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Volume 100, Issue 5

Welcome Week

Monday, July 14, 2008

Tahlequah, OK 74464

Welcome back
Kara French/TNE The burn was not very big because the treated wood did not let the bridge burn.

Trail bridge damaged

Sometime last week, there was an attempt made to set the walking bridge on fire. The bridge is located behind the Sequoyah Institute off of Seminary Ave. As of now, there are no suspects as to who committed this vandalism. The bridge is part of the Tahlequah History Trail. The attempt to burn down the bridge failed because of the treated lumber.

Stevy Rystedt/TNE Rick Boswell, construction worker, helps Josh Usrey, Coweta junior through the door. Usrey is now the Associate Hall Manager of South Leoser Hall.

New school year set to start


By Eric Davis TNE Writer
The beginning of a new school year is always an exciting time. For returning students, this means catching up with friends who have not seen each other since the spring, meeting some new people and getting back into the groove of college life. For incoming freshmen or transfer students, however, this is a time that can cause a lot of anxiety. Fear not, though, NSU is a very user-friendly university with a lot of great people. Do not hesitate to ask for help or directions. At some point, everyone on this campus was here for the first time. One of the best ways to attack college is to jump in and do not look back. My best advice to incoming students is to find your niche at NSU. Get involved in something that youre passionate about. We have so many involvement opportunities at NSU, take advantage of them. Remember balance and that school comes first, but research has shown involved students do better in school. If you need help finding whats right for you, come visit me in the Student Activities Office (UC Basement), said E. Kate Abad, director of campus involvement. The NSU Web site is an amazing tool to find all the information needed to make the transition much easier; take advantage of it. Get involved. Find something outside the classroom you enjoy. There are many opportunities for involvement at NSU, and Welcome Week is a great time to check out all of the student organizations. Dont be afraid to get out there and try something new, said Jennifer Ford, student success specialist/lecturer. NSU has created an environment where thinking outside the box is encouraged, challenging ones views and opinions is supported and meeting great people and having memorable times are inescapable. Enjoy the ride. e-mail Eric Davis at davis02@ nsuok.edu.

Stevy Rystedt/TNE It is unknown who committed this act of vandalism to the citys landscape.

To err is human. To fix it is TNE policy. Corrections can be found on Page 2. To report a correction call 918.444.2890 TNE Web site: http://arapaho.nsuok.edu/~tne. Classifieds: http://www.nsuexchange.com.

A message from President Don Betz


In July 2008, I was honored to rejoin the NSU family as the 17th president. From 1971 to 1994, I served NSU in both teaching and leadership roles. This is a very special time for Susanne and me. Not only does it feel like we are coming home, but we are returning at a unique moment in the history of this institution and this region of the state. Together with the students, faculty and staff of NSU, we have the opportunity to set the course for our second century. NSU is about to turn 100. With educational roots firmly planted by the Cherokee people as early as the 1840s, NSU is the continuing expression of that commitment to build a region and serve a people through the most potent agent for shaping change, education. 63 years after the founding of the Cherokee male and female seminaries, this locus of learning in Tahlequah became the foundation of NSU, as the brand new state of Oklahoma established a normal school for training teachers here. Oklahomas leaders well understood that the state would need a strong educational foundation in order to build a lasting community. And that foundation must begin with teachers and students. For Oklahoma, education was born here. This is hallowed ground, and it will remain so. On Aug. 20, we will enter NSUs Centennial Countdown. I would like to extend a personal invitation to each of you to join us Aug. 20 on Beta Field at 6 p.m. as we begin the Centennial reunions, and opportunities to build a memorable celebration of the vision and dedication that led us to the point where we are today. Over the next several months NSU will be sponsoring a wide spectrum of events demonstrating its rich pool of talent and its focus on the spectrum of issues that lay before us as a region and state. We will be informed, entertained and enriched by what we see, hear and learn. This is the enduring legacy of NSU in eastern Oklahoma begun so many decades ago. On March 6, 2009, NSU officially launches the Centennial, exactly 100 years after the signing of the enabling legislation. We will honor Sequoyah in bronze on the campus for all to see and reflect upon his accomplishments and the fundamental connection that links NSU with his legacy and with the Cherokee people. The celebration in multiple forms will continue throughout 2009, culminating in the Emerald Ball in December. For us at NSU, this is the moment to honor and recall the past, but also to imagine and build the future, to intentionally declare who we are as a dynamic and responsive learning community. Our values, mission, vision and plan to achieve our objectives are vital ingredients

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Special

Welcome Week 2008

Dr. Don Betz


Countdown with a community picnic that is open to everyone who wishes to be part of the celebration ahead. This is just the start of the many activities,

in NSU fulfilling its role and responsibilities as a trusted community citizen and a partner in the development of human potential. The challenge of change is all around us, accelerated and more intricate than ever. The prognosis is for more of the same. Our response to this challenge is the essence of our mission, namely, to graduate productive, creative, ethical, engaged, and collaborative citizens and leaders. In the next 100 years, NSU will serve the good people of this region by connecting with them, by understanding their hopes and concerns, and by serving as an accessible source of information, expertise, counsel and insight. Our faculty and staff are ready and able to serve in this way. NSU will be an economic engine in our communities, preparing our citizens to fill jobs and to create them. As students during this unique time in our history, you have the opportunity to help shape the course of our second century. Know that as you join us as partners in the transition ahead, we are committed to the vision of helping you achieve success and become lifelong learners in the process. Though we know this institution has 100 years of experience, we well know that we cannot do this alone. We will write this story together.

The Northeastern

Welcome Week 2008

Wednesday, Aug. 13:


No events scheduled

Calender of events
August 2008 20: Wednesday, Aug.
Thursday, Aug. 21:

Special

Page 

Thursday, Aug. 14:

RHA meeting Last day to drop a single class or withdraw from all fall intersession classes

Find class/ tour day sponsored by RiverHawk Ambassadors Faculty available for advising Fees due
Sixteen-week fall classes begin Sixteen-week fall classes late enrollment First eight-week fall classes begin

Friday, Aug. 15:

Fall intersession classes end

Saturday, Aug. 16:

Resident hall open for fall semester and moving day events

Friday, Aug. 22:

No events scheduled

Sunday, Aug. 17:

Saturday, Aug. 23: Sunday, Aug. 24:

Resident halls open and many moving date events planned

Road trip sponsored by NAB Sixteen-week fall late enrollment

Monday, Aug. 18:

Welcome Week events by sponsored by Greek life Freshmen Connections

Monday, Aug. 25: Tuesday, Aug. 26:

Sixteen-week fall late enrollment Sixteen-week fall late enrollment

Tuesday, Aug. 19:

Freshmen connections program Super slip-n-slide volunteer recruitment event (NAB) Faculty available for advising

Wednesday, Aug. 27:

Sixteen-week fall late enrollment Last day to withdraw from first eight week fall classes and receive a refund

The Northeastern

Page 4

Opinion

Welcome Week 2008

Letter to the editor


Dear Editor; This is in regards to the Editorial in the July 28 paper Clothes are not meant for dogs. Why would you think that dressing a dog up is considered inhumane? At least they are being taken care of. What about the people that get a dog and do not take care of it or leave it outside with no shelter in the freezing weather or any food or water in the hot sun? Or the people that drop their pets off in the country hoping someone will take care of it them? They usually end up starving to death. So when you worry about dressing up animals stop and think about the animals that are truly mistreated. We would not need the Humane Shelter if people would just take care of the animals they have or do not get one in the first place if you cannot afford it. Nancy Brenneis, Student Financial Services

Welcome to NSU and welcome to college life. To the incoming freshmen, have fun, do not be afraid of your professors and good luck. To those of you returning, get ready for another great year at NSU. Moving into the dorms, spending time getting your belongings in order, saying goodbye to mom and dad. Now what to do? Go take a walk around your dorm, inside and out. Say hello to whomever you want. Do not be scared. This might result in a friendship that will last the rest of your life. Some say that Tahlequah is boring on weekends. Sometimes, this is true. But, if you get a group

Editorial
of friends together to hang out then the boredom goes away. The next step, participate in Welcome Week. Go get some free food and a bunch of free stuff at Merchant Mall. Grab up a few posters at the poster sale. Go to the luau put on by the Residence Halls Association. In your classes, it is a good idea to try to befriend your professors. Not only will it make class more fun and enjoyable, it might help you out come finals week. Another good thing, next time you see them walking around campus, you will not have to avoid eye contact. The two most important

words you will soon be hearing. Get involved. We have made it a bit easier for you; turn to Page 17 for a list of just some of the clubs and organizations. Getting involved on campus helps you meet new people, develop relationships and make NSU your home. So, instead of just sitting in your dorm room, head on down to the Student Affairs office in the UC basement. Again, welcome to NSU and have fun becoming a RiverHawk. We, the staff of The Northeastern are looking forward to this school year and are hoping you are too. Have fun, get involved, do not be shy and have a great time.

Adviser: Co-editors: Sports Editor: Layout and Design Editor: Ad Manager: Account Manager: Photographer: Writers: Stefanie Anderegg James Anderson Jennifer Cash Kyle Cisper Eric Davis

Dr. Dana Eversole Chris Augerhole Kara French Jeremy Short Stevy Rystedt Larry Mattes Ranea Poteet Kyle Cisper Charles Innis Cara Keathley Jared Miller Liza Posson Jessica Remer

ext. 2891 ext. 2890 ext. 2890 ext. 2890 ext. 2890 ext. 2890 ext. 2890

Advertising Representatives: Alec Bisogno Leanne Williams POSTMASTER: Send PS from 3579 to NSU, Tahlequah, Okla., 744642399. The Northeastern (USPS # 395-580) is published weekly throughout the year except college holidays by Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Okla., 74464-2399. Periodicals postage paid at Tahlequah. Postmaster: send address changes to Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Okla., 74464-2399. For more information about advertising, classified or display, call 444-2890, seven days in advance of desired publication date. Editorial statements in The Northeastern and readers letters reflect those of the individual writers and not necessarily those of The Northeastern, its editors, staff, adviser or the administration of NSU. The opinions and comments therein do not necessarily reflect the policies or beliefs of the Board of Regents of Oklahoma Colleges or the regional universities and that the student newspaper is not an official medium or expression of the Board or the regional universities. The Northeastern is a public forum. All submissions become property of The Northeastern. This publication was printed by The Muskogee Phoenix and issued by NSU as authorized by House Bill 1714. Four thousand copies were printed at a total cost of $695 for 32 pages. The Northeastern is a member of the Associated College Press Association, Oklahoma Interscholastic Press Association, Society of Collegiate Journalists and College Media Advisers. e-mail address: tne@nsuok.edu.

Letters to the editor policy


The Northeastern accepts and encourages letters to the editor. Submissions should be relatively short and to the point, and must include your name, and contact information

in case we need to contact you back. We also encourage submission of any story ideas or pictures. E-mail letters, stories or pictures to tne@nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

Starting college can lead to good times


Starting college is one of those things that can be a little bit overwhelming. You are about to be subjected to a million new things. There will be good times, bad times, but most of all you are about to make friends, families, networking beneficial to your future and most important of all memories to last a lifetime. I know it sounds cheesy, but it is true. When I started college I lived in the hood at NSU known as Logan Hall. Living there was definitely an experience. I think it is important to live in the dorms at least once during your college career. It is the only way to get the full college experience, even if it is in the hood. Freshmen girls look out. You are about to be the hottest thing in the world strictly because you have the title of being a freshman. I would do anything to go back to my freshman year and relive this part. Instead of taking full advantage of being the hot new girl, I instead met a guy who became my boyfriend. Knowing what I do now, I would have lived up the year of hottie status. Also ladies, you are pretty easy to spot because you are the ones all dressed up with your hair and make-up done perfectly. We will know who you are because you will even look adorable in an early morning class. This will subside once you get into your second semester. You will appreciate that you can wear pajama pants to class and slowly those dress clothes get closer and closer to the back of your closet. Early morning classes will probably become a thing of the past the older you get. What you consider early your first year of college is not the same as what you will the rest of your time at NSU. Noon becomes the new eight. You also will probably try to not take classes five days a week. Most students like to take all of their classes on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. This is because party nights are the same days. Not to say that there will not be things going

Welcome Week 2008

Opinion

Page 5

Im Sandra D

Look at me

Cassandra Brubaker

on the other two days of the school week, but not as frequently. Best advice I have is to join some kind of an organization so that you have a sense of belonging. It is hard to move away from home, being a part of something can help make this transition a much smoother one. NSU offers several different groups. Rush a fraternity or a sorority. I did my second semester. If Greeks are not your thing join NAB, NSGA or something, just remember to get involved. Not to scare you, but there were several friends I made my first semester of college who were not back my second. The freedom of being away from mommy and daddy was too much for them and they simply stopped going to class. To not become one of these statistics I suggest you be involved

in NSU. When it comes right down to it the reason you decided to come to college was to further your education, so go to class. I always say, I dont live in Tahlequah for this or that, I live here so that I can go to school. So school should be your first priority. The next few years of your life are going to be exciting. You are about to do things you never thought you would or could. You are going to grow up and become your own person. You will develop your own thoughts and ideas. Hopefully become independent and self-sufficient. It is going to be exciting and scary, but you are going to love it. Make the most of your time here at NSU because time is going to fly by faster than you know. e-mail Cassandra Brubaker at brubaker@nsuok.edu.

Courtesy Photo Christina Cabbiness, OSU junior and Cassandra Brubaker, Bixby senior, hanging out in their dorm room in Logan Hall.

Courtesy Photo Sigma Sigma Sigma spring 2006 bid day.

The Northeastern

The problems with modern parenting compared to conventional upbringings


Parenting needs to be taken more seriously for the sake of the kids.
I am going to be a tough even states that she wishes she parent. The younger genera- had raised her kids to respect tion, for the most part, is not her a little more instead of letwhat they used ting them to be. First off, just tell many people are her whatnot raising their ever they children with want. Christian values. There Young kids and are not teenagers are as many not getting the y o u n g love they deserve Christians from their paras there ents. If they truly used to cared about their be either. childrens future To be a they would do the Christian right thing and you have raise their kids to be dedto succeed rather icated to than letting them God and Stevy Rystedt do what they live by the want. Bible, and Children need tough, loving there are not as many people parents; it helps them grow that are interested in going into an all-around good young to heaven anymore evidently, adult. I know that a good child because loving God and folcould come out of lenient par- lowing the Bible is the only enting, but it is a lot less likely. way to get there. I am a deMy mother was a wonderful vout Christian and I promise mom to me, and I love her to raise my kids to love and dearly but she was very lenient and I could have really turned out different. People including myself do not respect their elders like they should, and if this generation is going to keep going at the rate they are going then their kids will be ten times worse than they are. My mother

Welcome Week 2008

Opinion

Page 6

How I see things

know God. I also promise to let my children decide for them what life they want to lead, but I will show my children the way to God and the way to eternal life with him. I do not know a lot of people that are not having sex. Did you know, according to Gods law, that you are not suppose to have sex until after your married? The amount of people having sex today outside of marriage is outrageous, that is why all of these young kids, yes kids, are having children at such an early age and then they are not raising them or they are and just do not care what they do. I urge you to be a good parent, if you made a mistake by getting pregnant, because you have to live up to your responsibly. One day I am going to be a mom and I hope to be a very

good one. It will be a while from now, but when that time comes I know that I am al-

ready ready. I understand that there are certain things that you learn while being a mom, but showing them love and toughness is not one of those things and if you do not, then please learn for the sake of the next generations because they are the ones that will have to live with your poor parenting. If you have anything to comment on or have any questions about becoming a Christian then e-mail me at rystedt@nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

Picnic kicks off Centennial countdown


By Jessica Remer TNE Writer
Nearly 100 years have passed since NSU was founded March 6, 1909. On Aug. 20, the countdown to NSUs Founders Day begins with a community picnic. This is going to be a collaborative effort with Cherokee Nation because theyre such a big part of our history and where we came from, said Amber Fite, general counsel, assistant to the president, and chair of the picnic committee. Weve tried to keep it a traditional but yet fun picnic, said Fite. Beginning at 6 p.m. buffet lines will open while free hot dogs and hamburgers are served. President Betz, along with members of the Tahlequah community and NSU student body, will open the picnic. Theyre going to speak quickly on why the centennials important to the entity theyre representing, said Fite. After President Betz closes the short program, a countdown to NSUs Founders Day will begin with the punch of the centennial countdown clock. At 7 p.m., South 40, Okla. country band made up entirely of NSU alumni, will perform. Incorporating clothing from the early years of NSU will be volunteers from the Murrell Home that will be in period dress from the 1850s to 1909. The Murrell Home will be setting up a booth at the picnic to promote our activities, demonstrate traditional Cherokee life ways and sell items from our gift shop, said Amanda Pritchett, historical interpreter and gift shop manager for the Murrell Home. We will have our living history interpreter set up to demonstrate how to spin and weave cloth. Pritchett hopes to recreate the atmosphere that was present at the time that NSU was founded. According to the NSU Web site, Cherokee Nation will be demonstrating traditional Cherokee activities like basket weaving, pottery spinning and the making of cornstalk dolls, while Rowdy the RiverHawk hands out free centennial Tshirts. Traditional Cherokee storytelling will be part of the entertainment, and the History on Main Street project will display historic photos and project information. Its been great working with Cherokee Nation because theyve really provided a lot of activities, said Fite. I cant say that Im the mastermind of all this because I have such a wonderful committee that have gone above and beyond for this. Fites goal for the picnic is to have as many picnic-goers as possible participate in the event. Not only is the community picnic the beginning of the centennial celebration, but it is President Betz first official public appearance. I know that he has an extraordinary amount of compassion for education and a huge amount of love for NSU, said Fite. I want this to be a very big welcome home for him and Suzanne. According to the NSU Centennial Web site, after the community picnic, the next event will be a special end-of-season concert presented by Downtown Country Aug. 29. The NSU Centennial celebration will last 17 months, ending December 2009. The celebration includes a community wide invitation to all members of the NSU family. Visit the NSU Centennial Web site for more information on events and how to participate. e-mail Jessica Remer at remerjm@nsuok.edu.

Welcome Week 2008

News

Page 7

Lecture series speakers announced


The NSU Centennial Lecture Committee has announced the speakers for the Centennial Lecture Series: Elizabeth Eckford of Little Rock, Ark.; Mark I. Pinsky of Maitland, Fla.; and Larry Coker of Ft. Myers, Fla. Eckford, a member of the infamous Little Rock Nine, will speak on Saturday, Sept. 13 at 3 p.m. in the NET Auditorium on the Tahlequah campus. One of the pervasive images of the Civil Rights Era is that of 15-year-old Eckford, walking alone in front of the school, through a hate-filled mob while being taunted. She will share her experience of the 1957 desegregation of Little Rocks Central High School. In telling her story, Eckford walks through a painful past. True reconciliation, she said, can occur when we honestly look back on our shared history. The Centennial Lecture Committee in conjunction with the Oklahoma Speech Theatre Communication Association presents Eckford. Pinsky is scheduled to speak on Jan. 22, 2009 at 2 p.m. on the Tahlequah campus. He is the author of the bestselling books The Gospel According to The Simpsons and The Gospel According to Disney. He is currently working on an updated version of the Simpsons book that will discuss religious themes in other animated television shows such as South Park, Futurama, King of the Hill and Family Guy. Since 1995, Pinsky has covered religion for the Orlando Sentinel. His writing on faith, media and popular culture appears in such magazines as Christianity Today, Moment, The Columbia Journalism Review, Quill, and Harvard Divinity Bulletin. His reporting has also appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street

Courtesy Photo Mark I. Pinsky is one of the guest speakers to speak during the Lecture series.

Courtesy Photo Former University of Miami football coach Larry Coker will speak April, 18, 2009.

Journal and the Washington Post. Coker,anESPNanalystandformer University of Miami head coach, will be the guest speaker on April 18, 2009 at 1 p.m. on the Broken Arrow campus. Coker served as the head coach at the University of Miami from 2001 to 2006. Coker amassed a 60-15 record while coaching the Hurricanes and was named the 2001 Bear Bryant Coach of the Year and 2001 AFCA Coach of the Year after guiding Miami to the 2001 National Championship. Coker had served as an assistant at several universities (including Ohio State, Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State) and as Miamis offensive coordinator from 1995 to 2000 before taking over as head coach. He is an NSU alumnus.

The Northeastern

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Faces in the crowdknow? What is one thing that freshmen should


You can withdraw from classes,
Kyle Williams, Tahlequah senior.

News

Welcome Week 2008

Dont get stuck in debt,


Tim Cannon, Tahlequah NSU graduate.

They should not spend their graduation money too quickly,


Natasha Sawyer, Westville senior.

Go to class everyday even if the professor tells you they dont take attendance,
Jennifer Leep, Tahlequah senior.

Dont skip class, major in something you love not what will get you a job, do skip class on your birthday and go to the river in the winter,
Stacy Pratt, Lawton, NSU graduate.

The Northeastern

Menu for Cafe Aug. 11-16


Monday
Breakfast
Biscuits & gravy Oatmeal Omelet bar French toast Tri hash browns Frizzled ham Doughnuts Waffle Bar

Welcome Week 2008

Menu

Page 

Lunch

Tuesday
Breakfast

Broccoli cordon bleu Turkey pot pie Mixed vegetables Cheeseburger French fries Frito chili pie Pizza Blondie Brownies Chocolate chip cookies

Spicy Rice Catfish Nuggets Turnip greens

Dinner

Biscuits & gravy Grits Omelet bar Sausage cheese biscuit Hash browns Crisp bacon Apple cinnamon scones Waffle Bar

Lunch

Wednesday
Breakfast
Biscuits & gravy Oatmeal Omelet bar Apple pancakes Tator tots Sausage patty Banana nut Muffins Waffle Bar

French onion Lasagna Green beans BBQ sandwich French fries Corndog Pizza Peanut butter cookies Cereal bars Ham & vegetable Poast Pork Loin Au-Gratin potatoes Buttered carrots Hamburgers Potato chips Tuna melt Pizza Brownies Chicken tortilla Spaghetti & Meatsauce Garlic Breadstick Hamburgers French fries Hot dogs Pizza Rice Pudding Orange jello Two Potato Baked ham Au-gratin potatoes Fried Okra Turkey burger French fries Pizza Double chocolate chip

Turkey breast Turkey gravy Dressing Peas & mushrooms

Dinner

Lunch

Salisbury steak Mashed potatoes Country gravy Buttered corn

Dinner

Thursday
Breakfast

Biscuits & gravy Grits Omelet bar French toast Hash browns Sausage links Chocolate chip muffins Waffle Bar

Lunch

Cheese enchiladas Spanish rice Refired beans

Dinner

Friday

Breakfast

Biscuits & gravy Cheese grits Omelet bar Blueberry pancakes Tri hash browns Frizzled ham Poppy seed muffins Waffle Bar

Lunch

Chicken fried steak Mash Potatoes Country gravy Corn on the cob

Dinner

The Northeastern

Wyly will house honors students only


By Eric Davis TNE Writer
NSU has added a housing option starting this semester that has not been available before. For qualified students, there is now an honors dorm option. Designed for students who have demonstrated and maintained a high academic standard, this is a great alternative that will allow them to live in an atmosphere that embraces academic success. We are intentionally making this option available to any residential student that has already demonstrated a degree of academic success. Current NSU students who have a 3.25 GPA are eligible. Incoming freshman who have earned an ACT score of 26 or higher will also be eligible. This year approximately 40 percent of our current students would be eligible for this option next year, said Todd Hefner, director of housing. One benefit to having an honors dorm is that, as with other groups on campus, by placing like-minded resident students together, they will be less bothersome to each other. Having a group of students with common scholastic goals and similar study habits living together in one place creates an environment that promotes excellence. This project has been made possible through the combined efforts of University Housing, Enrollment Management, College and High School Relations, First Year Experience and the Honors Program. Todd and I both, come from Residence Education Programs that have strong residential honors programs. These programs were very successful in that they allowed us to build specific supports into the community that were geared to helping students who have already demonstrated high levels of academic success continue to strive academically as well as gain new experiences that expanded upon their academic learning, said Tammie D. Willis, hall manager. Many Oklahoma colleges and universities, from regional universities like East Central University in Ada to large state schools like University of Oklahoma, already have an honors dorm or hall. Just as we provide specific living options for our first year students, for example, through the First Year Experience program, we also wanted to provide a community where academic success is enthusiastically supported and fostered, said Hefner. According to the NSU Stevy Rystedt/TNE housing Web site, they are Brady Schroeder, Bristow freshman, leaves Wyly Hall. The building will be creating an academically focused environment. Wyly turned into an honors hall next semester. Hall will have an associate hall manager and two resident as- optimistic that this is a step in the as, having faculty members consistants. The hall manager will be right direction for NSU. It is not duct classes or study sessions in the Velma Coon, Peggs senior. only a marketable resource, but hall. Of course we will be asking I have been an RA for three also a way to encourage students our students in Wyly Hall what years now. I really like getting to to make and keep good grades they want to see and work to make know people who live on campus during high school and their col- those requests happen, if possible, and I really like being inspiring to lege career. said Hefner. people, said Coon. As the program develops, we e-mail Eric Davis at davis02@ All parties involved are very hope to implement activities such nsuok.edu.

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News

Welcome Week 2008

The Northeastern

Welcome Week 2008

Special

Page 11

The Northeastern

NSU has several ways to alert students


By Liza Posson TNE Writer
According to the National Weather Service, the fastest and largest tornado ever recorded was the F5, 301 miles per hour twister that ripped through Oklahoma on May 5, 1999. The tornado caused over $1 billion in damages. Being prepared can make a critical difference during emergency weather. NSU alerts students of severe weather in multiple forms. Clint Vernon, NSU Campus Police chief, explained emergency weather procedures. The city of Tahlequah will sound an alert. NSU will follow up with our own notification. An emergency bulletin will run on every computer and television screen linked to the NSU network. In addition, an audible alert will sound in the Seminary bell tower, said Vernon. Oklahoma weather is notoriously unpredictable and destructive. Research done by the NWS confirms that the U.S. is hit by more violent tornadoes than any other country. Joe Spence, director of the NSU Physical Plant, advised students on where to go in the case of a tornado or severe weather. All students should take shelter in the downstairs basement of the UC, said Spence. Students should avoid areas with a wide-span roof, including auditoriums, cafeterias and large hallways. Students should stay away from windows. In addition, avoid the corners of a room, this is where debris usually gathers. If in a vehicle, get out and seek shelter immediately, do not try to outrun the tornado. Another NSU severe weather alert is the lightning siren located near the football field. The lightning alarm will sound for a few seconds and then stop, it is not a continuous alarm like the tornado siren. Emily Jansen, Stigler senior, has had some experience with the sirens because of living on campus. The lightning siren can be heard throughout campus, it is a convenient way to be notified of severe

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News

Welcome Week 2008

weather, said Jansen. The lightning siren alerts people to avoid the dangerous, aluminum football bleachers. NSU also has signs posted throughout campus that inform students about emerCourtesy Photo gency procedures. An emergency bulletin will run on every DeJon Jordan, Tulsa junior, is familiar with computer and television screen linked to the NSU network. the signs. There are color coded posters building, said Jordan. located across campus. The signs Staying advised during severe tell students where to go in case weather can allow the time needed of emergencies, including severe to take proper shelter. weather. The posters point out e-mail Liza Posson at posson@ where every exit is in that particular nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

On-Campus jobs help with money and experience


By Eric Davis TNE Writer One of the realities of going to college is a lack of money. Whether money goes for tuition, rent, or a couple of nights at a bar, college students are not known for having a surplus of cash. Finding a job is not always easy. Class schedules, extracurricular activities and study time often cut down on the amount of time available to work. For some, not working is not an option, while for others; the time is there as long as a job can be found that is willing to work with a hectic schedule. One way for students to make some extra money and still be able to fulfill their educational obligations is to get a job on campus. There are a wide range of jobs available to students. The first thing a student who is looking for employment needs to do is find out if they are a work-study or institutional worker. Work-study is a federal grant that is awarded through a students FAFSA, and they must be enrolled in at least six hours to use it. The largest work-study funding is up to an average of 14 hours of work per week. For institutional workers, they only have to be enrolled in one hour to work on campus. They may work up to 29 hours per week, said Laurie Galbraith, student employment specialist. Once it is determined which type of work a student is eligible for, the next step is to search for available jobs. The NSU Web site is the easiest and most timeeffective way to search available positions. From the NSU home page, click the financial aid link in the green navigation bar at the top of the page. Under the heading of student information, there is a link to work-study jobs, institutional jobs and off campus jobs. By clicking on the appropriate tab, students can read through a list of open positions. I turned in a couple of applications on campus a few weeks ago. It was pretty easy to figure out; I just looked around on the Web site, found what I wanted and printed off the application to turn in. Hopefully Ill get one of them, said Justin Perry, Sallisaw junior. After finding a suitable job posting, the next step is to fill out a student employment application, which is found under the student jobs tab. For work-study positions, the application will be handled through the financial aid office. For institutional positions, return the application to the appropriate department listed in the job posting. The minimum wage on the NSU campus now is $6.75 per hour, which is above the new state minimum wage of $6.55. Student workers are paid every two weeks throughout the year, said Galbraith. Being a student worker also offers many benefits. Networking is one huge advantage to working on campus. Becoming familiar with professors and other faculty members can be very useful. However, scheduling is often the most beneficial perks. I really like having a job that works around my class schedule. I work 15 hours a week, said Sarah Larson, Meade, Kan. senior. Finding a job off-campus that can work around a class schedule is not always an easy thing to find, so working on campus can be a great alternative for students who need more flexibility in their scheduling. A students class schedule can be worked around their job with many different departments and offices. There are however, a few positions though that may need a student for a certain particular schedule to meet with their special criteria, said Galbraith. For more information, see the financial aid Web site. Kara French/TNE e-mail Eric Davis at Kyle Dougherty. Muskogee senior, works davis02@nsuok.edu. on the second floor of the library as a technology support student assistant.

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The Northeastern

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BA News

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Kara French/TNE

Criminology training offered


By Melissa Fremen TNE Writer
Criminology is the social-scientific study of crime as an individual and social phenomenon, according to Wikipedia. Criminological research areas include the incidence, forms of crime and its causes and consequences. My major is biology but criminal justice has always been interesting to me and I think a camp for it is pretty cool, said Amber Hays, McCurtain junior. They also include social and governmental regulations and reactions to crime. Criminology is an interdisciplinary field in the behavioral sciences, drawing especially on the research of sociologists and psychologists, as well as on writings in law. The American criminal justice system is comprised of police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice at the local, state, and federal levels. A criminologist studies normal social behaviors and deviations from the norm. A criminologist often studies law and crime. They provide explanations of delinquent and criminal behavior and analyze criminal law and criminal behavior. I think being in criminology would be so cool because of all the action and interesting cases people would hear about, said David Roberts, McCurtain junior. A criminologist studies crime by analyzing criminal behavior and methods of criminals. Criminologists work with and for law enforcement agencies developing profiles of particular types of crimes as well as gathering statistics on crime rates. Criminologists not only study or investigate the crimes they also analyze the entire criminal justice system and its processes. NSU has one of the highest rated criminal justice departments around. For students attaining this degree, they have the chance to attend Criminology Camp. Offered on the Broken Arrow campus, this program aims to provide an in-depth understanding of the complexities within the justice system. I would love to attend but because of my schedule I will not get to, said Della Combs, Tahlequah junior. Entry-level criminologists conduct data collection, report proofing, catalogue information about the possible causes of crime and the crimes committed amongst various other tasks performed. Criminologists also analyze and develop crime prevention strategies. They also analyze the causes of crime and how the community relates to crime. The criminal justice field is so broad and there would be a lot of jobs and interesting stories to tell, said Kirby Allen Van Buren, Arkansas junior. A criminologist may find themselves involved in crime scene investigations, or attend autopsies seeking evidence and information to analyze the crime. Admissions requirements include an earned bachelors degree from an accredited college of university. In addition, 24 semester hours of undergraduate course work in criminal justice related work are required. e-mail Melissa Fremen at fremen@nsuok.edu.

Many criminologists become police officers, FBI agents, or state medical examiners.

The Northeastern

Financial aid helps


By Liza Posson TNE Writer
Applying for financial aid can be a confusing experience for students unfamiliar with the process. Fortunately, the Financial Aid office provides step-by-step instruction. The Financial Aid office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., with counselors and staff on hand to answer any question a student may have. Completing FAFSA is the general process to apply for all Federal Grants, Federal Student Loans and OTAG State Grant. Financial aid counselors recommend applying for FAFSA as soon as possible. Shelly Dreadfulwater, assistant director of Financial Aid Services, explained the importance of applying early. We encourage students to apply as early as possible for FAFSA in order to avoid any possible delays in the application processing. The sooner the FASFA is properly completed, the sooner the student can receive aid, said Dreadfulwater. Waiting weeks after school starts for money can be a stressful experience. The earliest a student can apply for financial aid is Jan.1 of each year. Change checks will be disbursed Sept. 4, 2008, in the University Center Ballroom. Students must complete all paperwork and receive an award letter in order to collect a check. After Sept. 4, all change checks will be disbursed at the cashiers office. Students must have proper identification in order to receive a check. Kristal Soderstrom, NSU cashier, shed light on what is required for students. We accept many forms of

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Liza Posson/TNE The Financial Aid office is open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

identification, including student I.D., drivers license and military I.D. Students only need to bring one form of identification, said Soderstrom. The Financial Aid department has recently started corresponding to financial aid recipients through NSU student e-mail accounts. Teri Cochran, director of Financial Aid Services, had crucial advice for students. It is important to check your NSU e-mail accounts regularly. We encourage students to follow up once FASFA has been completed, and to come in to the office if they have any questions, said Cochran. Amanda Morgan, Tahlequah sophomore, appreciates receiving both forms of financial notification. Its reassuring being notified about my financial aid through both e-mail and standard mail. It lets me know my information hasnt some how fallen through the cracks, said Morgan. All financial aid information will be mailed to the permanent address listed on the students financial paperwork. When applying for FAFSA, Financial Aid Services only recommends the federal Web site www.FAFSA.ED.GOV. The federal website does not charge a fee to file FAFSA, other Web sites con students into paying an unnecessary fee. e-mail Liza Posson at posson@nsuok.edu.

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FYE helps students adjust


back and have FYE enroll them again. Students are given a place where they can comfortably enroll with their parents or by themMany freshmen come to enroll at NSU every selves. year and many new students do not have a clue Also, students are given many helpful tips about about enrollment, dorm life, activities and so classes, scheduling, organizations and various acforth. tivities in which they can participate. Fortunately these anxious freshmen have a When living away from home for the first time, great place to test the waters before diving in head FYE is a great place to come to for a little direcfirst. tion. This place is called First Year Experience or New students should always keep in mind that FYE located in the back part of the library, which they are not the only new people on campus and will soon move into the new Enrollment Manage- everyone else was new at some point in their colment Services Building. This office holds many lege careers too. helpful and cheerful advisors for students to enroll FYE has helped me to become more oriented with. with college and its a really helpful program, We want to make sure the transition from high said Evan Everett, Tahlequah sophomore. school to college goes as smooth as possible, said There are some helpful hints to keep in mind Jennifer Ford, student success specialist. We when setting foot on college soil for the first time. want students to get connected with the services Students should explore all of their options for on campus. majors. There is plenty of time to decide and it is The main purpose of FYE is to help all new exciting to see what a college has to offer to pique and transferring students shift productively into ones interests. the academic and social culture of college life. Getting involved is an awesome way to meet They provide assistance with connecting to the new people and potentially make all those lifelong various NSU student services and activities, aca- friends everyones parents have been raving about demic and enrollment counseling, as well as make for so long before their precious child goes away referrals to tutoring if necessary. to college. Many college campuses do not have a first year FYE is here to connect students with the uniexperience program it does have an impact on versity and college life. FYE is also here to edustudents. cate students on the processes of enrolling and It was a really good experience for me and was about college, said Megan Anderson, student helpful too, said Emily Rowe, Glenpool sopho- success specialists. more. Many returning students want to come Overloading can be hazardous simply because new students are adjusting to being away from home and on their own. Students taking it easy in the first year tend to find college less stressful and are happy about college life. And finally students remember to have fun. NSU offers countless sporting events, activities, plays, and floating the river. So for all the incoming freshmen; swing by and visit the wonderful staff of FYE because they can help everyone transitioning to college life a more enjoyable and informational experience that everyone can carry with them from Melissa Fremen/TNE now on. Janie Giles, administrative assistant, works in the First Year Exe-mail Melissa Fremen at freperience office. The FYE is a very helpful program that is there for new students. men@nsuok.edu.

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By Melissa Fremen TNE Writer

The Northeastern

Student clubs and organizations on campus


Alpha Psi Omega ext. 2796 ext 2965 American Indian Science & Engineering Society ext 4350 American Marketing Association ext. 3010 American Society of Safety Engineers ext. 2962 Army Ranger Club ext 3062 Association for Childhood Education International- Dr. Roxanne Fillmore 918- 931-3753 Association for Computing Machinery ext 5840 Association of Black Collegians ext 2120 Association of Information Technology Professionals ext 2933 Baptist Campus Ministries ext. 3087 Boosting Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the Health of University Student Desiree Rieckenberg 918- 9312120 Campus Christian Fellowship Dr. Louis White 918-232-3725 Chi Alpha Campus Ministries ext 3110 Club Meetings And Destinations ext. 3087 Crucial Dance Team ext 2526 Disney College Program ext 3110 Entrepreneur Club ext 2904 Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics Club Go Vertigo ext 2728 Government and International Studies Society ext 3512 Habitat for Humanity ext 3751 International Club ext 2917 Kappa Delta Pi ext 3710 Phemomenal Women ext 2120 Kappa Mu Epsilon ext 3810 Phi Theta Kappa ext 2137 Kappa Phi ext 2014 Kindred Spirits Gospel Choir ext 121 National Association of Student Social Work ext 3517 National Science Teachers Association ext 3819 Native American Student Association ext 4350 NSU College Republicans ext 2916 Residence Hall Association ext 4700 Northeastern Student Speech Language Hearing Association ext 3782 Rifle Team ext 3067 NSU College Democrats ext 3614 NSU Fish and Wildlife Club ext 3825 NSU Japan ext 4011 NSU Rugby Football Club ext 3031 NSU Students for Animal Welfare ext 3816 Wheelchair and Friends ext 2923 Young Allied Gays ext 3088 Physical Education Majors and Minors Club ext 3933 Pre-Medical Club ext 3832 Pre-Optometry Club ext 3002 Pre-Professional Health Club ext 3838 Presidents Leadership Class ext 3087 Student Voices ext 3506 Psycology Club ext 3020 The Fashion Association ext 2971 Student Council for Exceptional Children ext 3786 Student Oklahoma Education Association ext 3741 Social Dance Society ext 3910 Society of the Underground Bookworms ext 3621 Sigma Theta Epsilon ext 5868 NSU Womens Rugby Football Club ext 3523 RiverHawk Ambassadors ext 4679 Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislator ext 3530 Open Spirit, Open Minds ext 3522 Optometric Student Organization ext 4036 ROTARACT Club Gerard Gibson 918207-8608 Sigma Tau Delta ext 3626 RiverHawks Ultimate Frisbee Jackyn Bonner 918-207-8123 Riverhawks for Christ ext 3808

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Complete list at Student Affairs Web site.

The Northeastern

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Seminary Suites provides a home away from home


By Charles Innis TNE Writer
The suite life of NSU, for a little extra cost comes a few extra perks. All dorm rooms on campus are furnished with a bed, desk, dresser, and a little bit of closet space, but for Seminary Suites residents there is a microwave, cabinet space and a refrigerator thrown into the deal as well. The Seminary Suites are the apartment-like structures across the parking lot from the library. There are four suites; A,B,C and D. Each standard suite has four bedrooms, a living room and two bathrooms. There are a few suites that have two bedrooms, a living room, and two bathrooms. The living room is complete with a couch, coffee table and end tables. There is also a small dining table, a sink and plenty of cupboard space in the little kitchen area on the other side of the living room. The only thing the suites lack is an oven. said Jesse Ramsey, Colcord sophomore. The suites offer an apartmenttype feel to those students wanting to be more independent along with

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the luxury of being on campus and relatively close to all classes. Its not that bad of a walk to class, said Ryan Redbird, Lawton junior. It takes about the same amount of time to walk from the high-rises. Along with residing in the suites is access to the club house. The club house offers several amenities not given to Kara French/TNE those in the other dorms. The Call housing at ext: 4700. Visit housmost notable would be closer ing website at http://www.housing.nsuaccess to the club house din- ok.edu. ing facilities and the seminary suites convenience store. pool to cool down those bodies and With convenient hours it is an easy for those who like to keep their tan one stop shop for many students. well into the school year. The suites also have a laundry I like to lay by the pool and tan, room like the other dorms, but the said Natasha Kappus, Mustang sophsuites laundry room is much big- omore. It is very relaxing. ger than the others with more space Alongside the pool is volleyball to do laundry instead of the small, court for those who like to play and cramped rooms offered in the other a shaded patio. A grill is available for dorms. The laundry room also has residents who desire to have an evevending machines located against the ning barbeque with some friends by far wall. the pool. To find out more about the The clubhouse also features a com- suites visit the housing office located puter lab and a ping pong table. in the Leoser complex. For those sweltering first couple e-mail Charles Innis at Innis@ months of school, the suites offers a nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

Labs provide assistance


By Jessica Remer TNE Writer
When writers block becomes an insurmountable obstacle, the University Reading and Writing Center, though it is not a fix-it shop, offers assistance for a variety of disciplines. In place since the 1990s, the University Reading and Writing Center helps with writing formats, research direction and provides computer access for all students. However, the number one mission of the writing center is to tutor. Our job is to help them think through and articulate, said Dr. Mary Stanley, director of the University Writing Center. According to the writing centers Web site, its mission is to provide members of the NSU community with the tools needed to achieve their academic objectives. Joe Suse, instructor of English, said the writing center is a valuable resource for students. They get help from graduate students in any phase of the writing process, said Suse. They can get help with research papers, comp. I papers, whatever type of paper theyre doing, they can work on it. During the summer, major changes were made to the writing center. Both equipment and furniture were replaced to better sever students. The WC is equipped with not only new computer stations but new wheelchair accessible desks as well. Several computers are equipped with special software for persons with visual impairments. The writing center is the single most important resource for student writers, said Suse. Plus, its just a great environment.

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Kara French/TNE NSU Tahlequah houses two reading and writing centers, both in Seminary Hall, located in Rooms 135 and 136. NSU-BA houses one reading and writing center, located in Building G, Room 234.

During the spring semester, there were 5,912 visits to the University Reading and Writing Center in Tahlequah with over 3,351 individual students visiting the WC. I use the writing lab for my reports, just in case I need help, they help me with MLA format and my grammar usage, said Bradley Osburn, Tahlequah junior. They help me with my essays and sometimes they know some good research topics. Osburn said he visited the writing center almost every day this summer. The writing lab is probably the best place on campus if you have to write a paper or do research. The tutors help you with the information and understanding concepts. I go just about every day, said Ryan Friend, Tahlequah senior. Undergraduates and graduate students, not just English students, provide tutoring. Three

trained students are present in the writing center at all times. All tutors for the University Reading and Writing Center complete a professional training program lasting four weeks. During that time, the tutors-intraining have the opportunity to observe experienced tutors and watch an actual tutoring session. This program is open to upper level and graduate students with a GPA of 3.0 or higher in their major areas of study and who have a faculty recommendation. All major disciplines are welcome, not just English students. Currently, the University Reading and Writing Center is understaffed for the fall semester. If interested in becoming a certified tutor, e-mail Dr. Mary Stanley at stanleymf@nsuok. edu. e-mail Jessica Remer at remerjm@nsuok.edu.

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Volunteers make RBC an unforgettable experience


By Sharry Mouss TNE Writer
The fall semester is here and for many, it will be the first time they are away from home. Luckily, Rookie Bridge Camp is working to make that transition as easy as possible. RBC really helps students get connected to other freshman and upperclassmen, so on the first day of school they will see familiar faces, said April Collins, Westville junior and second-year volunteer. They also get a little taste of what college is really like. RBC is a two-day orientation-type camp for incoming freshmen, organized and led by student volunteers. During camp, freshman, or Rookies, have the chance to be familiarized with campus, receive advice from peers and faculty and have a chance to meet and have fun with other students. Every year, RBC starts on campus, and then is transported to a camp outside of town. This year it will take place at Heart of the Hills. At the end of the second day, Rookies will have the chance to float on the Illinois River. When I went to RBC I had so much fun, said Erin Cole, Owasso junior. On the first day of class, I knew a lot of people in my classes and in the cafeteria. I also got to meet a lot of upperclassmen that were leaders on campus and learned a lot about the organizations that they were involved in. I met a lot of people that Im still friends with today. For the student volunteers, RBC is more than just a way to hang out with friends and

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Courtesy Photo Every volunteer is required to do one work day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., which usually includes making name tags, painting rookie rocks, posters and T-shirts.

go floating. It is a way to give back to a program that helped them become the leaders they are today. I want to help freshman the way I was helped as a freshman. This is such a great program and I love everything it has to offer, said Collins. Out of 100 applicants, 70 volunteers were selected through an application and interview process. This selection is determined from a good grade point average, enthusiasm for the program, campus involvement and the vision the student directors see for that years camp. When I applied, I was nervous of the possibility of not being able to volunteer, but I was excited at the same time, so it kind of cancelled out, said Tayler Fruechting, Broken Arrow sophomore. Each volunteer is just that. Although being a volunteer is a big job, no one gets paid for being a part of RBC. Every volunteer is required to do one work day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., which usually includes making name tags, painting rookie rocks, posters and T-

shirts. They are also required to attend one call night where they call pre-enrolled freshman and talk to them about the benefits of attending RBC. Trainings are also mandatory. This year volunteers were obligated to attend four training sessions where the directors inform them what to do, what not to do and what to expect for camps. Emeritus, volunteers that have been with the program for at least three years and serve as group leaders, were required to attend CPR classes as well. We have to equip the volunteers with the right tools and knowledge for the camp to run smoothly so that it is the best that it can be, said Amanda Adney, Oktaha senior and RBC Director. It is important for everyone to be on the same page. The first camp session runs August 4-5 and the second will begin Aug. 7-8. For more information regarding Rookie Bridge Camp, call the Student Activities office at 444-2526. e-mail Sharry Mouss@nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

Welcome Week 2008


By Stefanie Anderegg TNE Writer

Library provides variety of services


The John Vaughan Library is a three story building located on the edge of campus. The library has many comforts of home, such as couches, chairs and a caf. Within this building students will find many services to assist in academic and personal development. Services that include Circulation, E-Reserve, ILL/Document Delivery, Reserve and Library Caf, Computers and more are all located in the building. Whether working in a study group or just need a little boost, students can visit the Library Caf. The caf has been around for about five years, said Dalana Leach, library circulation coordinator. It is provided by Sodexho. Although students can enjoy pop, chips and candy Leach requests that students keep the food in the Caf area. Jacquetta Shade, library employee, added that if students remove food from the Caf to please keep away from the computers and other library documents. Computers are located on the first floor and also now on the second floor. Laptops can be checked out at the Reserve desk by the printers on the second floor. The laptops must remain in the library but can me moved to any floor and receive NSU Wireless Internet. Im here doing research for his TLI class, Kiroki Imaeda, ELI Program, from Aichi, Japan. I use the internet like Yahoo. The service that most students are aware of is circulation. This would include a lost and found, hold shelve, ILL pick up and return and book check out and return. The Circulation desk is located right inside of the main Library entrance. If a student or faculty needs a document that we dont own they can get it by InterLibrary Loan, said Shade. The ILL is for documents not held in NSU collections. If the document is at a different NSU campus the library has a document delivery system to get that document to the campus where a student is located. The Library also hosts 13 reference librarians between three campuses. NSU has three libraries; one

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Kara French/TNE Larry Williams, Sherman, Texas sophomore, works on English homework in the John Vaughan Library.

John Vaughan Library - NSU Broken Arrow Tahlequah Campus

Library Hours
Monday - Thursday 8:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

on each campus. Currently, NSU is conducting interviews searching for a new director for the Tahlequah campus. Tom Messner is currently acting as director for both the Broken Arrow and Tahlequah campuses. The reference librarians specialize in different areas of studies. For example Sarah Archer is the resource librarian for Performing Arts, Languages and Literature, and Communication and Art. The Librarians are very useful for students, said Shade. As students return to NSU and get assisted homework that requires research or a group work they need to keep in mind the multi-function Library. e-mail Stefanie Anderegg at anderegs@nsuok.edu.

NSU Muskogee

Fall and Spring Semesters:


Monday - Thursday 7:30 a.m. - 2 a.m. Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday 2 p.m. - 2 a.m.

Monday - Thursday 8:30 a.m. - 8 p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday & Sunday Closed

The Northeastern

Welcome Week offers something for everyone


By Jennifer Cash TNE Writer
The first few days of school through the first full week are filled with activities for students to get involved in. It is an opportunity to make new friends and reconnect with old ones. Here is a basic line-up for Welcome Week and days that follow brought to students and faculty by the Northeastern Activities Board. All events, food and drinks are free of charge. I like going because it is all free and there is always free food and drinks, said Jeanie Cook, Porter sophomore. On Thursday August 21, Caf Divan will be sponsoring a concert in the spirit pit beside the University Center from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Food and drinks will be served. The reason Caf Divan was created is to be sort of like that coffee house acoustic setting that is the kind of atmosphere we like to compare it to, like an open mic night we bring in smaller acoustic artists where people get to show case their talent, said Todd Newcomb, Oologah senior and administration chairman. On Friday August 22, students can caravan over to the War Eagle waterslide off Highway 10 where NAB will have it reserved for a couple hours in the afternoon; admission will be free for NSU students. There will also be a poster sale in the basement of the U.C. on Thursday and Friday all day. I bought a poster for my dorm last year and it was cheaper than I usually pay, said Eli Saunders, Checotah junior. The first full week of school activities will get kicked off Monday Aug. 25 when students can participate in NSUs annual Merchant Mall. At this event merchants and vendors from around Tahlequah will be passing out free stuff and information. Committees will be giving things away and there will be food and drinks. After checking out the vendors students can watch the Dirt Drifters concert at 6 p.m. and enjoy the two giant inflatables, one featuring a 40-foot zip line is one of only three like it in the country. If students want to help out the big one well need help on is merchant mall, said Newcomb. Well have a recruitment table set-up for the freshman on Aug. 18 at freshmen connection and also at Caf Divan on Aug. 21. Well have interest forms there and they can fill them out and well get them in the data base and start contacting them to tell them when committee meetings are. Then well send them to Erin and shell get them set up with information and merchant mall T-shirts if they want to help with that, hopefully well keep them active during the rest of the events. Students interested in volunteering during welcome week can also pick-up a form in the NAB office, simply fill it out and return. Students will be contacted by committee members with details.

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NAB is a really good way to get involved and help-out and learn management and planning skills, said Erin Cole, Owasso junior and NAB chairman. There Courtesy Photo are different NAB is a program, with the exception of one adc o m m i t t e e s visor, where the entire organization, including comwithin NAB, mittee chairs and executive directors, are made-up I am apart of students. of the wild card committee which plans for yet to be released on video. miscellaneous events, like MerOne thing were doing difchant Mall, that dont fit into ferent from previous years is any other category. that we are trying to spread it On Wednesday Aug. 27, co- out and to do more than one median Barron Vaughn will by specific week because if you doing a show at 8 p.m. in the try to jam every thing in there U.C. Then Sept. 2, another in that one week you kind of Caf Divan event will be held get burned out and over profeaturing singer Jessica Som- grammed, said Newcomb. mer, the event will that at 7 Were trying to have somep.m. On Sept. 3, students can thing every three days or so stuhave dinner and a movie in the dents have time to get excited spirit pit, dinner starts at 7:30 for the next event sort of like a p.m. and the movie at 8 p.m., semester kick off. the movie has not been decided e-mail Jennifer Cash at on yet but it will be one that has cashj@nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

Wright choice for NAB


Wright seems very pleased with the students he will be working with and is impressed with the preparations In the recent years, Student Affairs they have already made for future has welcomed several new members events. to their team. The newest member A lot of the things are already that was welcomed this summer was kind of formalized, said Wright. Mike Wright. Im used to seeing schools that are Wright is the new advislast minute and tryer to Northeastern Activiing to plan things ties Board, Intrafraternity that are coming up Council and Multicultural a couple of weeks Greek Council. from now. It seems I was just looking for right now the board an opportunity to use a lot is really focused on of the things Ive learned, what they want in a both in experience and years prospective. in studies, and this is that Wrights immediplace, said Wright. Mike Wright ate goals are to get Wright was born in Wyfamiliarized with the oming, and then moved to Hous- campus, the rest of the faculty and ton, where he spent the majority of staff and the students, so he can help his life. He went to undergraduate as much as he can with the groups school at Sam Houston State Uni- he will be working with. He would versity where he received his bache- also like to see an improvement in lors in Business Management. involvement among student activiAfter graduation and traveling ties and committees. He would like all over the country, Wright went to see a recruitment plan to execute to graduate school and earned his this goal. masters degree in College Student It helps students get more inPersonnel at Arkansas Tech. volved student activity-wise and it Id say Im a Texan more than helps provide more leadership opanything else. Oklahoma is a new portunities for students who may be thing; Ive only lived here for a cou- looking for that kind of thing, said ple of years, said Wright. Wright. NAB is a student-ran board conHe is also eager to be part of NSU sisting of nine committees, each as it enters into its centennial with a managed by a student. They are new president. responsible for planning free student Its an exciting time. Weve got a activities on campus. new president that is coming in with Im really excited about them. a good vision of where he wants to They seem to have a lot of things take things, said Wright. planned out and good ideas of He particularly looks forward to things they want to see happen, the visions President Betz has on stusaid Wright. dent leadership. The board is also excited to have I like a lot of what hes been sayan actual advisor after a year of the ing about leadership development position being empty. for the students, said Wright. A lot Technically, we didnt have an of colleges will focus primarily on advisor, but Dean Boren would just the academics. I think it is a very come and sit in on our meetings, promising thing when the president said Rachel Lynn, Tulsa Union ju- comes in and says that our students nior and NAB concert chairperson. need to be leaders in the world they We are definitely excited to have step into. him working with us. e-mail Sharry Mouss at mouss@ Having started earlier this month, nsuok.edu.

Welcome Week 2008


By Sharry Mouss TNE Writer

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Generations call NSU their home


By Shannon Bigler TNE Writer
Most students are either the first or second generation in their families to attend NSU. Megan Kelley, Muskogee junior, is the fifth generation to attend. The first known person in Kelleys family to attend the institution was her great-great-grandmother Nannie Whitmire. This is her journal talking about coming to the Seminary, leaving Baron and coming to Tahlequah, said Kelley. Baron is north of Stilwell on U.S. Highway 59. The journal has dates from the 1870s and 1880s. She talks about going to Fort Gibson and meeting soldiers at the fort, said Kelley. In one entry, Nannie writes about one days travel. I left home Dec. 2. It was a clear day. The sun was very bright, but it was cold that day. My mother and brother went with me. On my way I saw rivers and creeks and also saw a herd of deer. I rode 25 miles before I came to my journeys end. I was not at all pleased with the place, for it was the Female Seminary. I did not enjoy my trip, said Whitmire. Nannie Whitmire earned a teaching certificate from the Cherokee Female Seminary. After graduating from the Seminary, Nannie married Edward Clyne. They owned and operated a hotel in Baron. Emmabelle Clyne, Nannie and Edwards daughter and Kelleys great-grandmother, also attended the Cherokee Female Seminary. It is not known if she graduated. She (Emmabelle) worked in her parents hotel in Baron, said Kelley. It was while working at the hotel Emmabelle met and married Robert Kelley, an Irishman from Kansas. He (Robert) worked on the railroad, and one went through Baron. Thats how they met, said Kelley. Nannie Kelley, Robert and Emmabelles daughter, also attended in the 1920s when it was named Northeastern State Teachers College. She was Kelleys great-aunt; her grandfathers sister. She was the third generation to attend the institution. Kelleys grandfather Emmett Clyne Kelley Sr. married Sarah Shimoon. Their son Emmett Clyne Kelley Jr. attended NSU when it was named Northeastern State College. He graduated in 1967 with a B.A. in Education. He went on to graduated from Oklahoma City University with a M.A. in Education in 1972, said Kelley. Emmett Jr. became involved with government while working on his masters degree. While my father was getting his graduate degree, he was a legislative liaison to Governor David Hall. While he was doing that, he was helping Teddy Kennedy on his campaign, said Kelley. Kelley Jr. met Margrett in 1980

Courtesy Photo Megan Kelleys father Emmett Kelley graduated from Northeastern State College in 1967 with a BA Education degree.

while working for the Oklahoma Indian Affairs Commission. They were married a year later. Kelley has considered going into education because her father did. But she has also considered becoming a dental hygienist because her greatgrandfather George Shimoon and great-uncle, also George, were dentists. Dr. George Shimoon emigrated from Persia in the 1880s. When he came over here he had only one name. His Shannon Bigler/TNE name was Givergis, said KelMegan Kelley holds a photo of her ley. He Americanized his father and then Oklahoma governor name to George and took his David Hall. fathers given name Shimoon as his last name. decided to stay, said Kelley. Shimoon was born in Orama, a Shimoon had been practicing village in the northwest part of Per- dentistry for a short time in Etna sia, called Iran today. Orama is 200 Green, Ind., when he met a visitmiles southeast from the Biblical ing dentist from Oklahoma. He was Mount Ararat. so impressed, he moved to OklaShimoon came to the United homa. States for an education, and planned My great-grandfather came to to return to Persia. Oklahoma because he heard it was Their family was not Muslim; the land of opportunity, said Kelthey were Christian. They were ley. Presbyterian. He and his brother Shimoon opened his practice first Joseph came over here to get their li- in Fort Gibson in 1906, and then cense to become ministers and then moved it to Muskogee in 1907. go back to Persia, said Kelley. Shimoon became a naturalized Shimoon attended Knox College U.S. citizen in 1909 in Muskogee. in Galesburg, Ill., and then earned a When we was naturalized he dental degree from Indiana Dental met his first wife, Gertrude (RogCollege in Indianapolis. His broth- ers). She was Cherokee. They had er Joseph returned to Persia with a daughter, Miriam. She (Gertrude) a medical degree, but Shimoon passed away when Miriam was 4 stayed. years old, said Kelley. He later He liked America so much, he married my grandmothers mother, Mary Gray. Sarah Shimoon, George and Mary Shimoons daughter, married Emmett Kelley Sr. She is Kelleys grandmother. Kelley is the fifth generation to attend NSU in its various incarnations. She plans to graduate with a bachelors degree in mass communications. e-mail Shannon at neel.bigler@ gmail.com.

The Northeastern

Annual Balloon Festival 16thAnnual Balloon Fest Thursday, Aug. 14 floats into Tahlequah
Carnival by Pride Amusement
By Eric Davis TNE Writer
As summer starts winding down and students get prepared to head back to class, the summer fun of lakes, boating, floating the river, sunbathing and for some, summer classes, comes to an end. Tahlequah has one more event that is sure to wow people of all ages. The 16 Annual Illinois River Balloon Festival is here once again, and with a variety of things to see and do, this year is sure to be as fun-packed as previous years. According to www.okballoonfest.com, this is the longest running hot air balloon event in the state of Oklahoma and will take place at Tahlequahs Municipal Airport, located west of the city on SH 51, and will feature balloon glows each night (weather permitting). The balloon fest will take place Thursday, Aug. 14 - Saturday Aug. 16. On Thursday there is a short balloon glow at 7 p.m. On Friday there is a 7 a.m. media flight. At 5:30 p.m. there is a competition/ sponsor flight, followed by a balloon glow from 8:30-9:15 p.m. On Saturday there is a 7 a.m. competition/sponsor flight followed by the 5K balloon chase run. That evening there will be another competition/sponsor flight followed by a balloon glow from 8:30-9:15 p.m. In addition to the balloon events, there will also be a carnival, live music, tractor pull, and childrens activities. As stated on their Web site, the committee would like to remind spectators to bring their own lawn chairs or blankets for seating. Please be aware that all balloon activities are weather related and may be cancelled at any time for safety reasons. Spectators also need to be mindful that while this is a family event, there is no outside food and drinks allowed and no alcoholic beverages, said Dr. Craig Clifford, IRBC president. There is a $5 parking fee per car per day and free entry, but carnival rides and food have their own costs. With somewhere between 25 and 30 balloons participating in the festival, it is important to go out and support the teams who have spent a lot of time and money to make this possible. We appreciate the local businesses every year supporting this spectacular event for our community, said Clifford. For more information on the 5K run or any other part of the festival, go to www.okballoonfest.com. e-mail Eric Davis at davis02@nsuok.edu.

Welcome Week 2008

Feature

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Friday, Aug. 15

4:00 PM Gates open 5:30 PM Balloon flight (weather permitting) 6:00 PM Live music 8:30 PM Balloon glow (weather permitting) Fireworks show (weather permitting)

Saturday, Aug. 16

6:00 AM Gates open 6:00 AM- 9:00 AM Kiwanis Pancakes breakfast 7:30 AM Balloon flight (weather Permitting) 7:30 AM Balloon chase, 5K run 9:00 AM- 9:00 PM Childrens Activities, vendors, and food concessions 10:00 AM 4x4 rock crawling demo 10:00 AM- 8:15 PM Live music 12:00 PM Vintage Tractor Pull 5:30 PM Balloon flight (weather permitting) 8:30 PM Balloon glow (weather permitting) 9:30 PM Fireworks show (weather permitting)

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Special

Welcome Week 2008

The Northeastern

Welcome Week 2008

A&E

Page 27

The third Mummy disappoints viewers


By Liza Posson TNE Writer
In a summer of blockbuster action movies, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, is a dud. Like many action trilogies, by the third movie the story is played out. In a quest to have bigger and better special effects, the charming characteristics of the Mummy franchise are lost. The script was weak and the timeline was irrelevant. The movie picks up seven years since the last movie. Lead characters Rick and Evy OConnell have aged very little, but their tenyear-old son now looks to be in his mid-twenties. In reality, only 13 years separate Brendan Fraser and on-screen son Luke Ford. Maria Bello does a decent job of replacing actress Rachel Weisz in the role of Evy OConnell. Bello lacks the spitfire grace that Weisz brought to the character, in addition to a convincing accent. It was better than mediocre, but not as good as expected for the amount of money that was put into it, said Ben Workman, Muskogee resident. At PG-13, the movie is geared more towards the younger crowd. The movie has a bubble gumtype action that is appropriate for older children. It would be better to wait for it to come out on DVD, its an all right kids movie, said Aaron Tallent, Wagoner senior. Action veterans Jet Li and Michelle Yeoh are underused in this over-processed action movie. Moviegoers might remember Yeoh from such movies as Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, Tomorrow Never Dies and Fearless. Yeoh effortlessly delivers compelling action scenes. Lis character is underdeveloped. I wish that Jet Li had been in more fight scenes in the movie, not just walking around, said Alan Gower, Tahlequah resident. Pointless storytelling by the OConnell family in the first third of the movie could have been replaced by fight scenes with Li and Yeoh. The movies dialogue is weak. However, Brendan Frasers best acting moments come when he is personally relating to other characters, not when he is trying to drive the action of the movie. The Rick OConnell role has become a cheap knock off of Indian Jones. One of the few highlights of the film is the CGI Yetis that have been shown in the previews. The Yetis were my favorite part of the film, besides the Harry Potter preview, said Annie Tallent, Wagoner senior. In a time when action movies like Iron Man and The Black Knight are receiving critical acclaim, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor is mediocre. e-mail Liza Posson at posson@ nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

Several premier options for recording music here in town


By Charles Innis TNE Writer
Recording studios in Tahlequah offer competitive pricing and studio quality recordings for the local artists with a dream. The Tahlequah music scene is very diverse and in need of being broadcasted to the world. One way to do this is to be recorded; a two-in-one recording studio down the street from campus could be the placed to do it. Guerilla studios and Ryan Kelly studios occupy the same building on Allen Road directly across from the NSU football stadium. NSU alumnus Arlis Moon operates one half of the studio and former NSU student Ryan Kelly operates the other half. We each record our own projects on our own sides, said Arlis Moon, owner of Guerilla Studios. We both share a dead room though. The dead room is a padded room used mainly for vocals. The room is specially prepared to keep outside noises from getting into the recordings. Both operators have many years of recording and sound experience between them. I have interned at a few different studios; Black Watch studios in Norman, Ok, and Cimarron Sound Lab in Tahlequah, Ok, said Moon. About 3 years ago I began

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A&E

Welcome Week 2008

Charles Innis/TNE To listen to Guerilla Studios recording visit www.myspace.com/arlismoon, To listen to Ryan Kelly Studios recordings visit www.myspace. com/therundownband.

building my own studio, at that time it was a classroom in my church. Last year I had a sublet downtown but things werent working out so I moved to the studios current location on Allen Road. After leasing the studio, Moon rented out the other half to Ryan Kelly. Ryan Kelly is an experienced sound engineer that works for a Tulsa based sound company that runs sounds for big time acts all over the region. His constant work schedule makes it hard for him to record, said Daniel Cook, Skiatook junior. He does take a few months off and dedicates his time to recording though. A few of the bands Arlis Moon has worked with are; Where Theres a Will, UpFromUnder, Kyle Williams and of course himself. Some bands that Ryan Kelly has worked with are; The Run Down, MOOK, and Fate Leads to Failure. One thing I have noticed about the studios is that Arlis Records the softer styles of music while Ryan contends with the heavier stuff, said Jared Brown, Catoosa junior. No matter what style of music they record, one thing a studio

needs to record quality music is good equipment. Both studios have plenty of it too with mics ranging from Sennheiser e806 and Sterling Audio ST 55 to AKG Perception Large Dia Condenser and MXL 770s, soundboards including a Vintage Yamaha 2404 analog mixing console and a Behringer Eurodesk ML640 console. If a band is missing a piece of equipment the studio is sure to have it, from guitars and amps, to processors and drum kits to even keyboards, organs and pianos. There is plenty of equipment to fulfill and bands needs. Ryan Kelly charges by the song, depending on how much goes into the song depends on the price. At the least, a band can expect to pay $100, which is conveniently cheap compared to other studios that charge by the hour. Guerilla studios charges by the project. I work on a project rate not an hourly rate because I want to take the time to get the sound the client is going for and make sure enough time is spent in all stages of production, said Moon. e-mail Charles Innis at innis@nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

Top 10 things to do in College

Welcome Week 2008

Special

Page 2

10. Float the river 9. Try to see the ghost of Florence Wilson in Wilson Hall 8. Frequent the numerous watering holes around town 7. Live in the dorms for at least one year 6. Guys, paint their chests for a football game 5. Attend at least one Mr. and Miss NSU pageant 4. Girls, attend at least one Bid Day party 3. Sing karaoke at Town Branch 2. Participate in Homecoming activities 1. Graduate

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Page 0

On DVD August 12

A&E

Welcome Week 2008

Evil 2006 (NR) 90 Minutes Someone discovers that the power of faith defeats darkness. Starring: Ita Ever Tonu Kark

Smart People 2008 (R) 93 Minutes A widowed professor experiences a new love. Starring: Dennis Quaid Ellen Page

An American Crime 2007 (R) 98 Minutes A true-life murder case of a girl who was tortured and killed. Starring: Ellen Page Catherine Keener

Camp Rock 2008 (NR) 90 Minutes A teenager spends her summer working in a kitchen. Starring: Demi Lovato Joe Jonas

Deal 2008 (PG-13) 86 Minutes An ex-gambler teaches a college kid things about playing cards. Starring: Burt Reynolds Bret Harrison

Prom Night 2008 (PG-13) 88 Minutes A sadistic killer terrorizes a teenage prom night. Starring: Brittany Snow Johnathon Schaech

Fighting With Anger 2007 (NR) 90 Minutes An assassin searches for the answers she has been looking for. Starring: Willie Nelson Kelli Fleming

Her Best Move 2007 (G) 100 Minutes A 15-year-old has a shot at joining the U.S. Team. Starring: Leah Pipes Scott Patterson

The Life Before Her Eyes 2007 (R) 90 Minutes Story of a survivors guilt from a Columbine-like event. Starring: Uma Thurman Evan Rachel Wood

On DVD August 19

Lost Stallions: The Journey Home 2008 (NR) 86 Minutes A troubled teen discovers a kindred spirit in a young stallion. Starring: Mickey Rooney Alex Hugh

The Pacific & Eddy 2007 (NR) 87 Minutes Coming-of-age drama follows a young man who returns to his beach hometown. Starring: Ryan Donowho James Duval

Recount 2008 (NR) 115 Minutes HBO production chronicles the days and weeks after the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election and the subsequent recounts in Florida. Starring: Kevin Spacey Bob Balaban

Prom Night 2008 (PG-13) 88 Minutes Donnas prom is supposed to be the best night of her life, but a killer has different plans. Starring: Brittany Snow Johnathon Schaech

Miss Pettegrew Lives for a Day 2008 (PG-13) 92 Minutes When a governess loses her job, she is thrown into the glamorous world. Starring: Amy Adams Frances McDormand

Quid Pro Quo 2008 (R) 82 Minutes A semi-paralyzed radio reporter is sent out to investigate a story that leads him into an odd subculture. Starring: Nick Stahl Vera Farmiga

The Northeastern

Page 1

Puzzle

Sudoku puzzles provided by Sudoku.com.au.

Each Sudoku has a specific solution that can be reached logically without guessing. Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

How to Play Sudoku

Sudoku

Last issues answers

Welcome Week 2008

Crossword Fun

Across

Crossword puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com at http://www. bestcrosswords.com.

1- Spy 5- Outer coat of a seed 10- Purims month 14- Words to Brutus 15- Eight singers 16- Additional 17- Way to go 18- Glass bottle 19- Second hand, took advantage of 20- Unbearable 23- Draft choice 24- Not for a Scot 25- Agent 33- Celestial body 34- Indigo 35- Kareem, once 36- Predictive sign 37- Nostrils 39- Yorkshire river 40- 1980s movie starring Bo Derek and Dudley Moore 41- Injure 42- Category 43- Salt 47- Marseilles Mrs. 48- Mil. address

49- Not practicable 56- Lab fluids 58- Hilo hello 59- Makes a row? 60- Algerian port 61- Be silent, musically 62- Son of Zeus in Greek mythology 63- Branta sandvicensis 64- Uneven 65- Japanese rice wine

Clues

Down

1- Gilpin of Frasier 2- School founded by Henry VI 3- Greek letters 4- African antelope 5- Fall forward 6- Resounds 7- Agitate 8- Nipple 9- Legendary island 10- Talisman 11- Prescribed amount 12- Exist 13- Sunburnt 21- Constituent 22- False god 25- Lover of Juliet

26- Correct 27- Compose 28- Third in a series 29- Vane dir. 30- Greek epic poem 31- Piece of poetry 32- More than one female sheep 33- Camp beds 37- Represent numbers by symbols 38- Rainbow shape 39- The Greatest 41- Rounded protuberance 42- Plastic clog 44- Inhumanly cruel 45- Workshop machinery 46- Sleep inducer 49- Oil-rich Islamic theocracy neighboring Iraq 50- Chemical used on trees 51- First name in fashion 52- Cries of discovery 53- Witotoan language 54- Vichyssoise ingredient 55- ___ quam videri (North Carolinas motto) 56- Male offspring 57- Before

The Northeastern

Page 2

A&E

Concerts in August
Zoo Amphitheatre
Aug. 2: Kattfest featuring Stone Temple Pilots along with
Shinedown, Coheed and Cambria.

Welcome Week 2008

Aug. 16: Sheryl Crow with special guest James Blunt, Toots and
the Maytals

Aug. 21: Judas Priest and special guest Motorhead, and


Testament.

Sept. 20: Cross Canadian Ragweed with Jason Boland,


Buckcherry, Lee Ann Womack, and Randy Rogers

Oct. 17: Montgomery Gentry, Gary Allan, and Keith Anderson

Cains Ballroom
Aug. 6: Apocalyptica Aug. 8: Drag Queen Bingo Aug. 11: Seether with Red Aug. 17: 12 Stones, Royal Bliss, and Your Final Thought Aug. 21: Hot Club of Chinatown Aug. 22: Red Dirt Rangers, and South 40 Aug. 29: Strange Noise Tour, Kottonmouth Kings, and Tech
N9ne

Georges Majestic (Fayetteville, Arkansas)


Aug. 2: Ben Miller Band Aug. 5: My-Tea-Kind, and Elephant Revival Party Aug. 6: Mountain Sprout Aug. 9: Use Curtis Aug. 14: The Black Crowes Aug. 28: Georges 81 Anniversary Festival featuring Jason
Boland and the Stragglers, and the Randy Rogers Band.

The Northeastern

Welcome Week 2008

Special

Page 

Housing welcome week activities


Sunday, Aug. 17:
Rave Party 7-9 p.m. RiverHawk Lodge in South Leoser Just show up. We would love to have you.

Monday, Aug. 18:

Scavenger Hunt 4 -5:30 p.m. start & finish at Seminary Suites Club House Thanks for helping out, look for our students in the afternoon.

Friday, Aug. 22:

Iron Chef Competition 11 a.m. Set-up in front of University Housing Office 12 p.m. Competition begins 1 p.m. Winners announced RSVP by Monday, Aug. 18 to sign up your team.

The Northeastern

RiverHawks 2008 Opponent womensLocation soccer schedule Date Time


Fri Sept. 19 Sun Sept. 21 Fri Sept. 26 Sun Sept. 28 Fri Oct. 03 Sun Oct. 05 Wed Oct. 08 Fri Oct. 10 Sun Oct. 12 Fri Oct. 17 Sun Oct. 19 Fri Oct. 24 Sun Oct. 26 Thu Oct. 30 Sun. Nov. 02 St. Marys Incarnate Word East Central Wayland Baptist Eastern New Mexico West Texas A&M Northwestern Okla. State Angelo State Abilene Christian Christian Brothers Midwestern State Central Oklahoma SW Oklahoma State Texas A&M-Commerce Texas Womens San Antonio, Texas San Antonio, Texas Ada, Okla. Tahlequah Portales, NM Canyon, Texas Tahlequah Tahlequah Tahlequah Tahlequah Tahlequah Edmond, Okla. Weatherford, Okla. Tahlequah Tahlequah 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 4 p.m. 3 p.m. 3 p.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. 4 p.m. 2 p.m. 3 p.m. 1 p.m.

Page 4

Sports

Welcome Week 2008

Home games in bold

The Northeastern

Womens soccer team looks to improve


By Kyle Cisper TNE Writer
The NSU womens soccer team is practicing hard this offseason to improve on a 6-13-1 record from a year ago. The team lost some key players from last season, so this year they will be leaning on some of their younger players to chip in. We have a lot of new players, but yet I still think the team will be better than last year. I expect some of our seniors to step up and lead the team, said Carol Melo, head coach. The team is made up of just four seniors and there are a total of 16 freshman and sophomores. Some of the recruits to the program include, Alli Tilleman, Bedford, Texas freshman, Rachael Zimmerman, Boswell, Texas freshman, Emily Taylor, Lewisville, Texas freshman, Kristina Marshall, Highland Village, Texas freshman, Melissa Michelsen, Plano, Texas freshman, Celeste St. Gemme, Owasso freshman, and Hannah Struck, Coppell, Texas freshman. These new players will be looking to have an immediate impact on the upcoming season. We have a 26 player roster this year, which will help us on the road because we can travel more and stay fresh. We have many new girls but we have been working hard and were all looking forward to getting this season underway. We have a few strong girls coming back that will help our team, but right now we are just focused on getting to know each other and get back to the playoffs, said Brittany Coursey, Rogers, Ark. senior. Coursey started in all 20 games for the RiverHawks last season recording a couple of assists and leading the attack from her midfield position. Ashley Badeen, Rogers, Ark. senior, is also returning after scoring 4 goals in her 19 games played last season. Melo took over the reigns as head coach in 2005 after longtime head coach Charlie Mitchell resigned. Mitchell coached both the Redmen and Lady Reds soccer team until his resignation in 2005. Over that span, Mitchell recorded a womens record of 83-81-4. Melo is a native of Sao Palo, Brazil. She played four years at National American University in Rapid City, South Dakota where she helped her team to three straight national tournament appearances. She is looking for her first winning season as head coach this upcoming season, but she has influenced many in her stay here at NSU. The RiverHawks first two games will be at home this season before heading off on an eight-game road trip. The RiverHawks will begin on August 29 against Harding University. e-mail Kyle Cisper @ cisperko@ nsuok.edu.

Welcome Week 2008

Sports

Page 5

Courtesy Photo The team is made up of just four seniors and there are a total of 16 freshman and sophomores.

The Northeastern

RiverHawks 2008 mens soccer schedule Date Opponent Location Time


Fri, Aug. 29 Sun, Aug. 31 Fri, Sept. 5 Wed, Sept. 10 Wed, Sept. 17 Fri, Sept. 19 Sun, Sept. 21 Tue, Sept. 23 Fri, Sept 26 Sun, Sept. 28 Sun, Oct. 5 Fri, Oct. 10 Wed, Oct. 15 Sun, Oct. 19 Fri, Oct. 24 Sun, Oct. 26 Fri, Oct. 31 Sun, Nov. 2 Truman State Texas A&M-International Harding Missouri Southern State Newman West Texas A&M Eastern New Mexico Oral Roberts Texas A&M-International St. Marys St. Edwards Midwestern State Missouri Southern State Newman Eastern New Mexico West Texas A&M Drury Midwestern State Tahlequah Tahlequah Searcy, Ark. Tahlequah Wichita, Kan. Canyon, Texas Portales, N.M. Tulsa, Okla. Laredo, Texas San Antonio, Texas Austin, Texas Tahlequah Joplin, Mo. Tahlequah Tahlequah Tahlequah Tahlequah Wichita Falls, Texas 5:30 p.m. 12 p.m. 4 p.m. 4 p.m. 7 p.m. 4 p.m. 12 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 12 p.m. 12 p.m. 3 p.m. 7 p.m. 3 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m.

Page 6

Sports

Welcome Week 2008

Home games in bold

The Northeastern

Mens soccer team set to take off with youthful roster


By Kyle Cisper TNE Writer
The NSU RiverHawks mens soccer team resumed practice yesterday in hopes to improve on a 5-11-2 record from a year ago. The team lost seven seniors from last years team, forcing them to go young this season with just two seniors on the roster this year. Former NSU Redmen standout Bobby Peterson is returning for his fourth season as head coach. He has a record of 2327-8 since taking over in the summer of 2005. Peterson and the RiverHawks have 11 new players coming in this season in hopes of having his second winning season in 4 years. Were excited, we have a new group of players coming in and it should be interesting. We have a couple of young guns coming in along with six juniors and three or four redshirt freshman, I think well be just fine, said Peterson. The two seniors returning to the roster are Kenneth Kelley, Dallas, Texas senior, and Chad Miller, Austin, Texas senior. The two players combined for 20 starts last season and appeared in 25 games. Other returning players with substantial experience include Zach Schmoker, Catoosa sophomore, Anthony Dingledine, Lincoln, Neb. sophomore, and Bo Evans, Duncanville, Texas sophomore. Schmoker appeared in 17 games last season, starting 14 of those. He recorded a goal and had 10 shots on goal on the season. Dingledine saw action in 15 games, starting 3 of those. He finished the season with three assists and four shots on goal. Evans appeared in all 18 games for the RiverHawks, starting 14. He recorded a goal on two shots on goal. These three players showed potential in their freshmen seasons and will be counted on for big production this season.

Welcome Week 2008

Sports

Page 7

Courtesy Photo Bo Evans, Duncanville, Texas sophomore, volleys for position in front of the goal in a game last season.

NSU will begin this upcoming season with the RiverHawk Classic from August 28-31. They

will be joined by Truman State University and Texas A&MInternational for the three day

round robin event. e-mail Kyle Cisper at cisperko@nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

RiverHawks 2008 football schedule


Home games in bold
Thu, Aug. 28 Sat, Sept. 6 Sat, Sept. 13 Sat, Sept. 20 Sat, Sept. 27 Sat, Oct. 4 Sat, Oct. 11 Sat, Oct. 18 Sat, Oct. 25 Sat, Nov. 1 Sat, Nov. 8 Arkansas Tech Tarleton State Midwestern State Texas A&M-Kingsville East Central Texas A&M-Commerce Southwestern Oklahoma State Southwest Baptist Southeastern Oklahoma State West Texas A&M Central Oklahoma Russellville, Ark. Stephenville, Texas Tahlequah Tahlequah Ada, Okla. Tahlequah Weatherford, Okla. Tahlequah Durant, Okla. Canyon, Texas Tahlequah 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 3 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 2 p.m.

Page 8

Sports

Welcome Week 2008

NSU poised to make postseason run under new head coach Evans
By Jeremy Short TNE Sports Editor
The RiverHawks football team is set to begin a new era this season under first-year head coach Kenny Evans. Evans resume includes stints as an assistant coach at Oklahoma, Florida, North Texas, Missouri Southern, Southeastern Oklahoma State and most recently Louisiana Tech. The team will try to bounce back from a 3-7 record last year. The team is picked to finish fifth in the Lone Star Conference preseason poll. Those things dont bother me, said RiverHawks head coach Kenny Evans. It doesnt matter to me where we start its how we finish. NSU returns several impact players from last season; most notably safety Broderick Mondy, Plano, Texas senior, and receiver Jarrett Byers, Kansas City, Kan. senior. Mondy led the defense last season recording 117 tackles and an interception. For his career he was recorded 256 tackles and 3 interceptions. Mondys career honors include being named to the Lone Star Conference North Division team three times and this offseason was named to the 2008 Consensus Draft Services preseason All-American team. Byers returns after receiving a medical hardship due to a season ending injury in the second game last year. He is NSUs all-time leading receiver with 1,846 yards and his 4.4 40-time has attracted Jeremy Short/TNE the attention of several NFL The football team began fall pracscouts. tices Aug. 7. The teams biggest concern in the offseason has been fillLewis will have plenty of competiing the starting quarterback role tion for carries from Rice transfer vacated by the graduation of Joe Tristan Thomas, Fayetteville, ArHogan. The competition is wide kansas sophomore, and John Kelly, open with as many as seven play- Garland, Texas sophomore. ers being considered. Among those The RiverHawks special teams are NEO transfer Kaelin Woods, should also be formidable with allMiami junior, Southern Arkansas conference punter Joe Kok, Brotransfer Matt Silcox, Alba, Texas ken Arrow junior, and kicker Jared sophomore, North Texas transfer Homer, Mustang junior. Woody Wilson, Fayetteville, ArkanWe have a good kicker and sas junior, Austin Axtell, Denton, punter back, but you can have the Texas freshman, and Kenny Davis, best kicker in the world and if you Adair freshman. dont have a good holder or blockRight now its up in the air and ing it doesnt matter, said Evans. theyre all competing, said Evans. NSU kicks off the season at ArOne area that is sure to produce kansas Tech Aug. 28 at Arkansas is the running back position where Tech. The RiverHawks lost 20-13 the RiverHawks return Josh Lewis, to the Wonder Boys last season at Arlington, Texas junior, who gained Gable Field. 1,173 total yards last season to earn e-mail Jeremy Short at short@ All-LSC second team honors. nsuok.edu.

The Northeastern

NSU fall sports are exciting should be enjoyed by more of the student body
The school year is here and that means that college football is about to be in full swing. For those who love college football, like me, there is not a better time of the year. That excitement can be enjoyed locally here on campus. I am not saying that Gable Field is Owen Field at OU or anything like that but if the majority of the student body attended games here it would create a fun, college football atmosphere. There has never been a better time to go with NSU beginning a JEREMY new era under head coach Kenny Evans. The RiverHawks can also claim two of the best players in the conference; Jarrett Byers, Kansas City Kan. senior, a receiver with 4.4 speed who is drawing attention from pro scouts, and Broderick Mondy, Plano, Texas senior, the prototype safety who led the conference in tackles last season with 117. NSU will likely boast one of the best defenses in the LSC after returning most of the starters from last season including Mondy and Latarus Sykes, Calhoun City, Miss. senior, in the secondary, Jon Evans, Chandler sophomore, at linebacker, and T.J. Raymond, Grand Prairie, Tex. senior, and Nick Jones, Jackson, Miss. senior, on the defensive line. Although the Lone Star Conference is not loaded with highSHORT ly touted five star recruits, the level of competition is higher than most think. There have been several players out of the Lone Star Conference play in the NFL including Hall of Famer Darrell Green, who played at Texas A&M-Kingsville. NSU has even had players play at the next level; most notably Derrick Moore who played three seasons in the NFL for the Atlanta Falcons and Carolina Panthers. My point is that although the LSC is not the Big 12, it is still an exciting league to watch. The bottom line is that if the students rally behind this team they may be able to start building the success that became customary in the 1990s. The other sports that will be beginning soon are mens and womens soccer. The womens team has several talented veteran players who should help them make a run at the postseason, something that barely eluded them last season despite a 6-13-1 finish. Last years leading scorer Early Villegas, Rogers, Ark. junior, as well as Ashley Badeen, Rogers, Ark. senior, Brittany Coursey, Rogers, Ark. senior and Vicki Pacula, Parma, Ohio senior, will also be players to watch for the RiverHawks. The mens team will be young with only two seniors but have several underclassmen that impressed when they were on the field last season. The RiverHawks will look to Kenneth Kelley, Dallas, Tex. senior, Anthony Dingledine, Lincoln, Neb. senior, and Zach Schmoker, Catoosa senior, to lead the young squad. I didnt really watch soccer until last season when I caught a few games and its much more fun to watch than people think, plus it is free. There are also the golf teams, which begin their fall seasons in September. Head coach Scott Varner has taken what was a mediocre program when he took over and built it into one of the nations best. The mens team will be lead by Sam Powell, Coweta senior, who was honorable mention on the All-America team last season. The womens team also has an AllAmerica player in Stephanie Bird,

Welcome Week 2008

Sports

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Football, golf and soccer are among the sports beginning this fall.

Yardage

Short

Courtesy Photo The RiverHawks will try to improve on last seasons 3-7 record under first year head coach Kenny Evans.

Las Vegas, Nev. senior, who was a second team selection last year. I hope after reading this column, students will at least go check out some of the athletic events on campus this fall. There are schedules in this issue and also posted on the athletic Web site if there are ever any questions about game times. e-mail Jeremy Short at short@ nsuok.edu.

Courtesy Photo The womens soccer team will try to bounce back from a 6-13-1 finish last season.

Courtesy Photo The RiverHawks celebrate a win against UCO last season.

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