inventory of existing policies and identification of policies that need to be developed. In addition, existing policies should be reviewed and updated as needed. A process should be implemented identifyingtimeframesforongoingreviews,inordertokeepallpoliciescurrent Improved deployment of employee growth and development. This includes the development of core competencies for positions. For example, a leadership development program should be initiated to assist in the development of existing andfutureleaders,aswellassuccessionplanning

5.11 IMPROVINGEFFICIENCYANDEFFECTIVENESS
ManystaffmentionedtheneedtogetthepositionsfilledinorderfortheDistricttobemore effective.Inaddition,overallDistrictcommunicationneedsimprovement.TheDistrictstaff 107

isinareactivemodeandisconstantlytryingtocatchup.Asaresult,processesinneedof improvementarenotchanged,asthereisnttimedevotedtothispractice. Most maintenance tasks are demand, rather than preventive maintenance tasks. Good systems track the percentage of demand versus preventive maintenance tasks and work toward decreasing the amount of time spent on demand activities. Maintenance employees mentioned not following any NRPA recommended maintenance practices, though there are regular inspection processes. The staff is currently working on maintenance standards, but the concern is the Districts ability to have the necessary resourcestoadheretothestandards.Workloadcontinuestoincrease.Anexampleisthe staffsstreetscaperesponsibilitiesthatusedtobedoneonacontractualbasis.Replacement schedules do not exist; equipment and vehicles are replaced when they can find the resourcestoreplacethem. SomestaffmentionedthatDougvisitsMaintenanceonaregularbasis,whichisveryhelpful. He has done a good job understanding maintenance issues, which is important from an efficiencyandeffectivenessstandpoint.Thereisnoautomatedworkordersystem,which alsoshouldbelookedinto. TheDistrictneedstomanageknowledgeandlearnfrommistakes.Though,theculturedoes not support this, as there is a lack of trust and fear in the organization. Efficiency and effectivenesswouldalsoimproveifemployeesweregivenbudgetinformationandincluded in the budget process. If employees had this knowledge, they could be a part of finding solutionstoproblemareas.Alsomentionedwastheneedformorepoliciestobeinplace. 5.11.1HOWDOYOUIMPROVEPROCESSES Commentsfromemployeesincludedthefollowinglistofitems: Wehavenofinanceprocesses;Ihaveneverseenasystemlikethis We just finished a $15 million dollar project and there was no financial oversight. WeshouldbeattractingregionalbusinessestoMatherField Weneedmarketingsupport TheemployeesshouldhavemoreinputintotheDistrictoperations Our opinions dont seem to be important. We are not taken seriously. Get everyonesinput Getridofthedeadwood.Leadershipneedstoseewhatsgoingon Uppermanagementdoesnotgetoutinthefieldenough PersonalaccountabilityandcommunicationwouldmaketheDistrictmuchbetter Someemployeesareherelongerthantheyshouldbeandtheyarejustcollectinga paycheck.Communication,communication,communication ItishardtogetadecisionfromtheAdministrator Weneedapersonhereonadailybasisforthepublic

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Thisisthe mostchallengingagencyI havebeenin.Weneedtobeproactivenot reactive

5.11.2RECOMMENDATIONS Theidentificationofprocesswasteshouldbeidentifiedthroughleanpractices.This includes providing staff with training in process management skills, identifying processesingreatestneedofimprovement,andinitiatingemployeeprocessteams toimproveongoingprocesses Implement a performance measurement system to identify how the District is performing.ThisshouldbesharedwiththeBoardandstaff

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CHAPTERSIX CONCESSIONSASSESSMENT PROS Consulting reviewed the District Concession Assessment to determine opportunities for the District to improve their operations and enhance their revenues. The Concession Assessmentincludedareviewofthefollowingareas: Softball/BaseballComplex IndoorRecreationCenter GolfProshopOperations ShootingRange

Theassessmentincludedareviewofthesiteswithstaffandsomelimitedmeetingswiththe concessionoperatorsiftheywereavailable.

6.1 SOFTBALL/BASEBALLCOMPLEX
The Softball/ Baseball Complex has many design limitations which make it difficult for the Districttomakeasmuchmoneyaspossible.Thelimitationsincludethefollowingelements: Lackofstorageexistsonsitewhichcausesalotmorestafftimetobringsuppliesin andoutoftheconcessionareaonadailybasis.Currentlythestaffusetheumpires roomforstorage Lack of having (2) cashiers stations serving customers at one time and the cash registersarenotlinkedwithapointofsalesystem Lackofarefrigerator/freezeronsite Limitedsettingoutsideforuserstositandeat Thefoodmenuisnottargetedbytypeofuser Pricingoffoodanddrinksisnotbasedoncostofserviceandaprofitmargingoal TheConcessionstandneedstohaveanoutsidemenuboardsopeoplestandingin line can determine what their food and drink needs are beforethestepuptothe concessionstaffperson Lackofstandardizeddrinksandfoodexiststomakeissimplefortheuserandthe staffindeterminingcosts Thestaffhastocookoutsideduringtournamentswithanoutsidegrill Thestaffisnotabletoservebeeronadultsoftballtournaments Staffing costsmakeup2830%ofcostswhichis10%higherthanmost concession facilitiesoperatedbypublicagencies

6.1.1RECOMMENDATIONS Consideraddingontotheconcessionfacilityandremodelingtheinsidetoallowfor storageandrefrigeratorsandfreezerspace Addoutsidemenustothebuilding 110

Standardize drinksizes,foodportionsandmenuitemsforyouthtournamentsand leaguesandadulttournamentandleagues Acquire simple food items with high cost recovery levels such as sale of beer, popcorn,hotdogs,nachos,pretzels,threestandarddrinksizesonly,pizzas,friesand hamburgers Addmoreseatingoutsideoftheconcessionstandtomakeitcomfortabletoeat Buyapointofsalesystemtodeterminecosts,profitmade,andreorderitems Continuetogrilloutsidefortournaments Limitstaffingcoststo20%orlessoftotalconcessioncosts Nametheconcessionstand Donotsellgumorseeds Determine the cost of service both direct and indirect for each food item and determinewhichfooditemsprovidethebestreturnoninvestments Runfoodspecialsonlastdaysoftournamentstoeliminateanywasteoffood Trainstaffonupsellingitemswhenpeopleorder Developtosetsofmenusforadultsandyouth Establishbeersalesforadulttournamentsandaddakegerator Market to the park users as well as to the sports complex users with signs that indicatewhattheyofferandencouragethemtousethefacility Offerteamdiscountsinadvanceofleagueortournamentplayforasetprice

6.2 INDOORACTIVITYCENTER
Theindooractivitycenterisverylimitedaswellforconcessions.TheActivityCenteroffers limitedfoodandvendingitemsonlyandisnotlocatedinaveryconducivespaceforselling food. The site does not have a place for user to sit down. A concession eating space is needed with TV and WiFi access so users and parents can sit and eat when using the building. 6.2.1RECOMMENDATIONS WhentheDistrictdecidestoupdatethebuildingorreplaceitwithanewbuildinga concessionareaneedstobedevelopedinsidethecenter The District needs to sell easy food items such as popcorn and hotdogs with fountaindrinksonly Findaplaceforpeopletoeatinthebuildingoroutside Continuetooffervendingmachineswhenfoodserviceisnotavailable

6.3 GOLFCOURSEPROSHOPANDFOODSERVICE
Thegolfcourseproshopisoutdatedinitsdesignandimage.Theproshopmanagerhasalot ofinventoryinstockforthesizeoftheoperationwhichmakestheshopfeelverycluttered 111

and not organized. The Proshop manager is on a long term contract (25) years plus. The Districthasmademanyneededimprovementstothegolfcourseandtherestroomsonsite with more improvements planned. The following limitations were observed at the golf coursefacilitybyPROS. Thereislimitedoutingsatthegolfcourse Thepricingofservicesneedstobeaddressedbasedonthevalueofthegolfcourse andthepriceelasticityinthemarketforthecoursesofsimilarvalue Theusersofthegolfcourseareprimarilyseniors The courtyard outside of the clubhouse and food service area needs a lot of enhancement Nobusinessplanisinplaceforthegolfcourse,proshoporconcessionfacility Dressoftheemployeeswasinconsistent Drivingrangefencingneedsimprovement TherearenoperformanceindicatorsusedbytheDistricttoholdthecontractorson siteaccountable TheProonsitegets100%ofthelessons TheDistrictpaystheproa$1,000amonthmanagementfee Thegolfcoursedoes60,000to70,000roundsayear Thegolfcoursehasthelowestgolffeesinthestateandthefeeswherelastraised threeyearsago Thegolfcourseneedsacartbarntostoregolfcartsin TheDistrictturnsthegolfcartsoverevery8yearswhichisfouryearslongerthan mostpublicgolfcoursesdo Thereisnotalotoffemalegolferswhoplaythegolfcourse Theproonsiteusesvolunteerrangerswhoareallowedtoplaygolfatcertaintimes forfreeinexchangefortheirvolunteersupportonsite Theyonlyprovideoneconcessioncartonthegolfcourseatatime The food operation is managed by a separate contractor with very little coordinationbythegolfcoursemanagerandthefoodserviceoperator ThefoodserviceoperatorpaystheDistrict12%ofgrossonthefoodoperation Thefoodservicemenuisverylimited Nooutingfacilityisavailabletohosttournamentsandaftergolfhospitalitybecause thefoodserviceareaissolimited Some complaints of poor service exist from users of the food service operation becauseofawidermenuoffoodoptionsandcustomerservice

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No cost of service is done by the District to determine direct and indirect costs of operations of the maintenance of the golf course, clubhouse operations or restaurantoperations

6.3.1RECOMMENDATIONS Thegolfpro/managercontractisveryfairincompensationfortheworkperformed but needs to be updated based on the indirect costs associated with the performanceofhisduties.Indirectcostsshouldbeevaluatedagainsthiscontractas itappliestothecostofmaintenanceoftheproshop,utilities,capitalimprovements, andmanagementoversight Theproshopneedstobeupdatedwithanimprovedimage.Theshopneedstohave morestorageaddedsoitisntsoovercrowdedwithmerchandise The addition of an outing facility would support tournaments and should be incorporated into the updating of the patio area in front of the clubhouse and improvementstothegolfcourse TheDistrictneedstoconsiderthetruecosttomaintainthegolfcoursebothdirect andindirecttodeterminethepricingofthegolfcourseforthefuturethatincludes thisinformation,costrecoverygoalsdesiredandpriceelasticityinthemarketplace forgolf Limitedmarketingeffortsareinplacetoattractfemales,youthandfamilygolfersto haveahigherlevelofusergroupstoplaythegolfcourse Golfcourseplayhasdroppedby40,000roundsoverthelasttenyearsandneedsto bereevaluatedwithwhythelossofplaythroughacommunitywidesurveyanduser groupsurveys Continued efforts to update the golf course, clubhouse, restaurant, driving range, patio,parkinglots,cartpathsneedstobeconsidered Operational standards need to be put into place by the District for maintenance, clubhouseoperationsandfoodservicewithmeasurableoutcomesthataretracked onamonthlybasis Abusinessplanneedstobecreatedforthegolfcourse,proshopandfoodservice operations Moreprogrammingofthegolfcourseisneededtoattractyoungergolfers,women andfamiliesincludingthemarketingofgolfoutingstobringplaytoahigherlevel Therestaurantisinneedofatotalupgradewitharevisedmenutoattractawider levelofusers SaleofbeershouldbeconsideredbytheDistrictintherestaurant The District needs to calculate the true cost of services for the restaurant both directandindirectcostsagainstthe12%theyreceivefromthecontractor Most public golf food contractors pay the public golf facilities they operate under 15%ofgrossand18%ofalcoholifsold 113

Ratesneedtobeadjustedandevaluatedonayearlybasis Therestaurantneedstohavetwogolffoodcartsonweekends Better coordination of food and golf is needed and outlined in the future developmentofthebusinessplanforthegolfcourse TheDistrictshouldconsiderputtingthegolfcourse,foodserviceandmaintenance underonecontractversusseparatecontractstomarketandmanagethegolfcourse inthemostefficientmanner Aoutingmanagerandyouthandwomenprogrammanagershouldbeconsideredto promotegreaterplayandencouragewideragesegmentofusers Ahealthyfoodmenuneedstobeaddedtotherestaurant Drivingrangeneedstoupdatedandprogrammed Amarketingplanisneededforthegolfoperation

6.4 CORDOVASHOOTINGRANGE
Theshootingrangeoperationhasbeenprivatelymanagedsince1979.Theshootingrange consistsofarifleandpistolrange,skeetandtrapshootingrangeandbuildingstohousea proshop and storage facilities. The District receives $1500 dollars a month in rental lease from the concessionaire but is responsible for all capital costs over $1,000 dollars. The District has not done a true cost of service assessment of their costs against what the contract pays the District to determine their level of cost recovery for the site. Key observationsoftheShootingRangeFacilitybyPROSinclude: NobusinessplanexistsfortheDistricttoreviewbytheoperators Fencing of the property is needed with appropriate signage due to the number of peoplewholivenearthesite Leadharvestremovalhasbeendiscussedbythecontractorbutnotextractedfrom thepropertyoverthenumberofyearsthecontracthasbeeninplacebutcontractor wouldliketodoitgivenpermissionbytheDistrict Noarcheryshootingisallowedonsite Lawenforcementtrainingdoesoccuronsite ElkGroveistheonlyothershootingrangeintheareaandtheDistrictcouldcontrol themarketiftheywantedto Theusersofthesiteislimitedtoprimarilymen Thecontractorallowsthecommunitytostoretrailersonthepremisewhichisnot outlined in their contract and it is not noticed rather they receive money from rentersfortherighttostoretheirtrailers TheDistrictonlyreceivesaflatrateandnotaflatrateandpercentageofgrossto determinetheamountofdollarvolumetheconcessionairereceives Foodserviceisverylimitedonthesite 114

Thesiteisnotveryinvitingforapublicfacility Signageneedstobeimprovedtogettothesiteandonthesite Nopointofsalecashregistersappeartobeusedonsite The District does not have any performance indicators to hold the concessionaire accountabletoanylevelofexpectations The past director never returned phone calls from the Concessionaire which was veryfrustratingforthem TheDistrictshouldnotbeapprovingthefeesonatotallandlease TheConcessionairehaspaidintoamaintenancefundtotheDistrictover$500,000 andtheywouldliketoseeaaccountingofwherethatmoneyhasgoneasithasnot beenreinvestedinthesite

6.4.1RECOMMENDATIONS The District should require the Concessionaire to develop an annual business plan ontheirfocusforthecomingyearwithperformanceindicators.Thebusinessplan shouldbeapprovedbytheDistrict The fence around the perimeter needs to be installed by the District as a safety elementfromthepublictoaccessthesite LeadremovalneedstobeallowedbytheDistrictfortheConcessionairetoharvest No storage of other peoples trailers should be allowed on the Districts property withoutwrittenapprovalbytheDistrict Aupdatedimprovementplantomodernizethesiteandimageshouldbeconsidered TheDistrictsshouldconsiderputtingtheShootingRangeoutforacompetitiveBide every 10 years if there is no capital improvements made to the site and every 20 yearsifsignificantcapitalimprovementsaremadebythecontractor TheDistrictshouldconsideraflatleaserateandapercentageofgrosstodetermine thelevelofrevenuerunningthroughtheoperation.Theyshouldincorporatetheir costsagainsttheleaseratetodeterminetheirlevelofcostrecoverytodetermine anylevelofnegotiationwiththeConcessionaire There needs to be updated quarterly meeting with the Concessionaire and the DistrictDirector The District should require to have a point of sale system in place for auditing purposesandiftheyincludeapercentageofgross The District needs to supply to the contractor where the $500,000 dollars of investmentbythecontractorhasgone Improvementtothepistolrangeisneeded Theentiresitecouldusesomemajorrenovation

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CHAPTERSEVEN FINANCIALANALYSIS

7.1 INTRODUCTION
This section assesses the current situation of the District and focuses on key financing strategies to support the Master Plan. The financial analysis identifies existing available fundstosupportthecapitalprogramandpresentspotentialtrendswithcurrentoperations andfunding.Itisanindepthreviewoftherevenues,expenditures,andcapitalfundsofthe District.ThisincludestheGeneralFundbudget,thebudgetsoftheSpecialRevenueFunds, andtheEnterpriseFundbudget.Trendsareevaluatedtodeterminefinancialintegrityand anticipated directions for the future. Where data is available, cost recovery has been analyzed by activity type to present the expenditure recovery through fees and charges. Pricingstrategiesareincludedtoguidestaffindeterminingfeesandimplementingapricing policy. Overall, the various components of the analysis will help provide better guidance andaroadmapforfuturefinancialplanningdecisionsmadebystaff. 7.1.1DATAREVIEWED ThePROSTeamreviewedthedetailedcostandactivityinformationpreparedbytheDistrict staff.FollowingisalistofthecostandactivitydatareviewedbyPROS: ComprehensiveAnnualFinancialReportsforyearsending2004through2007 AnnualBudgetsbyFundforfiscalyears2006through2011

Thefinancialstatementsandbudgetreportswereanalyzedtoassessthefinancialsituation oftheDistrict. 7.1.2DISTRICTOVERVIEWANDFINANCIALPROFILE The Cordova Recreation and Park District is an independent local government entity. The Districts financial structure includes four Major Governmental Funds, three NonMajor GovernmentalFunds,andoneEnterpriseFund. TheFinancialAnalysisisorganizedintosixsections: GeneralFund IndependenceatMatherLightingandLandscapeDistrict VillageofZinfandelandCapitalVillageCommunityFacilitiesDistrict SunridgeParkFacilitiesCommunityFacilitiesDistrict GolfCourse,EnterpriseFund ParkMaintenanceandRecreationImprovementDistrict

Theperiodfortheanalysisincludesfiscalyearsending2005through2010.Thedataused for the analysis are the actual amounts for years 2005 through 2009 and the budget projectionsfor2010.Thefundbalancesforbudgetpurposesareprojectedatzero($0.00.)

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7.2 GENERALFUND
TheCordovaRecreationandParkDistrictadministersatotalof438acres,whichincludes18 neighborhood parks, six community parks, four community swimming pools, the Cordova CommunityCenteratHaganCommunityParkonChaseDrive,theCordovaSeniorCenteron RoutierRoad,MatherSportsComplex,theCordovaPublicShootingCenteronDouglasRoad, and the Cordova Golf Course on Jackson Road (in a separate fund.) Many of these parks connect via trails or paths to the Parkway, which crosses through the Park District boundaries. 7.2.1GENERALFUNDTRENDS The General Fund revenues and expenditures including transfers in and out remain close over the seven year period as shown in Figure 43. The General Fund revenues and expenditures dropped significantly in 2010. The sharp increase in the projected 2011 revenuesandexpendituresisprimarilyrelatedtoanticipatedgrantfunds.

Figure128TotalRevenuesandTotalExpenditures

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ThefundbalanceandallreservesarecomparedtothetotalexpendituresinFigure44.The total fund balance and reserves have decreased in relation to the total expenditures over theperiod.Acontinuingdecreasecoulderodethestrengthofthefund.Whilethepercent oftotalexpenditureshasdecreased,thefundbalanceandreservesareaboveornearthe high target ranges for all year except the projected fiscal year ending 2011 as shown in Figure 45. A range of reserves between 60 and 90 days is generally acceptable to cover unexpectedrevenuedropsorunusualexpenditures.
Figure129FundingandReservestoExpenditures

TotalReservestoTotalExpenditures LowTarget HighTarget

2005 82% 17% 25%

2006 159% 17% 25%

2007 159% 17% 25%

2008 32% 17% 25%

2009 23% 17% 25%

2010 37% 17% 25%

2011 14% 17% 25%

Figure130ComparisonofFundingandReservestoExpenditureswithTargets

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The operating revenues and operating expenditures are shown in Figure 46 and the costs recoveryisshowninFigure47.Thefiscalyearending2008includesalargeleasepayment. The target cost recovery for general park operations is 40%. The cost recovery trend has decreased over the period but the projected fiscal year ending 2011 shows an increase approachingtheanticipatedrecoverygoal.Thisindicatesthatpricingmayneedadjustingto coverincreasedexpenditures.
Revenues

OperatingRevenues&Expenditures
$9,000,000 $8,000,000 $7,000,000 $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $0 2005 2006 2007 2008 FiscalYear Expenditures 2009 2010 2011

Figure131OperatingRevenuesandOperatingExpenditures

OperatingRecovery OperatingRecovery withoutLeaseIncome

2005 48% 48%

2006 39% 33%

2007 28% 28%

2008 96% 23%

2009 23% 23%

2010 24% 23%

2011 37% 36%

Figure132PercentofOperatingCostRecovery

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7.2.2GENERALFUNDPROGRAMS Aquatics, Recreation, and Resale program areas are shown in Figure 48. The direct revenues,directexpenditures,andpercentcostrecoveryareshownforeachprogram.
Aquatics Revenues Expenditures Recovery Recreation Revenues Expenditures Recovery Resale Revenues Expenditures Recovery 2005 $80,228 $270,332 30% 2005 $588,041 $535,695 110% 2005 $130,341 $106,802 122% 2006 $93,414 $324,993 29% 2006 $505,960 $483,776 105% 2006 $38,643 $10,571 366% 2007 $109,199 $292,909 37% 2007 $493,946 $490,590 101% 2007 $15,315 $6,782 226% 2008 $118,385 $318,360 37% 2008 $500,919 $452,714 111% 2008 $12,527 $6,774 185% 2009 $104,018 $314,468 33% 2009 $602,853 $499,183 121% 2009 $24,759 $9,083 273% 2010 $112,712 $320,832 35% 2011 $142,916 $332,584 43%

2010 2011 $788,717 $1,709,880 $524,553 $579,595 150% 295% 2010 $63,818 $28,060 227% 2011 $266,300 $79,134 337%

Figure133ProgramDirectCostRecovery

TheAquaticsprogramisgeneralabove30%costrecovery.Theexpectedtargetforaquatics programs is 40% as shown for fiscal years 2007 and 2008. The recreation direct cost recovery is above 100% for each year which is consistent with the general target for recreationprograms.Theresaledirectcostrecoveryisaboveornear200%forfiscalyears 2006through2010.Aminimumtargetof200%ofdirectcostisexpected. 7.2.3GENERALFUNDOBSERVATIONS TheCordovaRPDGeneralFundhassufficientfundbalanceandreserves.Thecostrecovery foroperatingprogramshasdecreasedoverthestudyperiod.Feesandchargesmayneedto beupdatedtomaintainabalancedsystem.

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7.3 INDEPENDENCEATMATHERLIGHTINGANDLANDSCAPEDISTRICT
TheIndependenceatMatherLandscapingandLightingAssessmentDistrictwasformedfor the purpose of levying and collecting assessments on all parcels of land within the subdivision, to provide funds for the maintenance, operation, servicing, and provision of utilities to park and recreational improvements on 17 acres of park land within the IndependenceatMatherProject. 7.3.1LIGHTINGANDLANDSCAPEDISTRICTTRENDS The Lighting and Landscape District revenues and expenditures including transfers in and outremaincloseforfiscalyearsending2005through2009.Thefiscalyearending2010and projectyear2011therevenuesareunderexpendituresapproximately$100,000asshownin Figure49.
Revenues $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $0 2005 2006 2007 2008 FiscalYear Expenditures 2009 2010 2011

TotalRevenues&Expenditures

Figure134TotalRevenuesandTotalExpenditures

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ThefundbalanceandallreservesarecomparedtothetotalexpendituresinFigure50.The totalfundbalanceandreserveshaveincreasedinrelationtothetotalexpendituresthrough the2011period.Thefundbalanceandreservesareabovethehightargetranges.Arange of reserves between 60 and 90 days is generally acceptable to cover unexpected revenue dropsorunusualexpenditures.Figure51showsthatthefundisabovethehightargetfor actualyearendresultsandbelowthetargetfortheprojectedyearending2011.
$50,000 $0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

FundBalanceandOperatingReserves ToOperatingExpenditures
$250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $0

ContingencyReserve EndingFundBalance

GeneralReserve OperatingExpenditures

Figure135FundingandReservestoExpenditures

TotalReservestoTotalExpenditures LowTarget HighTarget

2005 43% 17% 25%

2006 35% 17% 25%

2007 53% 17% 25%

2008 58% 17% 25%

2009 52% 17% 25%

2010 36% 17% 25%

2011 11% 17% 25%

Figure136ComparisonofFundingandReservestoExpenditureswithTargets

7.3.2LIGHTINGANDLANDSCAPEDISTRICTOBSERVATIONS The Lighting and Landscape District has sufficient fund balance and reserves for historic fiscalyears.

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7.4 VILLAGE OF ZINFANDEL AND CAPITAL VILLAGE COMMUNITY FACILITIESDISTRICT


TheVillageofZinfandelandCapitalVillageCommunityFacilitiesDistrict(CFD)wasformed for the purpose of levying and collecting special taxes on all parcels of land within the subdivisions,toprovideforthemaintenance,operation,servicing,andprovisionofutilities to park and recreational improvements and to provide maintenance for street trees, and landscapemedians,andcorridorswithintheProjects.ThislevyisaMelloRoosSpecialTax. 7.4.1CFDTRENDS The CFD revenues and expenditures including transfers in and out remain close over the sevenyearperiodasshowninFigure52.

$1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $0

TotalRevenues&Expenditures

2005

2006

2007

2008 FiscalYear

2009

2010

2011

Revenues

Expenditures

Figure137TotalRevenuesandTotalExpenditures

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ThefundbalanceandallreservesarecomparedtothetotalexpendituresinFigure53.The total fund balance and reserves have decreased in relation to the total expenditures over theperiod.Acontinuingdecreasecoulderodethestrengthofthefund.Whiledecreasingas a percent of total expenditures, the fund balance and reserves are between the high and lowtargetrangesthroughthefiscalyear2008.The2009andproject2010fundbalances aredangerouslowArangeofreservesbetween60and90daysisgenerallyacceptableto cover unexpected revenue drops or unusual expenditures. Figure 54 shows that the fund balancesarethelowtargetforrecentperiods.

FundBalanceandOperatingReserves ToOperatingExpenditures
$600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 $800,000 $700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0

ContingencyReserve EndingFundBalance

GeneralReserve OperatingExpenditures

Figure138FundingandReservestoExpenditures

TotalReservestoTotalExpenditures LowTarget HighTarget

2005 69% 17% 25%

2006 57% 17% 25%

2007 33% 17% 25%

2008 23% 17% 25%

2009 4% 17% 25%

2010 7% 17% 25%

2011 6% 17% 25%

Figure139ComparisonofFundingandReservestoExpenditureswithTargets

7.4.2VILLAGE OF ZINFANDEL AND CAPITAL VILLAGE COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICTOBSERVATIONS TheVillageofZinfandelandCapitalVillageCommunityFacilitiesDistrictmaybeinfinancial distress at the end of the 2011 fiscal year. The fund lacks sufficient fund balance and

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reservestocoverunexpectedcosts.Thebalancesandreservesarenotsufficienttosustain continuedoperationsatthehistoriclevelsofservice.

7.5 SUNRIDGEPARKCOMMUNITYFACILITIESDISTRICT
TheSunridgeParkCommunityFacilitiesDistrictconsistsofapproximately325acreslocated inthesouthwesternpartoftheCity.Developmentisplannedforapproximately1,319single familyresidentiallots,aswellasanumberofparks,anewelementaryschoolandvarious facilitiesforpublicutilities.OnJuly19,2004,theCityofRanchoCityCouncilestablishedthe CityofRanchoCordovaSunridgeParkCommunityFacilitiesNo.20041andauthorizedtotal bondedindebtednessof$42,000,000.Thelandownersatthetimeofformationthenvoted toauthorizethelevyofaMelloRoosspecialtaxonpropertieswithintheCFD.OnApril2, 2007,Councilvotedtoreducetheauthorizedbondedindebtednessto$34,200,000andadd aServicesSpecialTaxcomponenttofundtheadditionalcostofpoliceservicestobenefitthe residents in the CFD. In September 2007, special tax bonds in the principal amount of $13,485,000wereissuedonbehalfoftheCFD.ThislevyisaMelloRoosSpecialTax. 7.5.1SUNRIDGEPARKCFDTRENDS The Sunridge Park CFD revenues and expenditures including transfers in and out remain close for fiscal years ending 2005 through 2010 as shown in Figure 55. The projected revenuesarelessthantheprojectedexpendituresforprojectedyearending2011.Thefund hassignificantreservestoadequatelycovertheprojecteddeficitforthefiscalyearending 2011.

TotalRevenues&Expenditures
$3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 2005 2006 2007 2008 FiscalYear Revenues Expenditures 2009 2010 2011

Figure140TotalRevenuesandTotalExpenditures

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126

ThefundbalanceandallreservesarecomparedtothetotalexpendituresinFigure56.The totalfundbalanceandreserveshaveincreasedinrelationtothetotalexpendituresoverthe period.A continuingincreasedemonstratesthestrengthofthe fund. Arangeofreserves between 60 and 90 days is generally acceptable to cover unexpected revenue drops or unusualexpenditures.Figure57showsthatthefundissignificantlyabovethehightarget forallyears.

FundBalanceandOperatingReservesTo OperatingExpenditures
$4,000,000 $3,500,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $500,000 $0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 $0 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000

ContingencyReserve EndingFund Balance

GeneralReserve OperatingExpenditures

Figure141FundingandReservestoExpenditures

TotalReservestoTotalExpenditures LowTarget HighTarget

2005 117% 17% 25%

2006 44% 17% 25%

2007 78% 17% 25%

2008 103% 17% 25%

2009 130% 17% 25%

2010 184% 17% 25%

2011 114% 17% 25%

Figure142ComparisonofFundingandReservestoExpenditureswithTargets

7.5.2SUNRIDGEPARKCOMMUNITYFACILITIESDISTRICTOBSERVATIONS TheSunridgeParkCommunityFacilitiesDistricthassufficientfundbalanceandreservesto maintainoperations.

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7.6 CORDOVAGOLFCOURSEFUND
The Cordova Golf Course originally constructed in 1958 is a full service facility featuring practice putting green, lighted driving range, Stus Bar and Grill, proshop, club repair, private and group lessons. The Course is 18 holes, open to the public, and features cart paths,apracticeputtinggreen,lighteddrivingrange,and3lakes. 7.6.1CORDOVAGOLFTRENDS TheCordovaGolfCourserevenuesandexpendituresincludingtransfersinandoutremain closeoverthesevenyearperiodasshowninFigure58.Thegolfcoursewasapartofthe GeneralFundinfiscalyearending2005.Therevenueshaveexceededexpendituresforthe historical years 2006 through 2009. The expenditures exceeded revenues for the actual fiscalyearending2010andtheprojectedyearending2011.

$1,600,000 $1,200,000 $800,000 $400,000 $0

TotalRevenues&Expenditures

2005

2006

2007

2008 FiscalYear

2009

2010

2011

Revenues

Expenditures

Figure143TotalRevenuesandTotalExpenditures

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ThefundbalanceandallreservesarecomparedtothetotalexpendituresinFigure59.The totalfundbalanceandreserveshaveincreasedinrelationtothetotalexpendituresforthe actual historical years. The increases in reserve and fund balance demonstrate a trend increasingfinancialstrength.Thereservesareatthelowtargetfortheyearending2009. Thefundbalanceandreservesarebelowthetargetrangesforallotherfiscalyearsincluding theprojectedyearending2011.Arangeofreservesbetween60and90daysisgenerally acceptable tocoverunexpectedrevenuedropsorunusualexpenditures.Figure60shows thatthefundisbelowthelowtargetformostyears.Thegolfcourseshouldtrytoretainthe 30daystargetforfutureyears.

FundBalanceandOperatingReserves ToOperatingExpenditures
$700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 $1,600,000 $1,400,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $0

ContingencyReserve EndingFundBalance

GeneralReserve OperatingExpenditures

Figure144FundingandReservestoExpenditures

TotalReservestoTotalExpenditures LowTarget HighTarget

2005 N/A 17% 25%

2006 13% 17% 25%

2007 6% 17% 25%

2008 10% 17% 25%

2009 17% 17% 25%

2010 9% 17% 25%

2011 9% 17% 25%

Figure145ComparisonofFundingandReservestoExpenditureswithTargets

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The operating revenues are shown in Figure 61. Expect for the green fees, the revenues appeartobeflat.Thisindicatesthatthepricingneedstobereviewedtomaintainabalance incostrecoveryandtomaintainthequalityofthecourse.

$700,000

OperatingRevenueTrends

$600,000

$500,000

$400,000

$300,000

$200,000

$100,000

$0 2005 2006 2007 2008 FiscalYear Concessions 10PlayGolf Miscellaneous CartRentals Resales Rentals DrivingRange GreenFees 2009 2010 2011

Figure146OperatingRevenues

The costs recovery is shown in Figure 62 for the recovery of O&M expenditures and the recoveryoftotalexpenditures.Thetargetcostrecoveryforgolfcourseoperationsis100% or more. The cost recovery has exceeded the target since the fiscal years ending 2006 through2009.Thefiscalyearending2010andprojectyear2011arebelowthetargetcost recoveryrates.

2005 OperatingRecoveryof O&MExpenditures OperatingRecoveryof TotalExpenditures 86% 83%

2006 105% 100%

2007 154% 138%

2008 123% 118%

2009 122% 113%

2010 93% 87%

2011 82% 80%

Figure147PercentofOperatingCostRecovery

7.6.2CORDOVAGOLFCOURSERESALE Resale revenues and expenditures are shown in Figure 63. The target cost recovery for directcostofretailoperationsis200%ormore.Somemodificationsinpricingareneeded

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to increase to recovery the total cost of staff and facilities used to operate the retail operations.

Resale Revenues Expenditures Recovery

2005 2006 2007 2008 $100,627 $111,584 $109,394 $105,810 $98,424 $100,006 $79,397 $85,042 102% 112% 138% 124%
Figure148ResaleDirectCostRecovery

2009 2010 $86,135 $100,671 $60,105 $64,736 143% 156%

2011 $97,875 $66,000 148%

7.6.3GOLFCOURSEOBSERVATIONS Thegolfcoursefundbalanceandreservesneedtoincreasetothetargetamountsoverthe next three year. The cost recovery for operating programs needs review to maintain a balanced cost recovery and to maintain the level of quality. Additional funding sources shouldbereviewedtoincreasethecostrecoveryofthegolfoperationswithoutsignificantly increasinggreenfees.

7.7 PARKMAINTENANCEANDRECREATIONIMPROVEMENTDISTRICT
TheParkMaintenanceandRecreationImprovementDistrictmaintainsandimprovesparks, playfields, recreation areas and other recreational facilities and public areas in the communities of Gold River, Larchmont, Mather, Riviera East, Rosemont and the City of Rancho Cordova. The assessment proceeds are used for ongoing maintenance and improvements to park and recreational facilities. This assessment was levied following a successfulassessmentelectionin2006. 7.7.1PARKMAINTENANCEANDRECREATIONIMPROVEMENTDISTRICTTRENDS The Improvement District revenues and expenditures including transfers in and out are shown in Figure 64. The expenditures exceed the revenues for fiscal years ending 2009 throughprojected2011.
$1,400,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $0 2007 2008 2009 FiscalYear Revenues Expenditures 2010 2011

TotalRevenues&Expenditures

Figure149TotalRevenuesandTotalExpenditures

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ThefundbalanceandallreservesarecomparedtothetotalexpendituresinFigure65.The total fund balance and reserves in relation to the total expenditures are within the target amountsofthefiscalyears2007through2009.Thefundbalanceandreservesarebelow the target levels for actual fiscal year ending 2010 and projected year 2011. A range of reserves between 60 and 90 days is generally acceptable to cover unexpected revenue dropsorunusualexpendituresasshowninFigure66.

FundBalanceandOperatingReserves ToOperatingExpenditures
$700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $600,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 $400,000 $200,000 $0 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000

ContingencyReserve EndingFundBalance

GeneralReserve OperatingExpenditures

Figure150FundingandReservestoExpenditures

TotalReservestoTotalExpenditures LowTarget HighTarget

2007 25% 17% 25%

2008 24% 17% 25%

2009 20% 17% 25%

2010 13% 17% 25%

2011 10% 17% 25%

Figure151ComparisonofFundingandReservestoExpenditureswithTargets

7.7.2PARK MAINTENANCE AND RECREATION IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS The Park Maintenance and Recreation Improvement District expenditures should be monitoredtopreventmaintainsufficientreservesforunexpectedexpenditures.

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7.8 FINANCIALSTRENGTH
TheDistrictdemonstratesfinancialstrengthinthecurrentratioanddebtassetratioshown in Figure 67. The Current Ratio represents the Districts ability to cover shortterm expenses.Thecalculationisthecurrentassetsdividedbythecurrentliabilities.Aratioof2 or above is considered adequate. The debt/asset ratio indicates the amount that the District is leveraged with debt. The District has minimal liabilities as shown by the low ratios. The means that the District has primarily funding the capital assets through operationsandgrants.

CurrentRatio Debt/AssetRatio

FiscalYearEnding 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 5.7 16.6 20.3 6.1 24.6 0.01 0.09 0.17 0.10 0.09
Figure152FinancialRatios

ThecontinualinvestmentintheDistrictsassetsisareflectionofagrowingDistrictthatis adding to the system and also investing in capital renewal and replacement. PROS recommendsthatsystemsinvestaminimumof2%to4%oftheirnetassetvalueinnewand replacement assets on an annual basis. The District has invested amounts significantly abovetheminimumamounts.Thelowestpercentinvestoccurredinfiscalyearending2009 andisapproximately5.5%.Asthesystemassetage,theDistrictshouldstrivetoinvest2% to4%annuallyinsystemnew,renewal,andreplacementprojects
$30,000,000 30% $20,000,000 $10,000,000 $0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Figure153SystemInvestment

$60,000,000 $50,000,000 $40,000,000

70% 60% 50% 40%


BusinessTypeAssets GovernmentalTypeAssets PercentIncreaseinAssets

20% 10% 0%

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7.9 POLICIESFORCONSIDERATION
7.9.1PRICINGPOLICY PROSrecommendsthatwrittenpricingpoliciesbeestablishedtoguidethemaintenanceof fees and charges to the level of service provided. Any program subsidy should be communicatedtotheprogramparticipantstodemonstratetheinvestmentthattheDistrict ismakingtotheparksandrecreationalprograms.Thiscommunicationshouldincludethe costofoperatingtheprogramandfacilitieseveniffacilitiescostsarenotbeingrecoveredin thefee. 7.9.1.1 FEESANDCHARGESGUIDELINES The Guidelines should include age segment, exclusive use, contractual and special event pricingclassifications.Apricingguidelineshouldconsiderthefollowingelements: CostRecoveryGoalPricing AgeSegmentPricing GroupDiscountingandPackaging Nonprimetime LevelofExclusivityPricing IncentivePricing Primetime

Guidelines should include incentive pricing for programs that provide significant social benefits, group discounts, and primetime/nonprimetime classifications. Incentive pricing may also be used for new programs to test the program content and adequacy of the facilities. Cost recovery guides also help programmers in developing program content, numberofsessions,andmaterialsandsuppliesthatmaybeincludedintheprogramfee. 7.9.1.2 PRICINGPOLICYPHILOSOPHY A Pricing Policy provides the District with consistent guidelines in pricing services and programs. This allows users to better understand the philosophy behind pricing a service. Furthermore,thelevelofserviceandbenefitsusersreceiveistranslatedintoapricethatis basedonasetsubsidylevel,oronthelevelofindividualconsumptionorexclusivitythatis involvedoutsideofwhatageneraltaxpayerreceives. Costofservice documentation with adopted pricing policies provides the District with the tools to adjust the pricing of programs and services as operation and maintenance costs increaseagainstafixedtaxrevenuestream. Theobjectivesofpricinguserfeesarefourfold: Equity Revenueproduction 134

Efficiency Redistributionofincome

Equity means that those who benefit from the service should pay for it; and those who benefitthemostshouldpaythemost.Thetypeofservicewilldirectlydeterminethecost recovery strategy or pricing strategy to be used in pricing services. Public agencies offer threekindsofservices. Public services normally have no user fee associated with their consumption. These servicesaresubsidizedwithtaxes. Merit services can be priced using either a partial overhead pricing strategy or a variable cost pricing strategy. Partial overhead pricing strategies recover all direct operating costs andsomedeterminedportionoffixedcosts.Theportionoffixedcostsnotcoveredbythe priceestablishedrepresentsthetaxsubsidy.Whatevertheleveloftaxsubsidy,theDistrict needstoeffectivelycommunicatetheleveloftaxsubsidybeingincurred. Private park and recreation services are where a specific user or user group receives a benefit above and beyond what the general public receives. Most park and recreation agenciesuseafullcostrecoverystrategyfortheseservices. Revenue production means that user fees from parks and recreation programs and activities will assist in the overall operation of the Park and Recreation budget. It offers flexibility in providing services not normally provided through tax dollars. Example: Promotional dollars for programs and services. Revenue production provides the District withinkinddollarsforgrantmatchesandtheabilitytoenhancefacilities. Revenue production helps offset tax dollars spent on a program or service that over time demands more tax dollars to maintain. Example: Tennis and playground programs. Revenuedollarsarepaidbyindividualswhovaluethisexperience. Efficiencyismaintainedbypricingandprioritizingactivitiesbasedoncommunityinputand availabilityoffunding.Prioritiesinmanagementofparklands,resourcesandactivitiesare clearlydefined.Activitiesinhighestdemandarepricedaccordingly.Costtrackingofdollars spentforeachactivityisdocumented.Pricingcanachievesixpositiveresults: Reducescongestionandovercrowding Indicatesclienteledemandandsupport Increasespositiveconsumerattitudes Providesencouragementtotheprivatesector(soitcancompetewiththeDistrict, andtheDistrictcanreallocateresourceswhenappropriate) Providesincentivetoachievesocietalgoals Ensuresstrongeraccountabilityonagencystaffandmanagement

Redistributionofincome involvessettingfeestocoveroperationalcostsaswellasfuture improvements associated with the activity. Example: Adult softball player fees include additionalfundsforfacilitymaintenanceandcapitalimprovements.

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The District should regularly review and adjust the funding potential for the sources that bestfittheagencysmissionandobjectives.

7.10 FUNDINGPLAN
Inordertocontinuetobuildandmaintainagreatparksystem,theDistrict shouldpursue fundingsourcespresentedinthissectionforoperationsandCIPprojects. New, sustainable funding sources are essential to implementing the Master Plan. The District has relied heavily on developer impact fees, Lighting and Landscape assessments, anduserfeestosupportthesystem.Thekeyforthefutureistodiversifysourcesoffunding toaccomplishtheinitiativesin thisplan. Thesesourcesneedtobe committedonalong termbasistoassureacontinuingincomestream.Thereissignificantpotentialtoincrease revenuetooperatetheparksandrecreationservices,whilestillmeetingtheobjectivesof providingaffordableprograms. Theprojectteamconductedaworkshoptodiscussthemajorfundingoptions.Thestaffhas beenprovidedafundingmodeltodocumentthepotentialfundingsources. The following section list and describe potential funding options that have been used successfullyinotherU.S.parkandrecreationsystems. 7.10.1EXTERNALFUNDING The following examples provide external funding opportunities for the District to consider forthefuture.Eachofthesesourcescanbeevaluatedinmoredetailtodeterminethelevel offundingtheywouldyieldifpursued aggressively. Amountsshownarenewfundsabove and beyond any existing amounts collected. Some funding sources show $0 of revenue indicating the revenue source was evaluated but determined to produce no additional revenuepotential. 7.10.1.1 CORPORATESPONSORSHIPS This revenuefunding source allows corporations to invest in the development or enhancementofneworexistingfacilitiesinparksystems.Sponsorshipsarealsohighlyused forprogramsandevents. 7.10.1.2 PARTNERSHIPS Partnershipsarejointdevelopmentfundingsourcesoroperationalfundingsourcesbetween twoseparateagencies,suchastwogovernmententities,anonprofitandapublicagency, oraprivatebusinessandapublicagency.Twopartnersjointlydeveloprevenueproducing park and recreation facilities and share risk, operational costs, responsibilities and asset management,basedonthestrengthsandweaknessesofeachpartner. 7.10.1.3 FOUNDATIONS/GIFTS Thesedollarsareraisedfromtaxexempt,nonprofitorganizationsestablishedwithprivate donationsinpromotionofspecificcauses,activities,orissues.Theyofferavarietyofmeans to fund capital projects, including capital campaigns, gifts catalogs, fundraisers, endowments,salesofitems,etc. 136

7.10.1.4 DONATIONS Private Donations may also be received in the form of funds, land, facilities, recreation equipment, art or inkind services. Donations from local and regional businesses as sponsorsforeventsorfacilitiesshouldbepursued. 7.10.1.5 FRIENDSASSOCIATION These groups are formed to raise money typically for a single focus purpose that could includeaparkfacilityorprogramthatwillbetterthecommunityasawholeandtheirspecial interest. 7.10.1.6 IRREVOCABLEREMAINDERTRUSTS Thesetrustsaresetupwithindividualswhotypicallyhavemorethan$1millioninwealth. Theywillleaveaportionoftheirwealthtoanagencyinatrustfundthatallowsthefundto grow over a period of time and then is available for an agency to use a portion of the interesttosupportspecificparkandrecreationfacilitiesorprogramsthataredesignatedby thetrustee. 7.10.1.7 VOLUNTEERISM Therevenuesourceisanindirectrevenuesourceinthatpersonsdonatetimetoassistthe Districtinprovidingaproductorserviceonanhourlybasis.ThisreducestheDistrictscostin providingtheserviceplusitbuildsadvocacyintothesystem. 7.10.1.8 SPECIALFUNDRAISERS Manyparkandrecreationagencieshavespecialfundraisersonanannualbasistohelpcover specificprogramsandcapitalprojects. 7.10.2CAPITALFEES Capitalfeesareaddedtothecostofrevenueproducingfacilitiessuchasgolfcourses,pools, recreation centers, hospitality centers and sports complexes and are removed after the improvementispaidoff. 7.10.2.1 DEDICATION/DEVELOPMENTIMPACTFEES Thesefeesareassessedforthedevelopmentofresidentialpropertieswiththeproceedsto beusedforparksandrecreationpurposes,suchasopenspaceacquisitions,communitypark site development, neighborhood park development, regional park acquisition and development,etc. 7.10.2.2 IMPACTFEES Thesefeesaredifferentthantheoneabovesincethesefeesareinadditiontothesetuser rate for accessing facilities such as golf courses, recreation centers and pool facilities to supportcapitalimprovementsthatbenefittheuserofthefacility. 137

7.10.2.3 MELLOROOSDISTRICT TheDistrictcurrentlyusesthisfundingforoperations,maintenance,andcapital.Theseare feesforaspecificpurposewithanelectionapprovingDistrictandfeesby2/3majority. 7.10.3USERFEES Thesefeesarechargedprimarilytorecreationprogramusersandarebased onthedirect andindirectcosttoprovideconsumptiverecreationservicesandwillvarybasedonthecost recovery goals and pricing policy in place for the core programs. The District has been currentlyemployingamajorityoftheseinitiativesandshouldcontinuethesame. 7.10.3.1 RECREATIONSERVICEFEES This is a dedicated user fee, which can be established by a local ordinance or other government procedures for the purpose of constructing and maintaining recreation facilities.Thefeecanapplytoallorganizedactivities,whichrequireareservationofsome type or other purposes, as defined by the local government. Examples of such activities include adult basketball, volleyball, tennis, and softball leagues, youth baseball, soccer, football and softball leagues, and special interest classes. The fee allows participants an opportunitytocontributetowardtheupkeepofthefacilitiesbeingused. 7.10.3.2 RECREATIONFEES/CHARGES TheDistrictmustpositionitsfeesandchargestobemarketdrivenandbasedonbothpublic and private facilities. The potential outcome of revenue generation is consistent with nationaltrendsrelatingtopublicparkandrecreationagencies,whichgenerateanaverage 35percentto50percentofoperatingexpenditures. 7.10.3.3 TICKETSALES/ADMISSIONS This revenue source is on accessing facilities for selfdirected activities such as pools, ice skatingrinks,ballparksandentertainmentfacilities.Theseuserfeeshelpoffsetoperational costs. 7.10.3.4 PERMITS(SPECIALUSEPERMITS) Thesespecialpermitsallowindividualstousespecificparkpropertyforfinancialgain.The Districteitherreceivesasetamountofmoneyorapercentageofthegrossservicethatis beingprovided. 7.10.3.5 RESERVATIONS This revenue source comes from the right to reserve specific public property for a set amount of time. The reservation rates are usually set and apply to group picnic shelters, meeting rooms for weddings, reunions and outings or other types of facilities for special activities. 138

7.10.3.6 EQUIPMENTRENTAL The revenue source is available on the rental of equipment such as tables, chairs, tents, stages,bicycles,rollerblades,boogieboards,etc.thatareusedforrecreationpurposes. 7.10.4GRANTS TheGrantmarketcontinuestogrowannually.Grantwritersandresearchersarerequired tomakethisfundingsourceworkfinancially.Matchingdollarsarerequiredformostgrants. 7.10.4.1 PARTNERSHIPENHANCEMENTMONETARYGRANTPROGRAM Partnership Enhancement Monetary Grant Program, administered by the National Tree Trust. Matching grants are available on a 50/50 cost share basis. Funds are available for projects which promote public awareness in support of tree planting, maintenance, management,protectionandcultivationoftreesinrural,communityandurbansettings. 7.10.4.2 CDBGFUNDING Funding received in accordance with the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Programs national objectives as established by the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development.FundingmaybeappliedtosuchprogramsasInfrastructureImprovements, Public Facility and Park Improvements, Human Service Enhancements, LeadBased Paint Education and Reduction, Housing Education Assistance, and Economic Development and Antipovertystrategies.ThisrequiresapartnershipwiththeCity. 7.10.4.3 LANDTRUST Many systems have developed land trusts to help secure and fund the cost for acquiring landthatneedstobepreservedandprotectedforgreenwaypurposes.Thiscouldbeagood sourcetolooktoforacquisitionoffuturelands. 7.10.5PROPERTYTAXES Advaloremtaxesareassessedonrealproperty.Proposition13precludestheimpositionof newpropertytaxesinCalifornia. 7.10.5.1 LIGHTINGANDLANDSCAPEDISTRICT Thisisaspecialpropertyownerapprovedassessment.TheDistrictusesthisfundingsource for funding maintenance of parks and corridors. Assessment rates are governed by Proposition218,whichwaspassedbyvotersin1997. 7.10.5.2 HOTEL,MOTELANDRESTAURANTTAX Taxbasedongrossreceiptsfromchargesandmealservices,whichmaybeusedtobuildand operatesportsfields,regionalparks,golfcourses,tenniscourts,andotherspecialparkand recreation facilities. This fee is governed by the City. Although it is a possible source of funding,theCityisfacingitsownfundingchallengesandisusingthisfundingsourceforcity programs. 139

7.10.5.3 SPECIALIMPROVEMENTDISTRICT/BENEFITDISTRICT TaxingDistrictsestablishedtoprovidefundsforcertaintypesofimprovementsthatbenefit a specific group of affected properties. Improvements may include landscaping, the erection of fountains, and acquisition of art, and supplemental services for improvement andpromotion,includingrecreationandculturalenhancements. 7.10.5.4 SALESTAX This existing revenue source has been very successful in funding the park system in other partsoftheU.S...Thistaxisverypopularinhightraffictourismtypecitiesandwithcounty andstateparksandisnotlikelytobeusedinthisarea.Thisrequirespartnershipwiththe City. 7.10.5.5 FOODANDBEVERAGETAX The tax is usually associated with convention and tourism bureaus. However, since parks andrecreationagenciesmanagemanyofthetourismattractions,theyreceiveaportionof thisfundingsourceforoperationalorcapitalexpenses.Thisrequiresapartnershipwiththe City. 7.10.5.6 PUBLICIMPROVEMENTDISTRICT(PID) NewdevelopmentscanestablishaPublicImprovementDistrict(PID)whenauthorizedbya cityandlegallysetupaccordingtostatelaw.ThistaxingDistrictprovidesfundsespecially fortheoperationandmaintenanceofpublicamenitiessuchasparksandmajorboulevards. 7.10.6FRANCHISESANDLICENSES 7.10.6.1 CATERINGPERMITSANDSERVICES Thisisalicensetoallowcatererstoworkintheparksystemonapermitbasiswithasetfee or a percentage of food sales returning to an agency. Many agencies have their own cateringserviceandreceiveapercentageofdollarsoffthesaleoftheirfood. 7.10.6.2 POURINGRIGHTS Privatesoftdrinkcompaniesexecuteagreementswithanagencyforexclusivepouringrights withinparkfacilities.Aportionofthegrosssalesgoesbacktotheagency. 7.10.6.3 CONCESSIONMANAGEMENT Concession management is from retail sales or rentals of soft goods, hard goods, or consumableitems.Theagencyeithercontractsfortheserviceorreceivesasetamountof thegrosspercentageorthefullrevenuedollarsthatincorporatesaprofitafterexpenses. 7.10.6.4 PRIVATECONCESSIONAIRES

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Contract with a private business to provide and operate desirable recreational activities financed, constructed and operated by the private sector, with additional compensation paidtotheagency. 7.10.6.5 GREENWAYUTILITY Greenway utilities are used to finance acquisition of greenways and development of the greenways by selling the development rights underground for the fiber optic types of businesses. 7.10.6.6 NAMINGRIGHTS Many cities and counties have turned to selling the naming rights for new buildings or renovation of existing buildings and parks for the development costs associated with the improvement. 7.10.6.7 PRIVATEDEVELOPERS These developers lease space from agencyowned land through a subordinate lease that pays out a set dollar amount plus a percentage of gross dollars for recreation enhancements. These could include a golf course, restaurants, driving ranges, sports complexes,equestrianfacilities,recreationcentersandicearenas.Futurediscussionsneed tobeconductedwiththeCitytodeterminefeasibility. 7.10.6.8 EASEMENTS This revenue source is available when the District allows utility companies, businesses or individuals to develop some type of an improvement above ground or below ground on theirpropertyforasetperiodoftimeandasetdollaramounttobereceivedbytheDistrict onanannualbasis.TheDistrictisusingthisconceptwithcellularcompaniesinanumberof parksandcorridors. 7.10.6.9 ADVERTISINGSALES This revenue source is for the sale of tasteful and appropriate advertising on park and recreation related items such as in the agencys program guide, on scoreboards, dasher boards and other visible products or services that are consumable or permanent that exposestheproductorservicetomanypeople. 7.10.6.10 INTERLOCALAGREEMENTS Contractual relationships entered into between two or more government agencies and/or between a government agency and a nonprofit organization for the joint usage/developmentofsportsfields,regionalparks,orotherfacilities. 7.10.7FUNDINGPLANSUMMARY The District should periodically review the funding model to consider new and enhanced funding opportunities. The staff has not quantified the estimated potential additional funding. In PROS experience, similar agencies have identified $250,000 to $1,000,000 annuallyisadditionalnontaxandnonfeerevenues. 141

CHAPTEREIGHT IMPLEMENTATIONPLAN The following section articulates the vision and the goals and strategies by core areas of operations. The detailed Strategy Matrix including tactics, staff groups responsible and performance measures will be provided in the Appendix. The key areas and some of the broadstrategiesandtacticsare: Finance MaintenanceandOperations LandandFacilities MarketingandCommunications RecreationPrograms

8.1 VISION
TobetheleaderinmakingCRPDthebestplacetolive,work,andplay

8.2 FINANCE
8.2.1GOALFORFINANCE To maximize opportunities for sustainable operations through cost control and revenue generation and achieve a cost recovery level of 40% including direct and indirect costs within6years. 8.2.1.1 STRATEGY Develop a businessoriented culture and approach towards managing parks, recreationfacilitiesandservicesinasustainablemanner Focusonaregionalapproachtopartnerships Use policybased decision making to create consistency and structure within the District Focusonmaximizingnonuserfeegeneratedrevenueopportunitiestosupplement currentincomestreamsandcreateamoresustainableagency

8.3 MAINTENANCEANDOPERATIONS
8.3.1GOALFORMAINTENANCEANDOPERATIONS Creategreaterefficienciesandbetterplanningformaintenanceandoperationalpracticesin ordertocreateasophisticatedsystemthatisdrivenbyperformanceindicatorsandsound datatomaximizeexistingresources. 8.3.1.1 STRATEGY EstablishprioritiesfortheDistrictbasedonclassifyingservicesonasetcriteriathat determines essential, important and valuedadded services and how to manage eachtypeofservicetoitshighestlevelofcapacityandefficiency Transitiontoafunctionalorganizationalstructurethatincorporatesaflatterspanof controlwithintheDistrict 142

Develop a yearly work plan for the District to achieve to support the recommendationsintheStrategicMasterPlan FocusonenvironmentalsustainabilityasapartoftheDistrictsoperations Expandtheuseoftechnologytoderivedataandaidindecisionmaking Emphasizeoncustomerfeedbackasoneofthekeydriversofprogramdevelopment andenhancement Developamaintenancemanagementplanforallparks,recreationfacilities

8.4 RECREATIONPROGRAMS
8.4.1GOALFORRECREATIONPROGRAMS To provide a wide variety of multigenerational programs and increase program participationto30%by2015and35%by2020. 8.4.1.1 STRATEGY Focusonneedbasedprogramdevelopmentstartingwithcoreprogramareas Focusonaregionalstrategyforrecreationprogramplanning Ensurestandardizationinprogramdeliverytolimitservicevariationandstrengthen brandbuilding Increase awareness and participation rates of program offerings among CRPD residentsandbeyond Developvolunteerismasacoreprogram

8.5 LAND/FACILITIES
8.5.1GOALFORLAND/FACILITIES Toprovide5acresofneighborhoodparksandcommunityparksper1,000residentstomeet QUIMBY requirements. To provide safe, functional and wellmaintained facilities to meet therecommendedstandardforassetstoequitablymeettheCRPDpopulation 8.5.1.1 STRATEGY Develop neighborhood parks, community parks and recreation facilities in the underservedareasoftheDistrict

Partner with the school Districts to develop or enhance school sites, when practical,todeveloplandandfacilityofferings
Establishanacquisitionandsiteselectioncriteriaforacquiringappropriatetypesof parklandbasedonunmetneeds Ensureconsistencysystemwidethroughdesignprinciples,standardsandbranding guidelines Ensuresafeandinvitingparkstomaximizeuseandminimizeliability Leverage signature parks and facilities to enhance the livability of CRPD and generateeconomicimpactthroughtourism

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8.6 MARKETING/BRANDING
8.6.1GOALFORMARKETING/BRANDING To create a recognizable and trustworthy brand for CRPD and maximize outreach to increase program participation to 35% by 2015 and 40% by 2020 and consequently help increasecostrecoveryto40%systemwide. 8.6.1.1 STRATEGY Developamarketingplan,brand,andcommunicationstrategyfortheDistrict FocusondevelopingastrongbrandandpositivebrandequityforCRPDthatallows ittodifferentiateitselffromotherserviceprovidersandcreatesanicheforitself

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CHAPTERNINE CONCLUSION TobecompletedafterDraftReportapproval.

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