WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2011

DELPHOS HERALD
THE
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
St. John’s Mission Society
projects, p3

Lady Wildcats win second season
contest, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Business 8
Classifieds 10
TV 11
World News 12
Index
Mostly sunny
Thursday
with high
in low 40s.
See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
Local voters to
see renewal levy
in March
DELPHOS — Delphos
voters will see a 5.5-mill
Current Operating Expense
Levy renewal on the bal-
lot for the March Primary.
Delphos City Schools
Board of Education mem-
bers took the final step
necessary to place the levy
renewal on the ballot for
the March Primary at a
special meeting Monday.
The levy was first
approved in 1992 and
generates approximately
$572,211 each year.
Local business
to host ‘Kids ‘R’
Christmas
In conjunction with
the Delphos Community
Christmas Project, Fischer
Plumbing and Heating will
host “Kids ‘R’ Christmas”
from 4-6 p.m. Dec. 8.
New toys and monetary
donations will be accepted
to support the project.
Children can visit and
have their picture taken
with Santa, enjoy the light-
ing of the Christmas tree
and other activities.
Refreshments will be
provided and the event
will be broadcast live
on WDOH 107.1.
LCC facing possibility of
leaving NWC
According to Lima
Central Catholic Athletic
Director Ron Williams,
the school is facing the
possibility of leaving the
Northwest Conference.
According to Williams,
he has received an e-mail
from NWC Commissioner/
Secretary Mike Mullen
noting the matter is under
discussion but no firm reso-
lution has taken place.
Thursday’s Schedule
Girls Basketball: St. Marys
Memorial at Kalida, 6 p.m.
Friday’s Schedule
Boys Basketball (6 p.m.);
Vanlue at Jefferson; Fort Jennings
at Arlington; Cory-Rawson at
Ottoville; Van Wert Tip-Off
Classic (CV vs. LV; WT vs.
VW); Spencerville at St. Henry,
6:30 p.m.; Elida Tip-Off Classic
(Elida, Bath, LCC, Shawnee),
6:30 p.m. (2 games)
Saturday’s Schedule
Boys Basketball (6 p.m.):
Sidney Lehman at Jefferson;
Ayersville at Fort Jennings; Van
Wert Tip-Off Classic; Elida Tip-
Off Classic, 6:30 p.m.
Girls Basketball (1 p.m.):
St. Marys at St. John’s, noon
(changed from 6 p.m.); Ottoville
at Lincolnview; Bluffton at Fort
Jennings; Kalida at Ottawa-
Glandorf.
Wrestling: Jefferson at
Montpelier Ironhorse Invitational,
9:30 a.m.; Spencerville,
Lincolnview and Elida at
Coldwater Duals, 10 a.m.
Museum names stamp contest winners
Central
banks
ease
market
strains
By DAVID McHUGH
The Associate Press
FRANKFURT, Germany
— Major central banks around
the globe took coordinated
action today to ease the strains
on the world’s financial sys-
tem, saying they would make
it easier for banks to get dol-
lars if they need them. Stock
markets and the euro rose
sharply on the move.
The European Central
Bank, U.S. Federal Reserve,
the Bank of England and
the central banks of Canada,
Japan and Switzerland are all
taking part.
As Europe’s debt crisis has
spread, the global financial
system is showing signs of
entering another credit crunch
like the one that followed the
2008 collapse of U.S. invest-
ment bank Lehman Brothers.
The possibility that one or
more European governments
might default have raised fears
of a shock to the global finan-
cial system that would lead to
severe losses for banks, reces-
sions in the United States and
Europe, and a stranglehold on
lending.
“The purpose of these
actions is to ease strains in
financial markets and thereby
mitigate the effects of such
strains on the supply of credit
to households and businesses
and so help foster economic
activity,” the banks said in a
joint statement.
The central banks agreed
to reduce the cost of tempo-
rary dollar loans they offer
to banks — called liquidity
swaps — by a half percentage
point. The new, lower rate
will be applied to all central
bank operations starting on
Monday.
Non-U.S. banks need dol-
lars to fund their U.S. opera-
tions and to make dollar loans
to companies that need the
U.S. currency. The dollar is
the world’s leading currency
for central bank reserves and
is widely used in international
trade.
“Obviously, these moves
are designed to increase the
flow of dollar liquidity to
European banks, which are
struggling to attract short-
term funding because of ques-
tions about their exposure to
potential losses on holdings of
European sovereign bonds,”
said Paul Ashworth, chief
U.S. economist at Capital
Economics.
Stacy Taff photos
Delphos Museum of Postal History Curator Gary Levitt, right, congratulates the winners in the museum’s
stamp contest held during Canal Days festivities. Winners are, from left, Chelsey Bishop, 17, Jefferson High
School, Herald Building; Laci Roby, 8, Franklin Elementary, Turkeys; Lilly Huffman, 11, Franklin Elementary,
Lady Bug; and People’s Choice winner Avery Schulte, 8, Landeck Elementary, Football.
Chelsey Bishop
Avery Schulte (People’s Choice) Lilly Huffman
Laci Roby
Hometown
Christmas set
The Delphos Area Chamber of
Commerce and members will present
the annual Hometown Christmas
celebration on Friday.
The parade, with Santa, steps off at
6:30 p.m. from The Delphos Herald
building and travels south down Main
Street, east on Second Street and
concludes at the First Financial Bank
drive-through parking lot, where
Santa will hear children’s Christmas
wishes.
The Delphos EMS will offer its
Ham and Bean Supper from 5-8 p.m.
and WDOH will have cookies, hot
dogs and hot chocolate.
Horse-drawn carriage rides will
begin after the parade and continue
through 8:30 p.m.
Schrader Realty will host Santa’s
Workshop with coloring pages and a
place for children to write letters to
Santa.
The Delphos Canal Commission
Museum will also be open, showcasing
its annual Tree, Wreath and Nativity
Festival.
City Finance
Committee meets
The city Finance
Committee will meet at 7
p.m. Thursday in council
chambers.
Nancy Spencer photo
Area sees first snowfall of season
Delphos and the surrounding area received its first snowfall of season
Tuesday. Less than an inch of the white stuff accumulated in Delphos.
File photos
2
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“Holiday Remembrance Service”
Sunday, December 4, 2011 - 2:00 p.m.
At Harter & Schier Funeral Home
Please join us for our annual holiday program
to honor and remmeber your loved one who has
passed away. Our hope is to bring you comfort
and meaning during this difficult time.
All Families are invited.
HARTER & SCHIER FUNERAL HOME
209 W. Third St., Delphos 419-692-8055
.·,¸,·..,
]unc 21, 2006 - Novcmbcr 30, 2006
IN LCVINC MLMCRY Cl
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arms lor a IittIe whiIe, we
hoId in our hearts lorever."
\e míss you more und more
wíth euch pussíng duy, but
wííí be lorever bíessed
becuuse ol you und your
contínued presence ín
our ííves. Love never díes.
Lovc ulwuyv,
Mommy, Duddy, & Hullcc

Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Austin
Lucas.
Congratulations
Austin!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Kyle
Booher.
Congratulations
Kyle!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Wednesday, November 30, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
POLICE
REPORT
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 131
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Harold ‘Tuffy’
Warner
Janice Marie Burden
COLUMBUS —
Provisional numbers released
Monday by the Ohio State
Highway Patrol show fewer
motorists were killed on Ohio’s
roadways this Thanksgiving
Holiday. During the report-
ing period, which began at
12 a.m. Wednesday and ran
through 11:59 p.m. Sunday,
14 people were killed on
Ohio’s roadways. This is a
decrease from the past two
years when 18 people lost their
lives in 2010 and 20 died in
2009. Additionally, this year’s
reporting period was longer
as it included the entire day
before Thanksgiving while
last year’s reporting began at
6 p.m. Wednesday.
Impaired driving arrests
increased more than 14 percent
and drug arrests were up more
than 37 percent when compared
to last year’s holiday. One inci-
dent that resulted in the seizure
of an estimated $800,000 in
cash began as a traffic stop on
Thanksgiving Day on Interstate
70 in Preble County. Due to the
unusual circumstances discov-
ered during the initial traffic
stop, troopers worked alongside
DEA agents in an investigation
that uncovered the cash in a
motorhome. The investigation
is currently ongoing.
“We are encouraged by
the reduction of fatalities and
the increase in the arrests of
criminals using our highways
to carry out their crimes,” said
Colonel John Born, patrol
superintendent. “I hope that the
success of this holiday week-
end will continue throughout
the remainder of the year.”
A complete statistical anal-
ysis of the Patrol’s enforce-
ment activity over the holiday
weekend and a photo of the
seized cash are available at
statepatrol.ohio.gov.
Fewer fatalities, more
OVI and drug arrests
this Thanksgiving holiday
Driver backs
into other vehicle
Driver cited for
failure to stop
Margaret Ann
Judkins Cifarelli
April 11, 1967-Nov. 22, 2011
Harold James “Tuffy”
Warner, 44, of Warsaw, Ind.,
passed away at 6:39 p.m. on
Tuesday at his residence.
He was born on April 11,
1967, in Warsaw to James
Wilbur and Margaret Louise
(Cochran) Warner. His mother
survives in Shaw. Miss.
A memorial service will be
held at noon on Saturday at
Word of Truth Ministries, 210
E. Catherine Street, Milford,
Ind., officiated by Pastor Mike
Kelly.
Arrangements were entrust-
ed to Redpath-Fruth Funeral
Home of Warsaw.
May 21, 1926-Nov. 28, 2011
Janice Marie Burden, 85,
of rural Spencerville, died at
8 a.m. Monday at St. Rita’s
Medical Center.
She was born May 21,
1926, in Delphos to Harry
Frederick and Esther Mae
(Rohr) Werner, who preceded
her in death.
On June 10, 1945, she
married Billy Douglas “Bill”
Burden, who survives.
Other survivors include
two daughters, Virginia
Miriam “Ginny” (Douglas)
Pentenburg of Jefferson, Ga.,
and Miriam Faith (Dale)
German of Spencerville;
six grandchildren, Tony
Guidera of Nashville, Tenn.,
Kristin (Travis) Billman of
Dacula, Ga., Brent (Johnnie)
Pentenburg of Gainesville,
Ga., and Nicole German,
Shanna German and Derik
German of Spencerville;
a great-grandson, Logan
Guidera of Nashville; and a
sister-in-law, Peggy Werner
of Lima.
She was also preceded in
death by a son, Gary Douglas
Burden, who died in an auto
accident in 1967; and brother,
Melvin Paul Werner.
Mrs. Burden was a grad-
uate of Lima Central High
School and went to work at
the Lima Ordinance Depot
during World War II, where
she met her husband. Later,
she became a nurse’s aid
and worked at the Delphos
Memorial Nursing Home for
16 years. She was a member
of Hartford Christian Church,
where she had been a Sunday
School teacher and “prayer
warrior” for the church. She
enjoyed baking, reading, her
flowers, antiquing and enter-
taining.
Funeral services will
begin at 11 a.m. Thursday
at Hartford Christian Church
north of Spencerville, Pastor
Robert King officiating.
Burial will be in the Hartford
Cemetery.
Friends may call from 5-9
p.m. Wednesday at Thomas
E. Bayliff Funeral Home,
Spencerville, and after 10 a.m.
Thursday at the church.
Memorials are to the
church.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 20s. Southwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
THURSDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs in the lower 40s.
South winds 5 to 10 mph.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear in the evening
then becoming partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 20s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
FRIDAY: Partly cloudy in
the morning then becoming
mostly sunny. Highs in the
upper 30s. Northwest winds 5
to 10 mph shifting to the north
in the afternoon through early
evening.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Lows in the mid 20s.
SATURDAY: Partly
cloudy. Highs in the lower
40s.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a 40 per-
cent chance of rain. Lows in
the mid 30s.
At 7:54 a.m. on Monday,
a collision occurred when the
driver of one vehicle backed
into a second vehicle in a
drive-thru lane.
Jill Martz, 30, of Delphos,
was in the drive-thru lane of
McDonald’s when she began
backing up, failing to see a
second vehicle, driven by
Jennifer Schaffner, 29, of
Delphos, as it pulled in behind
her. This resulted in the rear-
end of Martz’s SUV striking
the front end of Schaffner’s
car, causing no injuries and
minor damage to both vehi-
cles.
No citations were given as
the accident occurred on pri-
vate property.
A Van Wert man was
cited for failure to stop at
an assured, clear distance
Monday following a two-
vehicle accident.
Lynsey Rahrig, 30, of
Atlanta, Ga., was traveling
southbound on State Street
and stopped at the posted
stop sign at the intersection
of West Second Street when
a vehicle driven by Ryan
Baker, 26, of Van Wert, also
traveling southbound on State
Street, failed to stop behind
the Rahrig vehicle and struck
it in the rear.
No one was injured.
Both vehicles sustained
moderate damage.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
17-29-43-48-52, Mega
Ball: 36
Estimated jackpot: $64 M
Megaplier
4
Pick 3 Evening
3-1-5
Pick 4 Evening
9-3-6-9
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $31
million
Rolling Cash 5
11-12-17-27-29
Estimated jackpot:
$140,000
Ten OH Evening
01-13-15-19-21-31-35-42-
45-48-52-56-58-59-61-63-65-
71-76-78
June 16, 1939-Nov. 22, 2011
Margaret Ann Judkins
Cifarelli, 72, of Davidson,
N.C., died Tuesday at Levine
& Dickson Hospice House
following a courageous battle
with lung cancer.
She was born June 16,
1939, in Lima to Russell
Judkins and Margaret (Dolt)
Judkins. They preceded her
in death.
She married Victor V.
Cifarelli, who survives.
Other survivors include a
son, James Cramton of San
Pedro, Calif.; a sister, Carla
Jean Harter of Delphos;
niece Denise (Mike) Matson
of Findlay; and nephews
Doug (Mary Joe) Weaver of
Columbus and Craig (Kathy)
Weaver of Santa Rosa, Calif.
She was also preceded in
death by her uncle, Donald
Judkins; an aunt, Belle
(Judkins) Eddy; and brothers-
in-law, Rollin Weaver and
Paul Harter Jr.
Mrs. Cifarelli spent her
early years in Delphos. Her
family moved to Dinuba,
Calif., in 1947. She gradu-
ated from San Jose State
University in 1961 and
later received her master’s
degree from the College of
St. Thomas in Minnesota.
In 1962, she began a long
teaching career in Southern
California, working in the
Torrance Unified School
District. In 1995, she moved
to North Carolina with her
husband and began teach-
ing in the Iredell-Statesville
School District until her
retirement in 2003.
Memorial services were
conducted Sunday in the
Chapel of Raymer-Kepner
Funeral Home in Huntersville,
N.C. A private interment in
Mimosa Cemetery will be at
a later date.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als are to the American Cancer
Society, 6000 Fairview Road,
Suite 200, Charlotte, N.C.
28210 or the Davidson Loaves
and Fishes, Ada Jenkins
Center, 212 Gamble St.,
Davidson, N.C., 28036.
Corn: $6.03
Wheat: $5.75
Beans: $10.98
Debbie Richeson
Police: 2 kids
call 911, ask for
Santa
Debbie Richeson, 58, of
Spencerville died at 8:59 p.m.
Tuesday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center.
Funeral arrangements
are incomplete at Thomas
E. Bayliff Funeral Home,
Spencerville.
KINGSTON, N.Y. (AP) —
No, Virginia, you can’t call
911 and ask for Santa Claus.
That’s what two young chil-
dren in New York’s Hudson
Valley have learned.
The Daily Freeman of
Kingston reports that around
11 a.m. Sunday, police in the
city of Kingston responded
to a home after two children,
ages 4 and 6, called 911 ask-
ing to speak to either the police
chief or Santa Claus.
Police say officers inter-
viewed the family and kids, and
instructed the youngsters on the
proper use of emergency ser-
vices. It wasn’t clear what the
kids wanted to ask Santa.
A boy, Cole Joseph,
was born Nov. 24 to Matt
and Michelle Brickner of
Columbus.
He was welcomed home by
brothers Eli and Casey.
Grandparents are Tom and
Marcey Brickner and Tom
and Sue Wiechart.
High Temperature Tuesday
in Delphos was 43 degrees,
low was 32. Rain and snow
mix was measured at .68 inch.
High a year ago today was
56, low was 30. Record high
for today is 65, set in 1934.
Record low is -1, set in 1958.
Delphos weather
TRASH TALK
Allen County Refuse pro-
vides garbage and recycle col-
lection in Delphos.
The Allen County portion of
Delphos is collected on Thurs-
days, with residents placing
garbage containers on the curb
Wednesday evening and recycle
every other Wednesday.
The Van Wert County por-
tion of Delphos is collected on
Friday, with residents placing
garbage containers at the curb
on Thursday evening and recy-
cle every other Thursday.
If a holiday falls during the
week, collection is pushed back
a day. For example, the week of
Memorial Day, collection in Al-
len County will be Friday and
in Van Wert County it will be
Saturday.
Big item collection is held
from 8 a.m.-noon the first Sat-
urday of each month in the
parking lot across from the city
building. Participants need to
show proof of residency like a
city utility bill.
See the full schedule at
cityofdelphos.com.
1
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Wednesday, November 30, 2011 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
The St. John’s Mission Society recently hosted a talent show in order to raise money for the Doug and Elena Rahrig
family whose home was completely destroyed by a fire. Over $1,300 was collected by the entire staff and student body of
the high school. Shown with the Rahrig family are, from left, Sam Miller, Dylan Krendl, Julie Bonifas, Kaitlin Wrasman
and Jordan Bergfeld.
The St. John’s Mission Society also sponsored a winter clothing drive in the high school. Students were permitted to
wear jeans if they brought in items such as coats, sweatshirts, hats, gloves or socks. Shown are Mission Society members
Sam Miller, Kaitlin Wrasman, Julie Bonifas, Jordan Bergfeld and Dylan Krendl.
St. John’s Mission Society raises money for local family
Photo submitted
Battelle identifies
solutions for Grand
Lake St. Marys
COLUMBUS — Ohio-
Battelle, the world’s largest
independent research and
development organization
and home of some of the
world’s foremost environ-
mental remediation experts,
has identified about 10
solutions for mitigating the
harmful blooms of algae
and toxic cyanobacteria
in Grand Lake St. Marys
(GLSM) from a group of
about 75 ideas. While none
of these proposals provided
a complete answer to solve
the problems at the lake,
Battelle is recommending
further evaluation of these
identified solutions.
The Battelle report sum-
marizes the environmental
support services provided by
Battelle under a contract with
the Western Ohio Educational
Foundation (WOEF) funded
by grants from the Grand
Lake St. Marys Restoration
Commission (GLSMRC)
and the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources (ODNR).
The WOEF is located at the
Wright State University, Lake
Campus, which also provided
research support.
Under this contract,
Battelle completed three
tasks:
• Task 1: Perform
Suitability Evaluations for
Lake Restoration Proposals
• Task 2: Provide Status/
Feedback to GLSMRC and
Stakeholder Groups
• Task 3: Assess/Site
Aeration Technologies in
Select GLSM Sheltered
Areas
Under Task 1, Battelle
reviewed more than 70 ven-
dor-proposed solutions for
the state’s largest inland lake.
Battelle worked closely with
GLSMRC and ODNR to
design a systematic screening
process to rank these pro-
posals. Four configurations
emerged that reflect distinct
lake improvement strategies
arising from the vendor-pro-
posed solutions:
• Reduction of external
phosphorus loading by source
reduction or treatment, includ-
ing treatment of tributaries
• Reduction of internal
loading by removal or inac-
tivation of phosphorus inven-
tory in lake sediments
• Aeration/circulation
• Algaecidal agents
“Battelle’s analysis of the
proposed technical solutions
provides a comprehensive
guideline for addressing the
environmental problems at
Grand Lake St. Marys,” said
Marty Toomajian, President
of Battelle’s Energy,
Environment and Material
Sciences Global Business.
“We appreciate this opportu-
nity to be a trusted technical
resource for Ohio.”
Thomas Knapke, WOEF
Development Officer, said,
“Battelle worked closely with
GLSM stakeholders to reach
consensus on the preferred
criteria to classify and rank
proposed solutions. This exer-
cise identified highest priority
solutions and allowed us to
start working with selected
vendors for follow-up anal-
ysis and demonstrations of
their proposed solutions in
both the lake and its sur-
rounding watershed.”
Task 2 provided a summa-
ry of various perspectives on
the environmental issues and
contributing factors stressing
GLSM. Conceptual models
were used to describe the eco-
system functions of the lake.
This task provided a frame-
work to support the assess-
ment of the proposed vendor
solutions. Task 3 reviewed
various options and made
specific recommendations for
aerating closed areas of the
lake.
Fall turkey season concludes with 1,375 birds bagged
COLUMBUS — Ohio’s
fall wild turkey season
ended November 27 with
hunters bagging 1,375 dur-
ing the seven-week season.
Ashtabula County led the
state with 67 birds taken,
according to the Ohio
Department of Natural
Resources (ODNR),
Division of Wildlife. Last
year’s harvest total was
1,425.
The 2011 fall turkey
season ran from October 8
through November 27 allow-
ing hunters to pursue a wild
turkey of either sex using
a shotgun, muzzleloading
shotgun, bow or crossbow
in 48 counties in the state.
Prior to the start of this
fall’s hunting season, Ohio’s
estimated wild turkey popu-
lation was around 180,000.
As many as 15,000 people,
not counting private land-
owners hunting on their own
property, enjoyed Ohio’s
fall wild turkey season.
The top 10 coun-
ties for fall turkey har-
vest were: Ashtabula-67,
Knox-55, Guernsey and
Tuscarawas-53, Noble-50,
Monroe-45, Coshocton-44,
Holmes-42, Licking-40, and
Carroll and Richland-39.
Hunters who wish to
share their success may sub-
mit a photo to wildohio.
com.
The ODNR ensures a
balance between wise use
and protection of our natu-
ral resources for the benefit
of all. Visit the ODNR web
site at www.ohiodnr.com.
EDITORS NOTE: The
following is a list of wild
turkeys checked and tagged
through November 27. The
number taken during the
2010 fall turkey season is
marked in ( ): 2011 (2010).
Adams –35 (29); Ashland
–17 (38); Ashtabula –67 (77);
Athens –27 (18); Belmont
–32 (11); Brown –26 (28);
Carroll –39 (28); Clermont
–32 (44); Columbiana
–37 (35); Coshocton –44
(68); Cuyahoga –0 (2);
Defiance-13 (25); Gallia
–36 (34); Geauga –31
(53); Guernsey –53 (39);
Harrison –38 (34); Highland
–37 (51); Hocking –20 (17);
Holmes –42 (29); Jackson
–17 (22); Jefferson –20 (25);
Knox –55 (62); Lake –7 (4);
Lawrence –21 (16); Licking
–40 (53); Lorain –29 (15);
Mahoning –24 (27); Medina
–17 (24); Meigs –15 (33);
Monroe –45 (15); Morgan
–23 (20); Morrow –11 (13);
Muskingum-36 (32); Noble
–50 (34); Perry –26 (25);
Pike –21 (10); Portage
–18 (23); Richland –39
(31); Ross –19 (32); Scioto
–22(12); Stark –23 (19);
Summit –3 (8); Trumbull
–31 (60); Tuscarawas –53
(56); Vinton –21 (19);
Washington –24 (25); Wayne
–9 (8) and Williams-27 (22).
Preliminary totals –1,375
(1,425).
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IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Wednesday, November 30, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
One Year Ago
• Trinity United Methodist Church members put finish-
ing touches on tables in the Fellowship Hall for the annual
Christmas Dinner and Bazaar on Wednesday. The General
Store is the first attraction of the day. Homemade crafts, candy
and baked goods will be available.
25 Years Ago — 1986
• The first Christmas Craft Celebration will be held today at
Franklin School. More than 60 booths featuring a wide variety
of crafts have been set up in the gym, cafeteria and hallway.
A bake sale will be held in conjunction with the show. Santa
will be on hand all day.
• Successful crossbow hunters in the Tri-County are Dave
Jettinghoff of Delphos, who bagged a doe, along with Steve
Roeper of Spencerville, who got a doe. Jim Grothouse of
Delphos and Philip Strayer of Elida each got a buck. Cris
Kehres of Ottoville got a button buck and Gary Dray of
Delphos and Ron Young of Fort Jennings, each got does.
Robert Parsons and Dave Vonderwell of Delphos, each got
does.
• The 1986-87 St. John’s Blue Jays were previewed Friday
evening. A tall, swift varsity team came away with a 36-28
victory. In the last period Mike Williams led the varsity with
seven points. Senior Scott Knebel and junior Brian Heitz
added four points. The alumni were led by 1983 graduate John
Bockey with four points.
50 Years Ago — 1961
• The Delphos Pythian Sister met in regular session Tuesday
evening in the K of P Hall with regular business being taken
care of. Plans were made for the annual Christmas party,
which will be held Dec. 13. Following the meeting, refresh-
ments were served by the committee in charge. Committee
members included Flossie Burgess, Dorothy Wells, Stella
Jamison and Mildred Rozelle.
• David Zoll, instrumental music instructor in Delphos
City Schools, will attend the Ohio Music Education
Association convention at the Piek-Center Hotel in
Cleveland on Dec. 1-2, it was announced Wednesday by
school officials. The convention will feature debate sessions,
panel discussions, exhibits, a Cleveland All-City Concert and
various clinics.
• The Catholic Daughters of America Study Club of
Court Delphos, No. 707, met Tuesday night at the Knights of
Columbus club rooms with Mrs. John Metzner Sr., in charge
of the General Councils of the Church. Mrs. Howard Illig
was in charge of the program for the evening and presented a
review of the book, “A Nation of Sheep.”
75 Years Ago — 1936
• Playing an indifferent brand of basketball, St. John’s
Blue Jays lost to Celina I. C. at St. John’s auditorium Sunday
afternoon by a score of 17 to 13. Many changes in the St.
John’s line-up were made in the final quarter but the Blue and
Gold continued to miss their shots and went down to defeat
by a four point margin, each team scoring five points in that
period.
• The annual Methodist church Christmas Bazaar and
dinner will be held Thursday night at the church. The ladies
aid will serve a business men’s luncheon, cafeteria style, at
noon and a fried chicken dinner will be served in the evening.
Various booths will also be arranged in the social room at the
church. The ladies will offer fancy work, various kinds of
baked goods and candy for sale.
• A large number of Eagles and friends attended the memo-
rial service held Sunday afternoon at the Presbyterian church
for departed members of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. The
Delphos Eagles met at the hall and marched to the church. The
Eagles band headed the procession.
WASHINGTON (AP)
— Nonmilitary government
agencies own or lease thou-
sands of aircraft, but they are
often on their own when it
comes to safety oversight of
their operations — a situation
that accident investigators say
has contributed to air crashes
and deaths.
Federal, state and local
agencies own or lease more
than 2,400 nonmilitary planes
and helicopters for fighting
forest fires, chasing crooks,
conducting scientific research
and other tasks. By compari-
son, the world’s largest airline
— created by the merger of
United and Continental — and
its regional carriers operate
fewer than 1,300 planes.
But unlike commercial air-
lines, government agencies are
mostly left to police the safety
of their flight operations them-
selves. The Federal Aviation
Administration has long said
it doesn’t have the authority
to apply regulations to govern-
ment agencies as long as their
aircraft are engaged in public
missions like firefighting or
law enforcement. The FAA
also doesn’t regulate the air-
worthiness or maintenance of
military surplus aircraft in use
by government agencies.
From 2000 through the
first eight months of this year,
the National Transportation
Safety Board investigated at
least 349 accidents, resulting
in 135 deaths, involving air-
craft owned by or operated
under contract for government
agencies. Problems uncovered
in some of those accidents
have prompted the board to
host a forum beginning today
aimed at getting the FAA and
other government officials to
discuss ways to address the
issue.
“The issue for us is who is
responsible (for safety). We
have cases now where we ask
that question and no one seems
to know,” said Tom Haueter,
director of NTSB’s office of
aviation safety.
By BRADLEY KLAPPER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Obama administration scram-
bled diplomatically Tuesday
to repair the damage caused by
a NATO air assault that killed
24 Pakistani soldiers, hoping
Pakistan won’t play spoiler
in the U.S.-backed plan to
shore up Afghanistan’s secu-
rity and bring international
forces home.
Senior State and Defense
Department officials were
reaching out to their coun-
terparts in Islamabad, while
the first battlefield accounts
suggested that NATO and
Pakistani forces may have
attacked one another in a trag-
ic case of mistaken identity,
with each believing the other
was Taliban.
A U.S. investigation was
under way into the incident,
the deadliest among allies
in the decade-long fight
against al-Qaida and other
extremist groups along the
Afghan-Pakistani frontier. Its
findings may not come fast
enough as Pakistani repercus-
sions are already mounting:
closed border crossings for
NATO supplies and troops,
and Tuesday’s decision by
Islamabad to withdraw from
a U.S.-backed meeting on
Afghanistan taking place next
week in Bonn, Germany.
“Pakistan has a crucial
role to play in supporting a
secure and stable and pros-
perous Afghanistan,” State
Department spokesman
Mark Toner said Tuesday.
“It’s absolutely critical that
Afghanistan’s neighbors play
a role in its future develop-
ment, and certainly its rela-
tionship with Pakistan has
been critical in that regard.”
The breakdown of the
U.S.-Pakistani partnership
comes at an awful time, only
weeks after a high-level del-
egation traveled to Islamabad.
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton and CIA
Director David Petraeus went
to patch up the relationship
marred by fights over the
arrest of a U.S. intelligence
contractor, the American
operation to kill Osama bin
Laden and repeated disagree-
ments over the links between
Pakistani intelligence and mil-
itant groups in Afghanistan.
Last week, U.S. Army Maj.
Gen. Daniel Allyn reported
improved cooperation along
the border and a tapering in
incidents of gunfire from
Pakistani territory. Officials
also have described better
U.S.-Pakistani understanding
at the political level, which
will only become more signif-
icant as the United States pulls
its troops out of Afghanistan
in the next three years and
relies on Pakistan to broker
reconciliation talks between
the U.S.-backed Afghan gov-
ernment and the Taliban-led
insurgency.
The improvements are
now at risk of unraveling.
Administration officials are
leaving the door open for
Pakistan to reverse course and
commit to the Bonn confer-
ence, but are more perturbed
by the idea of a substantial
change in Pakistani policy
toward Afghanistan. They
don’t know if the Bonn deci-
sion reflects merely another
slap at the United States, or
if it reflects a broader move
away from the U.S. strat-
egy for withdrawing from
Afghanistan.
Toner told reporters the
conference’s goal of a stable
Afghanistan was a shared
interest. But he demurred on
whether Pakistan saw it dif-
ferently or if it was willing
to sacrifice its own interests
to retaliate against the United
States. He acknowledged:
“We are facing a difficult sit-
uation, a difficult challenge.”
The Dec. 5 Bonn meet-
ing will still bring together
representatives from 85 coun-
tries and 15 organizations
to forge a strategy to stabi-
lize Afghanistan and smooth
the planned U.S. drawdown
through 2014. Pakistan is
perhaps the most important
regional country because
of its influence on Afghan
Taliban factions on its soil.
Even before Pakistan’s with-
drawal, few had high expecta-
tions for the conference.
By RAY HENRY
Associated Press
ATLANTA — Herman
Cain told aides Tuesday he
is assessing whether the latest
allegations of inappropriate
sexual behavior against him
“create too much of a cloud”
for his Republican presiden-
tial candidacy to go forward.
Acknowledging the
“firestorm” arising from an
accusation of infidelity, Cain
only committed to keeping
his campaign schedule for the
next several days, in a con-
ference call with his senior
staff.
“If a decision is made, dif-
ferent than to plow ahead,
you all will be the first to
know,” he said, according to a
transcript of the call made by
the National Review, which
listened to the conversation.
It was the first time doubts
about Cain’s continued can-
didacy had surfaced from
the candidate himself. As
recently as Tuesday morn-
ing, a campaign spokesman
had stated unequivocally that
Cain would not quit.
Cain denied anew that he
had an extramarital affair with
a Georgia woman who went
public a day earlier with alle-
gations they had been inti-
mate for 13 years.
“It was just a friendship
relationship,” he said on the
call, according to the tran-
script. “That being said, obvi-
ously, this is a cause for reas-
sessment.”
He went on: “With this
latest one, we have to do an
assessment as to whether or
not this is going to create
too much of a cloud, in some
people’s minds, as to whether
or not they would be able to
support us going forth.”
Saying the episode had
taken an emotional toll on
him and his family, Cain told
the aides that people will
have to decide whether they
believe him or the accuser.
“That’s why we’re going to
give it time, to see what type
of response we get from our
supporters.”
Cain has denied the affair
as well as several other accu-
sations of inappropriate sexu-
al behavior that have dogged
his candidacy over the past
month. He had been publicly
resolute about pressing ahead
even as his standing in public
opinion polls and his fund-
raising started to slide.
But in the conference call,
he pledged only to keep his
imminent schedule, includ-
ing a foreign policy speech at
Hillsdale College in Michigan
later Tuesday that he prom-
ised to deliver with “vim,
vigor and enthusiasm.”
He scrapped at least one
planned event, withdrawing
from a party in New York on
Sunday to meet with some of
the city’s top journalists includ-
ing NBC’s Matt Lauer and
ABC’s Barbara Walters. Cindy
Adams, the New York Post
columnist hosting the dinner,
told the AP she had received a
call Tuesday from Cain adviser
John Coale saying Cain had
decided not to attend. Coale
declined to comment.
Still, Cain was what one
participant described as calm
and deliberate as he addressed
his staff on the conference call.
The participant, Florida
state Rep. Scott Plakon, one
of four chairmen for Cain’s
Florida campaign, said he
wanted to see more evidence
from the accuser.
“If it is true that he didn’t
do this, I think he should
fight and kick and scratch and
win,” Plakon said.
But if Cain did have the
affair, Plakon said, it would
be unacceptable to Republican
voters.
WASHINGTON — When
the Democratic National
Committee circulates an ad
attacking Mitt Romney even
before the Iowa caucuses —
and long before his presi-
dential nomination is clear
— one can be fairly certain
that Romney is considered
the greatest threat to a second
Obama term.
This alone should be suf-
ficient endorsement to get
reluctant Republicans on
board, except for the fact
that the ad is very effective.
Titled “Mitt v. Mitt: The story
of two men trapped in one
body,” the ad traces the many
now-familiar “flip-flops” of
Romney’s political career,
from the seminal pro-choice
to pro-life position to his dis-
approval of “Obamacare,”
which, as the president never
tires of pointing out, was
modeled on “Romneycare.”
The ad is good. The mes-
sage is profound. And the
effect may be irreversible.
Nevertheless, voters deserve
to know more than what a
spliced-and-diced commercial
suggests. As anyone in public
life knows, a creative (or mali-
cious) editor can create any
impression he or she desires
regardless of context or real-
ity on the ground. Watching
the ad closely, you see not
only a changing position but
also a changing Romney,
from a youngish man with
black hair to an older model
with graying hair. Might the
man have matured?
This is not to suggest that
Romney hasn’t changed his
mind. There is a record. Then
again, who but the most-bar-
nacled ideologue hasn’t had
a change of heart given new
information (abortion), expe-
rience (Romneycare) or cir-
cumstances (a national versus
a state election)? Ironically,
Romney has become a
more-conservative candidate
because of his shifts, while
the narrative that he is merely
politically expedient rather
than principled seems to be
a contest between the pot and
the kettle. Mirror, mirror.
It is helpful to know more
about a person’s position than
a carefully selected sound
bite permits, but Romney’s
attempts to explain himself
have failed. So how does a
person change from one posi-
tion to the polar opposite on
such a core issue as abor-
tion? Easy. Countless women
have changed their minds
thanks to pregnancy and birth.
Countless others have suf-
fered the agony of revelation
too late following an abortion.
Men overjoyed by fatherhood,
or crushed by the loss of a
child through abortion, have
also changed their minds.
Romney’s change of heart
evolved not from personal
experience but rather from a
purposeful course of study. I
know this because I know the
man who instructed him in
2005 on the basics of embryon-
ic life during stem cell research
debate then taking place in
Massachusetts. As governor at
the time, Romney was under
intense pressure to help flip a
state law that protected embryos
from stem cell research. Some
of that pressure came from
Harvard University, Romney’s
alma mater, where scientists
hoped to assume a leading role
in stem cell research.
The politically expedi-
ent choice was obvious, but
Romney took a more-thought-
ful approach and sought to
educate himself before stak-
ing out a position. Enter
William Hurlbut, a physician
and professor of biomedical
ethics at Stanford University
Medical School. For several
hours, Hurlbut and Romney
met in the governor’s office
and went through the dynam-
ics of conception, embryonic
development and the reper-
cussions of research that tar-
gets nascent human life. It
was not a light lunch.
The result of that conver-
sation and others was a pro-
life Romney, who, though he
kept his campaign promise to
honor the state’s democrati-
cally asserted preference for
abortion choice, began a new
personal path that happened to
serve him well, at least theo-
retically, among social conser-
vatives. Was his conversion
sincere? No one can know
another’s heart, but Hurlbut is
convinced that it was.
“Several things about our
conversation still stand out
strongly in my mind,” Hurlbut
told me. “First, he clearly rec-
ognized the significance of
the issue, not just as a current
controversy, but a matter that
would define the character of
our culture into the future.
“Second, it was obvious
that he had put in a real effort
to understand both the scien-
tific prospects and the broader
social implications. Finally,
I was impressed by both his
clarity of mind and sincerity
of heart. ... He recognized that
this was not a matter of pure-
ly abstract theory or merely
pragmatic governance, but a
crucial moment in how we
regard nascent human life and
the broader meaning of medi-
cine in the service of life.”
Whether one agrees
with Hurlbut’s appraisal or
Romney’s conclusions, this
was at least a flip-flop of a
higher order. Would that all
our politics were so painstak-
ingly crafted.
Kathleen Parker’s email address
is kathleenparker@washpost.com.
US scrambles to contain
Pakistan assault fallout
Anatomy of a flip-flop
Cain begins reassessing his campaign
Gov’t aircraft
use often lacks
FAA oversight
1
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in Delphos, Ohio. Master stylist,
specializing in men’s and women’s
cuts, color and perms.
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enjoying Hometown Christmas!
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Wednesday, November 30, 2011 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Gomer United
Methodist Church
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
BY LOVINA EICHER
After some nice 60 degree
weather it has turned colder
again. The clouds look dark
so I wonder if we will get
some snow soon. Other than
those few inches we had ear-
lier this month we haven’t
had any. The chil-
dren are ready for
some snow but I am
glad it has held off.
Quite a few of the
children need new
boots for the win-
ter but so far it has
not been possible to
buy some. Buying
shoes and boots for
10 people can really
add up in a hurry.
This week my husband Joe
went back to work after being
off for the Thanksgiving holi-
day. The children are also
back in school after being
home last week.
Jacob, Emma, and fam-
ily and our daughter’s
friend, Timothy, were our
Thanksgiving dinner guests.
We opened our table all the
way and set it for the 18 of us.
It is getting a little crowded
around the table with the chil-
dren all growing up so fast.
Emma and Jacob’s deceased
dear little Marilyn is also still
missed at these holiday din-
ners.
On the menu was turkey,
dressing, mashed potatoes,
gravy, mixed vegetables,
corn, broccoli-cauliflower
salad, potato salad, vegetable
dip and veggies, dill pickles,
hot peppers, tea, homemade
wheat and white bread, rhu-
barb jam and butter, pump-
kin roll, strawberry fruit
pudding and an assortment
of pies including cherry,
apple, pecan, butterscotch
and chocolate pie, along with
ice cream. We had a lot of
leftovers and divided them
between our two families for
easy meals the next day. I
fixed a 24-pound turkey so
we had plenty left for another
meal.
The afternoon was spent
playing games and singing.
Friday, we did the laundry
and hung some outside to dry
and some in the basement.
The bed sheets dried really
nicely and smelled fresh to
put back on the bed. While
we were doing laundry, Joe’s
sister, Esther, husband David
and another of Joe’s sisters,
Susan, and three sons came
for a visit. Esther and David
live in Ohio but
were out here in
Michigan visit-
ing family. Susan
has a son who is
the same age as
Kevin. Those two
sure make a match
in playing togeth-
er. They were not
ready to part when
it was time for
them to leave.
Friday evening we went
to the visiting of our friend
Linda, 61, who lost her battle
to cancer. Our sympathy goes
to the family.
Saturday was spent just
cleaning up the house and
folding the laundry. The girls
cleaned out some closets
upstairs. We were glad to see
our friend Ruth stop in after
having not seen her in awhile.
The children always enjoy
the treats she brings.
Sunday we had a delicious
brunch at Jacob and Emma’s
house. They served biscuits,
sausage gravy, eggs, pota-
toes, sausage links, cheese,
hot peppers, pineapple sheet
cake, milk, coffee, tea, rhu-
barb, grape and V8 juices. It
was a rainy day so the after-
noon was mainly spent play-
ing games like Battleship,
Aggravation, Connect Four,
Skipbo, and Mancala. The
children wanted to go for a
pony ride but the rain did not
let up. Finally they decided to
be a little creative and fixed
a canvas up over the pony
wagon. It looked kind of like
a covered wagon and they
were able to go for a little
pony ride. They said they are
the Ingalls from Little House
on the Prairie. Although most
of them managed to stay dry,
we still had a few with wet
coats but at least they had
some fun.
The following recipe is a
good one for the holidays:
CEREAL CANDY
1 cup sugar
1 cup sweet cream
1 cup corn syrup
5 cups of corn flakes
2 cups of Rice Krispies
2 cups of Cheerios
1 cup salted peanuts
(optional)
1 cup coconut (optional)
In a large pot over medium
heat cook the sugar, cream,
and corn syrup together until
they reach the “softball stage.“
Then add the other ingre-
dients. Stir until thoroughly
mixed. Drop by tablespoon
onto a cookie sheet lined with
wax paper and let set like you
would a “no bake cookie.”
VERY IMPORTANT NOTE:
If you’re a fan of this column,
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expires in just 10 days. The
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of a budget hole which is why
this campaign is being pushed
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Eichers enjoy Thanksgiving, stay
busy with household chores
Happy Birthday
DEC. 1
Scott Jackson
Kevin Strayer
Danielle Dancer
Gerald “Jerry” Kraft Jr.
Paige Smith
The Putnam County
Chapter of the Public
Employees Retirement, Inc.
will hold its noon lunch meet-
ing at Dick’s Steak House in
Kalida on Thursday.
Ottawa Glandorf Choir will
entertain.
Retirees of the Public
Employees Retirement System
are invited, along with a guest.
This includes retirees from
state, county, municipalities,
township trustees and mainte-
nance men.
PERI meeting to
be held Thursday
The Delphos Chapter
of the Catholic Ladies of
Columbia 40 recently held its
November meeting.
The trustees opened the
meeting by leading the mem-
bers in the Rosary.
Roll call was read by
Secretary Barb Bockey.
Treasurer Mary Lou Beckman
read the Treasurer’s Report.
Minutes of last month’s meet-
ing were read by the secretary.
Barb Bockey made a motion
to pay the bills. It was sec-
onded by Leona Berelsman
and then passed.
Fifteen members were
present.
The Christmas tree at
the museum was decorated
Nov. 16 by Raylene Fischer,
Catherine Hammons and Irma
Hilvers.
The court’s Christmas
party will be Dec. 6 at 6:30
p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. A $3
give exchange is optional.
Christmas cards will be
sent to a military unit in
Afghanistan.
Election of officers
was held for the new year:
Catherine Hammons as presi-
dent, Raylene Fischer as vice
president, Barb Bockey as sec-
retary and Mary Lou Beckman
as treasurer.
The trustees are Leona
Berelsman, Irma Hilvers and
Ruth Calvelage.
Fifty-fifty winners were
Martha Ardner, Mary Thitoff,
Mary Lou Beckman and Judy
Pohlman won the attendance
award.
LaDonna Klima, Carol
Ricker and Mary Thitoff were
the November birthdays.
Chairladies for the
December meeting are Judy
Pohlman, Marcia Miehls,
Raylene Fischer, Rose
Weber, Lois Blankmeyer,
LaDonna Klima and
Winifred Siefker.
CL of C plans Christmas party
TODAY
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s
Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is be open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos Ladies
Club, Trinity United Methodist
Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building, Second
Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School parking
lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos Fire
and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s
Little Theatre.
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6 – The Herald Wednesday, November 30, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Tuesday Merchant
Nov. 22, 2011
Surveyor’s 30-10
R C Connections 28-12
Topp Chalet 26-14
Delphos Sporting Goods 22-18
Caballero’s 22-18
Adams Automotive 20-20
Unverferth Mfg. 15-25
Kerns Ford 14-26
Ace Hardware 13-27
Men over 200
Ron Mericle 204, Don Honigford 225,
Ryan Kies 279-225, Rick Suever 213-215-258,
Jim Hummer 203-209, Dan Stemen 226, Bill
Stemen 224, David Newman 257-216-203, Zach
Sargent 255-236, Kyle Early 206-247, Andrew
Schimmoller 259-241-204, Josh DeVelvis 258-
215-208, Denny Dyke 247-215, John Adams
214-214, Bruce VanMetre 204-207, Phil Austin
238-213-222, Scott Scalf 235-269, Matt Metcalfe
244-267, Jason Teman 209, Sean Hulihan 204,
Dan Grice 213-228-236, Kevin Kill 211, Ron
Wilhelm 209, John Jones 222-246, John Allen
209, Jason Wagoner 204-213, Joe Geise 220-
256-213, Bruce Haggard 248, Dan Wilhelm
202-218-220, Jason Mahlie 217-205.
Men over 550
Ron Mericle 576, Don Honigford 561,
Ryan Kies 677, Rick Suever 686, Jim Hummer
595, Dan Stemen 574, Bill Stemen 593, David
Newman 676, Zach Sargent 687, Kyle Early 652,
Andrew Schimmoller 704, Russ Wilhelm 559,
Josh DeVelvis 681, Denny Dyke 636, John Adams
613, Larry Etzkorn 578, Bruce VanMetre 607, Phil
Austin 673, Scott Scalf 697, Matt Metcalfe 705,
Sean Hulihan 561, Dan Grice 677, Kevin Kill 575,
John Jones 641, John Allen 587, Jason Wagoner
597, Joe Geise 689, Bruce Haggard 568, Dan
Wilhelm 640, Jason Mahlie 620.
Wednesday Industrial
Nov. 23, 2011
D R C 13th Frame Lounge 34-6
K&M Tire 24-16
Topp Chalet 22-18
Delphos Restaurant Supply 22-18
Rustic Cafe 20-20
Cabo’s 20-20
D&D Grain 18-22
Moe’s Dougout 16-24
Niedeckens 12-28
Villager Tavern 12-28
Men over 200
Armando Alverez 239-204, Jason Hefner
201, Brent Beck 209, Ben Jones 213, Don Rice
234-201, Brian Gossard 212-278-233, Bruce
VanMetre 279-237-236, Dan Grice 276-216-
222, Bruce Moorman 201, Dan Kleman 209,
Coda Henze 245-209, Rick Schuck 221, Charlie
Beckner 211-205, Duane Kohorst 211-224, Clint
Harting 222-235, Shawn Stabler 258-215, Dave
Kreischer 226, Butch Prine Jr. 202-222, Jeff
Kreischer 204-202, Frank Miller 235-248-201,
Joe Geise 223-215, Charlie Lozano 213-269,
John Allen 216-212, John Jones 205-211-219,
Mike Eversole 215, Sean Hulihan 235-208,
Dave Jessee 245-243, Lenny Hubert 208-237-
215, Lee Schimmoller 218, Justin Rahrig 202,
Josh DeVelvis 203, Shane Schimmoller 222.
Men over 550
Armando Alverez 599, Brent Beck 584,
Ben Jones 568, Don Rice 617, Brian Gossard
723, Bruce VanMetre 752, Dan Grice 714,
Bruce Moorman 576, Bill Warnimont 561,
Coda Henze 598, Charlie Beckner 608, Duane
Kohorst 626, Clint Harting 638, Shawn Stabler
664, Dave Kreischer 569, Butch Prine Jr. 614,
Jeff Kreischer 591, Frank Miller 684, Joe Geise
618, Charlie Lozano 630, John Allen 616, John
Jones 635, Mike Eversole 606, Sean Hulihan
668, Dave Jessee 658, Lenny Hubert 660, Lee
Schimmoller 585, Josh DeVelvis 567.
Thursday National
Nov. 17, 2011
Bowersock Hauling 32-8
D R C Big Dogs 30-10
C B 97 30-10
Westrich 24-16
Day Metals 22-18
First Federal 22-18
K-M Tire 16-24
V F W 14-26
Wannemacher’s 4-36
Men over 200
Lenny Klaus 214-226, Mark Biedenharn
220, Dave Moenter 205-228, Jason Mahlie
234, Tom Schulte 202-210, Tom Markward
267, Dave Knepper 219, Todd Menke 268-298,
Chuck Verhoff 265, Phil Fetzer 214, Ray Geary
221, Don Honigford 216, Ron Mericle 216,
Frank Miller 257-245, Tim Koester 221-238,
Ted Wells 204-219, Brad Thornburgh 233-246,
Doug Milligan Sr. 213, Dan Yoakam 204, Brian
Schaadt 225-226, Don Eversole 214-269-202,
Bruce VanMetre 242-229, John Jones 214-
213-247, Jerry Mericle 210, Rick Suever 233,
Doug Milligan Jr. 215-213, Jeff Menke 204,
Mark Radabaugh 223, Randy Ryan 215, Jeff
Lawrence 232, Jim Meeks 205-218, Brian
Gossard 202-268-214, Scott German 224-215-
213, Rob Ruda 206, Don Rice 256-279-255.
Men over 550
Lenny Klaus 597, Mark Biedenharn 581,
Dave Moenter 627, Jason Mahlie 623, Tom
Schulte 609, Tom Markward 638, Dave Knepper
571, Todd Menke 747, Chuck Verhoff 589,
Don Honigford 577, Ron Mericle 567, Frank
Miller 687, Tim Koester 641, Ted Wells 621,
Brad Thornburgh 673, Doug Milligan Sr. 578,
Brian Schaadt 630, Don Eversole 685, Bruce
VanMetre 664, John Jones 674, Rick Suever
555, Doug Milligan Jr. 581, Jeff Lawrence 601,
Jim Meeks 604, Brian Gossard 684, Sean
Hulihan 558, Scott German 652, Don Rice 790.
BOWLING
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delpho-
sherald.com
SHERWOOD — Though
the calendar reads November,
the area had a fore-
taste of early win-
ter Tuesday night as
accumulating snow
followed the rain of
the previous days.
Jefferson’s girls
basketball team
needed time to get
the heat turned up
in its non-confer-
ence road contest at
Fairview but once it
did, its lethal full-court press
did the damage against the
taller but slower Apaches
with a 62-31 blowout.
“We knew we couldn’t
match up with their size but
we were quicker. We had to
get them going up and down
the floor,” Jefferson mentor
Dave Hoffman noted.
It took a while, though.
The Wildcats (2-0) had some
turnover woes themselves in
the first period (8 of their
game total of 19) and it
was 5-2 with five minutes
left. However, a basket by
senior Elizabeth Schosker
got the Lady Wildcats on a
roll thanks to that hounding
trapping pressure defense: a
13-2 spurt. Senior Kennedy
Boggs, one of two starters
and three total letterwinners
back from last season’s state
semifinalists, poured in all
three of her 3-pointers (18
points for the night, 8 steals,
6 assists, 4 boards) in leading
the surge. Her two singles
with four ticks left accounted
for a 17-11 edge after one.
The Wildcats forced 15 of
their 45 mis-
cues the first
period.
“Fairview
played pret-
ty well the
first quarter,
while we got
off to a slow
start. Once
we started
forcing turn-
overs, that got
us going,” Hoffman noted.
“We also got them into foul
trouble. Their big girls had to
sit because of it and we took
advantage of that.”
That would mean 6-1
junior Abby Grinnell (12
markers, 13 boards, 4 blocks)
and 6-0 senior Sydney Vance
(5 boards, 2 counters).
The Red and White contin-
ued that trend into the second
period, adding 11 more forced
turnovers (3 of their own).
Plus, they stayed even on the
glass, only losing 37-34 but
winning the offensive glass
17-9. With Boggs and senior
Samantha Thitoff (career var-
sity-high 12 markers, 3 steals)
netting four each, Jefferson’s
lead stretched to 35-17 at one
point on a mid-range J by
Boggs. The Lady Apaches
netted the last three — include
a banker by Grinnell with 11
ticks left — to close within
35-20.
The Lady Jeffcats were
totally dominant the third
period, holding their foe
to a mere fielder early on
by Grinnell. Thitoff and
sophomore Rileigh
Stockwell (varsity
career-high 11 mark-
ers, 6 boards) net-
ted six in the period
as the team canned
8-of-14 shots (21-of-
57 for the game, 4-of-
16 downtown, for
36.8%) to assume a
55-22 edge on a layin
by senior Megan
Gilden (6 points, 7
caroms) with 11 ticks show-
ing.
The Wildcats did not score
from the field in the fourth
but hit 7-of-13 free throws
(16-of-30 for the game for
53.3%).
The Apaches (1-1) other
high scorer was Haley Clinker
with eight.
Senior Courtney Lewis
delivered five assists and five
thefts for Delphos, who com-
mitted 17 fouls. They will be
off until Dec. 8 when they
host Columbus Grove (6 p.m.
junior varsity tip) to begin
defense of their Northwest
Conference titles from the
previous two seasons.
“We had some other girls
step up tonight, like Sam and
Rileigh. We are going to need
them and others to do so con-
sistently,” Hoffman added.
“Right now, with only three
with any varsity experience
from last year, we need to get
them girls playing time at this
level.”
Fairview counted 11-of-31
fielders, 2-of-6 long range,
for 35.5 percent; 7-of-14 free
throws (50%); and 21 fouls.
The Jefferson JVs moved
to 2-0 with a 41-6 belting of
the Apaches.
Sophomore Hannah
Sensibaugh dropped in 11 for
the Wildcats.
VARSITY
JEFFERSON (62)
Samantha Thitoff 4-4-12, Courtney
Lewis 1-1-3, Brooke Culp 1-0-2,
Kennedy Boggs 6-3-18, Katie Goergens
1-1-3, Rileigh Stockwell 4-3-11, Hannah
Sensibaugh 0-0-0, Gabrielle Pimpas
0-2-2, Megan Gilden 2-2-6, Elizabeth
Schosker 1-0-2, Makayla Binkley 1-0-3.
Totals 21-16-62.
FAIRVIEW (31)
Sloan Mannino 0-0-0, Bradi Hall
0-0-0, Brittany Conkey 0-2-2. Ali Hug
2-0-4, Natalie Meyer 0-1-1, Sara
Carder 1-0-2, Sydney Vance 0-2-2,
Haley Clinker 2-2-8, Abby Grinnell 6-0-
12. Totals 11-7-31.
Score By Quarters:
Jefferson 17 18 20 7 – 62
Fairview 11 9 2 9 – 31
Three-point goals: Jefferson, Boggs
3, Binkley; Fairview, Clinker 2.
------
JUNIOR VARSITY
JEFFERSON (41)
Sarah Thitoff 0-0-0, Heather
Pohlman 2-0-4, Lindsay Deuel 1-2-
4, Shelby Koenig 3-1-7, Samantha
Branham 0-2-2, Brooke Hesseling 3-1-
7, Jasmine McDougall 2-0-4, Hannah
Sensibaugh 5-1-11, Gabrielle Pimpas
0-2-2. Totals 16-9/18-41.
FAIRVIEW (6)
Maranda Steffes 0-0-0, Shanea
Smith 0-0-0, Christina Gebers 0-0-0,
Kayla Bauer 1-0-2, Cathleen Woenker
0-0-0, Amelia Ankney 1-0-2, Olivia
Garrigus 0-0-0, Emilee Carder 0-0-0,
CC. Castillo 1-0-2, Amber Andrist 0-0-
0. Totals 3-0/2-6.
Score by Quarters:
Jefferson 7 11 12 11 - 41
Fairview 2 0 2 2 - 6
Three-point goals: Jefferson, none;
Fairview, none.
Lady ’Cats’ pressure wilts Apaches
Boggs Thitoff
By KIRK DOUGAL
Times Bulletin Editor
kdougal@timesbulletin.com
MIDDLE POINT -
Lincolnview used pressure
defense to make turnovers
into baskets and held visiting
Hicksville to only three points
in the third quarter as the Lady
Lancers beat the Aces 60-35 in
non-conference play at home
on Tuesday night.
Against the much taller vis-
itors, Lincolnview head coach
Dan Williamson said they
knew coming into the game that
their exterior defense and team
rebounding would be impor-
tant for a Lancer win. In
fact, while causing 36
Hicksville turnovers in
the game, they also did
not allow a made basket
outside of eight feet until there
was less than a minute to go in
the contest.
“We figured we were going
to need that kind of effort
because we are lacking in post
size and post defense,” he
explained. “We knew coming
in that was something they
would be very strong at. Their
post players have good size
and we wanted to put a lot of
pressure on them and hope-
fully force a lot of turnovers.”
That was exactly what hap-
pened as Lincolnview came
out in a full-court man-to-man
press. The Lady Lancers strug-
gled to put the ball in the basket
at first but they had the Aces so
flummoxed, they were unable
to even get a shot off. Kaitlyn
Brant cracked the scoreboard
first for the home team as she
had a steal out front and con-
verted on the runout for a 2-0
lead. She followed the next trip
down the court by rebounding
a missed 3-point attempt and
putting it back in for a buck-
et. She finished off her first-
quarter run when Katie Dye
had a steal and found Brant
flying down the right side for
a lay up and 6-0 lead, forcing
Hicksville into a timeout.
The break did not do the
visitors any good as Claire Dye
had a steal in the back court and
finished off the break for an 8-0
lead. Tara Smazenko finally put
the Aces on the board with a
post move off the block at the
4:30 mark but Lincolnview held
their lead through the end of the
first quarter, 14-9.
The second quarter start-
ed with the only pressure the
Lady Lancers would feel all
night. After Brant and post
player Carley Springer both
picked up their second fouls
and headed to the bench, the
Aces made a run at the home
team. Julia Thatcher hit a free
throw for Lincolnview but then
it was 6-1 Megan Headley who
scored off the block and hit
two free throws for Hicksville
to draw the score to 15-13.
They could not score on their
next two trips down the court
to tie the game, however, and
their opportunity was lost.
Lincolnview adjusted to
their smaller lineup and turned
up the defensive heat even
more. Kaylee Thatcher scored
on two steals and runouts,
Christine Stemen was fouled
twice on the baseline and
canned all four free throws
and K. Dye sliced to the bas-
ket with only 17 seconds on
the clock to push Lincolnview
to a 26-18 halftime lead. The
only bad news in the stretch
was when Brant picked up her
third foul with only 6.1 sec-
onds remaining.
The start of the third quar-
ter was a blitz the Aces could
not withstand. After Headley
hit a free throw, K. Thatcher
stole the ball twice in a row
for runouts, Lincolnview
rebounded a missed Hicksville
shot and hit C. Dye on a fast
break for two points, Springer
hit a turnaround jumper in
the lane and then it was back
to K. Thatcher again as K.
Dye threaded the needle on a
fast break for another bucket.
Just that fast, the Lancers had
jumped out to a 36-19 lead that
did nothing but extend from
there on out. Headley was the
only Ace to score in
the quarter, three points,
and Lincolnview was
up 42-21 going into the
final period.
Williamson called off the
pressure in the fourth quar-
ter and the Lancers worked on
their half-court sets, using the
post players consistently and
even adding in a 3-pointer from
K. Dye. Hicksville finally hit
their only shot outside of eight
feet when Hannah Jurick nailed
a shot from the elbow with
about a minute remaining.
Williamson said all the
turnovers they forced really
fueled the Lancers’ offensive
effort, as did a nice job on the
boards by the entire team.
“The first half we couldn’t
hit any outside shots,” he
added. “But we were able to
convert (on the turnovers).
Then in the second half we
were able to get some continu-
ity and the shots fell. They do
a really good job, even though
we’re not big, of really getting
after it and rebounding and
using what size we do have,
boxing out and going after the
ball hard.”
Headley led the Aces with 19
points in the game. Hicksville
was 11-of-35 shooting (31.4%)
from the field, including an
0-for-3 effort from behind the
arc. They made 13-of-20 free-
throw attempts for 65 percent.
Kaylee Thatcher had 17
points to lead the Lancers while
K. Dye added 11. Lincolnview
was 24-of-57 (42.1%) from the
field with 1-of-4 3-point attempts
going in. The home team made
9-of-15 free throws for an even
60 percent.
Lincolnview won the bat-
tle of the boards 33-29, with
senior Morgan Peel coming off
the bench to grab 10 caroms,
while Brant added seven in her
limited duty.
Jurick led all rebounders
with 11 for the Aces. The
Lancers pressure defense paid
off in the turnover totals as
well, forcing 36 Hicksville
miscues while only giving up
the ball 22 times, just eight
in the second half including
bench-clearing time.
Lincolnview is now 2-0 on
the season while Hicksville
falls to 0-2.
The Lady Lancer junior
varsity won as well, 38-13, to
go to 2-0 on the year.
The Lancers host Ottoville
1 p.m. (JV start) Saturday.
Score by Quarters:
Hicksville 9 9 3 14 - 35
Lincolnview 14 12 16 18 - 60
Hicksville - Jurick 2-0-4,
Hablawetz 0-0-0, Kinney 2-1-5, Burris
0-0-0, Gonwick 0-5-5, Schroeder
0-0-0, Mundy 0-0-0, Headley 6-7-19,
Smazenko 1-0-2. Totals 11-13-35.
Lincolnview - Miller 0-0-0, K.
Thatcher 8-1-17, Gorman 0-0-0, C. Dye
2-2-6, K. Dye 5-0-11, Stemen 0-4-4,
Peel 2-0-4, Brant 4-1-9, Springer 3-0-6,
J. Thatcher 1-1-3. Totals 25-9-60.
Three-pointers: Hicksville (0);
Lincolnview (1) - K. Dye.
JV score: 38-13 (Lincolnview).
Lancer girls trump
Aces in cage action
By Mallory Kemper
The Delphos Herald
mkemper2011@
hotmail.com

FORT SHAWNEE — The
Spencerville Lady Bearcats
girls basketball team traveled
to take on the Shawnee Indians
and couldn’t handle the Lady
Indians’ defensive pressure,
losing 78-37 Tuesday night.
The Lady Bearcats are 1-1,
while the Shawnee Indians are
1-0.
The Indians took a quick
11-2 lead with a steal and a
layin by senior Shantay Glenn.
Kaitlynn Gronas caused a
Bearcat turnover and scored
at the buzzer for a 22-7 first-
quarter lead.
The Indians forced
Spencerville into eight second-
quarter turnovers. Shawnee
used that defense to its advan-
tage and two quick back-to-
back baskets by Chrystena
Smith and Britt Lauck gave
the Indians a 39-12 lead with
3:48 left in the first half.
Glenn caused the Bearcats to
throw away the ball and Claire
Dahlke was left wide open on
the 3-point line and hit the shot
with 10 seconds left, giving
Shawnee a commanding 45-15
lead at halftime.
The Indians came out on
fire the third quarter with two
back-to-back field goals from
Lauck but the Bearcat offense
was sparked by a triple by
MacKenzie Miller.
The Indians took a 67-27
lead going into the fourth quar-
ter and didn’t look back as
they went on to win their first
game of the season.
“We are not a very big
team, so we have to focus on
our defense and getting up
and down the court quickly,”
Shawnee coach Jeff Heistan
said. “Defensively, we really
want to pressure the ball and
force teams to play a tempo
that they are not normally
comfortable with.”
Spencerville coach Katie
Krieg was unavailable for
comment.
Glenn and Smith led the
Shawnee offense with 15
points each. Lauck and Liz
Aller each ended with 11 points
and Stacey Sherrick had eight
points and eight rebounds.
Jenn Post and Schylar
Miller both had eight points
for the Lady Bearcats’ offense.
Miller and Abby Freewalt con-
tributed with five markers.
Shawnee won the junior
varsity contest 50-29.
Spencerville hosts Elida
Tuesday (6 p.m. JV start).
SPENCERVILLE (37)
Jenn Post 9, Schylar Miller 8,
Mackenzie Miller 5, Abby Freewalt 4,
Alyssa Mulholland 2, Kacie Mulholland
2, Emilee Meyer 4, Katie Merriman 3,
Cortney Miller 0, Tori Hardesty 0, Keri
Purdy 0, A. Crider 0.
SHAWNEE (78)
Shantay Glenn 15, Chrystena
Smith 15, Liz Aller 11, Britt Lauck 11,
Stacey Sherrick 8, Claire Dahlke 6,
Abby Waddle 5, Kaitlynn Gronas 2,
Isabelle Baird 3, Jaden Marlowe 2,
Score by Quarters:
Spencerville 7 8 12 10 - 37
Shawnee 22 23 22 11 - 78
Three-point goals: Spencerville,
M. Miller, Meyer; Shawnee, Aller 3,
Dahlke 2, Wadle.
JV score: 50-29 (Shawnee).
Shawnee defense turns over Lady Bearcats
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — The 2011 Associated Press
Divs. I-IV All-Ohio high school football teams,
based on recommendations of a state media
panel:
Division I
First Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Monty Madaris,
Cin. Moeller, 6-2, 190, sr.; Cameron Kavan,
Mentor, 5-10, 170, sr.; Marcus Davis, Dublin
Coffman, 5-10, 175, sr.. Linemen—Jacoby
Boren, Pickerington Central, 6-3, 285, sr.; Pat
Elflein, Pickerington North, 6-3, 285, sr.; A.J.
Williams, Cin. Sycamore, 6-6, 275, sr.; Billy Price,
Austintown Fitch, 6-4, 287, sr.; Storm Norton,
Tol. Whitmer, 6-8, 300, sr. Quarterbacks—Mitch
Trubisky, Mentor, 6-3, 195, jr.; Tyler Foster,
Canton McKinley, 6-3, 184, sr. Backs—Brandon
Schen, Lewis Ctr. Olentangy Orange, 5-11, 190,
sr.; Jody Webb, Tol. Whitmer, 5-8, 165, sr.;
Jack Snowball, Wadsworth, 6-0, 211, sr.; Conor
Hundley, Cin. St. Xavier, 5-10, 205, sr.; Bri’onte
Dunn, Canton GlenOak, 6-1, 221, sr.; Kareem
Hunt, Willoughby South, 5-10, 180, jr. Kicker—
Tim Shenk, Cleve. St. Ignatius, 5-10, 165, sr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Sam Coles, Hilliard
Davidson, 5-11, 190, sr.; Chris Wormley, Tol.
Whitmer, 6-7, 270, sr.; Se’Von Pittman, Canton
McKinley, 6-5, 262, sr.; Kevin Kavalec, Cleve. St.
Ignatius, 6-3, 225, jr.; Bryson Albright, Cin. St.
Xavier, 6-5, 215, sr.; Tom Strobel, Mentor, 6-6,
255, sr. Linebackers—Joe Bolden, Cin. Colerain,
6-3, 225, sr.; Dawhawn Hall, Canton GlenOak,
6-0, 210, sr.; Joe Burger, Cin. La Salle, 6-2, 230,
sr.; Ben Gedeon, Hudson, 6-2, 220, jr.; Nick
Davidson, Solon, 5-8, 190, sr.; Kent Kern, Tol.
St. John’s, 6-1, 225, sr.; Kurt Laseak, Mentor,
6-4, 220, sr. Backs—Mike Svetina, Cleve.
St. Ignatius, 6-2, 220, sr.; Andre Jones, Cin.
Colerain, 6-1, 195, sr.; Jermaine Edmondson,
Canton McKinley, 6-2, 166, sr.; De’Van Bogart,
Cleve. Glenville, 6-1, 195, sr.; Mark Meyers,
Tol. Whitmer, 6-1, 180, sr.; Allen Gant, Sylvania
Southview, 6-2, 211, sr. Punter—Brandon Smith,
Tol. St. John’s, 6-0, 193, sr.
Offensive players of the year: Jack Snowball,
Wadsworth; Mitch Trubisky, Mentor.
Defensive players of the year: Chris Wormley,
Tol. Whitmer; Mike Svetina, Cleve. St. Ignatius.
Coaches of the year: John Magistro,
Westerville Central; Mark Ritzler, Findlay.
Division II
First Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Kyle Nowlin, Cin. Harrison,
6-0, 205, sr.; Robby Buckwald, Lodi Cloverleaf,
6-1, 190, jr.; Matt Eckhardt, Avon, 5-11, 185,
sr.. Linemen—Damon Dillard, Cols. Marion-
Franklin, 6-5, 345, jr.; Taylor Decker, Vandalia-
Butler, 6-8, 315, sr.; Anthony Stanko, Warren
Howland, 6-5, 290, sr.; Troy Watson, Aurora,
6-6, 285, sr; Mike Brown, Sandusky, 6-3, 272,
sr. Quarterbacks—Corry Benson, Cols. Marion-
Franklin, 6-0, 187, jr.; Nathan Stock, Dresden
Tri-Valley, 6-3, 185, jr.; Justin O’Rourke, Avon,
5-10, 165, sr.; Jake Schneider, Maumee, 5-10,
175, sr.; Tra Chapman, Kent Roosevelt, 6-2,
200, jr.; Michael Simpson, Trotwood-Madison,
6-3, 205, sr. Backs—Fred Lee, Cols. West, 5-5,
145, sr.; Israel Green, Trotwood-Madison, 5-9,
200, jr.; Aregeros Turner, Copley, 5-11, 180, jr.;
Connor Pickens, Wapakoneta, 6-0, 215, sr.
Kickers—Jimmy Gammill, New Albany, 6-1, 180,
sr.; Ross Martin, Cuyahoga Falls Walsh Jesuit,
5-10, 183, sr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Terrell Jackson, Cols.
Marion-Franklin, 6-3, 271, sr.; Micah Carter,
Perrysburg, 5-9, 230, sr.; Jimmy Rousher,
Canfield, 6-3, 255, sr.; Jon Perrin, Tol. Cent.
Cath., 6-1, 305, jr. Linebackers—Dakota Hill,
New Philadelphia, 5-10 200, jr.; Billy Skerkavich,
Madison, 6-0, 205, sr.; Deon’tae Moore, Akron
Kenmore, 6-3, 205, jr.; Mike McCray, Trotwood-
Madison, 6-4, 230, jr. Backs—George “Bam”
Bradley, Trotwood-Madison, 6-2, 215, sr.; Troy
Robinson, Cols. Mifflin, 5-9, 165, sr.; Cameron
Burrows, Trotwood-Madison, 6-1, 190, jr.; Taurice
Scott, Alliance, 5-10, 165, sr.; Alex Kocheff,
Chagrin Falls Kenston, 5-11, 180, sr. Punter—
Anthony Melchiori, Aurora, 6-0, 190, sr.
Offensive player of the year: Michael
Simpson, Trotwood-Madison.
Defensive players of the year: Billy Skerkavich,
Madison; Deon’tae Moore, Akron Kenmore.
Coaches of the year: Chris McFarland,
Norwalk; Andy Olds, Kings Mills Kings.
Division III
First Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Dwayne Stanford, Cin.
Taft, 6-4, 205, sr.; Jordan Hargrove, Akron SVSM,
6-2, 185, jr.; Austin Etzler, Elida, 6-1, 190, sr.
Linemen—Max Pollom, Plain City Jonathan Alder,
6-7, 330, sr.; Terry Davis, Cin. Wyoming, 6-4,
205, sr.; Zach Higgins, Alliance Marlington, 6-5,
290, sr.; Austin Trgovcich, Youngs. Mooney, 6-3,
290, sr.; Joel Schilke, Springfield Shawnee, 6-4,
285, sr. Quarterbacks—David Fraley, Granville,
6-0, 175, jr.; Nick Merrick, Uhrichsville Claymont,
6-3, 225, sr.; Austin Osborne, Jackson, 5-11,
201, sr.; Reggie McAdams, Elida, 6-6, 195,
sr.; Kyle Smith, Oberlin Firelands, 5-10, 160,
sr.; Brad Jarzab, Spring. Shawnee, 5-10, 190,
sr. Backs—D.J. Jones, Ravenna, 5-10, 193,
sr.; Warren Ball, Cols. DeSales, 6-2, 215, sr.;
Dashaun Lewis, Cambridge, 6-0, 215, sr.; Denzel
Norvell, Day. Thurgood Marshall, 5-8, 165, jr.;
Alden Hill, Alliance Marlington, 6-2, 225, sr.; Nick
Deichler, Oberlin Firelands, 6-2, 245, sr.; Brad
Smith, Clyde, 5-8, 180, jr. Kicker—Nick Smith,
Plain City Jonathan Alder, 5-8, 140, jr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Adolphus Washington,
Cin. Taft, 6-4, 260, sr.; John Stepec, Mentor
Lake Cath., 6-3, 230, jr.; Aaron Melsop, Cols.
DeSales, 6-1, 195, sr.; Lucas Sparks, Spring.
Shawnee, 6-2, 220, sr.; Greg McMullen, Akron
Hoban, 6-5, 255, sr.; Mike Tozzi, Chagrin Falls,
6-2, 225, sr.; Luke Lyden, Bellevue, 6-4, 250, sr.
Linebackers—Craig Fada, Cols. Watterson, 6-1,
215, sr.; Mitch Rider, The Plains Athens, 6-1, 220,
sr.; Thomas Glick, Clyde, 6-1, 225, jr.; Courtney
Love, Youngs. Mooney, 6-2, 225, jr.; Quentin
Poling, Elida, 6-0, 205, jr. Backs—Najee Murray,
Steubenville, 5-11, 178, sr.; Dymonte Thomas,
Alliance Marlington, 6-1, 185, jr.; Jarrod Wilson,
Akron Buchtel, 6-3, 190, sr. Punter—Colin
Reardon, Poland Seminary, 6-1, 200, sr.
Offensive players of the year: Reggie
McAdams, Elida; Brad Jarzab, Spring.
Shawnee.
Defensive players of the year: Adolphus
Washington, Cin. Taft; Courtney Love, Youngs.
Mooney; Najee Murray, Steubenville.
Coach of the year: Ryan Adams, The Plains
Athens.
Third Team
OFFENSE: Kicker—Nathan Jenkins, Elida,
5-11, 170, sr.
Special Mention
Chance Weitz and Anthony Sumpter, Elida;
Seth Rosebauer.
Division IV
First Team
OFFENSE: Ends—Stewart Turner, Orrville,
5-10, 170, sr.; Jon Maibach, Creston Norwayne,
6-2, 175, sr.; Justin Sawmiller, Kenton, 6-1,
165, soph. Linemen—Isaiah Blevins, Richwood
N. Union, 6-4, 230, jr.; Jared Salisbury,
Clarksville Clinton-Massie, 6-6, 325, sr.; Tony
Matteo, Akron Manchester, 6-4, 285, sr.; Kris
Hayward, Pemberville Eastwood, 5-11, 204, sr.
Quarterbacks—Trent Williamson, Williamsport
Westfall, 5-10, 200, jr.; Luke Creditt, Waynesville,
6-2, 200, sr.; Maty Mauk, Kenton, 6-2, 185, sr.;
Adam Wallace, Creston Norwayne, 6-2, 205, sr.
Backs—Ross Franklin, Johnstown-Monroe, 6-0,
200, sr.; Tyrell Simmons, Martins Ferry, 6-3, 188,
sr.; Jeremy Simmons, Gates Mills Hawken, 5-11,
205, sr. Kickers—Brent Wahle, Cols. Hartley,
6-2, 185, sr.; Tyler Pickard, Genoa, 5-11, 195,
sr.
DEFENSE: Linemen—Nick SanFillipo,
Johnstown-Monroe, 5-9, 255, sr.; John Guilford,
Sullivan Black River, 6-4, 215, sr.; Jon Zimmerly,
Creston Norwayne, 5-8, 186, jr.; Isaac Jeffers,
Kenton, 6-4, 235, jr. Linebackers—Ja’Wuan
Woodley, Cols. Hartley, 5-10, 220, jr.; Darrien
Howard, Day. Chaminade-Julienne, 6-2, 245,
jr.; Patrick Dillon, Wickliffe, 5-10, 215, sr.; Gabe
King, Kenton, 6-1, 215, sr.; Mason Monheim,
Orrville, 6-1, 217, sr. Backs—Jared Marhefka,
St. Clairsville, 6-0, 160, jr.; Michael Lawless,
Ironton, 5-10, 160, sr.; Marco Gresham, Day.
Chaminade-Julienne, 5-8, 165, sr.; Devin Green,
Canton Cent. Cath., 6-4, 215, sr.; Matt Jordan,
Lorain Clearview, 5-7, 175, sr.; Brice Fackler,
Kenton, 6-4, 210, sr. Punter—Drew Brenner,
Orrville, 6-3, 195, sr.
Offensive player of the year: Maty Mauk,
Kenton.
Defensive player of the year: Ja’Wuan
Woodley, Cols. Hartley.
Coach of the year: Mike Carter, Johnstown-
Monroe.
AP ALL OHIO DIVS. I-IV
LOCAL ROUNDUP
T-Birds knock off Lady
Musketeers
FORT JENNINGS — For
three quarters Tuesday night,
it was an offensive struggle
for both the Lima Central
Catholic and Fort Jennings
girls basketball teams at The
Fort.
That change in the
finale as the visiting Lady
Thunderbirds dominated with
a 22-6 span to knock off
the Lady Musketeers (0-2)
47-34.
The Lady Musketeers led
28-25 after 24 minutes but
the Thunderbirds went wild
in the fourth.
Leading the way for the
visitors (2-1) were Stacia
Allen with 18 (4 bombs) and
Kelly Ahman 10.
Gabbi German paced the
hosts with 10.
The Musketeers host
Bluffton 1 p.m. Saturday.
LIMA CENT. CATH. (47)
Meredith Shepherd 1-0-2, Kelly
Ahman 3-4-10, Tylyn Taylor 3-0-6,
Shelby Warner 1-0-2, Madison George
1-0-2, Lexi Kingsbery 2-3-7, Stacia
Allen 6-2-18. Totals 17-9-47.
FORT JENNINGS (34)
Kaitlin Stechschulte 0-0-0, Kristen
Maag 0-0-0, Morgan Schroeder 4-0-8,
Macy Schroeder 4-0-8, Kelsey Von
Lehmden 3-0-6, Ashley Gable 1-0-
2, Cassie Lindeman 0-0-0, Gabbie
German 5-0-10, Gina Stechschulte
0-0-0. Totals 17-0-34.
Score by Quarters:
Lima Cent. Cath. 2 14 9 22 - 47
Fort Jennings 10 8 10 6 - 34
Three-point goals: Lima CC, Allen
4; Fort Jennings, none.
JV score: 39-21 (LCC).
----
Bulldogs bounce Bears
DOLA — Columbus
Grove outscored host Hardin
Northern 21-9 in the fourth
period to bounce the Lady
Polar Bears 54-41 Tuesday.
Nikki Stechschulte’s dou-
ble-double (13 markers, 11
boards) and Anna Ricker’s 19
points, seven caroms and five
dimes led the Lady Bulldogs
(1-0). Renee Karhoff added
12 boards for the Bulldogs,
who shot 10-of-43 from the
floor (5-of-21 from 3) for 23
percent and 19-of-26 from
the line (73%), grabbing 39
rebounds and totaling 12 mis-
cues.
Molly Hipsher dropped
in 20 points for the Bears
(0-1) and added five boards
and Kaylee Hooker had
13 and five, respectively.
Olivia Sampson added eight
rebounds (29 team total). HN
canned 5-of-33 shots (7-of-
17 long range) for 24 percent
and 10-of-18 singles (56%),
adding 15 turnovers.
Grove won the junior var-
sity contest 32-18.
Grove hosts Continental
6 p.m. Tuesday to open PCL
play.
COLUMBUS GROVE (54)
Anna Ricker 3-10-19, Brooke
Brubaker 1-0-3, Cece Utendorf 1-0-
2, Nikki Stechschulte 4-5-13, Renee
Karhoff 2-1-5, Breanne Halker 1-0-2,
Sydney McCluer 3-0-7, Megan Verhoff
0-0-0, Katelyn Scott 0-3-3, Rachel
Schumacher 0-0-0, Tessa Diller 0-0-0.
Totals 15-19-54.
HARDIN NORTHERN (41)
Molly Hipsher 5-6-20, Kaylee
Hooker 5-0-13, Lindsay Whalen 0-1-
1, Carlie Doll 0-1-1, Kylee Hooker
0-1-1, Olivia Sampson 2-1-5. Totals
12-10-41.
Score by Quarters:
Columbus Grove 20 4 9 21 - 54
Hardin Northern 2 14 16 9 - 41
Three-point goals: Columbus
Grove, Ricker 3, Brubaker, McCluer;
Hardin Northern, Hipsher 4, Ka.
Hooker 3.
JV score: 32-18 (Columbus
Grove).
Wednesday, November 30, 2011 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
The Delphos Optimist Club held its annual 5th/6th-grade volleyball tournament
recently.
Ottoville 6th Grade won 1st place: Bridget Landin, Emily Landin, Julia Langhals, Abi
Hilvers, CJ Kemper, Bethany Maag and McKayla Miller.
Ottawa SPPS 6th
Grade 2nd Place:
Kendra Kahle, Jessie
Huhlman, Lillian
Si efker, Jami e
Ellerbrock, Camryn
Fortnan, Carly Alt,
Avery Ross, Haley
Schroeder, Morgan
Maag and Sydney
Heitmeyer.
Columbus Grove St. Anthony 6th Grade 3rd Place: Lauren Birkemeier, Taylor
Ellerbrock, Kayla Reynolds, Lauren Schroeder, Marissa Smith, Brooke Silver, Carlee
McCluer, Hannah Roof and Coach Jeri Reynolds.
Delphos St. John’s (Rode) 6th Grade 4th Place: Kylee Reynolds, Ellie Csukker,
Mykenah Jackson, Sara Zalar, Allie Buettner, Haley Rode, Hannah Benavidez, Jessica
Odenweller, Kennedy Clarkson and Olivia Buettner.
Delphos St. John’s (Hodgson) 6th Grade – Sportsmanship Award: Abby Stocksdale,
Brooke Hodgson, Annette Klausing, Katie Pohlman, Kayla Schimmoeller, Sarah Miller,
Hannah Bockey, Holly Krites, Katilyn Brenneman and Madison Ellis.
1st place — 5th Grade — Delphos St. John’s (Hellman - Absent in picture is Aaron
McClurg): Allison McClurg, Kylee Moenter, Rachel Hellman, Sara Closson, Alaina
Thorton, Abby Bonifas, Anna May, Ayron McClurg and Hannah Elwer.
Sportsmanship award and 2nd place –5th Grade — Delphos St. John’s (Hays): Hallie
Hays, Kenzee Reynolds, Taylor Zuber, Morgan Bonifas, Abby Buettner, Alli Kramer,
Courtney Teman, Emily Ostendorf and Leah Hays.
3rd place – 5th Grade — Columbus Grove St. Anthony’s: Madison Wiseman, Sydney
Witteborg, Alyssa Ellerbrock, Amy Vorst, Addison Bonnell, Lauren Diehl, Grace
Morman and Renee Schroeder.
OPTIMIST VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT
Photos submitted
2
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8 — The Herald Wednesday, November 30, 2011
BUSINESS
www.delphosherald.com
Dear Bruce: My girlfriend
and I plan to get married. She
has a condo that is “upside
down” and is possibly doing
a “short sale.” Are there any
advantages/disadvantages to
doing this after being married?
We live in California. -- Lance,
via email
Dear Lance: I see no
advantage -- and some very
definite disadvantages -- to
waiting until after being
married to do a short sale.
The chief disadvantage is that
once you are married (even
though your finances may be
separate), it’s possible that
negotiating a short sale can
reflect on your credit as well
as your fiancee’s. If your
credit is already down the
drain, I suppose it doesn’t
matter much. I would get it
done before the nuptials.
Dear Bruce: I have been
married for 28 years. My
husband is in an assisted-
living facility. He is 89 years
old and receives $1,461 a
month from Social Security.
I am 81 years old and living
independently in a city about
150 miles from him. I receive
$734 a month from Social
Security. Unfortunately, I
started drawing early at age
62, because at that time my
husband encouraged me to.
I’m disabled and considering
moving to an assisted-living
facility because of my health.
Please tell me whether there
is any way I can change my
options to draw against my
husband’s benefits. My rent is
much more than my monthly
income, and I need help. --
Jeanne, via email
Dear Jeannie: When
you started collecting Social
Security at the earlier date, you
received a reduced benefit.
If you live long enough (as
you have), you reach a point
where that didn’t work to your
advantage, but there is no way
of knowing in advance.
It’s possible you can have
your account re-examined.
You may be eligible to collect
under your husband’s account
number, which could result in
a higher monthly statement.
Unhappily, the only way that
I know to determine this is to
either write to or visit a Social
Security office in your area.
There is no right answer
to your question. All the
variables, such as how much
you made and how much he
made, will determine if your
monthly Social Security could
be increased. Yes, this could
be done on the telephone or
computer, but my experience
tells me that you are far better
off investing the time to talk
to someone in person. It may
take a couple of trips, but it
is better to talk to one of the
representatives eyeball to
eyeball. I wish you well.
Dear Bruce: I am a
47-year-old schoolteacher, no
kids and never married. I have
been out of debt for several
months. I have about $15,000
in liquid assets and $12,000
in my emergency fund. I
have $20,000 in my nonliquid
403(b) accounts, $5,000 or
so in mutual funds and a
small Roth IRA that I just
started. I have another $6,000
in surrender value in a life
insurance policy. My income
is $60,000 a year. Being out
of debt, I believe I am finally
able to create a situation
where I can build enough
wealth over the next 10 to 15
years (including my pension)
to achieve financial security.
One thing that several people
told me I am wrong about is
using homeownership as a
powerful way to build wealth.
I have never owned my own
home. Circumstances over the
years have prevented me from
being in the market.
I have been renting a
house for several years now,
and it has been a good deal.
I pay reasonable rent, plus
all utilities, water, sewer and
fire charges. I will at some
point have an opportunity to
buy this place. At my age,
I believe it is a bad idea for
me to saddle myself with
the costs of owning a home.
It will not only put me into
substantial debt, but it will
also increase my monthly
costs dramatically. I expect to
live in this house until I die. I
will never be able to see the
equity/cash in the house. It
may or may not generate over
time. In this economy, the
house values will not rise in
the next 20 years
the way they have the past.
Am I missing something
here? If I were 25 years old,
this would be different. The
house would be almost paid
off by now. -- Lee, via email
Dear Lee: An entire
generation of people has never
seen large hiccups in the real
estate market. The idea was
that homeownership was
the best way to build family
wealth. While that might have
been true, it is clearly not the
correct way to increase your
worth. If you’re going to
buy a home, your motivation
should be enjoyment in life,
not profit. It would appear you
are in a home you like, you are
renting for a reasonable rate
and the home will continue
to be available. If all of those
assumptions are correct, then
why in the world would you
want to buy? There is little
question that over a period
of time, the difference you
would pay owning a home,
paying a mortgage, paying
for major maintenance, etc.,
would appreciate nowhere
near as quickly as long-
term investments in the
marketplace. I am sure you
can find exceptions to this.
If you wish to secure the
home so you can be assured
that you can live there, and
if there is some question that
it might go away if you don’t
purchase it, that’s one thing.
But looking at your situation
from a straight numbers
point of view, I believe you
are doing very well, and I
wouldn’t upset that.
Send your questions
to Smart Money, P.O. Box
2095, Elfers, Fla. 34680,
or send e-mail to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions
of general interest will be
answered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot be
provided.
BRUCE WILLIAMS
Smart
Money
Short-sale wait could lead to wedded bliss

Description Last Price Change
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NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,515.51 -11.83
S&P 500 INDEX 1,195.19 +2.64
AUTOZONE INC. 323.43 +3.92
BUNGE LTD 60.50 -0.21
EATON CORP. 42.37 +0.04
BP PLC ADR 41.00 +0.18
DOMINION RES INC 50.85 +0.74
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 36.26 +0.47
CVS CAREMARK CRP 37.68 +0.30
CITIGROUP INC 25.24 +0.19
FIRST DEFIANCE 14.20 -0.03
FST FIN BNCP 14.88 -0.25
FORD MOTOR CO 9.99 -0.01
GENERAL DYNAMICS 63.89 -0.17
GENERAL MOTORS 20.31 -0.43
GOODYEAR TIRE 12.81 -0.09
HEALTHCARE REIT 48.48 -0.19
HOME DEPOT INC. 38.96 +1.95
HONDA MOTOR CO 30.32 +0.44
HUNTGTN BKSHR 4.86 +0.02
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 62.78 +0.41
JPMORGAN CHASE 28.56 -0.60
KOHLS CORP. 52.66 +0.38
LOWES COMPANIES 24.30 +0.94
MCDONALDS CORP. 93.46 +0.40
MICROSOFT CP 24.84 -0.03
PEPSICO INC. 63.66 +0.67
PROCTER & GAMBLE 62.53 +0.29
RITE AID CORP. 1.17 -0.01
SPRINT NEXTEL 2.50 +0.05
TIME WARNER INC. 33.38 +0.07
US BANCORP 24.61 -0.11
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VERIZON COMMS 36.63 +0.38
WAL-MART STORES 58.17 +0.92
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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business Nov. 29, 2011
Europe delays major debt decisions for 10 days
By GREG KELLER
The Associated Press
BRUSSELS — European
finance ministers failed to
deliver the broad outlines of
a plan to shore up the euro
today, delaying action until
their bosses meet in less than
a week and a half.
Though the meetings since
Tuesday have not yielded any-
thing concrete about what’s
likely to come out of the EU
leaders meeting on Dec. 9,
there’s growing speculation
that Europe is readying a plan
to make the 17 countries that
use the euro more unified
and ruled by stricter budget-
ary rules. That, analysts said,
could allow the European
Central Bank to take a more
central role in the crisis —
seen as crucial to stabilize the
debt crisis that’s seen three
countries already bailed out.
“The new mantra seems
to be ’Build it, and they will
lend,’ in the sense if they
promise the ECB that they
will gradually move to a fis-
cal union, the central bank
will buy sufficient amounts
of government bonds to sta-
bilise the market,” said Gary
Jenkins, chief economist
at Evolution Securities in
London.
Markets appear to be giv-
ing Europe the benefit of the
doubt for now especially after
the world’s leading central
banks said jointly they would
make it easier for banks to
get hold of the dollars they
may need.
The forbearance in the
markets is unlikely to last
long though, especially if the
summit next week fails to
match swelling expectations
of a much tighter eurozone.
The EU’s leading econom-
ic official said as much.
“We are now entering the
critical period of 10 days to
complete and conclude the cri-
sis response of the European
Union,” EU Monetary Affairs
Commissioner Olli Rehn
said.
today’s meeting in Brussels
has brought in the 10 non-
euro finance ministers from
the 27-nation EU, who have
been pressing hard for a swift
solution for fear that their
economies will suffer.
Sweden’s Anders Borg
said there was no more time
to waste and that the markets
don’t provide “any honey-
moons” for any countries that
stray from fiscal austerity. He
stressed that Spain and Italy
need to “take out all the skel-
etons” from their financial
closets and implement bud-
getary belt tightening mea-
sures.
Many economists say the
17 nations that use the euro
have little choice but to back
proposals for much closer
coordination of their spend-
ing and budget policies.
“If the eurozone is to sur-
vive, there needs to be more
fiscal union,” said Eswar
Prasad, an economics profes-
sor at Cornell University in
the state of New York.
For struggling economies,
this might be the necessary
price of survival. With such
discipline in place, the ECB
could then agree to make
major purchases of govern-
ment bonds from Europe’s
troubled countries. Doing so
could help lower their bor-
rowing costs and enable them
to finance their debts.
Potentially, the ECB has
unlimited financial firepower
through its ability to print
money. However, Germany
finds the idea of monetizing
debts unappealing, warning
that it lets the more profli-
gate countries off the hook
for their bad practices. In
addition, it conjures up bad
memories of hyperinflation in
Germany in the 1920s.
So far, the ECB has been
reluctant in taking on a big-
ger firefighting role as it may
let profligate countries off
the hook. Current rules only
allow it to buy up govern-
ment bonds in the markets
on condition that it drains an
equivalent amount of assets.
At a meeting Tuesday
night, finance ministers for
the 17 countries that use the
euro handed Greece a prom-
ised (euro) 8 billion ($10.7
billion) rescue loan to fend off
its immediate cash crisis and
promised to increase the fire-
power of a fund to help bail
out ailing eurozone countries.
The ministers also called
on the International Monetary
Fund for more resources to
help further protect Europe’s
embattled currency. The IMF
has only about $390 bil-
lion available to lend, which
wouldn’t be anywhere near
enough to rescue Italy.
Rubbermaid
center closing
in brand’s Ohio
hometown
WOOSTER (AP) — The
maker of Rubbermaid con-
tainers is closing a distribu-
tion center with more than
100 workers in the Ohio town
where the brand was founded.
Atlanta-based Newell
Rubbermaid Inc. said Tuesday
it plans to shut down the facil-
ity in Wooster by the end
of 2012. The company says
it will expand distribution
functions at its manufacturing
plant in Mogadore, about 30
miles away in northeast Ohio.
Spokesman David Doolittle
says it’s unclear if any of the
110 distribution center jobs
in Wooster will transfer to
Mogadore.
The Akron Beacon Journal
reports the closing will leave
only a retail store with 14
employees in Wooster, about
50 miles south of Cleveland.
Rubbermaid started there in
1920 as Wooster Rubber. The
company was acquired by
Newell 12 years ago.
Stocks leap on central banks’
coordinated action
The Associated Press
Stocks are soaring in early
trading after major central banks
acted to avert a credit crunch.
The central banks of
Europe, the U.S., Britain,
Canada, Japan and Switzerland
eased banks’ access to dollars
by reducing their borrowing
rates. The move responds to
fears that a European country
would default, touching off a
credit crunch similar to what
followed the 2008 collapse of
Lehman Brothers.
Banks need dollars to fund
their daily operations. Their
access dried up as U.S. money
market funds reduced their
lending to European banks.
The Dow Jones industrial
average is up 319, or 2.8 percent,
at 11,874 in early trading today.
The S&P 500 is up 32, or 2.7
percent, at 1,227. The Nasdaq is
up 70, or 2.8 percent, at 2,586.
Your New Best Friend.....
The FREE Consumer Ac-
tion Website — its got thou-
sands of links to companies
and government agencies —
the names, numbers, advice,
and connections you need to
get your wrongs righted.
Log on to www.pueblo.
gsa.gov. and click on the
FREE Consumer Action
Web Site.
www.pueblo.gsa.gov
Have a story idea?
email:
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In 1776, the Continental
Congress resolved to use the
name “United States” instead
of the previous “United
Colonies.”
1
CARING
SHARING
&
2011
CARING
SHARING
&
2011
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Wednesday, November 30, 2011 The Herald — 9
www.delphosherald.com
How many shopping days
until Christmas? You have
plenty of time to make some
gifts for the children on
your list. Odds are you have
some of the supplies already.
Visit www.frugalvillage.
com/2009/08/21/easy-
homemade-gifts-for-kids/ for
some ideas.
Try these fun homemade
gifts:
Puppet theater: In a child’s
room, you can suspend a curtain
from a tension rod hung in a
doorway or a closet to make a
puppet theater. Make puppets
by removing some filling from
stuffed animals that have been
forgotten. Simple puppets can
be made from paper bags,
socks, gloves or felt, too.
Suitcases: Kids can use a
suitcase as a dress-up box or
to hold activity books. One
reader, Debbi from New
Jersey, shares: “Pick up an old
hard-sided suitcase at a yard
sale or thrift store. Decoupage
pictures on the side to give
it a theme. I did this for my
daughter to hold her American
Girl dolls and accesories. You
can also create a personalized
suitcase to hold Legos or for
craft or scrapbook supplies,
especially if you find an older
suitcase that has the little
interior pockets.”
Old sheets: Use a sheet to
create an indoor hopscotch
course or a checkerboard
game. Milk caps or pompoms
make fun game pieces.
Yarn surprise ball: A creative
way to wrap and give a small
gift or money is to wind yarn
around it. These work well
for Secret Santa gifts for co-
workers or to have on hand for
any last-minute gifts. You can
embellish the outside with a
jingle bell, silk flower or gift
tag that tells the recipient to
unwind the ball. Hang them
from your Christmas tree, tuck
them into stockings, give them
as party favors or use them as
place-card holders. You can
use crepe paper streamers
instead of yarn, too.
Reindeer fudge: Another
reader, Denise from Illinois,
shares tips for a fun holiday
treat: “Make fudge as usual
and pour it into a circular pie
pan. Cut the fudge into pie-
shaped wedges (like a pizza)
and wrap each wedge with
plastic wrap. Leave extra wrap
at the top and tie each corner
with curling ribbon to form
antlers. Glue two googly eyes
on the wedge and add a red
pompom at the bottom for the
nose.” You can also make the
antlers using chenille stems.
Root-beer reindeer: Buy root
beer or any bottled beverage
such as cola, apple juice,
Frappucino, etc. Twist pipe
cleaner antlers just below the
bottle cap, add a red pompom
nose, wiggle eyes and a thin
piece of fleece as a scarf. These
make quick, cute gifts and
can be given in the root-beer
carton or individually. You can
place the bottles on their sides
and make the bottlenecks and
bottle caps the noses of the
reindeer, too. Add a pompom
nose to the bottle cap. Glue on
wiggle eyes and wrap chenille
stems to form antlers.
Pillows: Turn a T-shirt inside
out and sew the bottom and
sleeve openings closed. Turn
the shirt right-side out, stuff
it and sew the top opening
closed. Or cut the body of
the shirt and use it to create a
square-shaped pillow.
You can make a pillow
snowman using a white
pillowcase stuffed with polyfill.
Sew the opening to close or
use double-sided sticky Velcro
so it can be washed easily. Tie
a scarf around the pillowcase
one-third of the way down to
form the body. Add a winter hat
and use glue to attach wiggle,
button, pompom or fabric-
paint eyes and a felt nose.
(Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a website
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas
City, MO, 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage.com.)
Give homemade gifts to kids
SARA NOEL
Frugal
Living
By NEKESA MUMBI
MOODY
The Associated Press
She likely won’t get “21,”
but Adele is poised to take
the biggest bulk of nods when
the Grammy nominations are
announced tonight.
The British singer-song-
writer has had a great year,
thanks to her sophomore
album, “21.” The mournful
album about a failed relation-
ship is the year’s best-selling
disc with over 4.5 million
copies sold. It has resulted in
two smash singles, “Rolling
in the Deep” and “Someone
Like You.”
The Recording Academy
will likely add to Adele’s
achievements. She is a strong
contender to get bids for album
of the year and for song and/
or record of the year for the
searing groove “Rolling in
the Deep.”
But she’s not the only favor-
ite for top nominations. Taylor
Swift’s multiplatinum “Speak
Now” is a possible contender
for album of the year, as is
Tony Bennett’s “Duets II,”
which marked the 85-year-
old’s first album to debut at
No. 1, making him the oldest
artist to achieve that feat.
Lady Gaga’s “Born This
Way,” which had the year’s
biggest debut with 1.1 mil-
lion albums sold in its first
week, could become her third
straight disc to be nominated
for album of the year. She was
cited for “The Fame Monster”
this year and for her debut,
“The Fame,” in 2010.
Then there’s Kanye West.
His “My Beautiful Dark
Twisted Fantasy” was one
of the most highly regarded
albums of 2010, and is eli-
gible for a nomination for
album of the year. So is his
collaboration with Jay-Z for
“Watch the Throne,” another
contender in the category.
A handful of the nomi-
nations are scheduled to be
revealed during the fourth
annual Grammy nominations
concert special, to air live
from the Nokia Theatre in Los
Angeles on CBS at 10 p.m.
EST. Lady Gaga is slated to
open and close the show.
Other performers include
Katy Perry, who could get a
record of the year nomina-
tion for her hit “Firework”;
Rihanna, who could snag
a few nominations, includ-
ing album of the year for
“Loud”; and The Band Perry,
the country sibling trio likely
to be up for best new artist.
(Another strong contender for
that category, Nicki Minaj, is
scheduled to be a presenter on
the special.)
The Band Perry, at rehears-
als Tuesday night, were hope-
ful about getting a nomina-
tion.
“Our fingers are crossed.
We kinda don’t like to think
too much about that kind of
stuff on nights before nomina-
tions. We don’t want to be a
bad luck charm. I’ll tell you
what, it would be the cherry
on top of a really wonderful
year,” said Kimberly Perry.
“We actually just today got
the news that we’ve been cer-
tified platinum. We’ve been
high-fiving and celebrating all
day. If we were honored to be
nominated for best new artist,
we would definitely be cel-
ebrating two days in a row.”
This year’s nominations
will mark the newly trimmed
Grammys. Earlier this year,
amid some protests, the acad-
emy cut the number of cat-
egories from 109 to 78. Some
of the more niche categories,
like best Zydeco or Cajun
music album, were eliminated.
In addition, men and women
will now compete together
in vocal categories for pop,
R&B and country, instead of
having separate categories for
each sex.
The 54th annual Grammy
Awards will be presented
Feb. 12 in Los Angeles, and
will be telecast live on CBS.
By DONNA BRYSON
The Associated Press
HENLEY- ON- KLI P,
South Africa — Mpumi
Nobiva was raised by her
grandmother in a neighbor-
hood beset by poverty and
crime after her mother died
of AIDS. Now one of the
first to graduate from Oprah
Winfrey’s school, she is
headed to college in North
Carolina.
Winfrey spent $40 million
to give her girls a campus
with computer and science
labs, a library and a wellness
center. None paid tuition. The
students are high-achievers,
often from communities
where schools are struggling
to overcome the legacy of
apartheid.
And as the South African
school year nears its end, all
72 members of the school’s
first graduating class have
been accepted to universities
in South Africa or the United
States. More than a dozen
have received full scholar-
ships.
Winfrey told her students
that when you teach a girl,
you teach a nation.
“The first class, my class,
will prove that,” said Nobiva,
18, who will study visual and
performing arts at Johnson C.
Smith University in Charlotte,
North Carolina.
Winfrey will be at the
school for graduation ceremo-
nies in January, school offi-
cials said today as students
gathered to reflect on their
experiences over the last five
years.
The school that has drawn
sometimes harsh attention
because of the celebrity who
founded it, and also because
of early problems.
Students have been accused
of being spoiled. Allegations
that a woman employed to
care for the girls in their dor-
mitory had instead abused
teens were the subject of
headlines around the world.
The woman was acquitted last
year.
Adele may be rolling deep
with Grammy nominations
1st class graduates from Winfrey school
Adele
By KAREN MATTHEWS
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Veteran
stand-up comic Patrice
O’Neal, who gained a wider
following through TV and
radio and helped roast Charlie
Sheen, died Tuesday from
complications of a stroke he
suffered last month. He was
41.
O’Neal’s manager,
Jonathan Brandstein, said he
died in a New York-area hos-
pital.
“Many of us have lost a
close and loved friend; all
of us have lost a true comic
genius,” Brandstein said in a
statement.
O’Neal appeared on
Conan O’Brien’s and David
Letterman’s TV shows and
was a frequent guest on the
“Opie & Anthony” radio
show on Sirius XM. His per-
formance was a highlight of
the Comedy Central roast of
Sheen, who had been fired
from the hit CBS comedy
“Two and a Half Men,” in
September.
Sheen said in a tweet
Tuesday, “The entertainment
world as well as the world at
large lost a brilliant man.”
He added, “Patrice had that
rare ‘light’ around him and
inside of him. I only knew
him for the few days leading
up the Roast. Yet I will for-
ever be inspired by his nobil-
ity, his grace and his epic
talent. My tears today are for
the tremendous loss to his true
friends and loving family.”
Other entertainers also
mourned O’Neal on Twitter.
“RIP Patrice O’Neal. You
made us laugh til we cried,”
comedian Sarah Silverman
said.
Actor Jay Mohr said, “Just
heard. Goodnight broth-
er. Damn. Just ridiculous.
Terrible. Beyond sad.”
Comedian Patrice O’Neal dies, had suffered stroke
10 – The Herald Wednesday, November 30, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
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*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
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419-453-3620
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• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
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AT YOUR
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ervice
MACHINING SUPERVISOR
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast
aluminum wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Met-
als America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfac-
tion has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23
years of steady employment. We now have an opportunity for a Production
Supervisor to oversee the operation of a multi-shift production department.
Responsibilities of this position include:
• Plan and direct the work of other supervisory, technical, and production
associates
• Develop process and equipment specifications, operating procedures,
and safe and efficient work methods
• Use standard production measurement and problem-solving tools to
analyze production results, prepare reports, and implement preventive
and corrective actions as needed
• Collaborate with other production groups, and quality assurance,
purchasing, and maintenance functions to ensure product quality,
efficient use of resources, machine utilization, etc.
The successful candidate must have at least five years of supervisory ex-
perience--preferably in a multi-shift manufacturing function. Exposure to
programming and operation of high-volume CNC cutting operations, and
robotic parts handling is strongly preferred. Related four-year degree is also
preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-
sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vi-
sion, and disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company
matching, paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a
career opportunity with a growing company, please forward your qualifica-
tions and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources-DK
19176 Venedocia-Eastern Rd., Venedocia
$0 down, $0 closing, home warranty.
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central air and more! A must see country home. $89,900.
Approx. monthly payment -
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482.60
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OPEN
HOUSE
Dawn to Dusk Fri., Sat. & Sun.
Sales:
Mon. 8 am-8 pm
Tues.-Fri.
8 am-6:00 pm
Sat. 9:00 am-2:30 pm
419-692-0055
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
Service
Parts
Body Shop
Mon. 7:30-8 pm;
Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri.
7:30-6;
Sat. 9:00-2:00
www.raabeford.com
CONVENIENT HOURS
TO GIVE YOU THE
BEST IN CUSTOMER
SERVICE!
005

Lost & Found
FOUND: BLACK male lab
about 1 yr. old. Found in
N. Clay St. area Sat.,
11/26, wearing a blue &
bl ack col l ar . Cal l
(567)242-3069.
010

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Announcements
DELPHOS
RADIO SHACK
DELPHOS POWER
EQUIPMENT
OPEN
Mon. thru Fri. 12-5
419-692-4691
40-75
%
off
All Merchandise
Shop early for
Christmas!
902 Elida Ave.
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
CONCRETE, STEEL
erection & carpentry work-
ers needed. Health bene-
fits, 401K. Send resume to
Alexander & Bebout, Inc.,
10098 Lincoln Hwy., Van
Wert, OH 45891. E.O.E.
NOW HIRING kitchen
help. Previous experience
required. Apply at Joey
Fratello’s, 126 N. Main,
Delphos between 3pm &
5pm.
PART-TIME office help
needed. Office duties in-
clude filing, multi-line
phones, mail, and other
misc. tasks. Microsoft
Word/Excel experience
preferred. Send replies to
Box 160 c/o Delphos Her-
ald, 405 N. Main St., Del-
phos, OH 45833
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN
pillow-top mattress set,
can deliver $125. Call
(260)267-9079.
340

Garage Sales
AVON CHRISTMAS Open
House and Garage Sale.
Clothes, misc. Nov. 25-27,
Dec. 2-4, 9am-? 11411
Ridge Road, Delphos.
510

Farm Equipment
FOR SALE: 10 IH Front
Suit Case Tractor weights
each $80.00 or best offer.
419-796-0230. Ft. Jen -
nings.
550

Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS. 1 gray ti-
ger female and 2 black
males. Really need new
homes. 419-695-6284.
590

House For Rent
2 OR 3 BR House
with attached garage.
Available immediately!
Call 419-692-3951.
3 BDRM farm house West
of Delphos. Garage, hard-
wood floors, no pets. Call
419-692-2878.
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM apt. 311-1/2 N.
Main St. Available soon.
419-863-1000.
NICE 1 BR upstairs apt.
Includes range, refrigera-
tor & washer/dryer. Tenant
pays all utilities. Landlord
pays garbage pick-up &
mows lawn. 387 W. 3rd
St., Ottoville. $350/mo. +
security deposit. Call
(419)453-3956.
ONE BDRM Apt., 537 W.
Thi rd St . , Del phos.
$ 3 2 5 / m o . C a l l
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 2 1 8 4 o r
419-204-5924
620

Duplex For Rent
104 E. 7th. 2 BR, stove &
refrigerator included, w/d
hook-up. No pets. Call
419-236-2722.
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
MOBILE HOME in (Es-
tero) Ft. Myers, FL. For
sal e or rent . Cal l
239-240-9184.
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
AB LOUNGER XL. Like
new. $35. 00. Ph.
419-692-2257.
GIDDY UP-N-GO pony,
$50. Ph. 419-692-2752.
OVERHEAD GARAGE
door, 10’ high x 8’ wide,
with railing and hardware.
Call (419)203-6810.
USED WHI RLPOOL
dryer. Ex-large capacity, 4
cycles, 3 temperatures,
$35. Call 419-235-1043.
999

Legals
ORDINANCE #2011-29
AN ORDINANCE TO
AMEND ORDINANCE
2010-37, THE ANNUAL
APPROPRIATION ORDI-
NANCE, AND DECLAR-
ING IN AN EMERGENCY.
Passed and approved this
21st day of November
2011.
Robert Ulm,
Council Pres.
ATTEST:
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
Michael Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete text of this leg-
islation is on record at the
Municipal Building and
can be viewed during
regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
11/30/11, 12/7/11
040

Services
290

Wanted to Buy
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
Classifieds Sell
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Cement component
5 Egg -- yung
8 Quick reminder
12 Artifact
13 Drop bait on water
14 Like Mr. Hyde
15 Mesabi shipment
17 Descartes’ name
18 “-- -Man Fever”
19 High clouds
21 Plow pullers
24 Dah partners
25 Mother lode
26 Throaty
30 Follow
32 Air-pump meas.
33 “Soapdish” actress
37 Failing that
38 John, in Glasgow
39 Chore
40 Meeting plan
43 Like some hours
44 Podium feature
46 Mini-lakes
48 Curio
50 Travel option
51 Lotion additive
52 Called the dog
57 Natural elevs.
58 Cleveland cager
59 Bronte governess
60 Furtive sound
61 Corroded, as acid
62 Shoal
DOWN
1 Struck a match
2 Boise’s st.
3 Comfy shoe
4 Avoid a big wedding
5 S&L protector
6 Feedbag tidbit
7 Sheik’s cartel
8 Most jolly
9 Turn inside out
10 Less
11 Pamplona shouts
16 Vintage vehicle
20 Ego companions
21 Speck of dust
22 Europe-Asia range
23 Oahu welcomes
27 Mayberry kid
28 Slippery -- -- eel
29 Marmalade chunk
31 Least tight
34 Actress Goldie --
35 Drew on
36 Barely makes due
41 Earn
42 Gibbons
44 Soda fountain treats
45 Golf clubs
47 Sleek swimmer
48 Incline
49 Swimming-pool loc.
50 Fast talk
53 Head cover
54 A caustic
55 Previously
56 Telephone trio
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
ALLEN COUNTY
City of Delphos
Federal National
Mortgage Association
to Jermey J. and Dianna
M. Backus, 516 S.
Washington St., $9,000.
Village of Elida
George E. Herold to
Christina M. and Aaron
R. McOwen, 102 Baxter
St., $82,000.
Catherine L. Stimmel
et al. and Sheriff Samuel
A. Crish to Federal
National Mortgage
Association, 111 W.
North St., $20,000.
Trinity Flooring
Investments to Wiggs &
Esmonde, Elida Road,
$205,000.
Helen M. Wiechart to
Gossard Snow Removal,
105 Roger St, $32,000.
Marion Township
Charlene S. and
Ronald L. Rice to
Andrew J. Hoehn and
Kristin R. Adams, 3123
McBride Road, $82,000.
Winifred R. Siefker
Trustee et al. to Barbara
A. and Richard Arthur,
8555 W. State Road,
4118,000.
Village of Spencerville
Donavon Cockerell
et al. and Sheriff Samuel
A. Crish to mnm, 213 W.
Third St., $18,000.
Patricia L. Lee and
Sheriff Samuel A. Crish
to Federal National
Mortgage Association,
309 Birch Drive,
$72,000.
Ronald and Jessica
Meyer II to Bruce T. and
Kelee J. Clayton, 303 N.
Main St., $68,000.
DEAR DOCTOR K: I’m an
80-year-old man who spends
summers on the coast of Maine.
I love to swim in the ocean for
20 or 30 minutes each day. The
water is cold (55 degrees F), but
it doesn’t bother me. My real
question is whether doing this
is bad for my heart, because my
heart rate is sometimes irregular.
Are my cold-water swims OK?
DEAR READER: First of all,
congratulations! Anyone who
is 80 years old and is up to the
challenge of a daily swim in the
ocean deserves our admiration.
You obviously have both courage
and a zest for life.
Now, is it wise for you to swim in
the cold ocean water? Swimming
is an excellent exercise for your
heart, arteries, lungs and muscles.
If you enjoy swimming in cold
water and have been doing it for
some time with no ill effects, it’s
probably fine for you. But I do
have three concerns.
First, immersing your body in
water squeezes blood from your
limbs into your chest. This makes
your heart work harder and raises
your blood pressure. When you
have your face in the water and
are holding your breath, your
heart slows down and your blood
pressure rises. And that is even
more true as the water temperature
gets colder.
Second, the shock of cold water
against your skin automatically
triggers a series of changes in
your body called the fight-or-
flight survival response. The most
important physical change is that
blood vessels supplying your skin
narrow. This also makes your
blood pressure rise.
Third, the fight-or-flight
response can also disturb the
heart’s steady rhythm.
Since you are already
prone to an irregular
heartbeat, it could spell
trouble.
For these reasons,
and because ocean water can be
treacherous, I think it would be
healthier for you to swim in a
pool with temperatures in the 70s
or low 80-degree range.
But if you want to continue
to swim in the ocean, I surely
wouldn’t advise you to stop.
Swimming daily is most likely
better for your health than not
doing so. I would suggest you
always swim with someone close
by and make sure that person
knows CPR. Be on the lookout
for warning symptoms: If you
feel faint or notice irregular or
“missed” heartbeats, get out of
the water.
Here in Boston we have a
fearless group of men who, by
long tradition, take a swim in our
salty harbor every New Year’s
Day. Then they try to get a suntan
-- regardless of the weather. They
enter the ocean at the foot of L
Street, and they’re called the L
Street Brownies. Of course, the
rest of us think they’re crazy.
But their pictures are in the paper
every year, because we all admire
their spirit, too.
Dr. Komaroff is a physician and
professor at Harvard Medical
School. Go to his website to send
questions and get additional
information: www.AskDoctorK.
com.
Copyright 2011 The President
and Fellows of Harvard College
Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
1130 Walnut, Kansas City, Mo.
64106
Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D.
Ask
Doctor K
Swimming may be healthier in
warm weather rather than cold
If YOU want to SEE your kids read
more, let them see YOU read more.
Call 419-695-0015 to subscribe.
10 – The Herald Wednesday, November 30, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Snow Removal
$5 OFF
SNOW REMOVAL
• Sidewalks-driveways
• Gutter Cleaning
Present coupon at completion.
Limit 5 mile radius of Delphos
Call Adam
419-741-7205
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
950 Construction
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
AT YOUR
S
ervice
MACHINING SUPERVISOR
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast
aluminum wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Met-
als America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfac-
tion has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23
years of steady employment. We now have an opportunity for a Production
Supervisor to oversee the operation of a multi-shift production department.
Responsibilities of this position include:
• Plan and direct the work of other supervisory, technical, and production
associates
• Develop process and equipment specifications, operating procedures,
and safe and efficient work methods
• Use standard production measurement and problem-solving tools to
analyze production results, prepare reports, and implement preventive
and corrective actions as needed
• Collaborate with other production groups, and quality assurance,
purchasing, and maintenance functions to ensure product quality,
efficient use of resources, machine utilization, etc.
The successful candidate must have at least five years of supervisory ex-
perience--preferably in a multi-shift manufacturing function. Exposure to
programming and operation of high-volume CNC cutting operations, and
robotic parts handling is strongly preferred. Related four-year degree is also
preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-
sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vi-
sion, and disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company
matching, paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a
career opportunity with a growing company, please forward your qualifica-
tions and salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources-DK
19176 Venedocia-Eastern Rd., Venedocia
$0 down, $0 closing, home warranty.
Beautiful country 4 bedroom 2 car garage, new carpet, paint,
central air and more! A must see country home. $89,900.
Approx. monthly payment -
$
482.60
www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com
OPEN
HOUSE
Dawn to Dusk Fri., Sat. & Sun.
Sales:
Mon. 8 am-8 pm
Tues.-Fri.
8 am-6:00 pm
Sat. 9:00 am-2:30 pm
419-692-0055
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
Service
Parts
Body Shop
Mon. 7:30-8 pm;
Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri.
7:30-6;
Sat. 9:00-2:00
www.raabeford.com
CONVENIENT HOURS
TO GIVE YOU THE
BEST IN CUSTOMER
SERVICE!
005

Lost & Found
FOUND: BLACK male lab
about 1 yr. old. Found in
N. Clay St. area Sat.,
11/26, wearing a blue &
bl ack col l ar . Cal l
(567)242-3069.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
010

Announcements
DELPHOS
RADIO SHACK
DELPHOS POWER
EQUIPMENT
OPEN
Mon. thru Fri. 12-5
419-692-4691
40-75
%
off
All Merchandise
Shop early for
Christmas!
902 Elida Ave.
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
CONCRETE, STEEL
erection & carpentry work-
ers needed. Health bene-
fits, 401K. Send resume to
Alexander & Bebout, Inc.,
10098 Lincoln Hwy., Van
Wert, OH 45891. E.O.E.
NOW HIRING kitchen
help. Previous experience
required. Apply at Joey
Fratello’s, 126 N. Main,
Delphos between 3pm &
5pm.
PART-TIME office help
needed. Office duties in-
clude filing, multi-line
phones, mail, and other
misc. tasks. Microsoft
Word/Excel experience
preferred. Send replies to
Box 160 c/o Delphos Her-
ald, 405 N. Main St., Del-
phos, OH 45833
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN
pillow-top mattress set,
can deliver $125. Call
(260)267-9079.
340

Garage Sales
AVON CHRISTMAS Open
House and Garage Sale.
Clothes, misc. Nov. 25-27,
Dec. 2-4, 9am-? 11411
Ridge Road, Delphos.
510

Farm Equipment
FOR SALE: 10 IH Front
Suit Case Tractor weights
each $80.00 or best offer.
419-796-0230. Ft. Jen -
nings.
550

Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS. 1 gray ti-
ger female and 2 black
males. Really need new
homes. 419-695-6284.
590

House For Rent
2 OR 3 BR House
with attached garage.
Available immediately!
Call 419-692-3951.
3 BDRM farm house West
of Delphos. Garage, hard-
wood floors, no pets. Call
419-692-2878.
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM apt. 311-1/2 N.
Main St. Available soon.
419-863-1000.
NICE 1 BR upstairs apt.
Includes range, refrigera-
tor & washer/dryer. Tenant
pays all utilities. Landlord
pays garbage pick-up &
mows lawn. 387 W. 3rd
St., Ottoville. $350/mo. +
security deposit. Call
(419)453-3956.
ONE BDRM Apt., 537 W.
Thi rd St . , Del phos.
$ 3 2 5 / m o . C a l l
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 2 1 8 4 o r
419-204-5924
620

Duplex For Rent
104 E. 7th. 2 BR, stove &
refrigerator included, w/d
hook-up. No pets. Call
419-236-2722.
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
MOBILE HOME in (Es-
tero) Ft. Myers, FL. For
sal e or rent . Cal l
239-240-9184.
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
AB LOUNGER XL. Like
new. $35. 00. Ph.
419-692-2257.
GIDDY UP-N-GO pony,
$50. Ph. 419-692-2752.
OVERHEAD GARAGE
door, 10’ high x 8’ wide,
with railing and hardware.
Call (419)203-6810.
USED WHI RLPOOL
dryer. Ex-large capacity, 4
cycles, 3 temperatures,
$35. Call 419-235-1043.
999

Legals
ORDINANCE #2011-29
AN ORDINANCE TO
AMEND ORDINANCE
2010-37, THE ANNUAL
APPROPRIATION ORDI-
NANCE, AND DECLAR-
ING IN AN EMERGENCY.
Passed and approved this
21st day of November
2011.
Robert Ulm,
Council Pres.
ATTEST:
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
Michael Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete text of this leg-
islation is on record at the
Municipal Building and
can be viewed during
regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
11/30/11, 12/7/11
040

Services
290

Wanted to Buy
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
Classifieds Sell
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Cement component
5 Egg -- yung
8 Quick reminder
12 Artifact
13 Drop bait on water
14 Like Mr. Hyde
15 Mesabi shipment
17 Descartes’ name
18 “-- -Man Fever”
19 High clouds
21 Plow pullers
24 Dah partners
25 Mother lode
26 Throaty
30 Follow
32 Air-pump meas.
33 “Soapdish” actress
37 Failing that
38 John, in Glasgow
39 Chore
40 Meeting plan
43 Like some hours
44 Podium feature
46 Mini-lakes
48 Curio
50 Travel option
51 Lotion additive
52 Called the dog
57 Natural elevs.
58 Cleveland cager
59 Bronte governess
60 Furtive sound
61 Corroded, as acid
62 Shoal
DOWN
1 Struck a match
2 Boise’s st.
3 Comfy shoe
4 Avoid a big wedding
5 S&L protector
6 Feedbag tidbit
7 Sheik’s cartel
8 Most jolly
9 Turn inside out
10 Less
11 Pamplona shouts
16 Vintage vehicle
20 Ego companions
21 Speck of dust
22 Europe-Asia range
23 Oahu welcomes
27 Mayberry kid
28 Slippery -- -- eel
29 Marmalade chunk
31 Least tight
34 Actress Goldie --
35 Drew on
36 Barely makes due
41 Earn
42 Gibbons
44 Soda fountain treats
45 Golf clubs
47 Sleek swimmer
48 Incline
49 Swimming-pool loc.
50 Fast talk
53 Head cover
54 A caustic
55 Previously
56 Telephone trio
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
ALLEN COUNTY
City of Delphos
Federal National
Mortgage Association
to Jermey J. and Dianna
M. Backus, 516 S.
Washington St., $9,000.
Village of Elida
George E. Herold to
Christina M. and Aaron
R. McOwen, 102 Baxter
St., $82,000.
Catherine L. Stimmel
et al. and Sheriff Samuel
A. Crish to Federal
National Mortgage
Association, 111 W.
North St., $20,000.
Trinity Flooring
Investments to Wiggs &
Esmonde, Elida Road,
$205,000.
Helen M. Wiechart to
Gossard Snow Removal,
105 Roger St, $32,000.
Marion Township
Charlene S. and
Ronald L. Rice to
Andrew J. Hoehn and
Kristin R. Adams, 3123
McBride Road, $82,000.
Winifred R. Siefker
Trustee et al. to Barbara
A. and Richard Arthur,
8555 W. State Road,
4118,000.
Village of Spencerville
Donavon Cockerell
et al. and Sheriff Samuel
A. Crish to mnm, 213 W.
Third St., $18,000.
Patricia L. Lee and
Sheriff Samuel A. Crish
to Federal National
Mortgage Association,
309 Birch Drive,
$72,000.
Ronald and Jessica
Meyer II to Bruce T. and
Kelee J. Clayton, 303 N.
Main St., $68,000.
DEAR DOCTOR K: I’m an
80-year-old man who spends
summers on the coast of Maine.
I love to swim in the ocean for
20 or 30 minutes each day. The
water is cold (55 degrees F), but
it doesn’t bother me. My real
question is whether doing this
is bad for my heart, because my
heart rate is sometimes irregular.
Are my cold-water swims OK?
DEAR READER: First of all,
congratulations! Anyone who
is 80 years old and is up to the
challenge of a daily swim in the
ocean deserves our admiration.
You obviously have both courage
and a zest for life.
Now, is it wise for you to swim in
the cold ocean water? Swimming
is an excellent exercise for your
heart, arteries, lungs and muscles.
If you enjoy swimming in cold
water and have been doing it for
some time with no ill effects, it’s
probably fine for you. But I do
have three concerns.
First, immersing your body in
water squeezes blood from your
limbs into your chest. This makes
your heart work harder and raises
your blood pressure. When you
have your face in the water and
are holding your breath, your
heart slows down and your blood
pressure rises. And that is even
more true as the water temperature
gets colder.
Second, the shock of cold water
against your skin automatically
triggers a series of changes in
your body called the fight-or-
flight survival response. The most
important physical change is that
blood vessels supplying your skin
narrow. This also makes your
blood pressure rise.
Third, the fight-or-flight
response can also disturb the
heart’s steady rhythm.
Since you are already
prone to an irregular
heartbeat, it could spell
trouble.
For these reasons,
and because ocean water can be
treacherous, I think it would be
healthier for you to swim in a
pool with temperatures in the 70s
or low 80-degree range.
But if you want to continue
to swim in the ocean, I surely
wouldn’t advise you to stop.
Swimming daily is most likely
better for your health than not
doing so. I would suggest you
always swim with someone close
by and make sure that person
knows CPR. Be on the lookout
for warning symptoms: If you
feel faint or notice irregular or
“missed” heartbeats, get out of
the water.
Here in Boston we have a
fearless group of men who, by
long tradition, take a swim in our
salty harbor every New Year’s
Day. Then they try to get a suntan
-- regardless of the weather. They
enter the ocean at the foot of L
Street, and they’re called the L
Street Brownies. Of course, the
rest of us think they’re crazy.
But their pictures are in the paper
every year, because we all admire
their spirit, too.
Dr. Komaroff is a physician and
professor at Harvard Medical
School. Go to his website to send
questions and get additional
information: www.AskDoctorK.
com.
Copyright 2011 The President
and Fellows of Harvard College
Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
1130 Walnut, Kansas City, Mo.
64106
Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D.
Ask
Doctor K
Swimming may be healthier in
warm weather rather than cold
If YOU want to SEE your kids read
more, let them see YOU read more.
Call 419-695-0015 to subscribe.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday, November 30, 2011 The Herald – 11
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Grandparents
hungry for
options
Dear Annie: We are the
grandparents of a beauti-
ful 4-year-old girl. We have
been watching her for the
past three months because
her parents had their water
service shut off due to lack of
payment. A month ago, they
had their gas and electricity
shut off, as well. They are
living off of the welfare sys-
tem with no other
means of support.
In the past, my
wife and I have
paid a lot of money
to keep their utili-
ties on, but this
time we took a
stand and decided
not to. Instead, we
opted to assist in
taking care of their
daughter until they
can fix this situ-
ation, knowing it
will probably happen again.
We want our granddaugh-
ter to have a shot at nor-
malcy, and we feel she will
never get that if we return her
to her parents. Unfortunately,
my wife and I lack both the
finances to raise a child and
the vitality necessary to keep
up with her. We don’t know
what to do. If we decide to
seek custody, how do we go
about it? Is there financial
aid available for people in
our situation? We want to do
the right thing for our grand-
daughter. -- Geezer with a
Cause in Los Angeles
Dear Los Angeles:
Instead of seeking custody,
you might want to apply for
legal guardianship of your
granddaughter or become
her foster parents. Would
the parents voluntarily allow
this? That would be the easi-
est way to do it. Discuss
your options with an attor-
ney who specializes in family
law. You can get referrals
for low-cost legal assistance
through LawHelp California
(lawhelpca.org).
Dear Annie: We work in
an office where the employees
(mostly the female employ-
ees) bring treats -- candy or
homemade goodies -- on a
regular basis. This always
has been a nice gesture and
much appreciated.
The problem is a new
employee who doesn’t seem
to understand the concept
of taking your share and no
more. “Vern” is the first one
at your desk if he notices
candy. Then he keeps com-
ing back over and over again,
taking large quantities on
each trip. Those treats are for
everyone.
Vern is really a nice man
in so many ways, but we are
about ready to discontinue
bringing treats to the office
because this is so frustrating.
One of the employees made
special homemade treats for
her boss on his birthday, and
Vern stood at her desk to
get his share before anyone
else, and then returned for a
second helping before others
had their first.
No one wants to hurt
Vern’s feelings, and he
doesn’t seem to get the hint
when comments are made to
others in his presence. Do
you have any suggestions
about how to handle this? We
hate to see a nice tradition
ruined because the
goodies can no lon-
ger be shared with
everyone. -- Didn’t
Take This Guy To
Raise
Dear Didn’t:
Someone needs to
speak up. If Vern
returns for seconds
before others have
had a turn, say, “A
lot of folks haven’t
had any treats yet,
Vern, so no sec-
ond helpings until everyone
has had one.” If he takes six
cupcakes, stop him, saying,
“Sorry, Vern, only one per
customer.” Be nice, firm and
consistent. We don’t think
it will take much to retrain
the guy, so please give him
a chance before you elimi-
nate something that all of you
obviously enjoy a great deal.
Dear Annie: “Showerless
in Sheboygan” said her retired
military husband refused
to shower or get a haircut.
You suggested he might be
depressed.
My husband is a psy-
chologist with the Veterans
Administration. V.A. ser-
vices are available in most
states for mental health issues
or changes in health status.
Please pass this along. -- V.A.
Supporter in Louisville,
Ky.
Dear Louisville: Thank
you for reminding those read-
ers who have served in the
military that the V.A. (va.
gov) can provide psychologi-
cal as well as medical coun-
sel.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2011
Both your ingenuity and cleverness
will be among the
major qualities that
will contribute to
your success in the
year ahead. Don’t be
reluctant to try your
hand at as many new
things as you like.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- You’re starting a new cycle,
which will continue for some time
and could be remarkably profitable if
you play your cards right. It’s a spotty
trend, so be able to recognize your
good days.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- This is likely to be a favorable
day for you where new adventures
or enterprises are concerned. It’ll be
especially so for anything that you’ll
have a hand in bringing about.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Something that was financially
fortunate for you previously could
be so again. Whatever you do, don’t
change anything that worked well the
first time.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
A couple of friends could play more
prominent roles in your affairs than
they have done in the past. It’s one of
those times when each party could be
lucky for the other.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- One of your greatest assets is your
ability to derive benefits or advantages
from shifting circumstances. Be as
supple as a reed in the wind.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
If at all possible, devote some time
to an exciting, fresh interest that has
captured your fancy. This new pastime
could have greater ramifications for
your life than you think.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Couple your will to win with your
imagination, and visualize the type
of results you hope to achieve, along
with some changes you would like to
make. They’re all doable.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Your ability to absorb and catalog
all types of new information is better
than usual at this time. Strive to
utilize this wonderful gift to your best
advantage.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Chances are you’ll be luckier than
usual, but not necessarily in ways of
your choosing. Even though benefits
will be influenced by what you can’t
control, you’ll like what occurs.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Team up with others, because
fortuitous developments can be
generated through partnerships,
especially those springing from a
social involvement.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- An
adverse situation that you’ve been
working hard at changing for the
better is likely to take that turn at last.
Instead of producing negatives, it
could bring you something very nice.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
A friend of yours is likely to be the
purveyor of some good news, but
neither you nor your pal will be aware
of this until you talk. It could be a big
surprise to both of you when you do.
COPYRIGHT 2011 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Wednesday Evening November 30, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
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WOHL/FOX The X Factor Daughter Local
ION Stand by Me Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Without a Trace
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ANIM Rattlesnake Republic Country Justice Alaska Wildlife Rattlesnake Republic Country Justice
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BRAVO Top Chef: Texas Work of Art Top Chef: Texas Top Chef: Texas Top Chef: Texas
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DISN Shake It Sky High Good Luck Shake It Good Luck Wizards Wizards
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2
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Good Luck To All The Area Teams!
12 – The Herald Wednesday, November 30, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Monday’s questions:
The rarest fish in the world is the oarfish, a long, ribbon-
like fish often confused with sea monsters if they wash up
on shore. Because they are found in the deep ocean, they are
rarely seen. They can range in size from 26 to almost 56 feet
in length.
Tornadoes do not often enter into big cities but they can
and have. Tornadoes have hit the downtown areas of Salt
Lake City, Miami, Nashville and Fort Worth just to name
a few.
Today’s questions:
What is the most dangerous job in America?
What were the first Jack-o’-lanterns made from?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Epicedian: sad, mournful
Unco: shy or awkward
Today’s joke:
A woman named Babbette finds herself in dire trouble.
Her business has gone bust and she’s in serious financial
trouble. She’s so desperate that she decides to ask God for
help. She begins to pray... “God, please help me. I’ve lost
my business and if I don’t get some money, I’m going to
lose my house as well. Please let me win the lotto.”
She does this for three nights in a row and still doesn’t
win. On the fourth night, Babbette prays her prayer and
suddenly there is a blinding flash of light as the heavens
open and Babbette is confronted by the voice of God him-
self: “Babbette, meet me halfway on this. Buy a ticket.”
LA police raid protest in show of force
Conn. money managers: No secret lottery winner
By JOHN
CHRISTOFFERSEN
Associated Press
NEW HAVEN, Conn.
— Three money manag-
ers awarded a $254 mil-
lion Powerball jackpot said
Tuesday there’s no fourth
participant despite a claim
they’re covering for a winner
who wants to stay anony-
mous.
Greg Skidmore, Brandon
Lacoff and Tim Davidson,
who work at an asset manage-
ment firm in Greenwich, one
of the most affluent towns in
America, came forward as
the lottery winners Monday.
Their lawyer said they formed
a trust to manage the money
after Davidson bought the $1
winning ticket at a Stamford
gas station.
But Thomas Gladstone,
who identified himself as
the landlord for the men’s
company, said he was sur-
prised to learn Lacoff was
among the winners because
he made no mention of it
when he saw him Friday. So
Gladstone called Lacoff on
Monday night.
“He said, ‘No, I didn’t
win the lottery. We’re rep-
resenting the guy who did,”’
Gladstone said. “He said he
represents the guy who’s
staying anonymous.”
Asked who the real winner
is, Gladstone said, “They’re
protecting him. That’s the
whole purpose of putting this
in this trust.”
He said the real winner,
a client of the men’s firm,
wants anonymity because
people “get harassed and
hounded when they win the
lottery.”
His claim was first report-
ed by the Daily Mail newspa-
per of Britain.
A statement from the
men’s Putnam Avenue
Family Trust said “there has
been much speculation and
quite a bit of misinformation
over the last 24 hours.” It said
the trust was established to
manage the winnings to help
those who can benefit from
the money.
“And to be clear, there
are a total of three trustees
and there is no anonymous
fourth participant,” the state-
ment said.
The trust promised to dis-
tribute $1 million in the next
10 days to organizations in
the New York-New Jersey-
Connecticut area that help
veterans.
“The three trustees consid-
er this the first stop on what
we see as a journey of phi-
lanthropy in the months and
years to come,” the statement
said. “We recognize that we
have been literally blessed
with a winning hand when
it came to playing a simple
game of chance. We also rec-
ognize that, as a result, we
have a moral obligation to
ensure these dollars are put
to their best possible use in
the shortest possible time to
help the broadest number of
people in need.”
Gladstone said the anony-
mous winner is the benefi-
ciary of the trust.
But a trust spokesman,
Gary Lewi, insisted there is
no secret lottery winner.
“I am afraid Mr. Gladstone
is mistaken,” he said.
The men’s attorney, Jason
Kurland, did not return
repeated telephone calls, an
email and Facebook messag-
es Tuesday. Messages also
were left with the men.
Connecticut Lottery
Corporation president Anne
Noble said she could not con-
firm or deny rumors swirling
around the prize. She said
officials are processing the
payout for the winners who
came forward Monday.
“The Connecticut lottery
followed its policies and pro-
cedures, and we are obliged
to pay the bearer of the instru-
ment,” she said.
By CHRISTINA HOAG and KATHY MATHESON
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — In a massive show of force, 1,400 police
officers, some in riot gear stormed the Occupy Los Angeles
camp early today, driving protesters from the park and arrest-
ing more than 200 who defied orders to leave. Similar raids in
Philadelphia led to 50 arrests, but the scene in both cities was
relatively peaceful.
Police in Los Angeles and Philadelphia moved in on Occupy
Wall Street encampments under darkness today in an effort to
clear out some of the longest-lasting protest sites since crack-
downs ended similar occupations across the country.
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck praised the officers
and the protesters for their restraint and the peaceful way the
eviction was carried out.
Officers flooded down the steps of City Hall just after mid-
night and started dismantling the two-month-old camp two days
after a deadline passed for campers to leave the park. Officers in
helmets and wielding batons and guns with rubber bullets con-
verged on the park from all directions with military precision and
began making arrests after several orders were given to leave.
There were no injuries and no drugs or weapons were found
during a search of the emptied camp which was strewn with
garbage after the raid. City workers put up concrete barriers to
wall off the park while it’s restored.
The raid in Los Angeles came after demonstrators with the
movement in Philadelphia marched through the streets after
being evicted from their site. About 40 protesters were arrested
after refusing to clear a street several blocks northeast of City
Hall, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey said.
They were lined up in cuffs and loaded on to buses by officers.
Six others were arrested earlier after remaining on a street police
that police tried to clear.
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa raised public
safety and health concerns in announcing plans for the eviction
last week, while Philadelphia officials said protesters must clear
their site to make room for a $50 million renovation project.
Defiant Los Angeles campers who were chanting slogans
as the officers surrounded the park, booed when an unlawful
assembly was declared, paving the way for officers to begin
arresting those who didn’t leave.
In the first moments of the raid, officers tore down a tent and
tackled a tattooed man with a camera on City Hall steps and
wrestled him to the ground. Someone yelled “police brutality.”
Teams of four or five officers moved through the crowd
making arrests one at a time, cuffing the hands of protesters
with white plastic zip-ties. A circle of protesters sat with arms
locked, many looking calm and smiling.
Opamago Cascini, 29, said the night had been a blast and he
was willing to get arrested.
“It’s easy to talk the talk, but you gotta walk the walk,”
Cascini said.
Police used a cherry picker to pluck five men from trees.
Two others were in a tree house — one wore a crown and
another taunted police with an American flag.
In Philadelphia, police began pulling down tents at about
1:20 a.m. EST after giving demonstrators three warnings that
they would have to leave, which nearly all of the protestors fol-
lowed. Dozens of demonstrators then began marching through
the streets and continued through the night.
Ramsey said breaking up the camp in the early-morning
hours helped minimize any disruption to businesses and traffic.
“We acknowledge the fact that we are going to have to leave
this space .... but in another sense this has been our home for
almost two months and no one wants to see their home taken
away from them,” Philadelphia protestor Bri Barton, 22, said
before police began clearing out the camp.
“Whether or not we have this space or work in the city is
nowhere near done,” she said.
Jackson’s doctor draws
judge’s ire, gets 4 years
By LINDA DEUTSCH
AP Special Correspondent
LOS ANGELES — It was clear that Michael Jackson’s
doctor was going to get the maximum four-year sentence
for involuntary manslaughter before the judge even finished
speaking.
In a nearly half-hour tongue lashing, Dr. Conrad Murray
was denounced as a greedy, remorseless physician who com-
mitted a “horrific violation of trust” and killed the King of Pop
during an experiment.
“Dr. Murray created a set of circumstances and became
involved in a cycle of horrible medicine,” Judge Michael
Pastor said in a stern voice.
Pastor said Murray sold out his profession for a promised
fee of $150,000 a month when he agreed to give Jackson a
powerful anesthetic every night as an unorthodox cure for
insomnia.
Murray will likely serve less than two years in county jail,
not state prison, because of California’s overcrowded prisons
and jails. Sheriff’s officials said he will be housed in a one-
man cell and be kept away from other inmates.
The tall, imposing Murray, who has been in jail for three
weeks, was allowed to change into street clothes — a charcoal
gray suit and white shirt — for court. But he wore prison-issue
white socks and soft slippers.
Jackson’s family said in a statement read in court that they
were not seeking revenge but a stiff sentence for Murray that
would serve as a warning to opportunistic doctors. Afterward,
they said they were pleased with the judge’s sentence.
“We’re going to be a family. We’re going to move forward.
We’re going to tour, play the music and miss him,” brother
Jermaine Jackson said.

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