Systems Development & TOGAF Explained

Leading Qualifications and Training for those involved in Systems Development and IT Architecture

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Systems Development & Architecture
Development of the IT solutions which underpin today’s organisations embraces a wide range of roles - from business analysts and enterprise architects through to software developers and testers. The skill sets needed range from an understanding of business processes through to technical knowledge of different software languages and hardware platforms. The most widely recognised training and certification for those needing generic systems development skills is from the BCS with their range of Solutions Development qualifications from their examination arm - the ISEB. Those wishing to achieve the International Diploma in Solution Development need to complete a series of modular certificates as well as an oral exam. TOGAF is the most widely used framework for IT Architecture. Certified TOGAF practitioners play a central role in developing and managing the IT systems of major organisations worldwide.

Prepared by: Rex Gibson Development Director

About:
Focus on Training specialises in provision of Best Practice training within the fields of IT and Project Management. A comprehensive range of ITIL, ISEB, Microsoft, PRINCE2, and other training courses from leading accredited training organisations can be booked at its website:
www.focus-on-training.co.uk

Rex Gibson leads the IT Service Management team at Focus. He has successfully executed major business change and IT projects, and has managed international engineering companies with significant IT dependency.
info@focus-on-training.co.uk

Version 1.03 October 2010

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Contents
1. What is “Systems Development”? 2. Where does “Architecture” Fit? 3. ISEB Solution Development Diploma Explained
3.1. 3.2. 3.3. Qualification Structure Training, Exams and Resources FAQs

4. ISEB Core Modules – What will I Learn?
4.1. 4.2. Systems Development Essentials Systems Modelling Techniques

5. ISEB Specialist Practitioner Modules – What will I Learn?
5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.4. Business Analysis Essentials Systems Design Techniques Integrating off the Shelf Software Solutions Enterprise & Solutions Architecture (Practitioner)

6. ISEB Specialist Foundation Modules – What will I Learn?
6.1. 6.2. 6.3. 6.4. Systems Development Foundation Software Testing Foundation ITIL Foundation v3 Enterprise & Solutions Architecture (Intermediate)

7. TOGAF

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1. What is Systems Development?
The relationship between business and IT has evolved rapidly and is critical to business success. IT roles have often fragmented as the scale of the task has increased. The importance of developing specialist skills along with best practice methodologies has become vital. At the interface with organisational objectives the Business Analyst (and Enterprise Architect) needs broad knowledge of business objectives and processes in order plan and direct the development process. Systems Development encompasses the more IT centric aspects of Implementation and Delivery. Software testing forms part of the development cycle – but As with Business Analysis it is the subject of a separate Focus training and qualifications guide.

The job roles and titles covered by Systems Development include: - Systems Analyst - Systems Engineer - Data Analyst - Software Architect - Systems Developer - Software Developer - Development Leader - Software Test Analyst - Software Test Manager - Systems Delivery Manager - Project Manager Sometimes the same individual will perform a variety of the development tasks. On other occasions there may be a team of highly specialised, software specific developers. Increasingly, certain elements (or all) of the systems development process will be undertaken by individuals or teams outside the target organisation – introducing a further interface which needs careful management.

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Basic competencies for Systems Developers centre on systems investigation and quality assurance. They must be able to: - interpret defined business requirements - translate these requirements into effective IT specifications - apply people and tools to deliver the required system - deploy the solution with appropriate training and quality assurance A knowledge of when and how to use alternative development lifecycles and methodologies is required – as is familiarity with key techniques such as systems modelling and release management.

2. Where Does “Architecture” Fit?
The term “architecture” is used at different levels within the Information Systems hierarchy. At lower levels, software architecture can describe the structure and design of specific systems or individual software programmes. The “Enterprise and Solution Architecture” we are referring to in this document is at a higher level – looking at the interfaces and interdependencies between multiple systems. In particular it relates to the alignment of multiple systems with the needs and constraints of a given organisation. Once the preserve of complex IT dependent organisations such as banks, IT Architects are increasingly common across both public and private sector. They are often amongst the highest paid IT staff – reflecting the breadth of vision and depth of technical knowledge required. The ISEB Enterprise & Solutions Architecture courses introduce generally applicable concepts and techniques. Many will also want to learn about specific widely adopted architecture frameworks such as TOGAF.

3. ISEB Solution Development Diploma Explained
3.1 Qualification Structure

ISEB is the examination board of the British Computer Society and it specialises in training and exams for IT professionals. ISEB exams cover 8 major IS areas – and over 250,000 exams have been delivered globally. Business Systems Development is one of the most popular ISEB categories. There are a series of short courses with exams which can be selected according to training requirement. Courses involve 3 to 5 days of training and an exam can be taken – either as part of the course or at a separate session later. The benefit of this modular approach is:
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Flexibility to concentrate on the topics you require Training inputs run alongside your work based experience Each module provides a well regarded certification

Those pursuing a career as a Systems Developer or Solutions Architect are likely to seek the ISEB Solutions Development Diploma. This requires completion of 2 core modules and 2 specialist options. The compulsory courses are Systems Development Essentials and Systems Modelling Techniques. The specialist modules are divided into two groups and candidates choose one from each. Candidates will then sit an oral exam with the ISEB which tests their ability to communicate effectively and to apply knowledge to their own work environment.

A change in the structure of the Solutions Development Diploma was introduced in November 2009 (previously Diploma in Systems Development). This will not impact anyone who is already in the process of studying for the qualification. The new structure means that the Systems Design Techniques course is no longer compulsory – and there are more specialist options.

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3.2

Training, Exams and Resources

Training is delivered by specialist providers who have been accredited by the ISEB. The courses are delivered in a conventional instructor led classroom environment. Both public scheduled and company specific on-site training is available. Focus offers ISEB Systems Development and Architecture training from most of the UK’s accredited trainers, enabling you to find and book the course most convenient for you. ISEB accreditation for Solutions Development allows training providers flexibility in the style of course materials and course formats. Call Focus if you are looking for advice on which course is likely to be most suitable. Sections 4 and 5 of this paper provide an overview of each of the Solutions Development modular courses. There is a one hour open book exam associated with most of the courses. The exams are based on a business scenario and 15 minutes reading time is allowed. The pass mark for these written exams is 50%. The knowledge based Foundation courses involve a one hour closed book multiple choice exam with pass mark of 65%. The oral exam for the Diploma is arranged directly with the ISEB. It comprises a 50 minute session, conducted by 2 examiners. The oral exam must be taken no later than 12 months after notification of the final modular exam result. The courses do not use a definitive manual but you will receive copies of course materials. In addition, the ISEB has a recommended reading list for each course which is available on their website. The following book is a useful introductory guide providing workable skills and techniques, underpinned with academic theory.

Introducing Systems Development Steve Skidmore and Malcolm Eva, Palgrave Macmillan ISBN 978-0333973690
Buy Now from Focus on Books: http://books.focus-ontraining.co.uk/catalog/browse.asp?id=101241&group=8009&subcat=14&cat=B

3.3

ISEB Systems Development FAQs

Do I need to pass multiple exams to obtain my Certificate? No. Each module provides its own ISEB certification. It is only if you want the ISEB Diploma in Solution Development that you need to pass four modules and sit the oral exam.
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Which order should I take the modules? It is not essential to take the modules in a given order. Why is there a Foundation AND an Essentials Course? The Foundation is a new course aimed at providing newcomers with an introductory overview. At present there are few training options. It is not required as a pre-requisite for other courses. Are there fast track routes to obtaining the ISEB Diploma? Yes. Focus offers a 10 day residential course which covers all 4 modules and the price includes the exam fees for the four written exams. Is it cheaper to book a package of courses to obtain the Diploma? Yes. You will significantly reduce the cost of your training and exams if you are able to book and pay for a series of modular courses in advance. The package price, course dates and scope will vary by provider. Contact Focus on enquiries@focus-on-training.co.uk to find out what options are available. Why does the course duration differ for the same modular course? The ISEB recommends a minimum number of hours training for a given syllabus but it is up to training providers to set the course length according to the needs of delegates. This means that course durations vary; the course content will be consistent and we recommend that if you have a choice, you select according to your confidence level in the subject matter. When is the exam taken? The exam is often taken on the final day of the course. There are however some trainers who prefer to arrange the exam as a separate event a few weeks after the classroom training. Check the course details on the Focus website. Is the exam fee included in the price of a course? Take care. Trainers will often present the exam as an optional extra. Because we find that nearly all our delegates wish to sit the exam Focus prices include the exam fee (except where the exam is arranged as a separate event). Are there any pre-requisites? There are few absolute pre-requisites for the Solutions Development course but the Focus website will indicate the target audience for which the training is most suited. To obtain the Diploma it is necessary to attend the ISEB oral exam within 12 months of completing the 4 required modules. Do previous version ISEB Certificates count towards the Diploma? They may do. The ISEB publishes an equivalence chart on its website Can Certificates used towards another Diploma count again? Yes. You will find that if you have already been awarded the Business Analysis Diploma then you will have completed at least one (and possibly three) of the modules you need for the Solutions Development Diploma.

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4. Core Modules – What will I Learn? 4.1. Systems Development Essentials
Interpret business requirements and produce systems requirements Quality assure systems requirements and design test cases Understand commonly used development lifecycles and be able to describe the detailed structure and activities of at least one Identify different architectures for systems development solutions Explain how CASE tools might be used to support the development methodology

4.2. Systems Modelling Techniques
Justify the need for IT systems modelling and modelling techniques Develop models of systems functionality Develop models of systems data Develop a dynamic model Evaluate models against business objectives and systems requirements and appreciate their interrelationships

5. Specialist Practitioner Modules – What will I Learn? 5.1. Business Analysis Essentials
Demonstrate understanding of business strategy and strategic analysis techniques Explain techniques to investigate an organisation’s business systems Make recommendations for business improvement Understand the contents of a rigorous business case Identify how business requirements may be supported by IT systems

5.2. System Design Techniques
[Formerly known as Systems Design & Implementation Techniques] Explain the roles and objectives of systems design

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Normalise a restricted set of inputs and outputs Understand all aspects of an effective user interface Apply the principles of physical design Understand security, confidentiality, privacy principles

5.3. Integrating off the Shelf Software Solutions
Understand the advantages and disadvantages of off-the-shelf software Define a framework for selection and integration Define functional and non functional requirements Prepare proposal requests and evaluate proposals Identify implementation and support issues

5.4. Enterprise & Solutions Architecture (Practitioner)
[Pre-requisites include the ISEB Intermediate or TOGAF Certificate] A knowledge of roles, concepts & techniques is assumed. The Practitioner certificate focuses on practical application Apply concepts and techniques to a case study Project management and migration to achieve Architecture objectives Understand Architecture change management and governance issues

6. Specialist Foundation Modules – What will I Learn? 6.1. Systems Development Foundation
[This is a new syllabus and at time of writing courses are not yet available] A wide ranging introduction to Systems Development concentrating on building awareness Business Analysis and Requirement Engineering Development Lifecycles, Programming & Development Approaches Systems Modelling, Design and Architecture Quality and Testing

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6.2. Software Testing Foundation
Perform effective testing of software Be aware of software testing techniques and standards Be aware of what testing tools can achieve Understand where to find more information Establish the basic steps of the testing process

6.3. ITIL Foundation v3
Explain the concept of Service Management and the objectives and business value for each phase of the Service Lifecycle Define key ITIL terminology Understand how key ITIL processes contribute to the Service Lifecycle Explain the role, objectives, organisational structures, staffing and metrics of the Service Desk function List generic requirements for a set of Service Management technologies and understand how service automation can assist

6.4. Enterprise & Solutions Architecture (Intermediate)
Understand different kinds of architecture and roles Understand concepts & techniques relating to business, data and applications architecture Solution design to meet non functional requirements Use of infrastructure architecture to support applications architecture

Visit the Focus website where you can browse and book accredited Systems Development training throughout the UK
http://www.focus-on-training.co.uk/systems-development-andarchitecture/courses/skillarea/14/

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7. TOGAF
The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) is a framework - a detailed method and a set of supporting tools - for developing an enterprise architecture. It may be used freely by any organisation wishing to develop an enterprise architecture for use within that organisation. TOGAF is developed and maintained by members of The Open Group, working within the Architecture Forum (refer to www.opengroup.org/architecture). The original development of TOGAF Version 1 in 1995 was based on the Technical Architecture Framework for Information Management (TAFIM), developed by the US Department of Defense. Starting from this sound foundation, the members of The Open Group Architecture Forum have developed successive versions of TOGAF and published each one on The Open Group public web site. Enterprise Architecture is defined as architecture that crosses multiple systems, and multiple functional groups within an enterprise. An “enterprise" is seen as a collection of organisations, divisions or departments with a common set of goals. The latest version is TOGAF 9, launched in February 2009. There is a comprehensive manual structured to reflect the TOGAF approach (see diagram below). The TOGAF 9 Certification for People Program is a market-driven education and certification program to support TOGAF 9.” There are two levels to certification, denoted Level 1 and Level 2.

Level 1 is known as TOGAF 9 Foundation. To provide validation that the candidate has gained knowledge of the terminology and basic concepts of TOGAF 9 and understands the core principles of Enterprise Architecture and TOGAF The exam format is 1 hour closed book with 40 questions

Level 2 is known as TOGAF 9 Certified. To provide validation that in addition to knowledge and comprehension, the candidate is able to analyze and apply knowledge of TOGAF The exam format is a 90 minute open book 8 scenario-based questions A single combined Level 1 and Level 2 exam is available to make it simpler to go direct to TOGAF 9 Certified. You will find 4 and 5 day TOGAF - IT Architecture courses on the Focus website. These cover all you need to achieve Level 2 certification.

TOGAF books and study guides are available from Focus on Books
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There are seven main parts to the TOGAF document: PART I (Introduction) A high-level introduction to the key concepts of enterprise architecture and in particular the TOGAF approach. It contains the definitions of terms used throughout TOGAF PART II (Architecture Development Method) This part is the core of TOGAF. It describes the TOGAF Architecture Development Method (ADM) - a step-by-step approach to developing an enterprise architecture. PART III (ADM Guidelines and Techniques) This part contains a collection of guidelines and techniques available for use in applying TOGAF and the TOGAF ADM. PART IV (Architecture Content Framework) The TOGAF content framework, including a structured metamodel for architectural artifacts, the use of re-usable building blocks, and an overview of typical deliverables. PART V (Enterprise Continuum & Tools) This part discusses appropriate taxonomies and tools to categorize and store the outputs of architecture activity within an enterprise. PART VI (TOGAF Reference Models) A selection of architectural reference models, which includes the TOGAF Foundation Architecture, and the Integrated Information Infrastructure Reference Model (III-RM). PART VII (Architecture Capability Framework) This part discusses the organisation, processes, skills, roles, and responsibilities required to establish and operate an architecture function within an enterprise. Focus on Training Tel: 0845 450 6120 Web: www.focus-on-training.co.uk

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