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December 2011

Volume 9, Issue 12
F
R
E
E
F
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West Central Ohios magazine for the mature reader
our our
Generations
Generations
Magazine
BELL RINGERS
Volunteers work to keep
Salvation Army afloat
SETTING PRIORITIES
Mutual respect, love
enhance relationships
THE LAST DANCE
A look back at
Springbrook Garden Dance
2 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
Our Generations Magazine
Editorial
Lifestyle/Special Sections Editor
Adrienne McGee
419-993-2072
amcgee@limanews.com
Contact Adrienne McGee if you have a story idea
or if you see an error of fact.
advErtising
For information on advertising in this publication,
contact:
Local Display/Advertising Manager
Natalie Buzzard
nbuzzard@limanews.com
or
Regional Display/Classified Advertising Manager
Steve Beck
sbeck@limanews.com
Our Generations Magazine is published monthly by The
Lima News by the first of every month. Address correspon-
dence to The Lima News, 3515 Elida Road, Lima, OH 45807,
Attn: Our Generations Magazine.
Our Generations Magazine is available free at libraries,
supermarkets, retail stores, assisted living center, hospitals
and other outlets.
Our Generations Magazine all rights reserved. No portion of
Our Generations Magazine may be reproduced without the
written consent of the publisher of The Lima News.
Volume 9, Issue 12
On The Cover:
Deborah Long rings a bell for the
Salvation Army donations at
Rays Signature Foods.
.
Lindsay Brown
The Lima News
Generations
our
FEaturEs
The last dance 10
By Jeanne Porreca
Bell ringers 12
By Adrienne McGee
Setting priorities 18
By Jill Campbell

dEpartmEnts
Sports Spot 4
Seasonings 6
At Our Age Q&A 10
Day Tripping 14
Your Money 21
Events calendar 22

CommEntary
On My Mind 3
By Adrienne McGee
Inspired 16
By Christina Ryan Claypool
For Fun
Crossword 20
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3 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
I
t pays to be positive.
Especially this time of year, when the economic powers that
be are frowning upon us. It can be easy to get down, along
the lines of good jobs are hard to find, everything costs more than
it did a month ago, the housing market is unfriendly, etc. You
know what your et cetera is, just the same as I know mine. Heck,
I even read recently that divorces are down and not for lovey-
dovey reasons. People just cant afford it right now.
Its easy to be mired in gloom. Thats why it stands out even
more to me when people refuse to be.
This months cover story is on the Salvation Army. By now,
youve probably passed a kettle or two. You may have even
donated. For that, they are thankful as is this whole commu-
nity, because all the money stays local.
This years goal is $112,000. Thats the yearly operating budget,
and the Salvation Army needs it to exist here. But consider this:
Many people donate change. Coins insert easily into the slot, and
when you come out of a store you usually have a few in your
pocket at the ready, right?
But its change. Thats a big goal to reach with pocket change.
Salvationist Virginia Siebeneck doesnt even bat an eye.
Even if they give a penny or a dime ... thats just as important,
because if 100 people give that, its going to build it up, she said.
Thats an attitude we all need to adopt. This time of year, espe-
cially. Choose your favorite charity, and have at it. Remember,
even a few coins will be appreciated.
On my mind
Adrienne
McGee
Lifestyle/Special
SectionsEditor
Pet of the Week
Check out Sundays Lifestyle
section for your favorite pet pictures
4 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
A
t halftime
of the 1958
NFL Cham-
pionship game, the
64,000-plus at Yan-
kee Stadium won-
dered just what it
would take to ignite
New Yorks offense.
The home team,
back in those days
before the Super
Bowl was played on
a neutral field, found itself on the short end of a 14-3 score.
The Colts repeatedly held the Giants offense in check for most of
the third quarter, and many felt the game was over when, at quar-
ters end, Unitas got his Colts to New Yorks three yard-line, first
down and goal. Another TD and extra point would put Baltimore
up 21-3 on that cold late-December Sunday 1958.
But, it was then that the Giants remembered their reputation as
the defensive beast of the East. Led by their superb middle line-
backer Sam Huff, the New Yorkers stiffened and stop the Colts
on downs. As so often is the case, the goal-line stand provided a
needed spark.
At the end of the third quarter, Giants signal caller Charley Con-
erly sent receiver Kyle Rote, usually a short-route possession player,
on a long post pattern. Rote caught the aerial in mid-stride at the
Colt 40 and raced an additional 25 yards before a double-team
tackle caused him to cough up the ball.
For a moment, it looked like yet another Giant fumble (New York
would have six on the day, losing four). However, Giant halfback
Alex Webster swooped and scooped, the bouncing ball that is, and
ran it all the way down to the one. From there, Mel Triplett went
over the top for six, and a Summerall PAT cut the gap to 14-10.
With momentum switching uniforms, the Giants took the lead
when Conerly began throwing deeper instead off checking off to
Rote and Frank Gifford. The quarterback with the unusual number
42, hit Bob Schnelker for 17 and 46 yards to get it to the Colts 15
yard line.
From there, Conerly found Frank Gifford for the touchdown, and
the PAT gave the Giants their first lead of the day at 17-14.
After another New York fumble and a missed long field goal
attempt by Baltimores Bert Rechichar late in the game, the Colts
were stopped in what appeared to be their final possession.
With time winding down and the G-Men trying to run out the
clock on a third and four, one of the games seminal moments
came. Conerly handed the ball to Gifford on a power sweep. The
tackle was made
by future Hall of
Famer Gino Mar-
chetti and line-
backer Don Shin-
nick, with a late
but then-legal hit
by Big Daddy Lib-
scomb. The force
and weight brought
by the mammoth
Libscomb broke
Marchettis leg as
tacklers and ball
carrier fell to the
partially frozen
ground.
While it was so
close to the first
down, when the
sticks were brought
out, it was also
inches short.
Recalled Gifford,
I made that first
down. But, Geno
broke his leg, there
was a lot of con-
fusion with him
screaming like a
wounded panther
and a long delay
until they could carry him off the field. When they spotted the ball,
it was a bad spot.
The Giants fine punter, Don Chandler, booted and the Colts Don
Taseff fair-caught the ball at his own 14-yard line. That left Unitas
86 yards from pay dirt with just 106 ticks left, but in that 1:46, its
amazing what a legend can do.
It was perhaps the most efficient two-minute drill ever executed,
and it came during a time the term wasnt even used. Ray Berry,
Unitas favorite receiver, later recalled, I looked down the field
before the first play on that drive, and the goalposts looked like
they were in Baltimore.
After two incompletions, Johnny U found Lenny Moore for 11
yards and a first down. Then, it was Berry three straight times, for
completions of 25, 15 and then 22 yards.
With just 19 seconds left, Colts coach Weeb Ewbank sent in a
Sports spot
Climb to the top
Looking back at the game that made the NFL
Final Part
By John
Grindrod
Gino Marchetti
5 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
North Dakota farmer when he wasnt playing football, Steve Myhra, who knotted the
game with his field goal at 17, sending the teams to the very first sudden-death overtime
in NFL championship history.
And, it was in that overtime that Unitas mixed mid-range tosses with runs brilliantly. On
the winning drive, key plays were a perfectly executed Alan Ameche run on a trap and a
twelfth and final pass on the day to the ubiquitous one, Ray Berry, bringing the ball to the
Giants eight.
Then, a fan raced out on the field, prompting an official timeout, giving Unitas a chance
to confer with his coach, Ewbank, who gave him explicit instructions to keep the ball on
the ground and not risk an interception so a winning short field goal could end the after-
noon.
So what did Unitas do? He went out on the field and floated a six-yard pass to Jim
Mutscheller, who was knocked out of bounds at the one.
More confusion arrived when, in those early days of TV when few safeguards were in
place during broadcasts of live events, someone kicked a cord out of the main power
source, and NBC lost the game feed. However, the problem was detected and TV screens
across the country again lit up, just in time to watch Alan Ameche bull into the end zone
behind guard Alex Sandusky on a play simply called 16 Power.
The Colts won both the game and the hearts of Baltimore fans back home. Baltimore
player would receive $4,718.77. Ameche left the post-game celebration early when he got
a call from producers of that nights Ed Sullivan Show, for which he would receive $500
more.
In an age before there were millionaire athletes, by 8:00 am the next day, many play-
ers, like Colts defensive tackle Artie Donovan, were punching factory time clocks to com-
mence their off-season work.
While it wasnt the most artistic of contests (the teams combined for eight fumbles), the
game has earned the moniker The Greatest Game Ever Played, in part, because of its
historical significance.
NBC showed its competitors ABC and CBS that they, too, just had to get into this pro
football business. And, of course, they did, and the rest is, as they say, is history.
5
Tues.-Thurs.
8:30-5, Fri. 8:30-
6, Sat. 9-2
OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET & EMPORIUM
528 N.Washington St.
Delphos
Right on the corner of 5th St. and N. Washington St.
next to Bellmans Party Shop
and across the street from the Pizza Hut.
419-692-0044
WERE NOT AN ANTIQUE STORE! WE BUY - SELL & TRADE.
WERE AN ANYTHING YOU NEED STORE!
STOP BY & SEE WHAT WE HAVE. STOCK CHANGES DAILY.

NEW
NEW
MERCHANDISE
DAILY
MORE VALUE
FOR YOUR
BUYING $$
STOP BY
AND
SEE US
STOCK CHANGES DAY TO DAY!
IF YOU WANT IT AND WE DONT HAVE
IT, WELL TRY TO FIND IT FOR YOU.
JUST LIKE
AN
OLD FASHIONED
TRADING
POST
We BUY,
SELL, and
TRADE
goods of all
types.
OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET & EMPORIUM
528 N.Washington St.
Delphos
Right on the corner of 5th St. and N. Washington St.
next to Bellmans Party Shop
and across the street from the Pizza Hut.
419-692-0044
WERE NOT AN ANTIQUE STORE! WE BUY - SELL & TRADE.
WERE AN ANYTHINGYOU NEEDSTORE!
STOP BY & SEE WHAT WE HAVE. STOCK CHANGES DAILY.

NEW
NEW
MERCHANDISE
DAILY
MORE VALUE
FOR YOUR
BUYING $$
STOP BY
AND
SEE US
STOCK CHANGES DAY TO DAY!
IF YOU WANT IT AND WE DONT HAVE
IT, WELL TRY TO FIND IT FOR YOU.
JUST LIKE
AN
OLD FASHIONED
TRADING
POST
We BUY,
SELL, and
TRADE
goods of all
types.
OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET & EMPORIUM
528 N.Washington St.
Delphos
Right on the corner of 5th St. and N. Washington St.
next to Bellmans Party Shop
and across the street from the Pizza Hut.
419-692-0044
WERE NOT AN ANTIQUE STORE! WE BUY - SELL & TRADE.
WERE AN ANYTHING YOU NEED STORE!
STOP BY & SEE WHAT WE HAVE. STOCK CHANGES DAILY.

NEW
NEW
MERCHANDISE
DAILY
MORE VALUE
FOR YOUR
BUYING $$
STOP BY
AND
SEE US
STOCK CHANGES DAY TO DAY!
IF YOU WANT IT AND WE DONT HAVE
IT, WELL TRY TO FIND IT FOR YOU.
JUST LIKE
AN
OLD FASHIONED
TRADING
POST
We BUY,
SELL, and
TRADE
goods of all
types.
Right on the corner of 5th St. and N. Washington St.
Just look for the Sign
STOCK CHANGES DAY TO DAY!
IF YOU WANT IT AND WE
DONT HAVE IT, WELL TRY TO
FIND IT FOR YOU.
419-692-0044
DELPHOS
TRADING
POST
OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET
and
At the Delphos Trading Post one mans unwanted items
are another mans treasure. So what weve done is give you a
place where you can bring your unwanted treasures and trade
them for something you might like or cash. We buy, sell, and
trade just about anything that is in good shape and has a
market value. We also buy and sell fre arms gold and silver
antiques and collectibles, so come see us at the Delphos
Trading Post and let us help your dollars go further.
Did You Know The items collectors collect may be
antique, or simply collectible. Antiques are collectible
items at least 100 years old; collectibles are not as old as
antiques, and may even be new. Collectors and dealers
may use the word vintage to describe older collectibles.
Most collectibles are man-made commercial items,
but some private collectors collect natural objects
such as birds eggs, butterfies, rocks and seashells.
Some collectors collect only in childhood while others
continue to do so throughout their lives and usually
modify their aims later in life.
In general, items of signifcance, beauty, value or
interest, that are too young to be considered antiques,
fall into the category of collectibles. Some collectibles
are limited editions, and some are new, but many of
them have been around for decades. So, if you are
looking for a proftable hobby start collecting.
Good Luck and Good Fortune
Alex Webster
6
Courtesy of CIA
C
ranberries are on the shelves of our markets produce sections. Prior to
refrigerated trucking, you could not find cranberries if you lived too far
from a grower. In 1912, the United Cape Cod Cranberry Co. was formed
and began the commercial process of canning a cooked cranberry and sugar
sauce. The canned sauce could be shipped anywhere and became so popular that
it evolved into a national traditional favorite to accompany roasted turkey. But
nowadays fresh cranberries are available nationwide, and the chefs of the CIA
encourage you to try making your own cranberry relish this holiday season.
Fresh cranberries are round like large marbles with a deep red color and a
very tart flavor, says CIA Chef Rob Mullooly. They should be plump and bright
and are excellent when paired with sweeter fruits to balance their tartness. If you
prefer to make this dish without alcohol, you can substitute additional orange
juice for the triple sec or Grand Marnier.
The cranberry is one of two berries along with the blueberry native to
North America. Its an unusual fruit in that it grows in wet bogs primarily in the
American North. Wisconsin is the heaviest producer, followed by Massachusetts,
but cranberries are also grown in New Jersey and the Pacific Northwest.
So go grab a bag of those beautiful fresh cranberries, and with just a few ingre-
dients, you can make and serve the quick and delicious recipe below for your
guests this holiday season.
Fresh Cranberry Relish
Makes 6 servings
One 12-ounce bag of fresh or frozen cranberries
1/3 to 1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup orange juice
1/4 cup orange liqueur such as Grand Marnier or Triple Sec
2 to 3 tablespoons orange marmalade
If using fresh cranberries, wash, pick through, and dry them thoroughly.
In a medium saucepan, mix 1/3 cup of sugar with the cranberries and the
remaining ingredients. Taste to adjust sweetness and add more sugar if desired.
Place over medium-high heat and simmer, stirring occasionally until the berries
pop.
You may serve hot or cold.
Nutrition Analysis per 1-ounce serving: 40 calories, 0g protein, 9g carbohydrate,
0g fat, 0mg sodium, 0mg cholesterol, less than 1g dietary fiber.
Still hungry for cranberries? Heres another way to serve them, courtesy the
Associated Press:
Our Generations Magazine December 2011
Seasonings
Think outside the can
Serve fresh cranberry relish on
your holiday menu
Fresh Cranberry Relish is delicious hot or cold.
Photos courtesy of CIA
Cranberries
make their
debut in the fall
and are featured
at holiday
dinners, but are
good for recipes
all season.
7 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
Cranberry-Pear Crisp
Serves 6 to 8.
Note: From Come One, Come All: Easy Entertaining With Seasonal Menus by
Lee Svitak Dean (Minnesota Historical Society Press, $29.95).
8 ripe pears (or apples), peeled, cored and cut into 1/4-inch slices
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 cups fresh cranberries
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup rolled oats
3/4 cup flour
1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, at room temperature, cut into small pieces
Whipped cream, for garnish
Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, toss pear (or apple) slices in
lemon juice. Add cranberries, granulated sugar and cinnamon and toss to com-
bine. Spread fruit in an ungreased 9- by 13-inch baking pan.
In a medium bowl, combine oats, flour, brown sugar and butter with a fork until
crumbly. Sprinkle oat mixture over fruit.
Bake until fruit is tender and topping is lightly browned, about 30 minutes.
Remove from oven and serve warm, at room temperature or chilled. Top with
whipped cream.
Nutrition information per each of 8 servings:
Calories: 400; Fat: 15 g; Sodium: 91 mg; Carbohydrates: 67 g; Saturated fat: 9 g:
Calcium: 48 mg; Protein: 4 g; Cholesterol: 38 mg; Dietary fiber: 8 g
Diabetic exchanges per serving: 2 fruit, 1 1/2 other carb, 3 fat.
7
300001833373 CenturyLink DHCWP 36600 X 29400 A5887111
Advertising Copy - Client Approval
CenturyLink
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PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS-M.D.
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Check the Accuracy Business Name Address Phone Number Web Address/Case Sensitive Spelling
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Cranberries make their debut in the fall and are
featured at holiday dinners, but are good for
recipes all season such as in this Cranberry-
Pear Crisp.
8 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
S
pringbrook Gardens Dance Club will close its
doors for the last time following the New Years
Eve dance, 2011. For the many members who
have enjoyed dancing on the finest dance floor in the
area it will be a very sad moment. But times have
changed, membership is not what it used to be, and
the old girl, built in 1924, is getting a wee bit tired.
The people have so many stories to tell about the
great bands that have played there, and the swimming
pool next door where their children grew up, but
especially the many friends they have made through
the years.
Recently one of the members suggested it would be
fun to read about some of the events that have taken
place around the world since the club was built. We
thought this would be a good idea, and after digging
a while, here are some of the events that perhaps you remember,
also.
1920-1929
Marathon dancing. How you danced was not important, as long
as you could stand up for hours and even days, keep moving, and
be the last couple on the floor. Then you could win the prize.
Babe Ruth hit 60 home runs for the Yankees.
Gertrude Ederle was the first woman to swim the English Chan-
nel and break a record held by men.
The stock market crashed in 1929 and caused misery for almost
every family in America.
A pretty girl was called the cats meow or the cats pajamas.
Dancing went a little crazy under the names of the Charleston,
Black Bottom, Shimmy, The Varsity Drag, and the Big Apple. But
never fear, there was plenty of music for ballroom dancers with
such songs as Fastinating Rhythm, Indian Love Call, The Man I
Love, and Rhapsody in Blue.
Time Capsule
The last dance
A look back at Springbrook Gardens Dance
By Jeanne
Porreca
A couple share the dance floor at Springbrook Gardens during a evening
of dancing.
The Lima News archives
Springbrook Gardens Dance Club will close following the
New Year's Eve dance, 2011.
9 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
1930-1939
The jukebox finally came into its own. Insert a
coin, and you could dance anywhere.
The Hindenberg fell out of the sky May 26, 1937.
Shirley Temple was the darling of the screen, and
radio shows like Fibber McGee and Molly and The
Lone Ranger were popular.
Your Hit Parade had people rushing to the store
to buy a record of the song they had just heard so
they could listen to it again.
1940-1949
World War II brought ration stamps, Frank Sinatra,
Betty Grable, Rosie and Riveter and trying for wom-
ens rights, and the jitterbug.
Mars invented M&Ms, a practical gift to send your
soldier, because they melt in your mouth, not your
hand.
1950-1959
Elvis Presley and rock and roll took over.
Remember when Mother said a boy in a black
leather jacket was fast?
3-D movies. You wore strange glasses and any
movement toward you on the screen scared the bejee-
bers out of you.
Legos, Barbies, Silly Putty and Slinkys were all
inventions of the 50s.
The first credit card was invented in 1954 when one man,
embarrassed to find he had left his wallet at home while enter-
taining, came up with the idea of The Diners Club card. And who
doesnt have at least one card these days?
Silly songs from the 50s: The Purple People Eater, Yakety
Yak, Stagger Lee, All Shook Up.
Hope you enjoyed this walk down memory lane. Thanks to the
lady who suggested it. Its been fun. And thanks for the memories,
Springbrook Gardens. Maybe there is life left in the old lady yet.
9
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Springbrook Gardens swimming pool
Photo courtesy of the Allen County Historical Society
10 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
A
At Our Age
Q&A
Q
GENERAL
Q
When a person who has worked and paid Social Secu-
rity taxes dies, are benefits payable on that persons
record?
A
Social Security survivors benefits can be paid to:
A widow or widower unreduced benefits at full retire-
ment age, or reduced benefits as early as age 60;
A disabled widow or widower as early as age 50;
A widow or widower at any age if he or she takes care of the
deceaseds child who is under age 16 or disabled, and receiving
Social Security benefits;
Unmarried children under 18, or up to age 19 if they are
attending high school full time. Under certain circumstances, ben-
efits can be paid to stepchildren, grandchildren or adopted chil-
dren;
Children at any age who were disabled before age 22 and
remain disabled; and
Dependent parents age 62 or older.
Even if you are divorced, you still may qualify for survivors ben-
efits. For more information, go to www.socialsecurity.gov.
Q
I lost my Social Security card. Should I get a new
one?
Answer:
A
You may not need to get a replacement card. Knowing your
Social Security number is what is important. However, you
can replace your Social Security card for free if it is lost or stolen.
Remember, you are limited to three replacement cards in a year
and 10 during your lifetime. Learn more at www.socialsecurity.gov.
RETIREMENT
Q
Can I get an estimate of my retirement benefit at sev-
eral different possible ages?
A
Yes. We suggest you use our Retirement Estimator at www.
socialsecurity.gov/estimator to test different retirement sce-
narios. This online tool will give you retirement benefit estimates
based on current law and real time access to your earnings record.
The Retirement Estimator also lets you create additional what if
retirement scenarios. Its even available in Spanish at www.seguro-
social.gov/calculador. You can test even more alternatives at www.
socialsecurity.gov/planners/calculators.htm.
Q
If both my spouse and I are entitled to Social Secu-
rity benefits, is there any reduction in our payments
because we are married?
Answer:
A
No. We calculate lifetime earnings independently to deter-
mine each spouses Social Security benefit amount. When
each member of a married couple meets all other eligibility
requirements to receive Social Security retirement benefits, each
spouse receives a monthly benefit amount based on his or her
own earnings. Couples are not penalized simply because they are
married. If one member of the couple earned low wages or failed
to earn enough Social Security credits (40) to be insured for retire-
ment benefits, he or she may be eligible to receive benefits as a
spouse. Learn more about Social Security at www.socialsecurity.
gov.
DISABILITY
Q
I am receiving Social Security disability benefits. Will
my benefits be affected if I work and earn money?
A
It can, depending on how much you make. We have special
rules called work incentives that help you keep your cash
benefits and Medicare while you test your ability to work. For
example, there is a trial work period during which you can receive
full benefits regardless of how much you earn, as long as you
report your work activity and continue to have a disabling impair-
ment. For more information about work incentives, we recom-
mend that you read the leaflet, Working While Disabled-How We
Can Help, at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10095.html.
Q
Is there a time limit on Social Security disability ben-
efits?
A
Your disability benefits will continue as long as your medical
condition has not improved and you cannot work. We will
review your case at regular intervals to make sure you are still dis-
abled. Learn more by reading our publication, Disability Benefits,
at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10029.html.
SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME
Q
Is it true that a person can own a home and still be
eligible for Supplemental Security Income benefits?
11
A
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Yes, a person who owns a home and lives in that home can
be eligible for SSI benefits. SSI is for people who are dis-
abled, aged, or blind and who have limited income and resources.
However, there are some items we do not count as resources,
such as the home you live in. For more information, read our
booklet, Supplemental Security Income, at www.socialsecurity.gov/
pubs/11000.html.
Q
I know you need to have limited resources to receive
Supplemental Security Income. But what is consid-
ered a resource?
A
Resources are things you own that you can use for support.
They include cash, real estate, personal belongings, bank
accounts, stocks and bonds. To be eligible for SSI a person must
have no more than $2,000 in countable resources. A married cou-
ple must have no more than $3,000 in countable resources. If you
own resources over the SSI limit, you may be able to get SSI ben-
efits while trying to sell the resources. Not all of your resources
count toward the SSI resource limit. For example:
The home you live in and the land its on do not count.
Your personal effects and household goods do not count.
Life insurance policies may not count, depending on their
value.
Your car usually does not count.
Burial plots for you and members of your immediate family do
not count.
Up to $1,500 in burial funds for you and up to $1,500 in burial
funds for your spouse may not count.
If you are blind or have a disability, some items may not count
if you plan to use them to work or earn extra income.
You may also wish to read our material on resources in the
booklet, Understanding SSI at www.socialsecurity.gov/ssi/text-
understanding-ssi.htm.
MEDICARE
Q
If I call 800-772-1213, can a Social Security represen-
tative take my application for Medicare prescription
drug help over the phone?
A
If an interviewer is available when you call the 800 number,
he or she can take your application over the phone. If an
interviewer is not immediately available, we can schedule a tele-
phone appointment for you. For the fastest and most convenient
way to apply for Medicare prescription drug help, go online to
www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp.
Pet of the Week
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section for your favorite pet pictures
OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
12 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
T
hey have begun.
The bell ringers are out in force this time of year, doing
what they can to help the Salvation Army.
Its a long tradition, said Maj. Felipe Phil Tamayo, explaining
the Salvation Army arrived in Lima in February 1888.
Since then, weve been running full-time, including the Red Ket-
tle Campaign, he said. Weve been pretty active in the commu-
nity since that time.
The Salvation
Armys background
stems from Christian
outreach, with the
Army going out into
cities to win souls.
Traditionally, its sol-
diers go to where
the need is to get
the message out. Its
Red Kettle Campaign
typifies its visible
stance. It started as on outreach for helping families at Christmas,
Tamayo said, and that has evolved to helping families with meals
and other assistance year-round.
Its proved to be an effective outreach for us to solicit for finan-
cial contributions, said Tamayo, who is a Lima native. During the
holiday season, our motto has been, Sharing is Caring.
The Salvation Army operates a food pantry throughout the year
and offers personal and family counseling and other help. The
food pantry closes during December, with those in need funnel-
ing through its holiday assistance program instead. (That includes
a meal, toys for the kids and new clothing.) Its a more formalized
way to make sure those in need are helped. The Salvation Army
is the clearinghouse for many other groups in town to be sure no
one is overlooked or is helped to an unfair share.
The Salvation Army has an average of 100 families pass through
its doors daily, and last year it served more than 1,000 individu-
als. More and more people are finding themselves in economic
trouble, Tamayo said.
This is the time we are called upon the most. I just encourage
people to think of their neighbors, he said. More than likely
their neighbors probably turned to us.
This years financial goal is $112,000, the same as last year.
Every cent donated at the kettles stays local.
Those coins do add up. A little bit of change in the red kettle
makes a big change in peoples lives, Tamayo said.
Cover Story
For whom the bell tolls
Salvation Army volunteers hope to ring in donations
Adrienne
McGee
Lifestyle/Special
Sections Editor
Want to donate?
Bell ringers are out
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
through Dec. 24.
Cant find a kettle?
Visit lima.salvationarmy.oh.org
to make a donation
at a virtual red kettle.
Richard Maag rings a bell for The Salvation Army at Rays on
Cable Road.
Lindsay Brown photos The Lima News
13 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011 13
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Lima resident Clara Long knows that firsthand. She is in
her 19th year of bell ringing because they helped me out
when my kids were real little, so my kids could have a
Christmas, because I was a single mother, she said.
To her, its simple that she would help and return the
favor. Shes glad to do it.
Lima resident Virginia Siebeneck has been attending wor-
ship services at the Salvation Army since 2007.
I liked everything that they stood for, she said. And all
that money goes to the children, and thats what I really
appreciate about it. ... I ring the bell because I know the
kids cant get a job.
She joked about her luck on her scheduled bell-ringing
days.
I always pick out the coldest days, I think, because I
always freeze, she said, laughing. The people are nice that
donate. Theyre just a blessing because I know that theyve
worked for that money and to give to someone else in the
community, thats just a wonderful thing. Lima is, I think,
theyre really good about that.
Lima resident Carol Wilson has been in the Salvation
Army for 12 years. Her husband encouraged her to partici-
pate, since it was something Stanley had done as a teen-
ager. Stanley Wilson, now at an age where he cant take the
cold, was a bell ringer for about 45 years, she said.
We have worked with the toys and we have worked with
the applications, and we know the stories that they have.
They really touch your heart, they really do, she said.
These younger kids are going through so much anymore.
... I dont know what people would do without that help.
Clara Long collects donations for The Salvation Army at Kewpee
West. Long has been a bell ringer for 19 years.
14
Our Generations Magazine December 2011
A
s we
approached
Dublin in our
coach on our way
to the same hotel
where we stayed a
week earlier, The
Mespil, my travel
partner Jane and I
both experienced the
same strange mixture
of feelings we always
do when a trip is almost over.
While there is sadness, there is
also a bit of longing for home.
Driving through the Hinter-
lands just outside Dublin, an
area filled with horses, it was
obvious so much of the bloodstock industry so
vital to Irelands economy lay just outside of its
largest city.
After checking in to the Mespil, we all re-
boarded the bus to depart for our farewell dinner,
covered as part of our Trafalgar Tour package, at
the Nancy Hands Restaurant.
When we arrived, we found a place that looked
a lot older than the 14 years our waiter told us
the establishment was. The reason was its inter-
esting dcor. There was the original staircase
from Trinity College, taken out during a renova-
tion of Irelands most famous college and one
located in Dublin. There also were a lot of pews
from various churches removed during restora-
tions. The front of the serving window separating
kitchen and upstairs dining room was from an
old butcher shop. Antiques were everywhere.
As for food, I again ate traditionally, Guinness
stew. During dinner Jane and I said our good-
byes to our fellow travelers. There were the two
CHIPS dispatchers from Pasadena; Lazlo, from
San Antonio; Norene and Stan from Kansas; and
the high school English teacher from Mobile, and,
of course, so many others.
After dinner, Jane and I requested we be let off
the bus at the Temple Bar District to see what
the famous area had to offer on a Friday night.
We knew we could walk back to The Mespil. The
area was jammed. We ran into several Scots in
kilts, who were in Dublin for a big rugby match
with Ireland, a match sure to draw over 50,000
people. The quickest way to fill a stadium in Ire-
land is to put in it a big rugby or hurling match,
especially one with national pride on the line.
The famous Temple Bar itself was so crowded
it was almost impossible to get to one of the sev-
eral bars throughout the multi-floored structure.
The bar, in operation since 1860, is known for its
wonderful live Irish music.
After our exploration, we walked back to The
Mespil and a final nights respite, before our
coach driver Kevin would take us to the airport
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A fond farewell to the Emerald Isle
An Irish adventure starts with a myriad of problems
Travel
Yearlong series
By John
Grindrod
Leaving Dublin for a nine-hour flight home.
photos by John Grindrod
15 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011 15
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the next morning so we could catch our flight.
During Kevins driving us to the airport and with Bernard behind
at The Mespil, I think the portly driver felt it was his place to
deliver his own narrative on mike. He told us an interesting story
of the multi-colored doors of so many stone row houses and apart-
ments wed seen in Dublin during our time there.
The brightly painted doors are all that distinguishes one dwelling
from another. They are painted thusly, supposedly, by wives who
wait far too long for their men to return from the pubs, men who,
without knowing the color of their doors, just may be trying to get
into the wrong abodes.
When we arrived to the airport on Saturday morning, we were
faced with a very long check-in line. I will warn you. Flying into
Dublin on a Saturday or Sunday will yield the same for you. It was
a full 90 minutes before we finally worked our way back and forth
in those amusement-park-type separated lines, the ones where you
keep seeing the same annoyed people again and again. Finally, we
reached check-in. Youll want to be certain to convert any left-over
euros back into American while at the airport. I dont think youll
have much luck spending them back home at Walgreens.
Finally on board, we took flight and I snapped the 253rd and final
picture of my week through the small window of the plane, a final
reminder of Dublin. We made the nine-hour flight home, with a
plane change back at OHare in Chicago, where wed had so much
trouble on the way to Ireland.
This time, no air-travel glitches befell us. On the long flight home,
that gave me plenty of time for reflection on a terrific week. I
thought about the thoroughbreds at the Irish National Stud; all the
castles, steeped in their antiquity; the majestic Cliffs of Moher; the
bagpipers of Killarney and so very much more.
And, somehow, I knew as I returned to my home with my own
history that I would, one day, return to a country comprised of so
many others histories, to once again drink in the verdant beauty of
Ireland and, of course, some more Guinness!
The famous doors of Dublin. While many downtown dwell-
ings are similiar, doors are a variety of colors. This is sup-
posed to help the men who have spent too long at the pub
find their way home.
W
idowed three times,
with a remarkable
family and an almost
65-year career in sales, Jetta Faye
Leonard is an inspiration to those
who know her.
She is a member of Limas First
Assembly of God Church, where
she is still active. Her faith has
been a driving force throughout
her 90 years on this Earth.
I knew whatever came along, (God)
knew about it. He loved me, and He was
going to take care it, she said.
The inspirational senior was born in
Worthington, Ind., Aug. 20, 1921. When
she was 16, Jetta became ill with tuber-
culosis and was hospitalized at a TB
sanitarium for nine months. She believes
that she was miraculously healed
through prayer.
The Lord touched me, and I got to get
out and go back to school, she said.
Leonard attended Hoosier State Com-
mercial College in Indianapolis, where
she met fellow student William Logan
Jones, who became an auditor. The cou-
ple married in 1941, and they had three
children, Ted, Jetta Sue and Richard.
When Richard was only 9 months old,
his father died.
I only got to keep him eight years. He died from heart failure, she said.
Jettas own father died when she was 8 years old.
My mother had to make a living during the Depression. She worked in peoples homes, and
then she got a job in a hotel as a maid, she said.
Following her mothers role model, when a young Jetta found herself widowed at only 28,
she clung to her faith and work ethic. In 1947, shortly before her husbands death, she had
joined the staff of Stanley Home Products in Indianapolis.
Stanley is the founder of the party plan of selling ... we put on parties, she said of the
company that she still works for.
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16 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
Inspired
Faith and family
are important to Limas Jetta Faye Leonard
Jetta Faye Leonard
By Christina
Ryan
Claypool
17
Working on commission, Jetta began to rapidly move up the ladder of
the Stanley organization. Then two years after the death of her spouse
she married Norman Elrod and inherited two stepsons, Max and James,
who are now deceased.
In 1958, the couple moved to Lima from Indianapolis when she was
promoted to the position of branch sales manager with the company. In
addition, they had two more children.
When I moved to Lima I (originally) rented a building down on South
Main for an office. ... I hired and trained people, had a secretary, and
had training classes there. Well, I made a good living, started going up
the ladder, she said. The Stanley product line includes grooming aids
and cleaning products.
Her husband, Norman tried his hand at different things. Sadly, in 1977,
Jetta was widowed again when her second husband had a stroke behind
the wheel of the taxi he was driving. Her youngest daughter, Donna, was
only 15 at the time.
Nine years later, when she was 65, she married 75-year-old Ovid Leon-
ard, another Stanley associate, who had also lost his wife. This marriage
also came with three stepchildren, and lasted 15 years until Ovids death
at 90.
She admits her life has had some difficult days.
My mother taught me this and this is in the Bible, This too shall pass.
And Ive taught my kids that, too, she said.
As for her children, Jetta believes that they learned from the years
of observing her work. Her son, Ted Jones is the president of Masters
Entertainment Group which has created programming for Fox Sports Net,
ESPN, Oxygen and Outdoor Channel, among others.
Son David Elrod is a four-time world champion of the International
Drag Racing association and owns an Allen County car lot. Son Rick
Jones has been with the Lima Auto Mall for more than three decades,
and daughter Donna Krech is well-known for her company, Thin
& Healthys Total Solution.
Daughter Jetta Sue Susie Inskeep is retired from Lima schools,
but most days you can still find her working. In addition, she
lives next to her mom in Lima, and picks Jetta up from the Allen
County Council on Aging Elderly Daycare Center when needed.
Jetta Leonard does have some physical limitations and uses
with a walker, but her mind is amazingly keen. Currently she is
completing her autobiography with the typing assistance of her
granddaughter, Chastity Butterfield. Son Ted Jones recently told
his mom, I hope when Im 90, my mind is as sharp, as yours is
now.
The mother of seven (three stepchildren are dead), grandmother
of 26, great-grandmother of 21, and great-great grandmother of
15 said, that she is especially proud of my family. They are so
precious and so good to me in so many ways.
Christina Ryan Claypool is a freelance journalist and inspirational speaker.
Contact her through her Website at www.christinaryanclaypool.com.
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H
er priorities are set: God, husband, family and helping
others. Lori Gratz Scherger was born May 19, 1959,
in Bluffton, to Rich and Betty Gratz. Her dad was an
administrator at Lima schools, and her mother was a secretary
at Bluffton College where Lori earned a bachelor of arts degree
in Business.
Raised in the country, the Gratz family had three sons and
two daughters.
We lived a normal life, said Lori who graduated from Bluff-
ton High School. Well-liked and athletic,
she was a member of the basketball and
track teams. She was also a cheerleader
and homecoming queen.
After graduating from college, Lori
worked in sales for 10 years and had her
own apartment prior to marrying and giv-
ing birth to son Matthew and daughter
Hannah.
On July 4, 1999, Lori married Bill
Scherger, an ob-gyn physician. It was the
second marriage for both of them and got
off to a rocky start.
We went through a few difficult years in the beginning, said
Lori, who gained four stepchildren through the union. The tri-
als the Schergers experienced, eventually led them to conduct
two six-week courses per year called Smart Steps. The classes
are currently held at Lima Community Church where the
Schergers are members. The course is designed for couples or
individuals looking to create a healthy stepfamily.
Candid about sharing her mistakes and trials, Lori says, I
have to be transparent to help people.
Her hearts desires
are not material,
but relational. She
doesnt believe the term blended family is accurate.
It never blends, she says, but knows mutual respect and love can
enhance family relationships over time.
During the Smart Steps course, the Schergers encourage couples
and individuals to put an end to ex bashing choosing rather to step
forward with positive speech and behavior.
It takes years and much patience for stepfamilies to progress, the
couple instructs.
While Smart Steps comes easy for Lori, her husband enlisted her
to accompany him to give talks called The Rules Have Changed a
sex education course for parents, teens and young adults.
We give five to ten talks per year, usually in the spring, said Lori.
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18 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
Portrait
Setting priorities
Mutual respect and love enhance family relationships
By Jill
Campbell
Lori Gratz Scherger enjoys decorating for
Christmas.
photos courtesy of Lori Gratz Scherger
19 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
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So far, weve been to Lima Central Catholic, Delphos St. Johns,
Delphos Jefferson and Ottoville schools.
Among Loris loves is a daily exercise routine.
Ive been heavier, and I feel better with the weight off, said
Lori. Weather permitting; she rides her bicycle 25 miles three times
per week. I never turn the television on during the day, says Lori
whose favorite book is Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers. I
have read that book twice.
A diligent housekeeper and talented decorator, Lori credits her
mother for giving her a sense of style. Lori tells of the time she and
her husband walked up and down the West Market Street area look-
ing for a house preferring the warmth, charm, and ample space of
an older home over a brand new one.
The house we currently own wasnt even for sale, but we had
talked to the owners in case they were ever interested in selling,
Lori said. We actually bought another house and owned it for a day
then the owners of our present home contacted us and said they
decided to sell after all. When we first moved in, this house was so
much larger than where wed been living; we only had enough fur-
niture to fill one room.
Loris beautifully former home on West Spring Street and her resi-
dence on West Market Street have both been part of the American
Red Cross Christmas Tour of Homes.
The Schergers enjoy being together as a couple and spending time
with all of their children. The couple also has a lake house in north-
ern Indiana where they enjoy fellowship with friends and family
and water sports during the summer. Once a year, the family travels
to Snowmass, Colo., where they ski.
Well-dressed, Lori says, I like to get ideas from magazines then
put outfits together inexpensively. Im cheap (that way), she laughs.
When people ask Lori why she takes time to talk to groups, when
she could otherwise avoid it, she answers, How can I not? Its all
for the glory of God. We are called to take our lives and help peo-
ple.
Lori Gratz Scherger
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Suprisingly, it wasnt depressing.
It actually brought
some things into focus.
Some see it as something to avoid
I saw it as a responsibility.
Why you decide isnt important.
Just decide.
I SEE IT AS A
RESPONSIBILITY.
Why you decide
to preplan
your funeral isnt
important.
Its that you do
decide.
Thats whats
important.
20 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
Across
1. Bandywords
5. ___four
10. Ordertaker
14. Decline
15. Home___
16. 100cents
17. Songanddance,e.g.
18. Catalogs
19. Balletmove
20. Restauranthost,French(2
wds)
23. Baptism,forone
24. Conceit
28. Buttonhole
31. FantasyIslandprop
32. Comprende?
33. Twistedshape
36. MozartsL___delCairo
37. Enlarge,asahole
38. Dustremover
39. Likeastuffedshirt
40. ___grass
41. RegionsurroundingEarth
wherecloudsform
45. Schuss,e.g.
46. Accident
47. Coffeeserver
48. Modusoperandi
50. Dirtycoat
51. Impossibletoenter
57. Bowed
60. Inpieces
61. Bouncedchecks,hangnails,
etc.
62. Face-to-faceexam
63. Plunder
64. The___haveit
65. Characteristiccarrier
66. AndreaBocelli,forone
67. Bind
Down
1. Didlaps,say
2. Legalprefix
3. TheAofABM
4. Comfortstation
5. Atelieritem
6. SayLilAbner,say
7. BritsBaloney!
8. Whatsgotten___you?
9. Examtakers
10. Quartetmember
11. Cast
12. Victorian,forone
13. Coxcomb
21. Classicboardgame
22. Auspices
25. Chemicalcousin
26. Safe
27. Inadequate
28. Downsopposite
29. Decrepit
30. Omnivorousmammals
resemblingracoons
31. ___-mutton(2wds)
34. Discontinue
35. 40winks
39. Inaplacewheresomething
cannotberemoved(2wds)
41. Notus
42. Barricade
43. Militarylookout
44. D
49. Deed
50. Self-regulatingfeedback
mechanism
52. Fencingswordwithblunt
point
53. Indianbread
54. Britishtermforyoungman
55. Onionrelative
56. ___quamvideri(North
Carolinasmotto)
57. Impede,withdown
58. ...___hedroveoutofsight
59. MasefieldplayTheTragedy
of___
Just for fun
Crossword Answer
Y
ou cant predict how long youll live. Nonetheless, you
still need to consider longevity as a key factor in creat-
ing, and following, a long-term investment strategy.
And your projected lifespan may be longer than you had
thought. Men who turned 65 in 2010 can expect to live another
18.6 years, while women who reached 65 that same year can
anticipate another 20.7 years, according to the 2011 Social Secu-
rity Trustees Report. And these figures are just averages; depend-
ing on your health and family history of longevity, you could
well spend two, or even three, decades in retirement.
Possibly because people are now realizing they may have to
support themselves for far longer than earlier generations did,
they seem to be growing increasingly concerned about running
out of money in their later years. In fact, in a poll of people ages
44 to 75, sponsored by Allianz Life Insurance, 61 percent said
they fear depleting their assets more than they fear dying.
So, if youre concerned about outliving your resources or
if you think that you may become one of those people what
steps should you take, both now and during your retirement?
Here are a few ideas:
Keep investing. Put away as much money as you can afford
for your retirement. Take advantage of tax-deferred accounts,
such as your 401(k) and traditional IRA, or tax-free accounts,
such as a Roth IRA. (Roth IRA earnings are tax-free provided
youve had your account at least five years and you dont start
taking withdrawals until youre at least 59-1/2.) And keep invest-
ing, year in and year out, despite the inevitable market volatility
youll encounter along the way.
Re-assess your retirement age. If you enjoy your work, you
might consider staying at your job a few years later than origi-
nally intended. Those extra years of income, not to mention
extra contributions to your 401(k) and potentially bigger Social
Security payouts, can make a big difference to your retirement
lifestyle.
Delay taking Social Security. As the laws now stand, you can
start taking Social Security as young as 62, but your monthly
checks will be bigger when you reach your full retirement age.
Youll get your biggest monthly Social Security checks if you
wait until age 70, when they max out, but many people feel
that waiting that long may not be worth it, when weighing the
lost years of any payments against the unknown variable of life
expectancy.
Calculate your withdrawal rate. Once you retire, its essen-
tial that you know how much can withdraw each year from your
investments without running out of money. Your withdrawal
rate depends on a variety of factors, including your age, size of
portfolio, risk tolerance and retirement lifestyle. A financial pro-
fessional can help you calculate your initial withdrawal rate and
adjust it as time goes on.
The possibility of outliving your resources is not a pleasant
thought. But by taking the steps described above, as well as oth-
ers, you can go a long way toward taking the fear out of longev-
ity, leaving you free to fully enjoy an active retirement.
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21 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
Your Money
How to cope with the threat of longevity
Dec. 1
Books Are Fun Sale, 6:30 a.m.,
Lima Memorial Health System,
1001 Bellefontaine Ave., Lima.
Mustang Breakfast Club, 9 a.m.,
Allen East schools, 9105 Harding
Hwy., Lafayette.
39th Annual Christmas Tree
Festival, 10 a.m., Allen County
Museum, 620 W. Market St., Lima.
2011 Holiday Street Fair - St.
Ritas Medical Center, 11 a.m., St.
Ritas Medical Center, 730 W. Mar-
ket St., Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Lima Public Library Book & A
Movie Film Discussion Group, 5
p.m., Lima Public Library, 650 W.
Market St., Lima.
Taste of Europe, 6 p.m., Wapako-
neta Wine & Cheese Cottage, 114
West Auglaize Street, Wapakoneta.
$20.
Author Book Signing, 6:30 p.m.,
Bluffton Public Library, 145 S.
Main St., Bluffton. Fred Steiner and
A Good Place to Miss: Bluffton
Stories 1900-1975.
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
6:30 p.m., Putnam County District
Library, 136 Putnam Pky, Ottawa.
Bluegrass Cafe, 7 p.m., Famous
Old Time Music Company, 20322
State Route 33, Wapakoneta.
Interactive Bible Study, 7 p.m.,
Fresh Word Temple, 797 West
Robb Ave, Lima.
White Christmas, 8 p.m.,
Encore Theatre, 991 N. Shore Dr.,
Lima. $16 adults, $14 seniors, $11
youth.
Dec. 2
39th Annual Christmas Tree
Festival, 10 a.m., Allen County
Museum, 620 W. Market St., Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Animals of the Nativity, 5 p.m.,
Old Fire Station, 122 N. Main St.,
Mendon.
Chicken/Fish Fry, 5 p.m., VFW
Post 9142, 212 W. Second St.,
Ottawa.
American Legion Fish Fry, 5 p.m.,
American Legion Post 96, 711 S.
Shore Dr., Lima. $6.
13th Annual Festival of Trees/
Christmas Walk, 6 p.m., Mendon,
Market St. and N Main St., Men-
don.
Christmas Concert Big Band
Sound, 7 p.m., Faith Baptist
Church, 4750 East Rd., Lima. With
Hallelujah Saints Band.
White Christmas, 8 p.m.,
Encore Theatre, 991 N. Shore Dr.,
Lima.
Dec. 3
Pancake Breakfast, 6:30 a.m.,
Uniopolis Fire Department, 140
Waynesfield Pike, Uniopolis.
Breakfast With Santa, 7:30 a.m.,
Waynesfield Lions Club, 331 E.
Wapakoneta St., Waynesfield.
Christmas at Apollo Craft Fair, 9
a.m., Apollo Career Center, 3325
Shawnee Rd., Lima.
Christmas on Main Street, 9 a.m.,
Downtown Cridersville, E Main St,
Cridersville.
Holiday Craft and Bake Sale, 10
a.m., Midway East Community
Center, 727 E. Kibby St., Lima.
39th Annual Christmas Tree
Festival, 10 a.m., Allen County
Museum, 620 W. Market St., Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Animals of the Nativity, 1 p.m.,
Old Fire Station, 122 N. Main St.,
Mendon.
13th Annual Festival of Trees/
Christmas Walk, 1 p.m., Mendon,
Market St. and N Main St., Men-
don.
Blanchard River Art Guilds Holi-
day Art Show, 2 p.m., Schroeder
Center for the Arts, 162 W. Main
St., Ottawa.
Kingsport Ballet: The Nutcracker,
2 p.m., Niswonger Performing Arts
Center, 10700 Oh 118, Van Wert.
Piano Recital, 2 p.m., Ohio
Northern University, 525 S. Main
St., Ada. (419) 772-2000. With Dr.
Rebecca Harnishfeger Casey. In
Snyder Recital Hall.
Chili Cook-Off, 4 p.m., Northwest
Ohio Railroad Preservation, Inc.,
11600 Township Rd. 99, Findlay.
White Christmas, 8 p.m., Encore
Theatre, 991 N. Shore Dr., Lima.
Dec. 4
Big Breakfast, 8 a.m., St. John
Catholic Church, 777 S. Main St.,
Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
39th Annual Christmas Tree
Festival, 1 p.m., Allen County
Museum, 620 W. Market St., Lima. .
White Christmas, 2 p.m.,
Encore Theatre, 991 N. Shore Dr.,
Lima.
A Festival of Lessons and Car-
ols, 2:30 p.m., Bluffton University,
One University Dr., Bluffton. With
three Bluffton University choirs. In
Yoder Recital Hall.
Candy Cane Tour of Homes, 3
p.m., Hardin County Historical
Museum, 223 N. Main St., Kenton.
Dec. 5
Yoga Class, 5:30 p.m., The Meet-
ing Place on Market, 220 W. Mar-
ket St., Lima.
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
6:30 p.m., Ottoville Branch Library,
349 Wayne St., Ottoville.
Dec. 6
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
10 a.m., Kalida Branch Library, 301
N. Third St., Kalida.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Allen County Veterans Service
Commission, 5 p.m., Allen County
Courthouse, 301 N. Main St., Lima.
Parents and Friends of Lesbians/
Gays (PFLAG), 6 p.m., OSU Lima/
Rhodes State, 4240 Campus Dr.,
Lima.
Lima Beane Chorus Rehearsal,
7 p.m., Marimor School, 2500 Ada
Rd., Lima.
Kenny G, 7:30 p.m., Niswonger
Performing Arts Center, 10700 Oh
118, Van Wert.
Dec. 7
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
10 a.m., Putnam County District
Library, 136 Putnam Pky, Ottawa.
UAW 1211 Retirees, 12 p.m.,
UAW Hall, 1440 Bellefontaine Ave.,
Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Public Hearing on Developmental
Disabilities Action Plan, 5 p.m.,
Marimor School, 2500 Ada Rd.,
Lima.
Amanda Township Trustees, 8
p.m., Amanda Township House,
Agerter Rd and S Conant Rd, Spen-
cerville.
Dec. 8
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Heir Force Community School
8 Senior Specials
Complete w/2 extras and choice of bread
20% OFF
with This Ad!
Elida Road, Lima Next to WENDYS
419-225-PACK
No other discounts apply.
22 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
Events calendar
23 OurGenerationsMagazine December 2011
Board, 6 p.m., Heir Force Com-
munity School, 2000 N. Cole St.,
Lima.
Diabetic Support Group, 6 p.m.,
Lima Memorial Medical Park, 525
N. Eastown Rd., Lima.
Allen County Patriots, 6:30 p.m.,
Allen County Sanitary Engineers
Office, 3230 N. Cole St., Lima.
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
6:30 p.m., Fort Jennings Branch
Library, 655 N. Water St., Fort Jen-
nings.
Bluegrass Cafe, 7 p.m., Famous
Old Time Music Company, 20322
State Route 33, Wapakoneta.
Interactive Bible Study, 7 p.m.,
Fresh Word Temple, 797 West
Robb Ave, Lima.
Dec. 9
Music Bachs Series Final Perfor-
mance, 11:30 a.m., University of
Findlay, 1000 N. Main St., Findlay.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
American Legion Fish Fry, 5 p.m.,
American Legion Post 96, 711 S.
Shore Dr., Lima. $6.
Dec. 10
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
11 a.m., Continental Branch
Library, 301 N. Sixth St., Continen-
tal.
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
11 a.m., Pandora Branch Library,
118 E. Main St., Pandora.
Live Music: Carl Rust in Concert,
11 a.m., The Meeting Place on
Market, 220 W. Market St., Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Holiday Celebration at the Library,
1 p.m., Columbus Grove Branch
Library, 317 N. Main St., Columbus
Grove.
Bluegrass in the Cornfields, 4
p.m., Famous Old Time Music
Company, 20322 State Route 33,
Wapakoneta.
Childrens Christmas Musical,
6:30 p.m., Bethel Church of Christ,
4014 Township Rd. 30, Ada.
Bells, Brass and Bows with the
Lima Symphony Orchestra, 7:30
p.m., Lima Civic Center, 7 Town
Square, Lima.
Dec. 11
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Putnam County Health & Diag-
nostic Center Community Open
House, 1 p.m., Putnam County
Health & Diagnostic Center, 102
Putnam Pkwy., Ottawa.
Skaggs Family Christmas, 4 p.m.,
Niswonger Performing Arts Center,
10700 Oh 118, Van Wert.
Childrens Christmas Musical,
6:30 p.m., Bethel Church of Christ,
4014 Township Rd. 30, Ada.
Dec. 12
AFSCME Retiree Subchapter
123, 1 p.m., UAW Hall, 1440 Belle-
fontaine Ave., Lima.
Yoga Class, 5:30 p.m., The Meet-
ing Place on Market, 220 W. Mar-
ket St., Lima. $8.
Dec. 13
Westinghouse Sundstrand Group,
11:30 a.m., Western Sizzlin, 2721
Elida Rd., Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Lima Beane Chorus Rehearsal,
7 p.m., Marimor School, 2500 Ada
Rd., Lima.
Fort Jennings School Board, 7:30
p.m., Fort Jennings schools, One
Musketeer Dr., Fort Jennings.
Dec. 14
Breakfast Optimists, 6:40 a.m.,
The Meeting Place on Market, 220
W. Market St., Lima. Lima Mayor
David Bergre with Year in Review:
2011.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Trinity Chapter Order of The East-
ern Star, 7:30 p.m., Lima Masonic
Center, 2165 N. Cole St., Lima.
Dec. 15
Allen County PERI, 12 p.m.,
Eagles Lodge, 800 W. Robb Ave.,
Lima.
UAW 1765 Retirees, 12:30 p.m.,
Golden Coral, 2620 Elida Rd.,
Lima.
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
Bluegrass Cafe, 7 p.m., Famous
Old Time Music Company, 20322
State Route 33, Wapakoneta.
Amputees in Motion, 7 p.m.,
Bethel Baptist Church, 630 Powers
Ave., Lima.
Interactive Bible Study, 7 p.m.,
Fresh Word Temple, 797 West
Robb Ave, Lima.
Dec. 16
22nd Annual Creative Art Sale
and Exhibit, 1 p.m., Wassenberg
Art Center, 643 S. Washington St.,
Van Wert.
American Legion Fish Fry, 5 p.m.,
American Legion Post 96, 711 S.
Shore Dr., Lima. $6.
Dec. 17
Appalachian Opry, 7 p.m.,
Famous Old Time Music Company,
20322 State Route 33, Wapakoneta.
John Tesh Big Band Christmas,
7:30 p.m., Niswonger Performing
Arts Center, 10700 Oh 118, Van
Wert.
Findlay Singles, 8:30 p.m.,
Humane Society Hall, 4550 Fos-
toria Ave., Findlay. $8.
Dec. 19
Yoga Class, 5:30 p.m., The Meet-
ing Place on Market, 220 W. Mar-
ket St., Lima. $8.
Dec. 20
Lima Shrine Club, 11:30 a.m.,
Eagles Lodge, 800 W. Robb Ave.,
Lima.
Caregivers Support Group, 3
p.m., St. Ritas Regional Cancer
Center, 803 W. Market St., Lima.
Support for Oral, Head and Neck
Cancer, 5 p.m., St. Ritas Regional
Cancer Center, 803 W. Market St.,
Lima. With Holly Metzger.
Lima Beane Chorus Rehearsal,
7 p.m., Marimor School, 2500 Ada
Rd., Lima.
Dec. 21
Area Agency on Aging 3, 10 a.m.,
Area Agency on Aging, 200 E.
High St., Lima. Advisory council.
Korean War Veterans, 3 p.m.,
Memorial Hall, 130 W. Elm St.,
Lima.
Community Fellowship Meal, 5
p.m., St. John United Methodist
Church, 205 N. High St., Columbus
Grove.
Dec. 22
Bluegrass Cafe, 7 p.m., Famous
Old Time Music Company, 20322
State Route 33, Wapakoneta.
Interactive Bible Study, 7 p.m.,
Fresh Word Temple, 797 West
Robb Ave, Lima.
Dec. 23
American Legion Fish Fry, 5 p.m.,
American Legion Post 96, 711 S.
Shore Dr., Lima.
Dec. 27
Lima Beane Chorus Rehearsal,
7 p.m., Marimor School, 2500 Ada
Rd., Lima.
Dec. 28
Trinity Chapter Order of The East-
ern Star, 7:30 p.m., Lima Masonic
Center, 2165 N. Cole St., Lima.
Dec. 30
American Legion Fish Fry, 5 p.m.,
American Legion Post 96, 711 S.
Shore Dr., Lima. $6.
Dec. 31
Lima Symphony Orchestra pres-
ents New Years Eve in Las Vegas:
Simply Sinatra with Steve Lippia,
7:30 p.m., Lima Civic Center, 7
Town Square, Lima.
Springbrook Dances, 8 p.m.,
Springbrook Gardens, 4240 N.
West St., Lima. With Impossibles.
Rehab is work. But it can also be fun.
To fnd out how we can help you
or someone you love transition
smoothly back home, call us to
schedule a personal tour.
419-643-3161 7400 Swaney Road
Blufton, OH 45817 richlandmanorhc.com
23
24 Our Generations Magazine December 2011
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