OLED Materials Markets ‐ 2008, Chapter One | Oled | Supply Chain

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

         
OLED Materials Markets ‐ 2008 
Page | 1 

 
Chapter 1    September 2008
                             
NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

 

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

Chapter One: Introduction
1.1 Background to This Report Materials  science  rarely  has  those  “Eureka”  moments  of  pure, serendipitous  discovery.  Instead,  an  initial breakthrough points toward a promising area of inquiry, followed by years — even decades — of  grinding experimentation and exploration. As Thomas Edison said, “Failed? — why we haven't failed,  we only know the thousands of ways that won't work.” This is the case for OLED electroluminescence.   Chin Tang of Kodak discovered OLED electroluminescence in 1979 while working on organic solar cells.  And, in 1989 Richard Friend, Jeremy Boroughs, and Donal Bradley at Cambridge University discovered  polymer‐based  OLED  electroluminescence.  These  initial  discoveries  launched  research  efforts  that  continue  to  build  momentum.  So  far,  OLED  researchers  have  identified  a  compendium  of  viable  materials, along with the large pile of materials that won’t work.  The initial commercial applications for OLEDs were modest, to say the least, starting with car stereos, a  battery level indicator on an electric razor (Philips), and the control panel display for a portable MP3  player. In just six years, we have seen OLED panels on digital cameras and mobile phones, and in 2007  Sony released the first OLED television set.  OLED displays are appealing for a number of reasons. Perhaps first and foremost is the fact that they  are  emissive,  providing  excellent  viewing  angle  performance.  They  are  solid  state,  so  there  is  no  maintenance required. And some materials — notably those intended for lighting applications — are  now rated at 100,000 hours or more until the light output drops to one half the original level.  Unlike  LCDs  that  require  a  pair  of  substrates,  OLEDs  only  need  a  backplane.  As  well  OLEDs  have  demonstrated their compatibility with plastic or metal foil substrates. The result is an improbably thin  device  that  can be  made  to  conform  to  curved surfaces or even  made  flexible.  Some  demonstration  displays  have  the ability  to  be rolled  and  unrolled  while in  use.  And  OLED  materials  do  not  rely  on  heavy  metals,  such  as  the  mercury  used  in  fluorescent  lamps,  so  they  promise  a  reduced  environmental impact and lower recycling costs.  OLEDs  produce  excellent  black  levels,  making  them  ideal  for  video  displays.  The  individual  pixel  response  time  is  low,  which  allows  OLED  displays  to  show  fast‐moving  images  without  blurring.  Another attractive  feature  of  OLEDs  is  their ability  to  operate  efficiently and  with  low  voltages  —  under 12  volts  —  making  them  ideal  for  bright displays  used in  portable applications.  And perhaps  most important of all, there is the promise that OLED devices can be manufactured at very low costs,  giving them a competitive advantage over other technologies.  1.1.1 Are We There Yet? The  OLED  industry  has  made  an  encouraging  start,  but  we’re  not  there  yet.  Many  fundamental  problems  remain  to  be solved.  None  appear  to  be  insurmountable at  this  point,  however,  but  it’s 
NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

Page | 2 

 

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

dangerous  to  make  assumptions  until  the  discoveries  are  proven  in  high‐volume  commercial  production. Three major limitations rise to the top for consideration.  • Perhaps  the  largest  challenge  for  full‐color,  pixilated  displays  —  such  as  those  needed  for  televisions — is that of differential aging. The light output of all OLED materials decreases with  use over time. The problem is that the red, green, and blue materials currently being used age  at different rates, with blue materials handicapped with the shortest lifetimes.  Materials  must  be  developed  that  can  be  implemented  with  efficient  and  cost‐effective  manufacturing  processes.  The  original  OLED  concept was a simple stack  of  a  few layers, but  novel  approaches  threaten  to  double  or  triple  the  complexity  of  the  structure.  Each  layer  creates  a  new  opportunity  for  unintended  interaction  between  materials  or  the  processes  used  to  apply  them.  And  production  of  displays  at  large  sizes  needed  for  many  markets  provides  additional  challenges.  One  such  challenge  is  how  to  create  layers  of  consistent  thickness—a must for reliable image quality and performance.  The very materials required for life — water and oxygen — are fatal for many materials in an  OLED  stack,  so encapsulation  is  required  to  protect  them  from  these  damaging  influences.  Techniques that work in a lab may turn out to be difficult to impossible to implement in a high‐ speed production environment using large substrates. 

Page | 3 

Other challenges  exist as  well.  For  example,  tuning  the  color  output of  OLED  materials  —  especially  blue  emitters  —  needs  additional  work  in  order  to  deliver  the  maximum  color  gamut.  Display  performance is  affected  by the  thickness of  the  materials  in the  stack, so  inconsistent  deposition of  materials can result in visible defects in the final display (mentioned above).   1.1.2 Heading Off in Many Directions at Once Like the blind men observing an elephant, members of the OLED industry see different opportunities  both in terms of the markets and the materials used to create products for those markets. As the paths  of inquiry diverge and diverge then again, we are confronted with a rapidly expanding and overlapping  matrix of ideas and a pproaches.  For  example,  one  major  fork  in  the  road  occurs  as  a  result  of  identifying  which  markets  for  which  OLEDs  should  be  commercialized.    OLEDs  were  initially  aimed  at  information  displays,  from  monochrome  segmented  displays  to high‐resolution pixel arrays  for  full‐color moving images. While  OLEDs  have  made significant inroads into  the  markets  for smaller  displays,  the  technology is  not  yet  established in larger displays. Now it looks as though large‐area OLEDs may come to market as lighting  products  before  information  display  applications.  Their  planar  emissions  and  efficiency  may  make  them suitable  replacements  for  other  incumbent  technologies.  And  the  production  of  monochrome  lighting devices may be easier to produce in high‐volume, roll‐to‐roll or other manufacturing processes  than pixilated displays, making lighting products easier to bring to commercial production. 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

 

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

There has also been a fundamental divergence in the types of materials used to create the OLEDs. The  division is between “small molecule” and polymer OLEDs. Small molecule designs, which typically use  Alq3   (tris‐(8‐hydroxyquinoline)  aluminum)  as  the  emissive  layer,  typically  rely  on  the  expensive,  vacuum deposition process to create the required thin films. In contrast, the polymer materials — such  as polyfluorene — are well‐suited for solution processing, holding out the possibility of cost‐effective  and efficient  manufacturing  processes such as  ink  jetting.  Recent research  has also pointed  the  way  toward hybrid approaches that may offer the best of both technologies.  Another source of departure is the growing complexity of the OLED stack, as mentioned above. In its  simplest  form, an  OLED  consists  of an anode, an  emissive  layer  (EML), and  a  cathode.  Doping  of  the  EML has proven to be a way to adjust the color of the emitted light and improve efficiency. There is  growing  interest  in adding  other layers,  which add  complexity  to the structure.  One  example is an  OLED constructed with an anode, a hole injection layer (HIL), a hole transport layer (HTL), an electron  blocking layer (EBL), the EML, a hole blocking layer (HBL), an electron transport layer (ETL), an electron  injection  layer  (EIL),  and  a  cathode.  And  this  does  not  include  consideration  of  substrates,  optical  enhancement  layers,  or  encapsulation  materials.  With  a  large  number  of  corporate  and  academic  research departments actively pursuing these different materials, we are in the midst of an explosively  expansive environment marked by the steady flow of new developments.  1.1.3 How Do We Get There? One  key  factor  in  sorting  out  the  OLED  industry  is  time—the  time  required  to  prove  out  initial  discoveries and to demonstrate that these early stage results can survive the demands of real world  costs a nd commercial volume production.  In the case of OLEDs, it will take more than just discovering the materials themselves. The industry will  also  need  to  build  up  the  infrastructure  required  to  develop  and  produce  a  robust  manufacturing  process.  Nokia  recently  made  OLED  production a  mandatory  requirement  for  companies producing  display panels for their mobile phone business. Should Nokia choose to use OLED panels in a significant  portion  of  their  product  line,  this single  application  will  require  an  enormous amount  of  production  capacity. Currently, Nokia builds more than 1.3 million mobile phones per day.  A large scale manufacturing system will also require an extensive supply chain. The complexity of this  system will be directly related to the complexity of the OLED structure that is put into production. If  many materials are involved, then the need for reliable sources for each becomes increasingly critical.  The absence of any one part of the mix could upset the market for all the other materials in the supply  chain. This will make technology licensing and multiple sources — or at least multiple production sites  — of utmost importance. 

Page | 4 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

 

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

1.2 Goal and Scope of This Report This report analyzes and  forecasts  the  prospects  for  OLED and  related  materials  in  the coming  eight  years.  In  the  report,  we  review  the  range  of  materials  currently  utilized  or  under  development  for  OLED  lighting  and  display  applications,  including  interesting  research  underway  in  universities  and  industrial labs. We also investigate how the OLED materials markets are changing, including the impact  of demands for commercially‐viable mass production processes.  We provide an in‐depth review of current commercialization efforts by firms that have focused on the  OLED materials, including strategic profiles of the leading suppliers of these materials.  In addition, the  report contains detailed forecasts of major OLED application categories, in both revenues and volume  terms.  This report is entirely international in scope.  The forecasts are worldwide forecasts and we have not  been geographically selective in the firms that we have covered in the report or interviewed in order  to collect information.    1.3 Methodology and Information Sources for This Report This  report  is  based  on  extensive  interviews  with  the  movers  and  shakers  throughout  the  OLED  community,  as  well  as  extensive  secondary  research  including  an  analysis  of  relevant  applications  markets. To determine where the opportunities are, we have based this report on both primary and  secondary research.   The secondary  research  drew  on  the  World  Wide  Web,  commercial  databases,  trade press articles, SEC filings and other corporate literature to fill out what is going on in this sector.   The forecasting approach taken in this report is explained in more detail in Chapter Three.  1.4 Plan of This Report Chapter Two of this report reviews the breadth and depth of the materials that have been identified  for  use  in  making  OLEDs,  from  the emissive  layer  all  the  way  out  to encapsulation techniques.    In  Chapter Three we provide detailed eight‐year forecasts of OLED materials across all applications from  lighting  to  high‐resolution  displays.  In  Chapter  Four  we  offer  profiles  of  leading  developers  and  suppliers of the various OLED materials.           

Page | 5 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

 

NanoMarkets
Table of Contents 
Executive Summary

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

E.1 Summary of emerging opportun ities for materials suppliers E.2 Implications for OLED device manufacturers E.3 Implications for equipment makers E.4 Key firms shaping the OLED materials market E.5 Summary of eight-year forecast of OLED materials

Page | 6 

Chapter One: Introduction
1.1 Backgroun d to this report 1.2 Methodology and scope of this report 1.3 Information sou rces for t his report 1.4 Plan of this report

Chapter Two: OLED Technology and Materials
2.1 Polymer and small molecule OLEDs 2.2 Options for OLED stacks 2.2.1 Top emitting vs. bottom emitting designs 2.2.2 Adding additional layers 2.2.3 Doping 2.2.4 Impact of stack design on materials 2.3 OLED materials 2.3.1 Photoactive materials 2.3.2 Hole injection materials 2.3.3 Transport layer materials 2.3.4 Electrode materials 2.3.5 Encapsulation and barrier coating materials 2.3.6 Other materials 2.4 OLED "Inks" 2.4.1 Polymer In ks 2.4.2 Small molecule inks 2.5 Substrates for OLEDs 2.5.1 Glass 2.5.2 Plastic 2.5.3 Foil

Chapter 3: Applications and Forecasts
3.1 Forecasting methodology 3.2 Analysis of OLED materials requirements by application 3.2.1 Passive matrix and segmented displays 3.2.2 Active matrix displays 3.2.3 Low-cost OLED light ing f or backlight ing, disposable electronics, etc. 3.2.4 Mainstream OLED lighting for general illumination, architectural lightin g, etc. 3.3 Eight-year forecast of OLED display materials by materials type 3.4 Eight-year forecast of OLED lighting materials by materials type

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

 

NanoMarkets

thin film | organic | printable | electronics  www.na nomarkets.net

3.5 Eight-year forecast of OLED materials by manufacturing process 3.6 Eight-year forecast of OLED substrates 3.7 Summary of eight-year forecasts of OLED materials

Chapter 4: Supplier Profiles
4.1 Agfa 4.2 BASF 4.3 Ciba Specialty Chemicals 4.4 DuPont 4.4.1 DuPont Teijin Films 4.5 GE Global Research 4.6 H C Starck 4.7 Idemitsu Kosan 4.8 Kodak 4.9 Merck/EMD 4.10 Mitsui Chemicals 4.11 Novaled 4.12 OLED-T 4.13 Plextronics 4.14 Sumitomo/Sumation 4.15 UDC 4.16 Vitex 4.17 Other suppliers

Page | 7 

 

NanoMarkets, LC | PO Box 3840 | Glen Allen, VA 23058 | TEL: 804-270-7010 | FAX: 804-270-7017

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful