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FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

Carol Ann Dunlap


FRIT 7430: Instructional Design

Stage 3: Understanding by Design


Summer 2010

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Addition and Title of Unit Subtraction

Grade Level

Second Grade

Standard: M2N2. Students will build fluency with multi-digit addition and subtraction. a. Correctly add and subtract two whole numbers up to three digits each with regrouping. b. Understand and use the inverse relation between addition and subtraction to solve problems and check solutions. c. Use mental math strategies such as benchmark numbers to solve problems. d. Use basic properties of addition (commutative, associative, and identity) to simplify problems (e.g. 98 + 17 by taking two from 17 and adding it to the 98 to make 100 and replacing the original problem by the sum 100 + 15). Understandings: Students will understand that: 1. Students will understand the basic properties of addition and how they are used to simplify problems. 2. Students will understand that addition and subtraction problems are interconnected. 3. Students will understand the systematic process of adding and subtracting multi-digit whole numbers with regrouping. Related Misconceptions: There is only one process in adding and subtracting multi-digit problems. Addition and subtraction are not related.

Essential Questions: Overarching Questions: 1. How would life be different if we


couldnt add or subtract?

2. What are the different processes in


multi-digit addition and subtraction? 3. How will understanding the relationship between addition and subtraction help me solve problems and check my work?

Topical Questions: 1. How would you keep track of how much money you are spending at the grocery store or how much money you have left without knowing how to add or subtract? 2. When do you need to regroup in a multi-digit addition problem?

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment 3. How can you check a multi-digit subtraction problem?

Stage 3: Plan Learning Experiences


Week 1

Understanding 1

Monday: The Unit Begins: Properties of Addition Introduction

o Foundational Entry Points

Prior to beginning the unit, the teacher will discuss the following vocabulary words and place them on the Math Vocabulary Wall: Addition, Sum, Subtraction, Difference, Equation, and Addend solving certain mathematical problems. This unit will begin with three addition math problems. Students will document how they solved the problem in each step.

o Each student has a math journal in which they will log the process for

HOOK: Look at this math problem 4 + 8 + 2? Is there more than one way to solve it? What if I switched the numbers around like this 8+2+4, would the answer still be the same? (allow time for students to answer and discuss) WHERE: We are going to learn some properties and characteristics of addition problems which will help you solve different kinds of addition problems. You will be able to use the properties you learn to solve complex problems more quickly! EQUIP: The teacher will introduce the properties of addition by displaying the Properties of Addition PowerPoint. Practice many examples of each property. The class will explore and discuss several strategies for solving addition problems and will make an Addition Strategy poster. They will log their ideas in their Math Journals along the way. There are several opportunities to model and practice the material. TAILOR: Students will work with partners, small groups, independently, or with the teacher. Students will be encouraged to develop their own research strategies as they explore addition. The content will be displayed in several formats: PowerPoints, visuals, writings, and open ended questions. RETHINK: At the end of the week, students will use what they have learned about the properties of addition to revise the traditional strategy for adding a problem. They will rethink other possible strategies and share with a

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment partner. EVALUATE: In their math journals, students reflect upon their new knowledge to evaluate their understanding. ORGANIZE: This weeks lesson slowly unfolds with an introduction to the properties of addition and then progresses to using those properties to simplify complex problems. The sequencing of the lessons are unpredictable and do not include book work. There are many opportunities to model, work together, and practice the content. Monday View the PowerPoint: (Figure 1.4) Properties of Addition(ORegan, 2004). Give several examples as you flip through each page. Give students the following problems: 2 + 8 = and 8 + 2= Have them solve and then ask:

What is the same about the two equations? (They have the same sums.) What is different? (The order of addends is different.) Which addition property do these problems display? Help students postulate the Commutative Property of Addition: changing the order of the addends does not change the sum. Give at least one more example of this property.

Give students the following problems: 8+0= 5+0= 3+0=


What would happen if you added 0 ones to 8 ones? (You would still have 8 ones.) What if you added 5 ones to 0 ones? (5 ones) Ask students what effect adding zero has. (None -- the sum is the same as the non-zero addend. Help students articulate the Identity Property of Addition when you add zero to any number, that number is the sum. Give at least one more example of this property.

Give students the following problem 21 + 19 = Ask students to solve the problem. Discuss different strategies for solving the problem. Explain: If you add the extra one in 21 to 19 it will bump 19 up to twenty and then you can easily add 20 + 20 = 40. The thought process would look like this (19 + 1) + 20 = which is the same as 21 + 19. Although the structure has changed, you still have the same value. Discuss which property uses parenthesis? Associative Property

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Give at least one more example of this property. Tuesday: Make a PowerPoint to demonstrate the Properties of Addition Technology: Divide students up into groups of three. Each student gets a number 1, 2, or 3. All the 1s are in charge of coming up with an example for the Commutative Property, all the 2s provide an example for the Identity Property, and the 3s provide an example for the Associative Property. After working together and helping each other write examples of each property, each group of three will make their own PowerPoint discussing and providing examples for each Property of Addition.

(REFINE)

Wednesday: Mouse Count Book Narrational Entry Point Read the book Mouse Count by Ellen Stoll Walsh to the class (Harcourt, 1991). After reading the story, explain to the children that Snake was very hungry one day and put 25 mice in the jar before he took a nap and then put 12 more in after the nap. Their job is to figure out how many mice are in the jar all together. Have various materials, paper and pencil, crayons, etc available for the children to use to help them solve their problem. Have them work alone, but sitting in groups to observe and discuss each others strategies. After students have come up with their answers, let several children share the strategies they used. Reading the book helps the children visualize this combination situation as they try to solve the problem. The actual numbers in the problem (25+12) can be adjusted to meet the needs of your children or to differentiate instruction within the class. Following is an example of how you might keep a record of the strategies your students used

Possible Strategies: For example: 25 + 12 (a)I counted on from 25 (25... 26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37) (b) 20+10 is 30 and 5+2 is 7 and 30 + 7 is 37 (c) 25 + 10 is 35 plus 2 more is 37 (d)I took 5 away from the12 and made 25 into 30. Then I added 7 and got 37 (e) I drew circles (0000000000000000000000000 000000000000)

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Students then write their own scenarios in which snakes problem is different. For example:
Snake puts in 25 mice then puts in 12 more. Snake has some mice in the jar. He puts 12 more in. Now he has 37. How many were in the jar to begin with? Snake has 25 mice in the jar. He puts some more in. Now he has 37. How many were in the jar to begin with?

Finally, each person has to illustrate or show two different strategies for solving their word problem. This must be displayed under their illustration. (REVISE)

Thursday: Using the Commutative Property to Simplify Problems Logical-Quantitative Entry Point

o Number Detectives: o

Have students look at the following math 39 + 7

problems on the board: Give several complex addition problems like: 23 + 7 + 2= + 3=

Students will work the problems in their math journals and will decide possible strategies for solving the problem. Break students up into groups of 5. Students solve the several problems together and discuss strategies for solving. Remember: the commutative property allows you to add the numbers in any order. problem and provides an example on a piece of construction paper. Possible strategies: -Find doubles facts -Look for numbers that add up to ten -Look for 5 facts -Look for facts of 2 Their strategy is glued to a class size poster labeled: Addition Strategies

o Each group decides on at least one strategy that helps simplify the

o Each group shares their strategy and example.

(RETHINK) Several addition problems are given to the students to

practice their new strategies. Students solve each problem and reflect upon this strategy in your math journal. For example: 3 + 7 + 3= Strategy 1: I found a doubles fact in this problem so I added 3 + 3=6, then I added 6 + 7 = 13

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Strategy 2: I found two numbers that make ten, 3 + 7= 10, then I added 3 more 10 + 3= 13. EVALUATE: To end this weeks lessons, students will return to their math journals. They will then solve the same problems they solved at the beginning of the week. This time, they are able to use the Addition Strategies poster and what they have learned about the properties of addition to solve each problem. Students will then evaluate what their knowledge by answering the following questions in their Math Journals: 1. Turn back to the math journal entry you wrote on Monday, if you could do the problems again would you revise your strategy? If so, how? If not, why? (REVISE) 2. How has what you learned about the properties of addition change your thinking as you solve addition problems? 3. What was the most effective strategy you learned for solving addition problems? 4. What was the least effective strategy you learned for solving addition problems?

Week 2

Understanding 3
EQ 1 & EQ 2

HOOK: Begin this weeks lessons by reviewing multi digit addition and
subtraction without regrouping in their Math Journals. Tell the students that Marty the Mathematician needs their help. Show them a video clip of Marty (a disguised silly version of you) trying to solve a math problem but is stuck (the problems will involve regrouping) Marty: EQ 1 I just do not understand! In this problem, Im supposed to subtract 5 ones but there are only 2 in the ones column? What do I do? In this problem, Im suppose to add 7 + 7 in the ones column but I have two many ones! What do I do? Please boys and girls put on your detective hats and try to investigate a solution! The fate of the world depends on it!!

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment WHERE: Explain to the students that they will be investigating some complex addition and subtraction problems. Their job is to figure out a strategy to solve both types of problems and share the solution with Marty the Mathematician. Finally, they will send a message back to Marty explaining how he can solve the problems.

EQUIP: Students will work together and independently to solve regrouping


math problems. They will use manipulatives to solve and practice this skill. There will be several opportunities for students to practice this skill.

TAILOR: Students will be able to work with partners, small groups,


independently, or with the teacher. There are several opportunities to practice regrouping in different formats to appeal to different interests: Hands-on activities, class basketball game, center contracts that involve choice and variety, and aesthetic options on how to present their knowledge to Marty the Mathematician (video, letter, poster, picture etc.)

RETHINK: Students are continuously rethinking and revising their


methods of adding or subtracting in order to devise a possible solution for multi-digit problems with regrouping. They document their thought process in their math journals.

EVALUATE: Students evaluate their knowledge of the content by


designing a message for Marty the Mathematician. They must decide if they truly understand the content and if they do, then they will be able to explain the process to Marty.

ORGANIZE: The weeks lessons slowly unfold as students try to


investigate a solution for Marty. The activities are organized but unpredictable as they offer nontraditional lessons. Monday: Experimental Entry Point

EQ 2
(RETHINK and REVISE)
Provide each student with a work mat that divides the ones, tens, and hundreds column. Give each student a set of 10 tens (longs) and 10 ones (units or cubes). Review how to add or subtract using the base 10 blocks i.e.: removing blocks or adding more blocks. Show students a problem where they need to regroup. For example 21 12. Explain, there are not enough ones in the number 21 to subtract 2. Tell them that they are detectives trying to find the solution to this problem. Explain that they can do whatever they need to in order to solve this problem. Remind them that ten units or cubes = one long or ten. As long as the base 10 blocks have the same value, than they can represent each number however they feel necessary.

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

(REFINE)
Allow students to work in partners until someone has come up with a solution. Once someone has decided that they can exchange or borrow a ten from the tens column to make enough ones to subtract, than they will share the solution with the entire class. This may take some probing and hints. Once everyone has seen the process of regrouping during subtraction, share the following rhyme: If theres more on the floor, go next door. This will appeal to the musical learners. Give several more examples of subtraction regrouping, allowing students to work with the base 10 blocks to solve. Students complete the following practice sheet: (Figure 1.3) Subtraction Regrouping Practice Sheet (Mifflin, 2007). Tuesday and Wednesday:

EQ 1 & EQ 2
(REFINEPractice Sessions) Students complete math contracts with the following items:

Math Contract Check each box as it is completed:

o Computer

Station: Step by step instruction s: http://www .dositey.co m/2008/ad dsub/subra 4.htm

o Write 3 word

EQ 1

problems involving multi-digit addition or subtraction. At least one problem should involve regrouping. Switch with a partner and solve their problems.

o Math Journals:

List 5 ways you use addition or subtraction in your lives. Write a story about what would happen if you woke up and no one knew had to add or subtract.

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

o Practice
regrouping by using base 10 blocks. Solve each problem at this station.

o Teacher Group:
Meet with the teacher during this center to practice regrouping.

o To Regroup or Not to
Regroup? That Is the Question On the Promethean White Board, take turns answering the questions on the flipchart. The board will make a noise if you are right or wrong. http://www.prometheanp lanet.com/enus/Resources/Item/2863 6/to-regroup-or-not-toregroup-that-is-thequestion/

Helping Marty the Mathematician: Tell the students it is now time to help Marty with his other math problem! Give students the same subtraction problem that Marty was trying to solve on the video. Have them write a letter, draw a picture, or record themselves demonstrating with blocks how to solve his problem. The final product will probably take a couple of weeks to finish. Allow for students to work on these projects during their spare time or reserve times of the week to work on them.

Thursday: Regrouping with Addition (REFINEPractice sessions)

EQ 2
The teacher will demonstrate the activity on the board first. First, They spin a number spinner twice and write the two numbers on the board. They will then draw squares on the board (representing ones) equal to the amount of the two numbers spun. They will show the students that if/when they have a full ten block, they are to trade it in for a ten strip. The students will each be given a spinner with the numbers 1-9 on it and a worksheet. They will be instructed to spin the spinner twice, and record the two numbers they get on the worksheet. They will then add the two numbers together, making sure to use their ones blocks and trading them in for a ten strip when their ten block becomes full. Students continue to practice this skill by using their number spinner and blocks to complete the Figure 1.2 Addition Regrouping Practice Sheet (Mifflin, 2007). Friday:

REFINEPractice sessions

EQ 2

The teachers will begin by asking the students what they do when adding they are two numbers together and their ten block is filled. After the students respond with the correct answer, the teacher will demonstrate it on the board. The teachers will then explain to the students that they will be playing a math game with the whole class, in which they will need to use that skill. The teachers will divide the class into two equal basketball teams. Students decide vote on a

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment name for their teams. The two students from each team will take turns coming up and picking one card from the teachers hands. They will then tell the rest of the class what the two numbers are. The two students will add their numbers together using ones blocks and tens strips provided on the board. After they have given their answer, the teachers will ask their teammates if they agree, and if so they will score a point for their team on the scoreboard and then get to shoot the mini basketball into the mini hoop to score an additional score. While the two students are at the board, the rest of the class will have tens and ones mats on their desk, as well as tens strips and ones blocks. They will be adding the two numbers independently and will be asked if they agree with their classmates answer to the problem. Aesthetic Entry Point Helping Marty the Mathematician: Tell the students it is now time to help Marty with one of his problems! Give students the same addition problem that Marty was trying to solve on the video. Have them write a letter, draw a picture, write a song, or record a commercial of themselves demonstrating with blocks how to solve his problem. Math Journal Reflection: After this weeks lessons, students will answer the following questions: 1. (EVALUATE) How comfortable do you feel about regrouping? 2. (EVALUATE) Do you still need to practice addition or subtraction regrouping? 3. (EVALUATE) Which regrouping do you feel is easier: addition or subtraction? 4. (REFLECT) EQ 1 What problems would Marty the Mathematician have if you did not teach him how to add and subtract? When would he need to use this skill in everyday life?

Week 3

Understanding 2

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Fact Families HOOK: Hook the students with a question: What do the following problems have in common? 2+3= 5, 3+2=5, 5-2=3, 5-3=2 WHERE: This week, we are going to learn about Fact Families and how addition and subtraction are related. In the end, you will be able to check your addition or subtraction problems without needing a teacher! EQUIP: The teacher will introduce fact families with a visual of fact families. Students will explore and practice fact families by making a class book, making a fact family house, playing a hands-on game, and playing computer games. There will be several opportunities to practice this skill. TAILOR: Students will be able to work with partners, small groups, independently, or with the teacher. Students will practice this skill in several formats that appeal to different learning styles and interests: investigating, creating craft, playing computer games, and playing a hands-on game that has opportunities for movement. RETHINK: At the end of the week, students will use what they have learned about fact families to solve the Fact Family Mystery. In their journals, students will have to revise their knowledge and Fact Families to find the missing member in each family. They will explain their answers in their journals. Students will also revise and rethink certain math problems as they are completed and checked by using the inverse operation. EVALUATE: In their math journals, students reflect upon their new knowledge of addition and subtraction to evaluate their understanding by solving the Fact Family Mystery. Students will also use what they know about the relationship between addition and subtraction to check their work of several problems. ORGANIZE: This weeks lesson slowly unfolds with the fact families and progresses to how they will use this knowledge to check their work. The sequencing of the lessons are unpredictable and do not include the usual book work. There are many opportunities to model, work, and create fact families. Monday: EQ 3 Show the following problems and ask what they all have in common: 2+3= 5, 3+2=5, 5-2=3, 5-3=2 Yes! They have the same digits. Actually, the digits 5, 3, 2 are considered a fact family. Think of it as your family at home, everyone has different jobs but you work together as a family. This is the same thing for fact families in

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment math. Consider the digits 5, 4, 9. They are a fact family. There are three members in their family. Their names are 5, 4, and 9. They can do four things together -5+4=9 4+5=9 9-5=4 9-5=4 Show several more examples. Hand out one note card to each student, all of which make up a fact family in the room. Have students explore the room to find their families. Once everyone has found their families they must make a page out of the class fact family book with the following template: We are a fact family. There are three members in our family. Our names are ______, ______, and _____________. We can do four things together: ______ +________= ______ +________= ______ -________= ______ -________= They then illustrate their fact family. This is written on the writing paper that has the space at the top for illustrating After each group has completed a page, it will be assembled into a Fact Families Book. The book will be shared with the entire class, allowing each group to share their page. Tuesday: EQ 3 Students hold math symbol sheets and arrange themselves Put each digit of several fact families on a piece of construction paper, one number on each piece. Use a different color for each fact family. Also have a paper with a plus sign, equal sign, and subtraction sign. Say a problem---ex. 9 + 4. The students with the right numbers go up front and arrange themselves in the right order to make the fact family--switching their order each time and also switching to the subtraction sign when necessary. The group must show all four facts to the class. Technology: Using Laptop Carts, students choose between the following

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment games to practice Fact Families: 1. http://www.ixl.com/math/practice/grade-2-properties-factfamilies 2. http://www.aaamath.com/add34a-inverseadd.html 3. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks1bitesize/numeracy/numbers/in dex.shtml ______________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________ Wednesday: EQ 3 The teacher makes a house pattern, then writes one fact in each window. The 3 numbers in the "family" are written on the roof (a triangle shape). The house is laminated so it can be written on with a dry-erase marker.
9

(REVISE---Practice Sessions) Show several examples and allow students to take turns writing the facts in the windows. The students write each fact family in their math journals. Now example that there is a Fact Family Mystery. Give several problems where a member of the family is missing. Students must use what they know about fact families to find the missing members. The answers are written in their math journals along with an explanation of how they discovered the missing member. Example: 5 + _____ = 12 12 - _____= 5 ______________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________ Thursday: Aesthetic Entry Point Make Your Own Fact Family House Students will now use construction paper, poster board, markers, scissors, and glue to make their own fact family house. They will draw two numbers

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment from a deck of cards to decide which digits will be in their fact family. They will add those two digits together to find the third member of their family. Next, they will write the fact family on a piece of paper and have a student check their answer. Now they will design their house using the materials. Each window will include a different fact. Each window will provide an addition or subtraction fact. Finally, they can decorate their house using fabric as curtains and different colors. The houses will then be displayed on a classroom wall labeled: Our Fact Family Neighborhood.

Friday: EQ 3 You can check your own work! How awesome would it be to be able to use what you know about fact families to check your work!

o Review fact families. o Show a multi-digit fact family such as:


21 + 22 = 43, 22 + 21 = 43, interconnected: First Solve: 21 +22 43

43-21= 22,

43-22= They are

o Explain that you can use this knowledge to check your work.

Now use the fact family to do the Inverse operation to check: 43 - 22 21

Do all three digits make this fact family true? Then your answer is correct!

o Have students fold a piece of paper into 4 boxes.

On the left side,

students write work a multi digit problem provided by the teacher. On the right side, the students switch with a partner for them to check their work. If you and your partner do not match-up you must REVISE your work and try again: (REFLECT and REVISE---Peer Response)

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment My work 54 +25 79

My Work Checked by a Partner 79 -25 54

72 +24 9

96 - 24 72

In math journals, students will answer the following questions about the content that was learned this week: 1. (REFLECT) How will knowing fact families help you with future addition or subtraction problems? 2. (RETHINK) How has your idea of addition and subtraction changed since this lesson? Do you still believe they are not related?

3. (EVALUATE) Do you believe you still need to practice fact families and checking a multi-digit problem by using inverse operations? 4. (EVALUATE) Which do you understand better: fact families or inverse operations? Notes to the Instructor Differentiation: Group investigations: This type of differentiation appeals to the interest of the students. Students will work in small groups and pairs to investigate the solution to Marty the Mathematicians problem in week two. Math Contracts: The math contract is fairly generic and can be altered to meet the needs of the students. It allows everyone to work on the same content. I will select different computer games depending on the needs of the students. Some students may need games that help re-teach the concept while other games allow the skill to be reinforced or extended. Also,

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment the level of the worksheets I assign to each student will depend on their needs. I will call specific groups, according to their level, to meet with me during the small group time. I will meet with some groups longer and with more intensity than other groups. In the end, the contracts will challenge students yet allow them to feel successful since it is on their level. Marty the Mathematician: How the students present the information they learned about regrouping is their choice. This flexibility allows students to use their personal interests by encouraging students to propose alternate forms of expressing their knowledge. Students can work in groups or on their own. They will have ample time to complete this project. Narrational Entry Point: Reading Mouse Count by Ellen Stroll is a great introduction to the lesson by providing a story about the concept appealing to the linguistic and visual learners. Logical-Quantitative Entry Point: In Week 1, students use numbers and deductive approaches to propose addition strategies that will simplify complex problems. They will then use those strategies to revise their originally work. Foundational Entry Point: Before each lesson in the unit, students will review key concepts and terms that will utilized in the lesson. The Math Vocabulary Wall will be reviewed to avoid confusion with the terminology. Aesthetic Entry Point: Students will use their aesthetic abilities throughout this unit to design an informational piece for Marty the Mathematician (letter, song, commercial, picture), create a PowerPoint on the Properties of Addition, make a page from the Fact Family Book and design a Fact Family House. Students will use their creativity and all these projects. Experimental Entry Point: Students will use manipulatives to experiment and investigate the regrouping process. The teacher is simply a facilitator while the students work to solve the regrouping subtraction problem.

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

Figure 1.1

Pretest:
Complete: 18 + 0 = _________ Which Property of Addition does this problem display? ___________________ Will finding a ten or finding a double help you solve this problem? What numbers in the ones column will help you? Complete: 5 + 3_____ 3 + 5 ________ Complete: 23 + 20 = or (20 + 20) + 3 = Which Property of Addition does this problem display? ___________________ Solve this problem in another way. Use pictures and diagrams to explain your thought process and strategy. Solve:

Which Property of Addition does this problem display? ___________________

56 14 + 22

45 +23
Did you have to regroup? Y or N

56 +37
Did you have to regroup? Y or N

56 14 + 22

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

Explain your strategy: _______________

Explain your strategy: _______________

76 -22
Did you have to regroup? Y or N

81 -47
Did you have to regroup? Y or N

Solve

Check

Write the Fact Family

Write the fact family

43 +25

3, 4, 7
_____ +______= _____ +______= _____ -______= _____ -______=

8, 7, __
_____ +______= _____ +______= _____ -______= _____ -______=

Figure 1.2 Name: ___________________________________ Addition Regrouping Practice Sheet Spin a spinner twice, and write the numbers on the worksheet. Add the two numbers together by drawing circles representing to numbers, in a ten block in the space provided. If you have a full ten block, cross out the circles and draw a line to represent a ten strip.

1.

2.

+_______

+_______

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

3.

4.

+ ______

+ ______

5.

6.

+ ______

+ ______

Ones Tens Ones Tes Tens Ones Tens Ones Tens Ones

Figure 1.3 Subtraction Regrouping Practice Sheet

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Tens Ones Tens Ones Tens Ones Tens O

Figure 1.4 FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment

References
Banfill, J. (2009). Aaamath. Retrieved from http://www.aaamath.com/add34ainverseadd.html Ixl. (1998, December). Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/practice/grade-2propertiesfact-families Ks1 bitesize. (2010, July). Retrieved from http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks1bitesize/numeracy/numbers Mifflin, H. (Ed.). (2007). Houghton mifflin math. Houghton Mifflin Company. Retrieved from: http://www.eduplace.com/math/hmm/g_2.html ORegan, M. (2008) Properties of addition. Retrieved from http://mrsoregan.net/.../Ch1/1-4Properties_of_Addition.ppt

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Walch, E. (1991). Mouse count. Orlando, Fl: Red Wagon Books Harcourt Inc.

Stage 3 Scoring Rubric


(0 Points) 1 Does not clearly . communicate WHERETO for learning activities Fails to provide a pretest for learners. 2 Alignment is not . demonstrated between instructional strategies, standards, and understandings of the unit. There is evidence of alignment between some of the instructional strategies, standards, and understandings of the unit. (2-3 Points) Codes some learning activities with WHERETO (4-5 Points) Clearly codes each activity with WHERETO Includes a pretest to check for prerequisite skills and knowledge. Alignment is clearly demonstrated between instructional strategies, standards, and understandings of the unit. Matches all essential questions, understandings, skills, and knowledge with a corresponding instructional strategy. 3 Instruction has one . global starting point for all learners. No evidence of an attempt at differentiation Utilizes Gardners strategy to provide different Entry Points. Evidence of an attempt at differentiation exists Provides opportunities for students to RETHINK big ideas, REFLECT on progress, and REVISE their work. (1 Points) Utilizes Gardners strategy to provide different Entry Points to meet the needs of all types of intelligences. Clear plan for differentiation Provides numerous opportunities for students to RETHINK big ideas, REFLECT on progress, and to REVISE work. (3 Points)
Your Scor e

4 Fails to provide . opportunities for students to RETHINK ideas, REFLECT, and to REVISE work. 5 (0 Points)

FRIT 7430: UbD Stage 3 Assignment Does not indicate Includes the use of the use of technology technology in a meaningful way 7 (0 Points) . Assignment is not organized Assignment Instructions not followed Several errors in grammar and form, which distracted the reader (1 Points) Assignment somewhat organized Most assignment instructions followed A few errors in grammar and form which distracted the reader

Includes the use of technology in a meaningful way. Off the shelf resources are properly referenced (2 Points) Assignment is organized Assignment Instructions followed No errors in grammar or form that distracted the reader.

Your Total Score

/25