You are on page 1of 4

Application of Continuum Mechanics to Nano­scale 

By: Joshua Rosen 
Introduction 
With  the  discovery  of  carbon  nanotubes,  the  ability  to  accurately  model  and  predict  their 
behavior  is  generating  considerable  interest.    This  is  mainly  due  in  part  to  the  ability  of  the  carbon 
nanotube to withstand great tensile strength (upwards of 100 GPa) and the fact that the nanotube has 
an  extremely  high  Young’s  modulus  (approximately  1  TPa).    Continuum  mechanics  cannot  be  directly 
applied to these nanotubes and other nano materials as they form a discontinuous medium.  However, 
work  is  currently  being  done,  such  as  intermediate  truss  steps,  scale  factors,  etc.  in  order  to  apply  the 
continuum mechanics hypothesis to the nanoscale.   
Early  modeling  of  the  macroscopic  physical  properties  of  carbon  nanotubes,  such  as  Young’s 
modulus and Poisson’s ratio was accomplished through the assumption of a uniform wall thickness [1].  
This  wall  thickness  was  assumed  to  be  0.34  nm,  or  the  thickness  of  inter‐planer  spacing  of  two 
grapheme  sheets.    This  method  however,  does  not  properly  show  the  effective  thickness  as  will  be 
shown later.  Other early continuum modeling techniques assumed that the tube to be a solid cylinder.  
This also proved ineffective as it could not differentiate between single and multi walled nanotubes [1].  
It  is  clear  something  must  be  done  in  order  to  successfully  apply  continuum  mechanics  to  the  nano 
scale. 
Scale­Factor 
  One  method  of  applying  the  continuum  mechanics  hypothesis  to  the  nano  scale  is  through  the 
use  of  a  scale  factor  [2].    When  studying  nano  scaled  materials,  one  thing  to  note  is  that  the  ratio  of 
surface area to volume is much greater when compared to the same macro scaled material.  Therefore, 
the surface effects play a much greater effect on the overall behavior than would normally be expected.  
Fortunately a scale factor has been developed in order to go from macro to micro scale.  The scale factor 
has the form: 
H(L)
H(«)
= 1 +
1
L
(o
k
l
x
+ [
µ
l
µ

Where  H(L)  is  the  physical  property 
corresponding  to  length  L  and  H(∞)  is  the 
same  property  when  the  surface  effect  is 
extremely small.  Furthermore, α and β are 
constants  while  l
µ
  and  l
λ
  are  the  two 
intrinsic  surface  elastic  constants  for  an 
isotropic  material  [2].    The  accuracy  of  the 
scale factor can be seen through figure 1. 
 
Molecular/Continuum Modeling Hybrid 
  Another  method  to  model  nano  scale  objects,  particularly,  carbon  nanotubes  has  been 
developed  by  Gregory  Odegard,  et  al.    Odegard  proposed  a  three  step  method  which  starts  with 
molecular  modeling,  then 
develops  a  pin‐joint  truss 
model  and  finally  finishes 
with  continuum  modeling 
[1] (figure 2).  
  The first step in Odegard’s 
method is run molecular mechanics on material in question.  This molecular model is developed in order  
Figure 2 ‐ Odegard Modeling Method 
Figure 1‐ Exact solution vs Scaling factor
to  determine  the  equilibrium  bond  angles  and  bond  length  between  the  individual  atoms.    Once  this 
step  is  accomplished,  an  intermediate  pin‐jointed  truss  model  is  created  in  order  to  represent  the 
molecular model [1]. 
The truss members in the model represent the inter‐atomic bonds as well as other inter‐atomic 
forces.    Typically,  two  different  types  of  truss  segments  are  used  in  this  model.    One  truss  segment  is 
used  to  represent  the  inter‐atomic  bonds  while  the  other  type  of  truss  segment  is  used  to  model  the 
inter‐atomic forces.  This model can be used as typically when modeling molecules the individual atoms 
are seen as masses held together via elastic springs [1].  The final step in this method is the application 
of continuum mechanics by conversion of the truss model into a continuous plate with finite thickness. 
Odegard applied four rules to the continuum developed from the truss model. 
1) Truss lattices with pinned joints are modeled as classical continua where micropolar 
continuum assumptions are not necessary. 
2) Local deformations are accounted for. 
3) The  temperature  distribution,  loading,  and  boundary  conditions  of  the  continuum 
model simulate those of the truss model. 
4) The Same amount of thermoelastic strain energy is stored in the two models when 
deformed by identical static loading conditions. [1] 
Once  the  truss  model  and 
the  continuum  model  are 
linked  via  the  above  rules, 
the final step is to determine 
a  uniform  thickness  for  the 
continuum.    This  is 
accomplished  through  the 
application  of  the  boundary 
Figure 3 ‐ Continuum Model vs Molecular Model
conditions.  From his model, Odegard found results  much different  than what was previously believed.  
As stated previously, the common belief was that the wall thickness for the carbon nanotube was 0.34 
nm.    However,  through  the  application  of  Odegard’s  method,  the  wall  thickness  was  found  to  be  0.69 
nm. 
Conclusion 
  The application of reliable models to nano scale materials is extremely important due to the 
strength and durability these materials offer.  Unfortunately, due to their small size inter atomic forces 
and discontinuities arise, making it difficult to apply the continuum mechanics hypothesis.  Work is 
currently being accomplished in order to develop continuum mechanic models to nanoscale materials.  
Two such methods which currently show promise is the three step truss process developed by Odegard 
and the scale factor method.  However, further work must be accomplished in each of these. 
Reference 
[1]  Odegard, G., Gates, T. Nicholson, L. & Wise, K.  (2002) Equivalent‐continuum Modeling of Nano‐
Structured Materials.  Composites Science and Technology.  Vol 62: 1869‐1880 
 [2]  Wang, J. , Karihaloo, B.L., & Duan, H.L.  (2007) Nano‐mechanics or how to extend continuum 
mechanics to nano‐scale.  Bulletin of the Polish Academy of Sciences Technical Sciences. Vol. 55, 
No. 2, 2007: 133‐140 

Fortunately a scale factor has been developed in order to go from macro to micro scale.  This molecular model is developed in order   . α and β are  constants  while  lµ  and  lλ  are  the  two  intrinsic  surface  elastic  constants  for  an  isotropic material [2].  carbon  nanotubes  has  been  developed  by  Gregory  Odegard.  The scale factor  has the form:  1   Where  H(L)  is  the  physical  property  corresponding  to  length  L  and  H(∞)  is  the  same  property  when  the  surface  effect  is  extremely small.  Figure 1‐ Exact solution vs Scaling factor   Molecular/Continuum Modeling Hybrid    Another  method  to  model  nano  scale  objects.  then  develops  a  pin‐joint  truss  model  and  finally  finishes  with  continuum  modeling  [1] (figure 2).    Odegard  proposed  a  three  step  method  which  starts  with  molecular  modeling.  particularly.  Furthermore.  The accuracy of the  scale factor can be seen through figure 1.     The first step in Odegard’s  Figure 2 ‐ Odegard Modeling Method  method is run molecular mechanics on material in question.  et  al.

 two different  types of truss segments are used in  this model.  and  boundary  conditions  of  the  continuum  model simulate those of the truss model.  2) Local deformations are accounted for.  3) The  temperature  distribution.  Odegard applied four rules to the continuum developed from the truss model.  loading.  This model can be used as typically when modeling molecules the individual atoms  are seen as masses held together via elastic springs [1].  4) The Same amount of thermoelastic strain energy is stored in the two models when  deformed by identical static loading conditions.to  determine  the  equilibrium  bond  angles  and  bond  length  between  the  individual  atoms.  an  intermediate  pin‐jointed  truss  model  is  created  in  order  to  represent  the  molecular model [1].  the final step is to determine  a  uniform  thickness  for  the  continuum.  One  truss segment is  used  to  represent  the  inter‐atomic  bonds  while  the  other  type  of  truss  segment  is  used  to  model  the  inter‐atomic forces.    This  is  accomplished  through  the  application  of  the  boundary  Figure 3 ‐ Continuum Model vs Molecular Model .    Once  this  step  is  accomplished.  The truss members in the model represent the inter‐atomic bonds as well as other inter‐atomic  forces. [1]  Once  the  truss  model  and  the  continuum  model  are  linked  via  the  above  rules.  1) Truss lattices with pinned joints are modeled as classical continua where micropolar  continuum assumptions are not necessary.  The final step in this method is the application  of continuum mechanics by conversion of the truss model into a continuous plate with finite thickness.  Typically.

69  nm. Gates.   As stated previously. L.  Reference  [1]  Odegard.L. & Duan. the common belief was that the wall thickness for the carbon nanotube was 0. J.  However. K. 55.   Two such methods which currently show promise is the three step truss process developed by Odegard  and the scale factor method. T.conditions. making it difficult to apply the continuum mechanics hypothesis.34  nm.  Vol 62: 1869‐1880   [2]  Wang.  No.  Unfortunately.  Work is  currently being accomplished in order to develop continuum mechanic models to nanoscale materials. further work must be accomplished in each of these. 2. . Odegard found results much different than what was previously believed.  Composites Science and Technology..  (2007) Nano‐mechanics or how to extend continuum  mechanics to nano‐scale.. Vol. Karihaloo. B. G. H. due to their small size inter atomic forces  and discontinuities arise. & Wise. the wall thickness was found to be 0.  (2002) Equivalent‐continuum Modeling of Nano‐ Structured Materials. Nicholson.  However. 2007: 133‐140  .  From his model. through the application of Odegard’s method.  Bulletin of the Polish Academy of Sciences Technical Sciences.L.  Conclusion    The application of reliable models to nano scale materials is extremely important due to the  strength and durability these materials offer.