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Welcome to the Percussion Department We hope that you will find your participation in the Percussion Department a challenging and rewarding experience. In association with the Performance Division Dean’s Office, we have put together this handbook to acquaint you with the many forms of instruction available within the department and to help you understand our policies and procedures. Please read this handbook carefully. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions, feel free to stop by our offices during posted office hours. John Ramsay Department Chair Office - Room 005 (Uchida Building, 921 Boylston) Add John’s 1140 office Yoron Israel Assistant Chair Office - Room 4B1 (1140 Boylston) Room 005 (921 Boylston) Department Mission The mission of the Percussion Department is to educate, train, and develop students to excel in music as a career. Developing the musicianship of all our students is the foundation of our curriculum. We believe that the lessons and qualities derived from that work—the self-discipline needed for excellence, the empathy required of music making, and the openness and inquisitiveness essential to creativity—are critical to achievement in any pursuit, musical or otherwise, and that music is a powerful catalyst for personal growth, which is central to any collegiate experience. Our comprehensive curriculum is distinctly contemporary in its content and approach, and covers the principal musical movements of our time. Through a course of scholarly and practical learning experiences integrating performance and writing, our curriculum covers the variety of influential styles, relevant technologies, and career opportunities open to today’s music professional. Department Advisors Department advisors keep office hours to answer questions about course offerings, departmental activities, and the Performance Major. Advisors are assigned according to your principal instrument, as follows: Drumset Principals: Bob Tamagni Henrique DeAlmeida Hand Percussion Principals: Mike Ringquist Room 4F Room M 1140 Boylston 1140 Boylston

Room 022

921 Boylston

Total Percussion Principals: Dean Anderson Vibraphone Principals: Ed Saindon Marimba Principals Nancy Zeltsman

Room 001 Room 020 Room 020

921 Boylston 921 Boylston 921 Boylston

Percussion Department Tutors The Percussion Department offers tutoring for all students enrolled in a Percussion Department lab or private lesson. Each principal instrument has its own tutor. Check the department bulletin board or website for specific hours. Drumset Principals: Jon Hazilla Hand Percussion Principals: Mike Ringquist Total Percussion Principals: Dean Anderson Vibraphone Principals: Victor Mendoza Marimba Principals Nancy Zeltsman Room 4C Room 022 Room 001 Room N Room 020 1140 Boylston 921 Boylston 921 Boylston 1140 Boylston 921 Boylston

II. Private Instruction Private Lesson Scheduling Private lessons, which are 30 or 50 minutes in length, begin during the first week of classes. No lessons are given during final exam week. During Check-in Week, entering students are assigned a private instruction teacher by John Ramsay and Yoron Israel. We will match the individual learning needs of each student with the strengths of a particular instructor. During Registration for the next semester, continuing students may sign up for the teacher of their choice, based on availability. Attendance and Make-up Lesson Policies • Be on time for your lesson. (Teachers will wait 10 minutes).

Notify your teacher if you will have to miss a lesson. Any unexcused absences (those not agreed upon with your teacher in advance) will not be made up and could affect your grade. If you have three unexcused absences you could receive a grade of "F" for the lesson. Lessons missed due to teacher absence will be made up.

Criteria for Grading Private Lessons Your final grade for the private lesson will be determined by averaging the teacher’s evaluation grade (50%) and the final exam grade (50%). The following grading criteria will be used in the private instructor’s evaluation: Grade Considerations A AB+ B BC+ C CD F W (93-100) (90-92) (87-89) (83-86) (80-82) (77-79) (73-76) (70-72) (60-69) (below 60)
Superior, Exceptional; control of course material enables excellent production.

Good; grasp of material enables above average production.

Average; assimilation of material enables acceptable production. Below Average; exposure to material enables poor but passable production. Not Passing, assimilation of material is insufficient to demonstrate acceptable productive capacity. Withdrawal (not included in grade point average). You must request withdrawal by filling out a "Student Initiated Withdrawal from a Class" format the Counseling Center. (The "W" deadline for each semester is found in the Registration Manual/Course Master Schedule, in the section marked "Academic Calendar" under the heading "Last Day to Request an advance grade of 'W'." This information is available from the Counseling Center.) Incomplete. The "I" grade is given by your teacher (not the department chair) only in extraordinary circumstances. You must be passing the course to receive an "I". A detailed description of the Incomplete Grade Policy can be found in the college bulletin.

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Private Instruction Final Exams All Percussion Department principals who are taking a leveled private lesson are required to take a final exam. The final exams have been designed by the Percussion Department to evaluate your progress in technical proficiency on your instrument. The exam evaluations are cumulative: if you are being tested for Level 3, you may be asked to perform material from Level(s) 1 and/or 2. The following semester, your private instructor will go over the final exam notes with you. We recommend you use this information to address specific areas of deficiency as part of your lesson plans for the new semester.

Exam requirements are not the only materials that will be covered in your private lesson. Depending on your own skills and rate of progress, however, you may need to spend a large portion of the lesson time on exam-related material. Scheduling of Private Instruction Final Exams Final exams for private lessons are given during the final exam week of each semester. Level 7 Juries (RPPC 411) are scheduled during the first two weeks of class. Advance Placement and Makeup Exams are scheduled throughout the semester with the Assistant Chair. Approximately two weeks prior to final exam week, see the Percussion Department Office Supervisor (rm. 13 Uchida) to schedule the day and time for the private lesson exam. Failure to do this will result in an F for that lesson. Additionally, a Makeup Exam Fee will be incurred. Students should discuss the exam level to be performed with her/his private lesson instructor. If any exam levels need to be made up the student should contact Assistant Chair Yoron Israel directly. Additional Lessons: Non-leveled & Non-principal. All instrumental instruction credit for graduation must be earned on a single or dual principal instrument. As a drumset, vibraphone, hand percussion, marimba, total percussion, or steel pan principal, you may use credit earned on other percussion instruments to meet the graduation requirement. If you change your principal instrument, you may jeopardize your graduation status. Non-leveled lessons, which do not include a final exam, may be available to students who are already enrolled in an exam-based lesson and wish to take an additional lesson on their principal instrument. Non-leveled lessons are not included in your full-time tuition. In addition, approval by Chair John Ramsay or Asssistant Chair Yoron Israel is required. Non-leveled lessons do not satisfy the graduation requirement for private instruction; instead, they are applied to your general elective credit within the established limits. Private instruction on instruments outside of the percussion department may be available, depending on teacher availability. Approval by the appropriate department chair is required. As a drumset, vibraphone, hand percussion, marimba, total percussion, or steel pan principal, any private instruction credit you earn on an instrument outside of the Percussion Department, except in the case of dual principals and/or performance majors, is applied to your general elective credit within the established limits. Percussion Department Teacher Profiles Percussion Department faculty offices are located in the basement and on the 4th floor of 1140 Boylston Street and the basement of the Uchida Building (921 Boylston Street). Faculty profiles may be found at http://www.berklee.edu/departments/percussion.html.

III. Ensemble/Lab Program Lab General Information • For instrumental labs, prerequisites are based on ensemble ratings and/or completion of lower level sequential labs. All first-semester students are required to participate in the ensemble program. All 2nd semester students planning on applying for entrance into the Performance Major must be enrolled in an ensemble. The number of lab/ensemble credits that must be earned differs by catalog year and major. Please consult the Counseling and Advising Center and the Major Grids. (Complete information on the graduation requirements for your major, including how many credits you must earn in each area of instruction, is available from the Counseling Center.)

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Elective Labs The Percussion Department offers many elective labs, which can help you to develop your skills in a broad range of percussion styles and instruments. You can use the College Bulletin (available online) and consult with a Percussion Department Advisor or other percussion faculty during their posted office hours to find out more about what is covered in each course. ILPD 111 Drumset Basics ILPD 112 Jazz Drum set Fundamentals ILPD 125 - Snare Drum Techniques for the Drum Set ILPD 211 Introduction to Brazilian/Afro-Cuban drum Set ILPD 212 Drum Set Chart Interpretation ILPD 239 Country and Western Drumming ILPC 319 Advanced Drum Rudiments ILPD 333 Advanced Drum Chart Reading ILPD 351 Alternate setups for Drumset/Percussion ILPD 125 - Snare Drum Techniques for the Drumset Principal ILPD 217 - Brush Techniques ILPD 221 - Rock drumming Repertoire and Application ILPD 225 - Jazz Repertoire Development and Application ILPD 229 - Hip Hop Drumming Development, Repertoire, and Application ILPD 233 - Funk Repertoire Development and Application ILPD 235 - Polyrhythms 1 ILPD 250 - Global Sigh-reading and Advanced Rhythmic Solfege ILPD 317 - Advanced Brush Lab ILPD 331 - Contemporary Electronic Percussion ILPD 339 - Fusion Repertoire Development and Application ILPD 341 Contemporary Electronic Percussion ILPD 355 - African Rhythms for the Drumset

ILPD 357 - South American Rhythms for Drumset ILPD 361 - New Orleans Drumming ILPD 369 - Double Bass Drum Studies ILPD 373 - Afro-Cuban and Brazilian Rhythms for the Drumset ILPD 424 - Caribbean Rhythms for Drumset ILPD 433 - Advanced Jazz Drumming ILPC 281 - Introduction to Timpani ILPC 315 - Concert Snare Drum Techniques ILPH 293 - Afro-Caribbean Rhythms & Percussion for Non-Percussionists ILPH 351 - Drumming Styles of Ghana ILPH 353 - Native American Drumming ILPH 354 - Bata Rhythms/Afro-Cuban Ceremonial Drumming Lab ILPH 357 - Afro-Cuban Rhythms & Percussion ILPH 359 - Brazilian Rhythms & Percussion ILPH 365 - Timbale Playing Styles 1 ILPH 371 - Advanced Afro-Cuban Rhythms and Percussion ILPH 391 - Steelpan Techniques for Percussionists ILPH 429 – Contemporary Techniques for Pop Percussion ILPH 451 - Drumming Styles of Guinea ILPH 459 - Brazilian Rhythms & Percussion 2 ILPM 121 - Mallet Lab 1 ILPM 221 - Mallet Lab 2 ILPM 231 - Mallet Keyboard Musicianship ILPM 341 - Marimba Transcription and Repertoire ISPC 221 – Percussion Class for Music Education Majors ISPC 231 - 1 Percussion for Music Therapy Ensemble Auditions & Offerings All entering students perform a placement audition, which determines their first semester placement in ensembles. Students who wish to upgrade their ensemble ratings (in order to enroll in upper level ensembles in the following semester) may audition during midterm week or final exam week. Students who intend to pre-register for the fall or spring semesters should plan to audition during midterm week of the preceding semester. (In the summer semester, ensemble auditions are only scheduled during final exam week.) You must go to the Ensemble Department Office (Room A01, 150 Mass. Ave.) to schedule an audition. Auditions are scheduled on a first come, first served basis, and the Ensemble Department posts notification of the sign-up period throughout the College. Students may audition only once per semester (with the exception of students who are in their first semester) either during midterm week or final exam week. If you plan to audition for ensemble ratings, you should discuss this with your private lesson instructor early in the semester so you can work on audition material in your private lessons. The prerequisites for each ensemble are listed in the College Bulletin and the Registration Manual. You may also visit the Ensemble Department to discuss ensemble auditions and offerings.

Strings.Percussionist PSW-335 .Performance Ear Training for Winds.Fundamentals of Improvisation for Percussion PSPC 341 .World Percussion for Percussionist PSW 341 .Survey of Drum Styles Since the 60s PFSS 345 . Hand percussion. Drumset principals take a private mallet lesson (vibraphone or marimba). techniques. and Mallets 2 (Vibraphone. Eight levels of private instruction on a principal instrument and six levels of recital preparation culminate in the Senior Recital.Survey of Drum Styles to the 60s* (Drumset Principals) PFSS 342 . IV. Hand Percussion and Total Percussion) PSW 235 . and musical styles that are necessary to a successful performance career. . vibraphone. The Performance Major Students who major in Performance master the concepts. Additionally. ensemble performance. and steelpan principals take a private drumset lesson. Required courses emphasize improvisation. Marimba and Steelpan Principals) PFET 370 . style analysis. which is the required final project for Performance majors.The Music of Guinea PFSS 341 . reading. and rehearsal techniques.World Percussion for Non. Please see the current College Bulletin for complete course descriptions. PSPC 231 . Hand Percussion and Total Percussion) PFET 371 . Marimba and Steelpan Principals) PFET 362 .Performance Ear Training for Percussion 2 (Drumset. and Mallets 1 (Vibraphone.Survey of Latin American Hand Percussion Styles* (Hand Percussion Principals) *Required of Performance majors.Performance Ear Training for Winds. total percussion.Survey of Percussion Styles* (Total Percussion & Marimba Principals) PFSS 347 .Special ensemble offerings that are primarily percussion-based include the follow: ENPC 211 – Beginning Percussion Ensemble ENPC 215 – Contemporary Mallet Percussion Ensemble ENPH 291 – Berklee Steelpan Ensemble ENPC 321 – Mixed World Ensemble ENPM 331 – Marimba Ensemble ENPC 332 – Marimba Ensemble 2 ENPC 333 – Marimba Ensemble 3 ENPC 359 – Berklee Bata Ensemble ENPC 363 – Marimba in Mixed Chamber Music Ensemble ENPC 374 – West African Drum & Dance Ensemble ENPC 385 – The Berklee Drumline ENPC 429 – Contemporary Techniques of Pop Percussion ENPC 431 – Berklee Percussion Ensemble Recommended Supplementary Courses for Percussion Department Principals.The Music of Ghana PSW 342 . Strings.Performance Ear Training for Percussion 1 (Drumset.Studio Drumming Techniques and Applications* PFET 361 . all percussion department principals are required to take a private lesson on a designated percussion double during their sixth semester of study.

song styles and rhythms. Prospective Performance Majors will be required to complete an audition/interview as scheduled by the Instrumental/Voice Department Chair. and on the development of Latin American music in New York from the 1920s to the present. The student's residency as a Performance Major will be under the auspices of the Instrumental/Voice Department Chair. and accessories. PSPC 341 Studio Drumming Techniques and Applications (Drumset. including timpani. The purpose of this audition/interview is to advise the student on her/his potential to succeed in the major by identifying specific strengths as well as areas needing development. Studies will include solo percussion in orchestral. Buddy Rich. Studies of Big Sid Catlett. Emphasis will be on the music of Cuba and Brazil. To initiate the process of declaring a Major in Performance. as well as specific instruments. marimba. theatrical. glockenspiel. and others. Max Roach. composing and arranging styles. The Division strongly recommends that students who major in Performance maintain a 3. and to register for and take a Performance Major Ensemble Audition.Students who are interested in declaring the Performance Major are strongly urged to discuss the requirements with the Department Chairs and advisors. xylophone. PFSS 341 Survey of Drum Styles to the ’60s (Drumset Principals) A study of the development of the jazz drummer from the music’s early period through the 1960s. vibraphone. Required Courses in the Performance Major PFSS 345 Survey of Percussion Styles (Total Percussion & Marimba Principals) Historical survey of musical development and usage of percussion instruments. Musical relationships to the European and African traditions will be studied. Analysis through recordings and transcriptions of various playing styles.7 minimum GPA in Performance concentrate courses to remain in good academic standing. snare drum. students should see the Chair of their department. and significant artists in the idiom. & Total Percussion Principals) .0 minimum GPA in their private lessons. with particular focus on hand percussion playing. and various studio environments. Students should declare the Performance Major by the middle of their second semester and must have a minimum GPA of 2. multiple percussion. Students who are accepted into the major must maintain a 2. Hand Percussion. PFSS 347 Survey of Latin American Hand Percussion Styles (Hand Percussion Principals) A study of the history and development of the music of Latin America and the Caribbean.7.

). Recital Preparation Lessons Recital Preparation lessons are required of Performance majors in the 3rd through 8th semesters and build toward the Senior Recital. and motion picture soundtrack recording techniques. and 8. Each student performs a minimum of one solo. Students cannot receive credit by exam for Recital Preparation lessons. If you are an experienced performer. and auxiliary percussion parts to studio performance. Recital Preparation lessons focus on developing performance technique. . Issues covered include repertoire. or declare a secondary instrument. If you are inexperienced in on-stage performance. ILRE 375 Recital Workshop for Performance Majors A co-requisite with Recital Preparation 311. Emphasis on rhythms of North Africa. Class meetings are split weekly into lecture and playing sections. memorization. students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. 7. all 5th semester performance majors must take this class. Performance majors are required to take the 6 levels of Recital Preparation (RP 3-8) in 6 successive semesters. study of jingle. With the exception of RP 5. or steel pan – on their instrument with a faculty from another department. Your Recital Preparation private instructor will help you prepare your performances for this class. study of drum looping and sampling techniques and their application to drumset recording. Please review the RP lesson final exam criteria with your specific teacher early in the semester. mental preparation. expanding your repertoire. and Turkey. and constructive criticism. the Middle East. stage presence.Application of drumset and percussion techniques to the studio recording environment. etc. using a click track. hand percussion. Recital Preparation lessons and performances present a great opportunity to experience new challenges and grow beyond your proven strengths. Application of skills including tuning the instrument. vibraphone. drum chart reading. dumbek. and how to apply them to contemporary American music. Analysis of today's top studio recording drummers and producers. PSW 335 World Percussion for Percussionists (Hand Percussion Principals) A course for Percussion Department principals focusing on abilities and techniques used to produce a wide variety of sounds from any hand drum (frame drum. marimba. television. and honing your sense of musical direction in building a performance. total percussion. and two 2 accompanied pieces during the semester and participates in discussion of in-class performances. electronic percussion. the Recital Preparation series can help you to select and prepare pieces with which you can build confidence and performance skills. which is the Performance Major’s required final project. and they must take the corresponding Private Instruction levels (PI-3 8) at the same time.

and timbre by ear and responding on the student’s instrument in class. Recognizing pitch. RPPC 411 Recital Preparation 5/Jury – 7th Semester Recital Preparation 5.RPPC 311 Recital Preparation 3 – 5th semester A co-requisite with ILRE 375. Course content includes dictation and non-solfege sight singing.. and Mallets 1 & 2 (Vibraphone and Marimba principals) PFET 370 and PFET 371 Performance Ear Training for Percussion 1 & 2 (Drumset. . In addition to performing a project from the ILRE class. and must be completed by the end of that semester. Your Jury program should be prepared using the guidelines listed in this handbook for Final Exam Requirements. you can strengthen your improvisation techniques in styles including jazz. Strings. and world music. 921 Boylston St. No changes may be made to your program after it has been approved. A panel made up of two teachers from the Percussion Department will evaluate your Jury performance. taken in the seventh semester of study. The Jury is a 30-minute preview performance of material that will be presented on your Senior Recital. room 013. In order to receive credit for Recital Preparation 5 and proceed to Recital Preparation 6 (SENIOR RECITAL).net/co. rhythm. Juries are scheduled during the first two weeks of classes by the Percussion Department Office Supervisor. We especially recommend improvisation studies for students who are Performance majors. The following courses are Approved Specified Electives (ASEs) for the Performance Major: PFET 361 and PFET 362 Performance Ear Training for Winds. is referred to as a Jury. Hand Percussion. students must present an odd metered piece and sight read a snare drum piece. This performance program must consist of at least 60 minutes of music and should offer a wide selection of idioms and styles. you must receive a passing grade for your Jury. all 5th semester performance majors must take this lesson on their principal instrument. Latin. RPPC 412 Recital Preparation 6/Senior Recital – 8th semester Recital Preparation 6 is your Senior Recital. Total Percussion. Recital protocol and procedures must be observed. Applications must be made one semester prior to the semester in which you wish to hold your recital. As a drummer or percussionist here. Your Recital program must be approved and signed by John Ramsay or Yoron Israel at least 7 weeks before your Recital is presented. and Steelpan principals) Ear training with an emphasis on practical performance experience. Performance Studies Electives Improvisation Courses Most Berklee students say that developing their improvisation skills is one of their most important musical goals. V. harmony. Information about applying for the senior recital can be found on the Concert Office website at Berklee. rock.

room 5J in the 1140 Boylston St. PSIJ 255 The Music of Wayne Shorter Historic. PSIJ 372 Performing Harmony Workshop 2 Advanced melodic material studied. and style integration. coordination. Sonny Stitt. students perform weekly. Kenny Dorham. This course is recommended for serious. and others. PSIJ 331 The Jazz Line A performance-centered class covering jazz vocabulary and the construction of jazz melodies based on the traditions of players including Charlie Parker. Emphasis is placed on rhythm skill. PSW 341 Pentatonics in Improvisation A performance-centered class covering minor 7. stylistic. PSIJ 216 Standard Jazz Repertoire 2 A sequel to PSIJ 215. PSIJ 335 Melodic Structures in Improvisation A performance-centered class covering melodic cells and their permutations applied to improvising in a variety of settings. Aim. intermediate and advanced levels. especially those who take the Jazz Improve 1-6 course series. The following courses are electable by students in all majors: PSIJ 371 Performing Harmony Workshop 1 Recommended for performers interested in developing their musical ear. minor 7(b5). major b6 and all diminished related pentatonics and their application to improvisation and the creation of .PSX 492 Professional Performance Internship If your are interested in the Performance Internship. ballad and contemporary styles. building. PSIJ 215 Standard Jazz Repertoire 1 Recommended for students who take the Jazz Improvisation Techniques 1-5 series: These classes are leveled and instrumentally balanced. PSPC 231 Fundamentals of Improvisation for Percussion Survey of performance techniques related to drumset solo and duet improvisation. JAZZ PSIJ 211 Jazz Improvisational Technique Highly recommended if you are considering any of the Performance Studies' jazz improvisation classes and would like to begin to develop the language used in jazz improvisation. John Coltrane. this course explores in detail the critical areas involved in learning how to improvise in the jazz idiom. career-minded students of jazz improvisation at beginning. Study of multi tonic systems (Coltrane changes) and their application as either harmony or substitutions. and performance-based overview of the compositions and improvisations of Wayne Shorter. Sonny Rollins. this course continues the process of building and retaining a functional repertoire of jazz standards in bebop. PSIJ 271 Ready. covering the period from the late 1950s to the present. please visit the Performance Office. Improvise! Using the lecture/demonstration format. thematic development. minor 6. Latin.

melodies and usage charts. 423. PSIJ 311 Chord Scale Theory in Improvisation Designed for performers. 321. students perform weekly: PSIJ 221 Jazz Improvisation Techniques 1 An ideal follow-up to PSIJ 211 Jazz Improvisational Techniques. 422. John Coltrane. 325: These classes are instrumentally balanced. and others. 421. PSIJ 421 Jazz Improvisation Techniques 4 An upper-level course recommended for students with well-developed improvisational skills and concepts who are interested in further developing their own personal style through detailed application. PSIJ 425 Advanced Jazz Improvisational Techniques Recommended for students who have ensemble ratings of 6666. *PSIJ 221. this course will examine the application of chord scales to harmonic progression. with the introduction of techniques that will further enhance your personal improvisational style. and interpretative techniques. 315. PSIJ 422 Jazz Improvisation Techniques 5 An advanced course recommended for students who have already begun to develop their own personal music styles. improvisation. PSIJ 351 Performance and Analysis of Bebop Music Analysis and performance of music in the style of Charlie Parker. Joe Henderson. PSIJ 315 Improvisation on Standard Songs This class is recommended for students considering taking PSIJ 322 Jazz Improvisation Techniques 3. PSIJ 321 Jazz Improvisation Techniques 2 An expansion of the fundamental improvisational skills developed in PSIJ 221. PSIM 327 Improvisation in the Jazz-Blues Idiom A study of basic blues playing in the jazz idiom. Kenny Dorham. . PSIJ 322 Jazz Improvisation Techniques 3 Intermediate level course introducing approaches to improvisation that requires a solid background in harmonic and tonal concepts. Recommended for the beginning-tointermediate improviser interested in this genre. PSIJ 325 Jazz Interpretation Development of a personal and individual jazz style through emphasis on reading. Voice leading and approach systems as used by master improvisers including Wayne Shorter. Dizzy Gillespie. and others. 322. Clifford Brown. PSIJ 423 Jazz Improvisation Techniques 6 An advanced course offering sophisticated approaches and concepts.

Bulgaria. the East and Eastern Europe A study of the music of North India and other music and cultures of the Near East and Far East. Martha Reeves and the Vandellas. including Japan. David Sanborn. Smokey Robinson. ADDITIONAL COURSES IN THE ROCK IDIOM PSPR 381 Commercial Band Workshop Performances of music in various styles appropriate to general business jobs. and Gladys Knight and the Pips. An end-of-semester public performance is normally scheduled. PSPR 363 Progressive Rock Performance A study integrating performance of the progressive rock style of the ’70’s: repertoire. LHAN 346 . bossa and contemporary Latin grooves. PSIM 335 Improvisation in the Jazz-Rock/ Fusion Idioms Major players and groups to be analyzed will be The Yellowjackets. sound. The class will include a rhythm section plus varied instrumentation and will perform in a recital at the end of the semester. LATIN PSIM 341 Improvisation in the Latin/Jazz Idiom Performance and analysis of Latin/Jazz music and related song forms. and other musical elements leading to emulation and creative reproduction of this musical genre. and of the interaction of African and European cultures in the New World of Latin America and South America. melodic and rhythmic embellishment. calypso. and Turkey.ROCK PSIM 231 Rock Improvisational Techniques 1 Major techniques discussed in this course include pacing. rhythmic density. ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE STUDIES COURSES R&B PSPR 361 Motown Analysis and performance of music by such artists as Stevie Wonder. Latin and South America A study of the major music and cultures of Africa. Recommended for the beginning-tointermediate improviser interested in this playing idiom.Music of India. and Chick Corea. including Greece. Michael Brecker. as well as Eastern Europe. Diana Ross and the Supremes. chord scale practice. This class will perform original compositions in an end-of-thesemester final performance. the Temptations. Concentration on samba. focusing on the way these cultures have produced new musical forms as a result. Indonesia. . and non-harmonic melody notes. instrumentation. WORLD MUSIC LHAN 345 . forms. Marvin Gaye.Music of Africa. and Georgia. PSIM 235 Improvisation in the Rock-R&B Idiom A study of basic blues playing in the rock/R&B idiom. The focus of study will be on the interaction of cultures to produce new musical forms.

PST 471 Stage Performance Workshop 1 . VI. This must be surrendered to the Percussion Department work-study on duty at the time a practice room is needed.Rock & Pop Idiom PST 472 Stage Performance Workshop 2 . The following policies are enforced: • A valid ID is necessary for admittance to any practice room. acquisition of materials budgeting. Recording Ensemble. PST 385 Elements of Theatre Production Staging and directing musical productions.) as a production assistant to the concert and will write and conduct some of the music. The valid ID will be retained in the Percussion .one’s sense of oneself in movement . ETC Resources for Percussionists Policies for Use of Percussion Department Facilities Percussion Department practice facilities are located at 921 Boylston Street. organization of production staff. clarity. conducting rehearsals and performances. (in Allston). and 25 Fordham Rd.. responsibilities of production departments. INTERNSHIP PSX 492 Professional Performance Internship Monitored and evaluated professional work experience for the Performance Major. INJURY PREVENTION PSH 238 Awareness Training for Musicians Self-awareness exercises will be used to improve the kinesthetic sense .Rock & Pop Idiom All performances are in a rock/pop band format. supervision of all practice facilities. building is a dedicated drumset practice facility with 20 drumset rooms. The basement of 171 Mass Ave.enabling the instrumentalist to avoid injuries due to overuse and/or misuse. PST 351 Stage Performance Techniques Recommended for instrumentalists and vocalists interested in developing on-stage performance presentation skills. etc. 150 and 171 Massachusetts Ave. as well as helping to develop sensitivity. How to audition. The department work-study offices are responsible for all departmental faculty communication. and power in musical production. CONCERT/THEATRE PRODUCTION PST 451 The Musical Director Each student will be assigned to a specific faculty-directed concert (Jazz-Rock Ensemble. Singers’ Showcase. and Percussion Department security. Classes present an end-of-semester final performance.STAGE PERFORMANCE Stage performance workshops are open to students in any major.

Any student or non-student practice/rehearsal activity that has not been properly cleared through the department work-study office will be reported to the appropriate college officials. These events are advertised on Visiting Artist Series posters throughout the college. • • Drum Lockers Students can sign up for drum lockers during registration for each semester. These events are a good way for faculty and students to get acquainted. are in room B20 and can be reserved through the Ensemble Department. first-served basis. The Faculty Artist Series is designed to put you in touch with teachers both within the Percussion Department and from throughout the college. Some recent visiting percussion professionals have included: Alex Acuña Louis Hayes Walfredo Reyes Bill Stewart Dafnis Prieto Jimmy Cobb Pedro “Pedrrito” Martinez Peter Lockett Jose Luis “Changuito” Quintana • • • • • • • • • . concerts.D. The Boston musical community supports and attracts many professional musicians. to the department work-study. • Department work-study employees monitor all use of practice facilities. and inform you about special offerings of their departments. Instruments are available at the Uchida Building and at 150 Mass.Department work-study office for the duration of the practice room usage. Ave. Some lockers will fit drums with cases depending on the case size and shape. Practice rooms are available on a first-come. Students may reserve certain Percussion Department instruments by presenting a student I. and informal rap sessions faculty artists showcase their specialties. Ave. Lockers fit bass drums smaller than 22” and a regular 5 piece drum set. Faculty Artist Series and Visiting Artist Series Berklee’s Faculty and Visiting Artist Series offers students multiple opportunities each semester to meet and learn from experts in a wide variety of musical fields. master classes. Instruments at 150 Mass. Do not ask faculty to open available practice rooms. Instruments may not be taken out of the building. Locker rentals are managed by the Housing Office (3rd floor 150 Mass Ave). At clinics. The Visiting Artist Series invites many of these professionals to share their expertise in clinics/demonstrations. answer your questions. and concerts.

John Robinson Bobby Rock Trichy Sankaran Marvin "Smitty" Smith Steve Smith Ed Soph Julie Spencer Gordon Stout Glen Velez Jeff Watts Dave Weckl Percussion Department Annual Events Information on the Berklee Percussion Festival (summer) is available from the Special Programs Office.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Winard Harper Derico Watson Carmine Appice Gregg Bissonette Cindy Blackman Terry Bozzio Jimmy Branley Will Calhoun Dennis Chambers Vinnie Colaiuta Jack DeJohnette Peter Erskine Dave Friedman David Garibaldi Jeff Hamilton Billy Hart Horacio Hernandez Giovanni Hidalgo Steve Houghton Hilary Jones Johnathan Mover Lewis Nash Adam Nussbaum John Piper Enrique Pla Marc Quinones Walfredo Reyes. Registration brochures will be available in the Admissions office. . Full information is also available on the Berklee website. Sr. see the Summer Programs section.

vibraphone. Representatives from the percussion industry participate in daily exhibits. The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the final exam grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. South Indian. and marimba faculty. VII. West African. hand percussion. and North African/Middle Eastern traditions.0 Total Credits: *Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset.0 and Application 4. Vibraphone. Principal instrument tracks include drumset (all styles). and concerts.0 to the ‘60s Studio Drumming Techniques 2. which takes place in June. Classes are taught by Berklee’s drumset. total percussion. vibraphone.0 Total Credits: 16. is a five-day intensive study of all forms of percussion. ensembles.0 RPPC** 6. Native American. hand percussion from Afro-Cuban. marimba. Percussion industry exhibits occur each day.0 or 15. Percussion Days This annual two-day event takes place during each Spring semester and features Berklee students. vibraphone.Berklee Percussion Festival This annual festival. and concerts.0 th (taken in the 6 semester) Student Choice* 3. open classes.0 or 5. hand percussion. Final Exam and Grade Requirements DRUMSET PRINCIPAL PIPC AND RPPC FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENTS Performance Major Required Lessons Credits Drumset PIPC 6. workshops. and visiting artists in a series of clinics. **Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. total percussion. or steelpan. Brazilian. hand percussion.0 Vibraphone 1. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. and by world-renowned visiting artists. Marimba. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Snare Drum . master classes. marimba.0 Required Classes PFSS 341 PSPC 341 Credits Survey of Drum Styles 2. and Steel Pan. master classes. faculty. The daily curriculum includes eight hours of principal instrument classes.

LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Snare Drum 1. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. shuffle. rock. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. Snare Drum Book List. Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. 16 or 32 bar song form. Time Feels Perform the following time feels: swing. Student should demonstrate her/his ability to support melody as well as her/his command of groove and structure. decided by the student and teacher. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. “All American Drummer”. Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above. and mambo. “Musical Studies for the Intermediate Snare Drummer”. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song. jazz waltz. bossa nova. Snare Drum Book List. Snare Drum Book List. “All American Drummer”. the form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. 2. reggae. orchestrate any five of the 26 American. Rudiments On the drum set. Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels from level one in the context of a 12 bar blues. funk. calypso. .1. Rudiments Demonstrate any six of the 26 American Rudiments as determined by the faculty member administering exam. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. 2 times “comping”. Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above sources. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of accompaniment. One prepared piece from Garwood Whaley. One prepared piece from Recital Solos for Snare Drum by Garwood Whaley. 2.

decided on by the student and teacher. “Portraits in Rhythm”. samba. Time Feels Perform two of the following Afro Cuban. Prepared Drumset Piece Student determines one style track for himself: Jazz. the . Chart Interpretation Appropriately leveled drumset sight-reading and interpretation.) CONTINUED DRUMSET Student performs 1 snare drum piece from “Portraits in Rhythm”. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. hand percussion. R & B/Funk. 6/8 afro cuban. vibraphone. total percussion. time sense/comping. decided on by the student and teacher. The performance of these should demonstrate student’s command of melody support. chosen by the student and teacher. dynamic use and improvisational skills.LEVEL 3 RPPC 211 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. baiao and calypso/soca. baiao. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. calypso/soca) in the context of a musical composition chosen by the student and teacher. Snare Drum Book List. If the student chooses jazz. Afro Cuban. Brazilian and Caribbean time feels: songo. (songo. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept. These pieces are to be chosen by the student and teacher. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song. Anthony Cirone or possibly a piece from another Level 3 book. marimba. Rock. 6/8 Afro-Cuban. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. Gospel. one selection must be with brushes. Afro-Pop…) and performs 2 standard/classic compositions in her/his chosen style with an ensemble of any size. form. samba. Fusion. Student should have a strong sense of all of these as well as those time-feels studied previously in levels 1 and 2. Brazilian or World (Reggae. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone. Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels studied in this level. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of accompaniment.

or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. Chosen by the adjudicating faculty. Chart Interpretation Sight-read and interpret one advanced drumset chart. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone “Portraits in Rhythm”. medium tempo 4/4 and 3/4 swing. Calypso. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. 6/8 Afro Cuban. These include Songo. Student should demonstrate his/her ability to support melody as well as his command of groove and structure.form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. Mambo. . marimba. Samba. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. total percussion. and Shuffle. vibraphone. These pieces are to be decided upon by the student and teacher. Funk.) CONTINUED DRUMSET Prepared Piece Student performs one original composition. 2 times comping. Swing. Time Feels Trade 4s or 8s in any of the time feels studied in levels 1 – 3. Baiao. Chart will feature time feel and/or time signature shifts. hand percussion. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept. Brushes Demonstrate basic brush strokes for jazz ballad. Rock. decided by the student and teacher based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. or an original arrangement of a nonstandard/classic composition in his/her chosen style track with an ensemble of any size and one standard/classic composition outside of her/his chosen style track. LEVEL 4 RPPC 212 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. decided by the student and teacher. Medium tempo 4/4 should be performed as a double time out of ballad tempo. Snare Drum Book List.

) CONTINUED DRUMSET Prepared Piece Perform one unaccompanied piece with an asymmetrical form (non 32.“I’ve Got You Under My Skins” * Steve Houghton . vibraphone. marimba. . Level 4 Chart Library or * Irv Cottler . total percussion. Student should demonstrate his ability to support melody. Snare Drum Book List. rock.7.Time Feels Trade 4s and 8s in two chosen level 3 time-feels and all of the level 1 and 2 time feels (swing.“Commandments of R & B Drumming” * Inside the Brazilian Rhythm Section by Nelson Faria and Cliff Korman * In The Pocket by Dennis Chambers * Drum Studies: Concepts.9…) composition of any style with or without accompaniment. Snare Drum Book List. then 1 chorus of accompaniment followed by 1 chorus of solo (could be a full solo or trading). as well as his improvisational expertise. Drumset Prepared Piece One prepared Chart from: * Percussion Dept. his command of groove and structure. Odd Meter Perform one odd metered (5. Snare drum sight-reading from sources comparable to appropriately leveled sources listed in the Percussion Dept. Phrasing. and Technique Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation comparable to the preceding list of prepared drumset choices. or steelpan. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. Sight-Reading and Chart Interpretation 1. Reading Snare Drum sight-reading from sources comparable to the Percussion Dept. 16 or 12 bar form) in a three-chorus format: 1 chorus of supporting melody. hand percussion. shuffle. Reading.“Studio and Big Band Drumming” * Zoro . LEVEL 5 RPPC 311 Drumset Prepared Piece Student performs the Solo (unaccompanied) or duo/ensemble project from her/his ILRE 375 (Recital Workshop) course. funk. bossa nova and mambo).

or one longer four-mallet piece. Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. 2. decided by the student and teacher. LEVEL 6 RPPC 312 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. decided by the student and teacher based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. . Major. decided by the student and teacher. played two octaves (q = 100). played two octaves (q=80). Major scales. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. marimba. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. this performance should include accompanying musicians (duo.) CONTINUED DRUMSET: Prepared Piece Fifteen-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher. minor and dominant arpeggios. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Vibraphone or Marimba Prepared Pieces Two prepared solos: one single line and one four-mallet piece. Technical Exercises 1. total percussion. vibraphone. Drumset sight-reading from sources comparable to: Irv Cottler “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” Steve Houghton “Studio and Big Band Drumming” “The Ultimate Drum Set Reading Anthology” Zoro “Commandments of R & B Drumming” Percussion Dept.2. hand percussion. band…). Chart Library ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT OPTION Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. trio.

decided by the student and teacher. LEVEL 8 RPPC 412 SENIOR RECITAL A performance of at least sixty-minutes. . Demonstration may focus on one idiom but should have stylistic variation within the context of the performance. vibraphone. marimba. The performance may focus on one style but should have stylistic variation within the context of the performance. hand percussion.) CONTINUED DRUMSET Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. Sight-Reading 1. Drumset sight-reading from sources comparable to: Irv Cottler “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” Steve Houghton “Studio and Big Band Drumming” “The Ultimate Drum Set Reading Anthology” Zoro “Commandments of R & B Drumming” Percussion Dept.Sight-Reading Sight-read a single line piece. Snare drum sight-reading from sources comparable to The Percussion Dept. The performance should feature the student in an ensemble context and demonstrate a high degree of instrumental proficiency. LEVEL 7 RPPC 411 JURY A thirty-minute ensemble performance that will include compositions planned for the student’s recital. Snare Drum Book List 2. Chart Library ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT OPTION Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. LEVEL 7 PIPC 411 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. total percussion. decided by the student and teacher. or steelpan. Student may perform on alternative percussion instruments but this option should not exceed 25% of the recital.

“All American Drummer”. Professional Music (Ensemble/Lab credits required: 12) Required Lessons Drumset Student Choice* Total Credits Credits 6.0 2. 2. total percussion. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. Snare Drum Book List.0 or 5. The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final exam (Proficiency. or steelpan. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. marimba. or steelpan. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. Advanced Drumset Chart Interpretation Ask your private teacher about references from our Percussion Dept. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. 3. Ten-minute performance project decided upon by the student and teacher. Snare Drum Book List.LEVEL 8 PIPC 412 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. vibraphone.) CONTINUED DRUMSET Prepared Piece 1. Jury or Recital) grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. hand percussion. vibraphone. Chart Library ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT OPTION Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher. “Musical Studies for the Intermediate Snare Drummer”. One prepared piece from Garwood Whaley. hand percussion.0 *Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. .0 or 7. 2. total percussion.0 8. marimba. Snare Drum Book List. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Snare Drum 1. Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the Percussion Dept.

Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. shuffle. funk. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. 2 times comping. “All American Drummer”. “Portraits in Rhythm”. and mambo. jazz waltz. Rudiments Orchestrate on the drum set any five of the 26 American. decided by the student and teacher. Snare Drum Book List. . calypso. rock. Student should demonstrate her/his ability to support melody as well as her/his command of groove and structure. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song. Rudiments Demonstrate any six of the 26 American Rudiments as determined by the faculty member administering exam. One prepared piece from Recital Solos for Snare Drum by Garwood Whaley. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Snare Drum 1. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone. reggae. 16 or 32 bar song form. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of accompaniment. Time Feels Perform the following time feels: swing. bossa nova. Snare Drum Book List. Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above. 2. Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels from level one in the context of a 12 bar blues. Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. the form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept.Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above sources.

. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept. shuffle. (songo. calypso/soca) in the context of a musical composition chosen by the student and teacher. Student should demonstrate his ability to support melody as well as his command of groove and structure. either solo or with recorded accompaniment.Time Feels Perform two of the following Afro Cuban. vibraphone. Brazilian and Caribbean time feels: songo. baiao. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drum set. Level 4 Chart Library or Irv Cottler “I’ve Got You Under My Skins” Steve Houghton “Studio and Big Band Drumming” Zoro “Commandments of R & B Drumming” Chart Interpretation (drumset) Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. 2 times comping. Medium tempo 4/4 should be performed as a double time out of ballad tempo. bossa nova and mambo). rock. or steelpan. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone “Portraits in Rhythm”. hand percussion. Brushes Demonstrate basic brush strokes for jazz ballad. total percussion. samba. Time Feels Trade 4s and 8s in two chosen level 3 time-feels and all of the level 1 and 2 time feels (swing. 6/8 afro cuban.) CONTINUED DRUMSET Prepared Piece Ten-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher. Student should have a strong sense of all of these as well as those time fells studied previously in levels 1 and 2. chosen by the student and teacher. Snare Drum Book List. comparable to the proceeding list of prepared drumset choices. medium tempo 4/4 and 3/4 swing. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of Accompaniment. the form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. 6/8 afro cuban. baiao and calypso/soca. funk. samba. marimba. Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels studied in this level. Drumset Prepared Piece One prepared Chart from: Percussion Dept.

Jury or Recital) grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. . or steelpan. Sight-Reading Sight-read /interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. trio.Chart Interpretation (drumset) Drum set sight-reading and interpretation from sources comparable to: Percussion Dept. hand percussion.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final exam (Proficiency.0 or 7.0 8.0 1. this performance must be with accompanying musicians (duo. Sight-Reading Sight-read /interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument.) CONTINUED DRUMSET Prepared Piece Fifteen-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher. total percussion. marimba. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT OPTION Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher.0 or 5.0 1. Music Education Required Lessons Drumset Timpani Mallets Total Credits: Credits 6. Chart Library (level 4) Irv Cottler “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” Steve Houghton “Studio and Big Band Drumming” “The Ultimate Drum Set Reading Anthology” Zoro “Commandments of R & B Drumming” ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT OPTION Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher. band…). LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. vibraphone.

rock. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. “All American Drummer”. funk. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of accompaniment. One prepared piece from Garwood Whaley. calypso. Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Snare Drum 1. 16 or 32 bar song form. reggae.LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Snare Drum 1. shuffle. . “All American Drummer”. 2. Rudiments Orchestrate any five of the 26 American. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above sources. Student should demonstrate her/his ability to support melody as well as her/his command of groove and structure. the form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels from level one in the context of a 12 bar blues. Rudiments Demonstrate any six of the 26 American Rudiments as determined by the faculty member administering exam. jazz waltz. Snare Drum Book List. bossa nova. Time Feels Perform the following time feels: swing. “Musical Studies for the Intermediate Snare Drummer”. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. Snare Drum Book List. One prepared piece from Recital Solos for Snare Drum by Garwood Whaley. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song. Snare Drum Book List. 2. 2 times comping. and mambo. decided by the student and teacher. Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation.

Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels studied in this level. Snare Drum Book List. Drumset Prepared Piece One prepared piece from: Percussion Dept. 6/8 afro cuban. . samba. 2 times comping. rock. “Portraits in Rhythm”. Brushes Demonstrate basic brush strokes for jazz ballad. Brazilian and Caribbean time feels: songo. Level 4 Chart Library Irv Cottler “I’ve Got You Under My Skins” Steve Houghton “Studio and Big Band Drumming” Zoro “Commandments of R & B Drumming” Chart Interpretation (drumset) Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. shuffle. medium tempo 4/4 and 3/4 swing. baiao. baiao and calypso/soca. Time Feels Trade 4s and 8s in two chosen level 3 time-feels and all of the level 1 and 2 time feels (swing. the form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. 6/8 afro cuban. Student should have a strong sense of all of these as well as those time fells studied previously in levels 1 and 2. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song. Time Feels Perform two of the following Afro Cuban. (songo. bossa nova and mambo). funk. chosen by the student and teacher. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of Accompaniment. Medium tempo 4/4 should be performed as a double time out of ballad tempo. comparable to the proceeding list of prepared drumset choices. samba. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept. Student should demonstrate his ability to support melody as well as his command of groove and structure. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept. calypso/soca) in the context of a musical composition chosen by the student and teacher.Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone “Portraits in Rhythm”. Snare Drum Book List.

0 or 5. cross-sticking. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Timpani Prepared Pieces 1. Snare Drum Book List. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. Major. rolls and embellishments. minor and dominant arpeggios.LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Vibes or Marimba Prepared Pieces Two prepared solos: one single line and one four-mallet piece. 2. An easy four-drum etude.0 or 5.0 6. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Snare Drum 1. or one longer four-mallet piece. Snare Drum Book List. played two octaves (q = 100). Jury or Recital) grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. “All American Drummer”. . Also the ability to set and change pitches on two drums. Major scales. played two octaves (q=80). “Musical Studies for the Intermediate Snare Drummer”. Sight-Reading Sight-read a single line piece.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final exam (Proficiency. Technical Exercises 1. 2. One prepared piece from Garwood Whaley. 2. A two-drum solo demonstrating basic stroke types. dampening. All Other Majors Required Lessons Drumset Total Credits: Credits 6.

Time Feels Perform two of the following Afro Cuban. 2 times comping. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song.Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above sources. One prepared piece from Recital Solos for Snare Drum by Garwood Whaley. Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above. “Portraits in Rhythm”. “All American Drummer”. calypso. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. and mambo. Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. shuffle. Student should demonstrate her/his ability to support melody as well as her/his command of groove and structure. baiao and calypso/soca. chosen by the student and teacher. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Snare Drum 1. 16 or 32 bar song form. decided by the student and teacher. Rudiments Demonstrate any six of the 26 American Rudiments as determined by the faculty member administering exam. Chart Interpretation Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. jazz waltz. 2. Student . the form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. 6/8 afro cuban. reggae. Time Feels Perform the following time feels: swing. Rudiments Orchestrate on the drum set any five of the 26 American rudiments. Brazilian and Caribbean time feels: songo. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept. Snare Drum Book List. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of accompaniment. Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels from level one in the context of a 12 bar blues. rock. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone. Snare Drum Book List. funk. samba. bossa nova.

2 times comping. Snare Drum Book List. Medium tempo 4/4 should be performed as a double time out of ballad tempo.should have a strong sense of all of these as well as those time fells studied previously in levels 1 and 2. comparable to the proceeding list of prepared drumset choices. Percussion Department Snare Drum Book List Levels 1 & 2 Garwood Whaley: Musical Studies for the intermediate Snare Snare Drum Solos for the Advanced Beginner Louie Bellson: Modern Reading Text in 4/4 Dave Vose: Drum Studies: Concepts. Drumset Prepared Piece One prepared piece from: Percussion Dept. (songo. In the case of a 12 or 16 bar song. bossa nova and mambo). 6/8 afro cuban. calypso/soca) in the context of a musical composition chosen by the student and teacher. shuffle. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two-chorus format: 1 chorus of melody followed by 1 chorus of accompaniment. Student should demonstrate his ability to support melody as well as his command of groove and structure. medium tempo 4/4 and 3/4 swing. Time Feels Trade 4s and 8s in two chosen level 3 time-feels and all of the level 1 and 2 time feels (swing. Level 4 Chart Library Irv Cottler “I’ve Got You Under My Skins” Steve Houghton “Studio and Big Band Drumming” Zoro “Commandments of R & B Drumming” Chart Interpretation (drumset) Drumset sight-reading and interpretation. the form should be played through 4 times: 2 times melody. baiao. Phrasing. Brushes Demonstrate basic brush strokes for jazz ballad. Reading. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Snare Drum One prepared piece from Anthony Cirone “Portraits in Rhythm”. Drumset Prepared Piece Perform one of the time feels studied in this level. or from another appropriately leveled source listed in the Percussion Dept. rock. funk. and technique Charles Wilcoxon: All American Drummer Modern Swing Solos Mitchell Peters: The Rudimental Primer . samba.

Levels 3 & Above Anthony Cirone: Portraits in Rhythm Louie Bellson: Odd Time Reading Fred Albright: Contemporary Snare Studies Mitchell Peters: Intermediate Snare Studies Odd Meter Rudimental Studies Drummer John Pratt: 14 Modern Contest Solos Rudimental Solos for the Accomplished Drummers Vic Firth: Solo Snare Drummer Les Parks: 15 Diversions for Snare Drum Garwood Whaley: Contemporary Rhythmic Patterns Recital Solo for Snare Drum Morris Goldberg: 12 Snare Drum Solos Dave Vose: Drum Studies: Concepts. and technique . Phrasing. Reading.

HAND PERCUSSION PRINCIPAL
PIPC AND RPPC FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENTS CATEGORIES FOR HAND PERCUSSION Instrument List This document contains essential information regarding the instrumental performance requirements of your studies as a Hand Percussion Principal in the Percussion Department. As a Hand Percussion Principal you will learn many rhythms and song styles from a variety of cultures on the following instruments. Please note the categories and their respective instruments. Category 1 - Afro-Cuban Timbales (w/cow bells & wood block) Congas/Tumbadoras (3) Bongos Bongo Bell/Campana Clave Maracas Guiro Guira Batá (3) Tambora Gua-Gua/Palitos Hoe Blade/Guataca Bass Drum/Bombo Cowbells (All) Shekere Basic Drum Set Category 2 – Brazilian Surdo (3) Snare Drum/Caixa Ago-Go Bells Ganzá/Chócsalho Caxixi Berimbau Triangle Pandeiro Cuica Atabaque/Congas Tamborim Repinique Reco-Reco Cabasa/Afoxé Basic Drum Set Category 3 – African Gankogui Axatse Kagan Kidi Sogo Atsimevu Djembe Dunumba Sangban Kenkeni Lunga Gungon Atumpan Apentema Mpetia Category 4 – Middle Eastern/North African Frame drum Kanjira Ceramic Drums Dumbeck Hadgini Drum

FINAL EXAM GUIDELINES All students are responsible for knowing the following: 1. The names of all of the instruments both in English and the language of the culture from which the instrument originates. 2. How to tune the instrument, how to set up or hold the instrument in performance, what to strike it with, and how to strike it to play it. 3. A brief cultural and musical history of the instrument. 4. How to properly care for the instrument as well as how to perform basic maintenance on it. 5. All students are required to pick one of the five categories as their principal area of focus and perform every proficiency in that category. Performance Majors only: 1. In semesters 5 through 8 you are required to perform level one requirements (one per semester) from the remaining four categories. 2. You are required to take a drumset and a snare drum exam. ILPD 111, Drumset Basics, and ILPD 112, Jazz Drumset Fundamentals, as well as your private drumset lesson, will help you with the preparation for these exams. Additionally, the Percussion Department offers drumset and snare drum tutoring for assistance with the preparation of these exams. Also, notated and recorded versions and supplemental information on all drumset feels are included in the following books: The Essence of Afro-Cuban Percussion and Drumset and The Essence of Brazilian Percussion and Drumset, both written by Ed Uribe and published by Warner Bros. Publishers.

Performance Major (ensemble/lab credits required in major: 12)
Required Lessons Hand Percussion PIPC RPPC* Drumset Student Choice** Total Credits: Credits 8.0 or 7.0 6.0 1.0 1.0 16.0 or 15.0

*Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset, hand percussion, total percussion, marimba, vibraphone, or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. **Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset, hand percussion, total percussion, marimba, vibraphone, or steel pan.

The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final exam (Proficiency, Jury or Recital) grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels.

LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. 2. Basic Tumbao rhythm using two drums with variations at a slow to medium tempo. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. Rumba Guaguancó. Individual parts (Basic salidor, tres golpes and quinto ride) as well as Salidor and Tres Golpes together. Basic conversation (accompanied) when playing individual parts. You must also be able to play the accompanying stick part. (Gua-Gua/Palitos). Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. You should play along with a tune of the appropriate level. You must transcribe quinto solos on the verse. Basic Merengue. Conga part on two drums, as well as a basic tambora part. Basic Bomba on one drum. Basic Plena performed on two drums. Single line sight-reading.

3. 4. 5. 6.

Category 2 Brazilian 1. 2. 3. 4. Surdo: Basic samba pattern on each of the three surdos (Marcação, ContraSurdo, Cortador). Tamborím: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo. Ago-gô: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo. Chocalho/Ganzá: Basic samba pattern medium tempo.

Category 3 African You are expected to study 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Ghana" and 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". This can be done in any order or preference. Drumming Styles of Ghana Basic technique on the Gankogui and axatse Basic stick technique on the Ewe Barrel drums Basic support parts for the following music: Gahu and Slow Agbeko Drum Maintenance and tuning The Agbeko Bell pattern with four different down beats Sight-Reading / chart reading

2. Shekere: Basic Latin-Jazz groove (cut-time feel). (Slow to medium tempo). b. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. South India. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. Surdo: a. Move to bell and back. Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium to fast tempo. Basic samba pattern on Marcação incorporating variations at medium tempo. 3. not required. 5 and 7. 3. 5.Note: This exam can be replaced by level 3 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". . 2. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian Frame Drum: 1. Maracas: Son groove (Medium to fast tempo). You must transcribe and play repique solo on the verse Güiro: Cha-Cha and Son groove. Short reductions in 3-4-5 and 7 and a long reduction in 5 is required. Students are required to play the frame drum and tap a foot to the larger beats of the cycle while playing a series of rhythmic puzzles (interlocking grooves) in 3/4. Copying the repique from the recording). You must play along with a song of your own choice. 5/4 and 7/4. Bongos: Martillo pattern with basic repique (variations). Tamborím: a. Melodic versions of the scales and reductions can also be melodically demonstrated with voice or instrument of choice. You must play along with a tune of the appropriate level. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Bongos and Miscellaneous Percussion: 1. Variations on the Cortador (with accompaniment). This is optional. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Guira: Basic merengue pattern. The focus is on feels derived from North Africa. Solo improvisation (accompanied). 6. 2. 4/4. 4. and Morocco. 4. 4. Students must also sing the rhythmic scales as covered in the course curriculum while conducting the finger count to demonstrate the beats of the cycles of 3.

1. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Timbales: 1. Support and dialogue parts for the following music: Agbadza and Kinka. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. Basic pattern and variations. 2. Students are expected to demonstrate short compositions in cycles 3. 4. Setup fill (Abanico) moving to Cha-Cha section. 4. Ago-gô: a. Basic support parts for the following music: Kpanlogo and Fume Fume. Udu. Basic West African hand drumming technique. Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. 2. Sight-Reading / chart reading. Basic samba pattern at slow tempo. Students must then be able to improvise and return to the form and finish by playing a composed ending. Hadgini Drums. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. 4. Danzón. Basic samba patterns with simple improvised variations within the patterns at medium to fast tempo.3. Students must compose a short percussion duet that demonstrates the various pitches that provide melodic content with interlocking patterns on their choice of instruments. Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. Call and response dialogue techniques. 3. In his/her second semester. Pandeiro: a. Frame Drum. Clay Pots (Ghatam. based on a clear time feel. For example: play in a cycle of 5 with 6 beats per pulse playing phrases of 5. . and then improvise while keeping the cycle and the number of beats per pulse. 5 and 7. 5. 4. 3. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. Kanjira. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Ghana Note: This exam can be replaced by level 4 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". Dumbeki.

5. 4. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 1 if student has studied “Drumming Styles of Ghana". 2. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. 5. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Chart reading (a prepared piece). 4. 1. Improvisation (accompanied).2. Basic cascara pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with the other hand. Kanjira. "Changuito" style including bass drum. Udu. Sight-Reading / chart reading. Congas: Basic samba pattern on one or two drums at medium tempo. Contra-campana pattern along with clave with the other hand. Clay Pots (Ghatam. 3. The student will learn basic technique on the djembe and the three dundun. 5. . Surdo: Basic Baião (at least two variations) and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. Basic parts for the following music: Kuku . 7. 6. Sofa. Pattern should start with a setup fill (Abanico). Tamborím: Basic "Virado" style (turning the Tamborím) at slow tempo. 8. Baião and Maracatú. Songo pattern. Basic sight-reading. 4. and Tiriba. 3. 2. Basic breaks with each music above. Makuru. Contra-campana pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with other hand. 6. 2. Play fill and go to cascara pattern. Frame Drum. Dumbeki. Pandeiro: Samba at slow to medium tempo with basic variations. Tuning and drum maintenance. Triangle: Baião at medium to fast tempo. 3. Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. Hadgini Drums). Basic 6/8 comping. (Following a chart with kicks). Ago-gô: Patterns for Afoxé. Basic cascara pattern along with clave on the jam-block with the other hand.

Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. the student will demonstrate the styles of two different Timbale players. Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. Timbale solo construction. Note: 1. vibraphone. Pattern should start with a setup fill (Abanico). (example: 6 beats per pulse x 7 beats = 42 inner beats in 1 cycle. total percussion. Contra-campana pattern along with clave with the other hand. In depth analysis of the Quinto ( solo drum ) in a Rumba setting since understanding this drum is key for soloing. Setup fill (Abanico) moving to Cha-Cha section. on any instrument in Afro Cuban music. either with a recording or accompanied by panel with percussion and vocals. as well as his/her own solo. Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. to be chosen by the student and his/her teacher. Play fill and go to cascara pattern. Basic 6/8 comping. 2. hand percussion. Students must be able to demonstrate their abilities to create a feel. Basic sight-reading. Improvisation (accompanied). Songo pattern.3. 6. In addition. Student is required to play the Quinto in a Rumba Guaguanco setting. 2. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. 7. Basic cascara pattern along with clave on the jam-block with the other hand. "Changuito" style including bass drum. and then improvise on the following rhythmic cycle and inner beat combinations: a cycle of 7 must be played with 6 inner beats per pulse while playing in phrases of 7. Basic pattern and variations. 3. Contra-campana pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with other hand. phrased as 6 groups of 7) LEVEL 3 RPPC 211 *Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. . marimba. (Following a chart with kicks). Basic cascara pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with the other hand. 4. 5. Chart reading (a prepared piece). Danzón. 8.

Student and teacher will explore and examine recordings of both of their choosing. The focus will be on the recording technique used on various percussion instruments and the way and in what order they were used in an overdubbing and live recording situation. Student demonstrates ability to transpose (modulate) chosen grooves. 2. Student and teacher will approve this music. Kanjira. Maracatú pattern at medium tempo. 3. Student will demonstrate a non-traditional application using any combination of percussion instruments. Partido Alto pattern (at least two variations) on one or two drums. The student will compose and orchestrate a musical solution to a piece of music that he will perform with. principal instrument. 3. Category 3 Middle Eastern 1. Baião at medium to fast tempo. determined by student and teacher. Timbão: 1. 7. secondary. Student will perform 4 compositions that demonstrate his ability to incorporate contemporary Latin-Brazilian and Jazz styles of playing on chosen instruments. Samba-Reggae patterns (at least two variations). Hadgini. 2. Surdo: 1. A samba pattern on one or two drums at medium tempo. Pandeiro: 1. 4. Patterns for Afoxé. Ago-gô: 1. Samba at slow to medium tempo with some common variations. He may use other percussionist as well. Student should be able to move back and forth from a Samba pattern (play 8 bars) to the virado style (play 8 bars) in a clear and concise manner. Student determines the main instrument that he will focus on as well as secondary instruments. Open solo (accompanied).Category 2 Brazilian 1. Baião (at least two variations). Samba-Reggae pattern with some variations. 6. 8. . Baião and Maracatú. Generic Samba-Reggae pattern (playing the 3 Surdos all at once) 2. Virado style (turning the Tamborím) at slow tempo. 5. 5. 4. Caixa: 1. Triangle: 1. Ex. Tamborím: 1. Congas: 1. 2.

2. student must perform with at least 3 other players. . Rumba Columbia. 3. decided on by the student and teacher. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument.Category 4 African 1. tres golpes and salidor) as well as tres golpes and salidor together. Three individual parts (quinto. Martillo with repique (variations). Move to bell and play varied bell pattern as sometimes used during the mambo section. Medium to fast tempo. Medium to fast tempo. ("Changuito" style). based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. Tumbao pattern using three drums with some syncopated variations as would sometimes be used in montuno sections. Student is responsible for directing the group with the appropriate authority with regard to all intros and outros. A 15 minute presentation is given on this piece with full ensemble ie. Bongos: 1. Agbeko. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. Student then studies and learns all parts. Kuku or Manjani. Student may choose one of the following traditional pieces and transcribe all the support and master drum rhythms: Gahu. Play basic songo pattern including bass drum. 2. Timbales: 1. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. Student may choose one area of focus: Ghana or Guinea. Medium tempo. You should also be able to play the accompanying stick part (palitos). including bass drum. decided on by the student and teacher. contra-campana and bongo bell patterns at the same time. 2.

3. Demonstrate ability to move from 4/4 to 6/8 and back using basic rhythmic structures covered thus far. Shekere: 1. Güiro style. Playing the three different shekere parts. You are expected to be able to sing the clave while playing any of the three parts. Instrumental choice. (Congas, Bongos, Timbales): 1. Open solo improvisation as well, as being able to trade fours and eights (accompanied). 2. Chart reading. 3. Sight-reading. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Surdo: Play basic samba pattern with one hand while playing caixa or tamborím parts with the other hand. 2. Tamborím: Tamborím Virado style at medium tempo. 3. Pandeiro: a) Basic Baião pattern at medium tempo. b) Samba pattern with more developed variations at medium tempo. 4. Congas: Samba pattern on at least two drums with some variations at medium to fast tempo. 5. Caixa: c) Basic Samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium tempo. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. d) Basic Baião and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. 6. Chocalho/Ganzá:Play shaker in one hand while playing rhythmic patterns on other instrument. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 2 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Ghana". 1. The student will learn advanced techniques on the djembe and dundun. 2. Basic parts for the following music: Manjani, Dunumba, Yankadi, and Sunu. 3. Sight-Reading / chart reading.

Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. Students must play 2 compositions of choice in a percussion ensemble format, no smaller than a trio. There is no maximum number of performers; students can use as many instrumentalists as needed to properly perform the pieces. 2. Students will be evaluated on sound, pitch quality and orchestration of parts. LEVEL 4 RPPC 212

(Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset, hand percussion, total percussion, marimba, vibraphone, or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument.)

Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. Tumbao pattern using three drums with some syncopated variations as would sometimes be used in montuno sections. Medium to fast tempo. 2. Rumba Columbia. Three individual parts (quinto, tres golpes and salidor) as well as tres golpes and salidor together. You should also be able to play the accompanying stick part (palitos). Medium tempo. Bongos: 1. Martillo with repique (variations). Medium to fast tempo. Move to bell and play varied bell pattern as sometimes used during the mambo section. Timbales: 1. contra-campana and bongo bell patterns at the same time, including bass drum. 2. Play basic songo pattern including bass drum. ("Changuito" style). 3. Demonstrate ability to move from 4/4 to 6/8 and back using basic rhythmic structures covered thus far. Shekere: 1. Güiro style. Playing the three different shekere parts. You are expected to be able to sing the clave while playing any of the three parts. Students should demonstrate the comping and soloing styles of two renowned conga players, as well as the development of their own solos. In addition, student are required to play the solo drum, the Caja, in a Bembe setting accompanied by panel with percussion and vocals or a recording.

Category 2 Brazilian Note: This exam should be performed with two other musicians. They can be any combination of musicians. For example: 2 percussionists, one drumset and one piano player, etc. This should be decided upon by the student and their private instructor. 1. Tam-Tam (lap-surdo): a. Play samba pattern (with variations) while demonstrating at least three Tamborim variations with the other hand. 2. Tamborím: a. Virado style at medium tempo. You should also analyze, copy and perform with a Tamborím section (pre-recorded) of your choice. 3. Pandeiro: a. Baiáo pattern b. Samba pattern with more developed variations at medium tempo. c. Samba-Funk or other contemporary pattern. 4. Congas: a. Play the 2 supporting Candomblé (Rumpí and Lé) parts for a toque (decided by the student and their teacher). Student should also analyze and copy the lead-drum (Rum) for the same toque. 5. Timbão: a. Further development on instrument. You should be able to trade 4s and 8s with other musician. 6. Caixa: a. Samba patterns (at least three variations at medium tempo). Student should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. b. Baião and Maracatu patterns at medium tempo. 7. Ganzá: a. Play shaker pattern with one hand while playing a syncopated rhythmic pattern on another instrument. Category 3 Middle Eastern 1. Student will focus on practical performing solutions to multi percussion setups. Attention will be focused on live performing as well as studio recording. 2. Student will develop a portable modular set up that can be manipulated to help them perform in a wide variety of situations. Attention will focus on size and portability of the set up. Teacher and student will examination of student’s techniques and functionality with his instruments of choice with regard to his set up. 3. Student will be given a recorded composition with music minus percussion and given the chance to overdub and to also perform live with the recording. 4. The knowledge of how to overdub and in what order will be focused on. The live performance choices will demonstrate their ability to make a musical composition of the overdubbed version.

decided on by the student and teacher. decided on by the student and teacher. Perform the criteria from one of the following categories . 2. with approval from teacher. 3. LEVEL 5 RPPC 311 1. 5.5. The emphasis will be on the student’s ability to perform on an African multiple percussion set up. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. A 5 minute song is appropriate. with other players. 2. Students will transcribe and perform at least 2 solos of their choice. Students will choose or compose a contemporary afro-pop song. Student will perform a half hour of music of whatever he/she wants with whomever he/she wants. A demonstration of music from your primary area of focus as a solo or duo. Completion of ILRE 375 Recital Workshop for Performance majors. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. Final project to be determined by student and instructor. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. Students may choose one area of focus: Ghana or Guinea. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 In addition to your principal area of focus. 4. in length. Students and teacher will explore recordings of prominent African Artists focusing on improvisational solo techniques. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. Category 4 African 1. you are required to perform the first semester proficiency requirements from one of the other four hand percussion categories. Students are required to demonstrate solo techniques during performance. Must be at least 10 min.

Ago-gô: Patterns for Ijexá and Cabúla. Mozambique. ("Changuito" style). 2. Basic technique on the Lunga and Gungon 2. Bamaaya. Congas: a. 2. 6/8 bell comping with basic improvisation with the other hand. 3. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Individual parts. Sight-Reading / chart reading OR . Nanigo and Zimtakurga 4. Conga de Comparsa. 3. ("Havana" style). Repiníque: a. some improvised variations are expected. Conga de Comparsa with variations. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Ghana 1. Cabúla rhythm (two parts). b. Timbales: 1. Songo on two or more drums with variations. 4. Intro call and setup. 5. as well as three drums together. Tamborím: "Virado" style at medium-fast tempo. Basic time pattern. 3. Mozambique on two or more drums. Surdo: Play the three basic surdo parts for Samba de Roda.Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. Basic concepts of tonality on these Instruments. “Sartenes” (frying-pans) part. ("Pello el Afrocan" style). Drum Maintenance and tuning 5. Bell part and bombo part (played on low timbal) together. You should also be able to play two or three different "hand held" bell parts. When playing the Cortador. 3. Basic support parts for the following music: Slow and fast Damba. 2. integrating other rhythmic patterns as variations. Ijexá rhythm (two parts) b.

Your presentation in these areas will also be assessed. Ceramic Drums. Sight-Reading / chart reading Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. You must compose a duet that demonstrates your playing ability and knowledge of rhythmic construction as covered in the course material. Baião.Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali 1. 4. 6/4. You are expected to demonstrate further abilities with the same subject matter. 2. but can also include development of your own in any format or style. Additionally. as well as with only one other percussionist. The student will learn master drum parts for the following music: Kuku and Lamba. This exam must be given in a group format (duo. 2. Dumbeck. Brazilian Feels: Samba. In essence. Caribbean Feel: Calypso. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Drumset and Snare Drum Exam You must perform all of the following feels on the drumset. Frame Drum. This exam continues with the material from level four. and 9/4 time signatures. or with a full percussion section. etc. LEVEL 6 RPPC 312 1. Song Form: Perform one of the time feels in this level in the context of a tune form chosen by the student and teacher. 5. 4/4. Songo and general 6/8 accompaniments. 7/4.). you must know how to play this musical role with or without other percussionists. You are functioning not only as a player but also as the leader in your group. Kanjira. Hadgini Drum. Additional exam material may also be introduced and required by the course instructor. 3. and Partido Alto. Afro-Cuban Feels: Son (Salsa/Mambo). you must know how to accompany and play these feels in all musical situations. You are expected to play a short composition that demonstrates your ability to play in 3/4. 5/4. Your performance must include material from your primary area of focus. trio. The song should be performed without accompaniment in a two .

These can be full compositions. with an identifiable beginning. . A demonstration of music from the student’s principal area of focus. LEVEL 7 RPPC 411 Jury Performance A performance by you and at least two other persons of material that you are preparing for performance in your recital. In addition to the principal area of focus. and should be presented as a solo piece. The presentation should include rhythmic patterns as well as improvisation within them. The performance should include instruments and musical material from your primary area of focus as well as material from at least one of the other hand percussion categories. The performance time is thirty minutes for all three pieces. The demonstration should exhibit a technical command of the instruments used as well as substantial knowledge of the musical styles presented. The performance may focus on one style. development and ending. The performance should be presented in a professional manner and account for all elements that professionalism encompasses. You are encouraged to utilize the Percussion Department tutors to assist your studies in this area. Must be at least seven minutes in length. but should have stylistic variations within the contest of the performance. LEVEL 8 RPPC 412 Senior Recital A performance of at least 60 minutes of music by the student and his/her group demonstrating a high degree of proficiency. LEVEL 7 PIPC 411 1. The student should prepare three selections. or rhythmic song styles. 2. the student is required to perform the first semester proficiency requirements from one of the other two hand percussion categories not previously chosen in semesters five or six. (Excluding the category performed in semester five). In addition to your principal area of focus.chorus format demonstrating command of groove and structure as well as ability to outline melody. The student is the leader and musical director of the presentation and will be judged on this as well. or parts or movements of longer works. your are required to perform the first semester proficiency requirements from one of the other four hand percussion categories.

or steel pan. Basic Tumbao rhythm using two drums with variations at a slow to medium tempo.0 8. The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final exam (Proficiency.0 *Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. Conga part on two drums. Single line sight-reading. 2. (Gua-Gua/Palitos).LEVEL 8 PIPC 412 1. . Basic Merengue. 5. as well as a basic tambora part. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave.0 or 5. Performance must be at least ten minutes in length. 4. You must also be able to play the accompanying stick part. Basic Bomba on one drum. Professional Music (ensemble/lab credits required in major: 12) Required Lessons Hand Percussion Student Choice * Total Credits: Credits 6. hand percussion. Perform the first semester proficiency requirements for the fourth (and last) of the other hand percussion categories not previously chosen. 3. vibraphone. Rumba Guaguancó. Cortador). Final exam project is decided upon by the student and teacher. Surdo: Basic samba pattern on each of the three surdos (Marcação. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. Jury or Recital) grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. Basic conversation (accompanied) when playing individual parts. marimba. with choice of instrument. Basic Plena performed on two drums. Individual parts (Basic salidor. tres golpes and quinto ride) as well as Salidor and Tres Golpes together. total percussion.0 2. 2. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1.0 or 7. Category 2 Brazilian 1. 6. Contra-Surdo.

Solo improvisation (accompanied). 3. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian Frame Drum: 1. 4/4. 4. Short reductions in 3-4-5 and 7 and a long reduction in 5 is required. 5 and 7. The focus is on feels derived from North Africa. 5/4 and 7/4. 3. Drumming Styles of Ghana Basic technique on the Gankogui and axatse Basic stick technique on the Ewe Barrel drums Basic support parts for the following music: Gahu and Slow Agbeko Drum Maintenance and tuning The Agbeko Bell pattern with four different down beats Sight-Reading / chart reading Note: This exam can be replaced by level 3 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". 2. 4. This can be done in any order or preference. Students must also sing the rhythmic scales as covered in the course curriculum while conducting the finger count to demonstrate the beats of the cycles of 3. Bongos: Martillo pattern with basic repique (variations). LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Bongos and Miscellaneous Percussion: 1. This is optional. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. 2. Category 3 African You are expected to study 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Ghana" and 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". and Morocco. Chocalho/Ganzá: Basic samba pattern medium tempo. Güiro: Cha-Cha and Son groove. Tamborím: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo. Ago-gô: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo. Students are required to play the frame drum and tap a foot to the larger beats of the cycle while playing a series of rhythmic puzzles (interlocking grooves) in 3/4. South India. 4. not required. (Slow to medium tempo). Move to bell and back. . Melodic versions of the scales and reductions can also be melodically demonstrated with voice or instrument of choice.2.

3. You must play along with a song of your own choice. . Dumbeki. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Ghana Note: This exam can be replaced by level 4 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". 4. Basic samba pattern on Marcação incorporating variations at medium tempo. Ago-gô: e. 3. Pandeiro: f. In his/her second semester. Clay Pots (Ghatam. Basic samba patterns with simple improvised variations within the patterns at medium to fast tempo. 2. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. 5. 2. Shekere: Basic Latin-Jazz groove (cut-time feel). 4. Frame Drum. Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. 4. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. based on a clear time feel. Hadgini Drums. Guira: Basic merengue pattern. Maracas: Son groove (Medium to fast tempo). 4. Students are expected to demonstrate short compositions in cycles 3. 5. Call and response dialogue techniques. Tamborím: d. Udu. Sight-Reading / chart reading. Surdo: b. Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium to fast tempo. Kanjira. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. 5 and 7. Basic samba pattern at slow tempo.3. Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. Copying the repique from the recording). 3. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Support and dialogue parts for the following music: Agbadza and Kinka. c. Variations on the Cortador (with accompaniment). 1. 2. Basic support parts for the following music: Kpanlogo and Fume Fume. Basic West African hand drumming technique. 6.

Students must then be able to improvise and return to the form and finish by playing a composed ending. Tamborím: Basic "Virado" style (turning the Tamborím) at slow tempo. Triangle: Baião at medium to fast tempo. Basic cascara pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with the other hand. Songo pattern. Students must compose a short percussion duet that demonstrates the various pitches that provide melodic content with interlocking patterns on their choice of instruments. 3. Setup fill (Abanico) moving to Cha-Cha section. Basic 6/8 comping. 2. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Timbales: 1.and then improvise while keeping the cycle and the number of beats per pulse. (Following a chart with kicks). Category 2 Brazilian 1. Chart reading (a prepared piece). 8. 4. 6. Ago-gô: Patterns for Afoxé. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. 6. Congas: Basic samba pattern on one or two drums at medium tempo. Play fill and go to cascara pattern. 2. 4. Improvisation (accompanied). Contra-campana pattern along with clave with the other hand. 5. Basic cascara pattern along with clave on the jam-block with the other hand. For example: play in a cycle of 5 with 6 beats per pulse playing phrases of 5. Pandeiro: Samba at slow to medium tempo with basic variations. Pattern should start with a setup fill (Abanico). Baião and Maracatú. . 7. Surdo: Basic Baião (at least two variations) and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. Contra-campana pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with other hand. 3. 5. Danzón. Basic sight-reading. "Changuito" style including bass drum. 4. Basic pattern and variations.

("Changuito" style). Udu. Sight-Reading / chart reading. including bass drum. Martillo with repique (variations). Timbales: 1. Tumbao pattern using three drums with some syncopated variations as would sometimes be used in montuno sections. Basic parts for the following music: Kuku . Students must be able to demonstrate their abilities to create a feel. 2. Play basic songo pattern including bass drum. Dumbeki. and then improvise on the following rhythmic cycle and inner beat combinations: a cycle of 7 must be played with 6 inner beats per pulse while playing in phrases of 7. Kanjira. Medium to fast tempo. 5. 2. Rumba Columbia. Makuru. Three individual parts (quinto. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. Clay Pots (Ghatam. 3. 1. Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. . tres golpes and salidor) as well as tres golpes and salidor together.Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 1 if student has studied “Drumming Styles of Ghana". (example: 6 beats per pulse x 7 beats = 42 inner beats in 1 cycle. Bongos: 1. 2. You should also be able to play the accompanying stick part (palitos). Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. Medium to fast tempo. 3. Medium tempo. 4. Tuning and drum maintenance. phrased as 6 groups of 7) LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. and Tiriba. contra-campana and bongo bell patterns at the same time. The student will learn basic technique on the djembe and the three dundun. Basic breaks with each music above. Sofa. Move to bell and play varied bell pattern as sometimes used during the mambo section. 2. Hadgini Drums). Frame Drum.

Instrumental choice. . Yankadi. Dunumba. The student will learn advanced techniques on the djembe and dundun. 5. Sight-Reading / chart reading. Open solo improvisation as well. Timbales): 1. Congas: Samba pattern on at least two drums with some variations at medium to fast tempo. b) Basic Baião and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. 3. 3. 3. Demonstrate ability to move from 4/4 to 6/8 and back using basic rhythmic structures covered thus far. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 2 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Ghana". Tamborím: Tamborím Virado style at medium tempo. Basic parts for the following music: Manjani. 2. Chart reading. You are expected to be able to sing the clave while playing any of the three parts. Sight-reading. 4. and Sunu. as being able to trade fours and eights. Chocalho/Ganzá:Play shaker in one hand while playing rhythmic patterns on other instrument. Güiro style. Surdo: Play basic samba pattern with one hand while playing caixa or tamborím parts with the other hand. 7. Pandeiro: a) Basic Baião pattern at medium tempo.3. (accompanied). (Congas. b) Samba pattern with more developed variations at medium tempo. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. 6. Shekere: 1. Caixa: a) Basic Samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium tempo. Playing the three different shekere parts. 2. 1. Category 2 Brazilian 2. Bongos.

marimba. 3. Mozambique. Tamborím: "Virado" style at medium-fast tempo. Individual parts. There is no maximum number of performers. . ("Havana" style). Ijexá rhythm (two parts) b. students can use as many instrumentalists as needed to properly perform the pieces.Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. hand percussion. 2. Students will be evaluated on sound. When playing the Cortador. b. 6/8 bell comping with basic improvisation with the other hand. Cabúla rhythm (two parts). ("Pello el Afrocan" style). Students must play 2 compositions of choice in a percussion ensemble format. You should also be able to play two or three different "hand held" bell parts. Songo on two or more drums with variations. 2. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Mozambique on two or more drums. Ago-gô: Patterns for Ijexá and Cabúla. 2. Congas: a. 5. All rhythms must be performed with respect to the clave. some improvised variations are expected. 3. Basic time pattern. pitch quality and orchestration of parts. 3.) Perform the criteria from one of the following categories Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. no smaller than a trio. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. total percussion. vibraphone. Intro call and setup. Surdo: Play the three basic surdo parts for Samba de Roda. as well as three drums together. 2. “Sartenes” (frying-pans) part. 4. Conga de Comparsa with variations. Bell part and bombo part (played on low timbal) together. Repiníque: a. or steel pan. integrating other rhythmic patterns as variations. ("Changuito" style). Timbales: 1. Conga de Comparsa.

4/4. 5/4. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. Basic technique on the Lunga and Gungon 2. Hadgini Drum. Sight-Reading / chart reading Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. Additional exam material may also be introduced and required by the course instructor. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. 4. Basic support parts for the following music: Slow and fast Damba. decided on by the student and teacher. Kanjira. Bamaaya. The student will learn master drum parts for the following music: Kuku and Lamba. Frame Drum. and 9/4 time signatures. Nanigo and Zimtakurga 4. You are expected to demonstrate further abilities with the same subject matter. 5. This exam continues with the material from level four. Dumbeck. Basic concepts of tonality on these Instruments. Drum Maintenance and tuning 5. 2. 3. 6/4.Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Ghana 1. 7/4. Ceramic Drums. You are expected to play a short composition that demonstrates your ability to play in 3/4. Sight-Reading / chart reading OR Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali 1. You must compose a duet that demonstrates your playing ability and knowledge of rhythmic construction as covered in the course material. . 2. 3.

LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. 2.LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. Rumba Guaguancó. Surdo: Basic samba pattern on each of the three surdos (Marcação.0 or 5.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final exam (Proficiency. Basic conversation (accompanied) when playing individual parts. Conga part on two drums.0 1.) Any instrument: A performance project decided upon by the student and the teacher. Music Education Required Lessons Hand Percussion Timpani Mallet Total Credits: Credits 6. Basic Bomba on one drum. Individual parts (Basic salidor. Single line sight-reading. vibraphone. Must be at least 10 minutes in length. . Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. Cortador).0 or 7. or steel pan. Basic Tumbao rhythm using two drums with variations at a slow to medium tempo.0 1. (Gua-Gua/Palitos). You must also be able to play the accompanying stick part. tres golpes and quinto ride) as well as Salidor and Tres Golpes together. Basic Merengue. Jury or Recital) grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. 4. 5.0 8. marimba. Basic Plena performed on two drums. total percussion. Category 2 Brazilian 1. 6. hand percussion. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. as well as a basic tambora part. 3. Contra-Surdo.

Güiro: Cha-Cha and Son groove. (Slow to medium tempo). 5 and 7. Tamborím: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo.2. Drumming Styles of Ghana Basic technique on the Gankogui and axatse Basic stick technique on the Ewe Barrel drums Basic support parts for the following music: Gahu and Slow Agbeko Drum Maintenance and tuning The Agbeko Bell pattern with four different down beats Sight-Reading / chart reading Note: This exam can be replaced by level 3 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". 5/4 and 7/4. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. The focus is on feels derived from North Africa. 4. Category 3 African You are expected to study 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Ghana" and 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". Bongos: Martillo pattern with basic repique (variations). Students are required to play the frame drum and tap a foot to the larger beats of the cycle while playing a series of rhythmic puzzles (interlocking grooves) in 3/4. 4. 3. Ago-gô: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo. not required. Students must also sing the rhythmic scales as covered in the course curriculum while conducting the finger count to demonstrate the beats of the cycles of 3. This is optional. Melodic versions of the scales and reductions can also be melodically demonstrated with voice or instrument of choice. 4. Move to bell and back. 2. and Morocco. 2. . 3. South India. 4/4. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Bongos and Miscellaneous Percussion: 1. Solo improvisation (accompanied). Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian Frame Drum: 1. Short reductions in 3-4-5 and 7 and a long reduction in 5 is required. Chocalho/Ganzá: Basic samba pattern medium tempo. This can be done in any order or preference.

Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. 5. Students are expected to demonstrate short compositions in cycles 3. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. 4. 3. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Ghana Note: This exam can be replaced by level 4 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali".3. Basic samba pattern at slow tempo. 6. You must play along with a song of your own choice. Clay Pots (Ghatam. Guira: Basic merengue pattern. 5. Call and response dialogue techniques. Hadgini Drums. 4. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Surdo: a. . Kanjira. Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium to fast tempo. 4. 2. Udu. 3. 1. Basic support parts for the following music: Kpanlogo and Fume Fume. Maracas: Son groove (Medium to fast tempo). 5 and 7. Support and dialogue parts for the following music: Agbadza and Kinka. 2. In his/her second semester. Pandeiro: a. 1. Basic samba pattern on Marcação incorporating variations at medium tempo. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. Sight-Reading / chart reading. Frame Drum. Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. based on a clear time feel. 2. Basic samba patterns with simple improvised variations within the patterns at medium to fast tempo. Tamborím: a. Ago-gô: a. Shekere: Basic Latin-Jazz groove (cut-time feel). Variations on the Cortador (with accompaniment). 4. Dumbeki. Copying the repique from the recording). b. Basic West African hand drumming technique.

3. Surdo: Basic Baião (at least two variations) and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. 2. Triangle: Baião at medium to fast tempo. 4. Contra-campana pattern along with clave with the other hand. 7. Students must then be able to improvise and return to the form and finish by playing a composed ending. 5. 5. Setup fill (Abanico) moving to Cha-Cha section. 3. 8. Basic cascara pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with the other hand. (Following a chart with kicks). Improvisation (accompanied). Chart reading (a prepared piece). 6. 4. Danzón. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. Basic pattern and variations. Basic cascara pattern along with clave on the jam-block with the other hand. Ago-gô: Patterns for Afoxé. 2. "Changuito" style including bass drum. Pandeiro: Samba at slow to medium tempo with basic variations. Basic 6/8 comping. Baião and Maracatú. 3. Pattern should start with a setup fill (Abanico). 6. Congas: Basic samba pattern on one or two drums at medium tempo. Basic sight-reading. For example: play in a cycle of 5 with 6 beats per pulse playing phrases of 5. Play fill and go to cascara pattern. . Tamborím: Basic "Virado" style (turning the Tamborím) at slow tempo. Students must compose a short percussion duet that demonstrates the various pitches that provide melodic content with interlocking patterns on their choice of instruments. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Timbales: 1. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Songo pattern.and then improvise while keeping the cycle and the number of beats per pulse. Contra-campana pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with other hand.

Basic parts for the following music: Kuku . Dumbeki. and Tiriba. Basic breaks with each music above. The student will learn basic technique on the djembe and the three dundun. 3. tres golpes and salidor) as well as tres golpes and salidor together. Three individual parts (quinto. Move to bell and play varied bell pattern as sometimes used during the mambo section. Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. Medium tempo. and then improvise on the following rhythmic cycle and inner beat combinations: a cycle of 7 must be played with 6 inner beats per pulse while playing in phrases of 7. Rumba Columbia. Frame Drum. Play basic songo pattern including bass drum.Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 1 if student has studied “Drumming Styles of Ghana". (example: 6 beats per pulse x 7 beats = 42 inner beats in 1 cycle. 5. contra-campana and bongo bell patterns at the same time. 2. Udu. Makuru. 2. Sofa. Kanjira. 4. Tuning and drum maintenance. ("Changuito" style). 3. Medium to fast tempo. including bass drum. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. 1. 2. Timbales: 1. Martillo with repique (variations). You should also be able to play the accompanying stick part (palitos). Tumbao pattern using three drums with some syncopated variations as would sometimes be used in montuno sections. Bongos: 1. 2. Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. . Hadgini Drums). Sight-Reading / chart reading. Clay Pots (Ghatam. phrased as 6 groups of 7) LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. Students must be able to demonstrate their abilities to create a feel. Medium to fast tempo.

4. Yankadi. as being able to trade fours and eights. Demonstrate ability to move from 4/4 to 6/8 and back using basic rhythmic structures covered thus far. and Sunu. 2. 6. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 2 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Ghana". . 3. 2. 5. Surdo: Play basic samba pattern with one hand while playing caixa or tamborím parts with the other hand. Congas: Samba pattern on at least two drums with some variations at medium to fast tempo. Playing the three different shekere parts. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Open solo improvisation as well. 2. Caixa: c) Basic Samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium tempo. Chart reading. Sight-reading. b) Samba pattern with more developed variations at medium tempo. Shekere: 1. Tamborím: Tamborím Virado style at medium tempo. 1. Sight-Reading / chart reading. (accompanied). d) Basic Baião and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. Pandeiro: a) Basic Baião pattern at medium tempo. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. Bongos. (Congas. Instrumental choice. Chocalho/Ganzá:Play shaker in one hand while playing rhythmic patterns on other instrument.3. Güiro style. You are expected to be able to sing the clave while playing any of the three parts. Dunumba. 3. Basic parts for the following music: Manjani. 3. The student will learn advanced techniques on the djembe and dundun. Timbales): 1.

Timbales: 1. pitch quality and orchestration of parts. integrating other rhythmic patterns as variations.Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. f. 5. Songo on two or more drums with variations. no smaller than a trio. 2. Students must play 2 compositions of choice in a percussion ensemble format. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Category 1 Afro-Cuba Congas: 1. Repiníque: e. ("Pello el Afrocan" style). 3. Students will be evaluated on sound. When playing the Cortador. All rhythms must be performed with respect to the clave. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Conga de Comparsa. There is no maximum number of performers. some improvised variations are expected. . 4. Mozambique. Ijexá rhythm (two parts) d. Congas: c. 4. Basic time pattern. ("Havana" style). Surdo: Play the three basic surdo parts for Samba de Roda. students can use as many instrumentalists as needed to properly perform the pieces. Bell part and bombo part (played on low timbal) together. 2. “Sartenes”(frying-pans) part. 6/8 bell comping with basic improvisation with the other hand. Intro call and setup. 3. as well as three drums together. Cabúla rhythm (two parts). Individual parts. 2. You should also be able to play two or three different "hand held" bell parts. Ago-gô: Patterns for Ijexá and Cabúla. 2. Conga de Comparsa with variations. Mozambique on two or more drums. Tamborím: "Virado" style at medium-fast tempo. 3. ("Changuito" style).

Additional exam material may also be introduced and required by the course instructor. 7/4.Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Ghana 1. Bamaaya. Kanjira. Sight-Reading / chart reading OR Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali 1. Basic support parts for the following music: Slow and fast Damba. 5/4. You are expected to demonstrate further abilities with the same subject matter. Must be at least 10 minutes in length. 3. 2. Ceramic Drums. 4. Nanigo and Zimtakurga 4. 6/4. You must compose a duet that demonstrates your playing ability and knowledge of rhythmic construction as covered in the course material. The student will learn master drum parts for the following music: Kuku and Lamba. You are expected to play a short composition that demonstrates your ability to play in 3/4. 2. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Any instrument: A performance project decided upon by the student and the teacher. Dumbeck. and 9/4 time signatures. 3. This exam continues with the material from level four. Basic concepts of tonality on these Instruments. Drum Maintenance and tuning 5. Basic technique on the Lunga and Gungon 2. Sight-Reading / chart reading Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. Hadgini Drum. . 5. Frame Drum. 4/4.

Drumming Styles of Ghana Basic technique on the Gankogui and axatse . Surdo: Basic samba pattern on each of the three surdos (Marcação. 4. Chocalho/Ganzá: Basic samba pattern medium tempo. Single line sight-reading. 3. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Basic Plena performed on two drums. tres golpes and quinto ride) as well as Salidor and Tres Golpes together. (Gua-Gua/Palitos). 3. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. 4.All Other Majors Required Lessons Hand Percussion Total Credits: Credits 6. Cortador). Basic conversation (accompanied) when playing individual parts. Individual parts (Basic salidor. 6.0 or 5.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final exam (Proficiency. Basic Merengue. 2. Jury or Recital) grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. This can be done in any order or preference.0 or 5. 5. Basic Bomba on one drum.0 6. 2. Tamborím: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo. Rumba Guaguancó. Conga part on two drums. as well as a basic tambora part. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. Ago-gô: Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at slow to medium tempo. Contra-Surdo. Category 3 African You are expected to study 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Ghana" and 2 semesters of "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". You must also be able to play the accompanying stick part. Basic Tumbao rhythm using two drums with variations at a slow to medium tempo.

Variations on the Cortador (with accompaniment). and Morocco. South India. Students must also sing the rhythmic scales as covered in the course curriculum while conducting the finger count to demonstrate the beats of the cycles of 3. . Solo improvisation (accompanied). Surdo: g. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Bongos and Miscellaneous Percussion: 1. h. 4. The focus is on feels derived from North Africa. Guira: Basic merengue pattern. Maracas: Son groove (Medium to fast tempo). Move to bell and back.- Basic stick technique on the Ewe Barrel drums Basic support parts for the following music: Gahu and Slow Agbeko Drum Maintenance and tuning The Agbeko Bell pattern with four different down beats Sight-Reading / chart reading Note: This exam can be replaced by level 3 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". 2. 4. Basic samba pattern on Marcação incorporating variations at medium tempo. 5 and 7. Melodic versions of the scales and reductions can also be melodically demonstrated with voice or instrument of choice. 5/4 and 7/4. 6. 3. Bongos: Martillo pattern with basic repique (variations). (Slow to medium tempo). 4/4. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian Frame Drum: 1. Category 2 Brazilian 1. not required. 5. Güiro: Cha-Cha and Son groove. Copying the repique from the recording). Short reductions in 3-4-5 and 7 and a long reduction in 5 is required. 2. This is optional. You must play along with a song of your own choice. 4. Students are required to play the frame drum and tap a foot to the larger beats of the cycle while playing a series of rhythmic puzzles (interlocking grooves) in 3/4. 3. Shekere: Basic Latin-Jazz groove (cut-time feel). Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave.

2. Kanjira. and then improvise while keeping the cycle and the number of beats per pulse. Ago-gô: j. based on a clear time feel. 5 and 7. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. 2. Udu. Pandeiro: k.2. Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. 4. Students must then be able to improvise and return to the form and finish by playing a composed ending. Basic samba pattern at slow tempo. Basic samba patterns with simple improvised variations within the patterns at medium to fast tempo. Dumbeki. Basic samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium to fast tempo. Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. Hadgini Drums. Call and response dialogue techniques. 3. Students are expected to demonstrate short compositions in cycles 3. Tamborím: i. Support and dialogue parts for the following music: Agbadza and Kinka. 4. 3. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Ghana Note: This exam can be replaced by level 4 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Guinea and Mali". 1. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. 4. Basic West African hand drumming technique. 4. Sight-Reading / chart reading. 3. . Frame Drum. Students must compose a short percussion duet that demonstrates the various pitches that provide melodic content with interlocking patterns on their choice of instruments. Clay Pots (Ghatam. Basic support parts for the following music: Kpanlogo and Fume Fume. 5. For example: play in a cycle of 5 with 6 beats per pulse playing phrases of 5. In his/her second semester.

5. 2. 7. Sofa.LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Timbales: 1. Basic sight-reading. Triangle: Baião at medium to fast tempo. Basic breaks with each music above. Surdo: Basic Baião (at least two variations) and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 1 if student has studied “Drumming Styles of Ghana". 3. 1. Pattern should start with a setup fill (Abanico). 3. Songo pattern. Play fill and go to cascara pattern. Basic cascara pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with the other hand. Basic parts for the following music: Kuku . Pandeiro: Samba at slow to medium tempo with basic variations. The student will learn basic technique on the djembe and the three dundun. 3. Basic pattern and variations. 4. Makuru. 2. Rhythm must be performed with respect to the clave. 6. (Following a chart with kicks). Contra-campana pattern along with basic comping on low timbal with other hand. "Changuito" style including bass drum. Tamborím: Basic "Virado" style (turning the Tamborím) at slow tempo. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Chart reading (a prepared piece). Danzón. Contra-campana pattern along with clave with the other hand. 8. . 4. and Tiriba. Improvisation (accompanied). Basic cascara pattern along with clave on the jam-block with the other hand. 5. Basic 6/8 comping. Baião and Maracatú. 2. Ago-gô: Patterns for Afoxé. Congas: Basic samba pattern on one or two drums at medium tempo. Setup fill (Abanico) moving to Cha-Cha section. 6.

Contra-campana and bongo bell patterns at the same time. Three individual parts (quinto. . You are expected to be able to sing the clave while playing any of the three parts. Instrumental choice. Students must be able to demonstrate their abilities to create a feel. Medium to fast tempo. 2. 2. and then improvise on the following rhythmic cycle and inner beat combinations: a cycle of 7 must be played with 6 inner beats per pulse while playing in phrases of 7. Playing the three different shekere parts. Open solo improvisation as well. Clay Pots (Ghatam. Medium tempo. Kanjira. Bongos. Rumba Columbia. phrased as 6 groups of 7) LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Category 1 Afro-Cuban Congas: 1. Udu. (accompanied). Play basic songo pattern including bass drum.4. 3. Bongos: 1. ("Changuito" style). (example: 6 beats per pulse x 7 beats = 42 inner beats in 1 cycle. Sight-Reading / chart reading. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. (Congas. Dumbeki. 3. You should also be able to play the accompanying stick part (palitos). Timbales): 4. Medium to fast tempo. Timbales: 1. as being able to trade fours and eights. 2. including bass drum. Shekere: 1. Tumbao pattern using three drums with some syncopated variations as would sometimes be used in montuno sections. Students are required to play and tap a foot to the beats of the cycle while performing on their choice of 3 of the above instruments. Move to bell and play varied bell pattern as sometimes used during the mambo section. Hadgini Drums). Güiro style. Frame Drum. tres golpes and salidor) as well as tres golpes and salidor together. Students are required to bring a duet partner for part of the final exam. Martillo with repique (variations). Demonstrate ability to move from 4/4 to 6/8 and back using basic rhythmic structures covered thus far.

1. 3. Congas: Samba pattern on at least two drums with some variations at medium to fast tempo. Yankadi. 3. You should be able to move freely from one pattern to another. Dunumba. Students will be evaluated on sound. Tamborím: Tamborím Virado style at medium tempo. Sight-reading. The student will learn advanced techniques on the djembe and dundun. students can use as many instrumentalists as needed to properly perform the pieces. Chart reading. 5. Basic Samba patterns (at least three variations) at medium tempo. Students must play 2 compositions of choice in a percussion ensemble format. . 6. Pandeiro: a. b. 2. Chocalho/Ganzá:Play shaker in one hand while playing rhythmic patterns on other instrument. b. Caixa: a. pitch quality and orchestration of parts. Basic parts for the following music: Manjani. 6. no smaller than a trio. Basic Baião pattern at medium tempo. Category 2 Brazilian 1. Category 4 Middle Eastern/North African/Indian 1. 2. and Sunu. 2. Basic Baião and Maracatú patterns at medium tempo. 4. Samba pattern with more developed variations at medium tempo. Sight-Reading / chart reading. There is no maximum number of performers. Surdo: Play basic samba pattern with one hand while playing caixa or tamborím parts with the other hand.5. Category 3 African Drumming Styles of Guinea and Mali Note: This exam can be replaced by level 2 if student has studied "Drumming styles of Ghana".

One short 4-mallet piece (e.0 1. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos. an adapted classical guitar solo.) AND b. vibraphone." beginning of Section III. Sight-reading of single line material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Marimba 1.) AND b. a movement from J. marimba.. One short single-line piece (e. Two prepared solo pieces: a.S. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing.g.0 *Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset.0 6. etc. One intermediate-difficult 2 or 4-mallet solo piece 3. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Marimba 1." beginning of Section III. an adapted classical guitar solo. harmonic and melodic) scales played in eighth notes at q=132.0 16.0 or 15.S.g.g. The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final Exam.. Two prepared solo pieces: a. 2. a movement from J. Proficiency. One short 4-mallet piece (e. hand percussion. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos.0 or 8. etc. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. One single-line piece (e. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR . All major and minor (natural...g.MARIMBA PRINCIPAL PIPC AND RPPC FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENTS Performance Major Required Lessons Marimba PIPC RPPC* Vibraphone Total Credits: Credits 9. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR c. total percussion. two octaves.

Two short. contrasting pieces representative of his/her work in that style track. 2. Two short. Chamber ensemble piece involving marimba (2-3 players total) 4.) Within student's determined style track: . contrasting. contrasting.improvisatory (any style of improvised or popular music. Sight-reading of single line and double-stop material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 3 RPPC 211 Marimba (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. At least one piece must be performed with 4 mallets. or adaptations such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing. hand percussion. marimba. The student and teacher make these choices.interpretive (classical. 2. total percussion. contemporary. Sight-reading of an intermediate 2-mallet piece. which may incorporate the above) 1. intermediate-difficult 4-mallet solo piece. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. Two prepared. Sight-reading of single line and double-stop material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 1. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. One prepared 4-mallet solo piece (composed for marimba. One prepared 4-mallet solo piece . decided on by the student and teacher.c. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. decided on by the student and teacher. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. and a beginning 4-mallet piece." beginning of Section III) OR 2. or . intermediate-difficult 4-mallet solo pieces OR 3. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. These can be solos or chamber/small group pieces. through-composed music). LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 1. vibraphone.

decided on by the student and teacher. 3. approximately 4-12 minutes in length. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument.) Within style-track (as defined under Level 3 Performance Major): 1. One piece must be performed as part of a duo or small ensemble. vibraphone. contrasting 4-mallet solo pieces OR 3. Chamber ensemble piece involving marimba (2-3 players total) 4.OR 2. hand percussion. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. Sight-reading of an intermediate two-mallet piece. Two prepared contrasting pieces representative of his/her work in that style track. marimba. This solo must be included as part of the ILRE 375 Recital Lab performances. decided on by the student and teacher. 2. original composition and perform a total of two or three pieces within the time-frame. LEVEL 5 RPPC 311 Marimba ILRE 375 preparation. total percussion. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. Sight-reading of 4-mallet material (beginning-intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 4 RPPC 212 Marimba (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. The student and teacher make these choices. . Two short. These can be solos or chamber/small group pieces. At least one piece must be performed with four mallets. should include a solo from a self-made transcription or adaptation of a through-composed piece (originally for another instrument). WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. Optional: Student could include a short. and a beginning four-mallet piece.

composed after 1975. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. through-composed jazz-style or groove-oriented solo. decided on by the student and teacher.) 1. vibraphone. Prepared piece: 5-7 minutes. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. LEVEL 6 RPPC 312 Marimba (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project.LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Marimba 1. hand percussion. Prepared piece: a short through composed solo that demonstrates dampening and pedaling ability (David Friedman: Vibraphone Technique or Ian Finkel: Solos for the Vibraphone Player. lydian augmented. Scale patterns played through root cycles in eighth at q = 132 (Roots: C. F. 2. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. any style. marimba. 4. Scales: whole tone. . and symmetrical diminished scales played in all keys in eighth notes at q = 132. Comping and improvisation: perform a "head" and display some ability to comp and solo on one jazz standard.). etc. 2. 3. This work should be in addition to the Recital Preparation 1 solo work. A major solo marimba work for 4-mallets. total percussion. 7-10 minutes. Sight-reading of easy 4-mallet material. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Vibraphone 1.). decided on by the student and teacher. etc.

d. or other culture. . Middle Eastern.LEVEL 7 JURY RPPC 411 A twenty minute jury performance of at least three works being prepared for student’s senior recital. 2. Multiple percussion solo or with mixed instrumentation. approximately 10-15 minutes in length. approximately 15 minutes in length. LEVEL 8 RPPC 412 Senior Recital Sixty minutes of music with the following requirements: 1. LEVEL 8 PIPC 412 Prepared piece: a major solo work with piano accompaniment. LEVEL 7 PIPC 411 Prepared piece: a major solo for four mallets. or vibraphone repertoire. (Percentage weight: 60%) Material for the other 20 minutes can be chosen from the following: (Percentage weight: 40%) a. Drumset performance (solo. African. e. or marimba with piano or some other instrument as accompaniment. Solo or group hand percussion performance from any Afro-Cuban. This work may be included as part of the senior recital performance. Hand percussion (solo. b. c. Other marimba. such as a concerto (with a piano reduction). f. or with a group). Any performance(s) from the required criteria (see above). Indian. or with a group). xylophone. At least 40 minutes of solo marimba music. Brazilian.

Sight-reading of single line material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 2: PIPC 112 1. LEVEL 1: PIPC 111 1.Professional Music Required Lessons Marimba Student Choice* Total Credits: Credits 7.0 *Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset.0 2.S. vibraphone or steel pan.g. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing. Two short.g. harmonic and melodic) scales played in eighth notes at q=132.. One short 4-mallet piece (e. etc. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR c. an adapted classical guitar solo.. an adapted classical guitar solo. One intermediate-difficult 2 or 4-mallet solo piece 3." beginning of Section III. Sight-reading of single line and double-stop material (intermediate level of difficulty) .g. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. Proficiency. Two prepared solo pieces: a. two octaves. total percussion. 2.) b.0 or 6.. intermediate-difficult 4-mallet solo pieces 2. a movement from J. contrasting. a movement from J. etc. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos.g.) AND b. Two prepared solo pieces: a. One short 4-mallet piece (e. hand percussion. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR c. All major and minor (natural..S. The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final Exam.0 9.0 or 8. One single-line piece (e. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing." beginning of Section III. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos. marimba. One short single-line piece (e.

Chamber ensemble piece involving marimba (2-3 players total) 4.LEVEL 3: PIPC 211 1. Sight-reading of single line and double-stop material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 4: PIPC 212 1. Sight-reading of 4-mallet material (beginning-intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 1. One prepared 4-mallet solo piece OR 2. 6-10 minutes in length. Two short. 2. A contemporary solo work (composed after 1965) for 4 -mallets. intermediate-difficult 4-mallet solo pieces OR 3. One prepared 4-mallet solo piece (composed for marimba. 2. Two short. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 1. Final exam performance project decided upon by the student and the teacher. or adaptations such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing. . Chamber ensemble piece involving marimba (2-3 players total) 4. 10 minutes minimum. contrasting 4-mallet solo pieces OR 3. contrasting. Must be at least 10 minutes in length. Final exam a performance project decided upon by the student and the teacher. Student Choice-any instrument." beginning of Section III) OR 2.

. 2. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing. a movement from J. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR c.0 .0 1. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing." beginning of Section III.0 1.0 1. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR c. One intermediate-difficult 2 or 4-mallet solo piece 3.Music Education Required Lessons Marimba Vibraphone Timpani Snare Drum Total Credits: LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Marimba 1. harmonic and melodic) scales played in eighth notes at q=132.) AND b.g. Sight-reading of single line material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Marimba 1. intermediate-difficult 4-mallet solo pieces 2. One short 4-mallet piece (e. Two prepared solo pieces: a. One short 4-mallet piece (e. an adapted classical guitar solo.0 or 7. etc. Sight-reading of single line and double-stop material (intermediate level of difficulty) Credits 5. Two short. etc. two octaves. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos. All major and minor (natural.g. an adapted classical guitar solo.S. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos.) AND b.g." beginning of Section III.g. contrasting. One single-line piece (e. Two prepared solo pieces: a. One short single-line piece (e...0 or 4..S. a movement from J.0 8.

Sight-reading of easy 4-mallet material. Two prepared snare drum solos. F. A major solo marimba work for 4-mallets. any style. and symmetrical diminished scales played in all keys in eighth notes at q = 132.18-32). Scales: whole tone. etc. Performance of a two-drum piece demonstrating: a. Scale patterns played through root cycles in eighth at q = 132 (Roots: C. this work should be in addition to the Recital Preparation 1 solo work. 4. Prepared piece: a short through composed solo that demonstrates dampening and pedaling ability (David Friedman: Vibraphone Technique or Ian Finkel: Solos for the Vibraphone Player. etc. 2. staccato) 2. 13-17). One from Whaley: Intermediate Snare Drum (pp. 3.) 2.). Snare drum Sight-Reading (comparable to above). and one from Whaley: Intermediate Snare Drum (pp. Performance of an easy four drum etude. marcato. 7-10 minutes. Basic stroke types (legato. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Vibraphone 1.LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum 1. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Marimba 1. . Comping and improvisation: perform a "head" and display some ability to comp and solo on one jazz standard. lydian augmented. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Timpani 1. 2. composed after 1975. (For Performance majors.).

All major and minor (natural. an adapted classical guitar solo. Proficiency.g." beginning of Section III. or adaptations such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing.g. One prepared 4-mallet solo piece (composed for marimba. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos. Two prepared solo pieces: a.0 6. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing." beginning of Section III. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR c.0 or 5.S. One single-line piece (e. Two short. Two prepared solo pieces: a.g. intermediate-difficult 4-mallet solo pieces 2. an adapted classical guitar solo.. such as those in Zeltsman's "Four-Mallet Marimba Playing. a movement from J.. Sight-reading of single line and double-stop material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 1. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. Sight-reading of single line material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 1. 2.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final Exam." beginning of Section III) OR . two octaves.0 or 5. One intermediate-difficult 2 or 4-mallet solo piece 3. Bach's Unaccompanied Violin Solos..S. etc. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 1. or an intermediate-level marimba solo ) OR c. One short 4-mallet piece (e.) AND b.g. etc. a movement from J.All Other Majors Required Lessons Marimba Total Credits: Credits 6.) AND b. contrasting. One short 4-mallet piece (e. harmonic and melodic) scales played in eighth notes at q=132.. One short single-line piece (e.

contrasting. Sight-reading of single line and double-stop material (intermediate level of difficulty) LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 1. Sight-reading of 4-mallet material (beginning-intermediate level of difficulty) . intermediate-difficult 4-mallet solo pieces OR 3. One prepared 4-mallet solo piece OR 2. Two short.2. Chamber ensemble piece involving marimba (2-3 players total) 4. Two short. Chamber ensemble piece involving marimba (2-3 players total) 4. contrasting 4-mallet solo pieces OR 3.

0 2.0 2. Multiple Mallet Timpani Student Choice* Total Credits: Credits 4. total percussion.0 1. vibraphone.0 1. One prepared snare drum solo from the 1st half of Portraits in Rhythm. One easy/intermediate 2-mallet xylophone solo 3. One intermediate 4-mallet solo.0 1. Two xylophone excerpts.0 1.TOTAL PERCUSSION PRINCIPAL PIPC AND RPPC FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENTS Performance Major Required Lessons PIPC Multiple Perc.0 17.0 or 3. marimba. Proficiency. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Multiple Percussion 1. One must be from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels.0 1. One snare drum solo from “Portraits in Rhythm” – Cirone (2nd half).0 1. hand percussion.0 2. One easy/intermediate 4-mallet solo LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Multiple Percussion 1.0 1. Cirone. or.0 1. . from “Method de Caisse-Claire” – DeLecluse (2nd half) 2. Snare Drum Marimba Timpani Vibraphone Drumset Hand Percussion RPPC Marimba Multiple Perc. 2.0 *Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. 3.0 or 16. The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final Exam.

sixteenth.) with quarter.LEVEL 3 RPPC 211 Multiple Percussion 1. Basic dampening skills (abrupt. . One xylophone excerpt 3. Multiple percussion performance as a duo with another instrument. Performance of an easy four drum etude. Performance of a two-drum piece demonstrating: a. 2. Repertoire for this must be discussed with your private teacher. etc. smooth. marcato. or. Solo snare drum sight-reading. Rolls. with a larger chamber music setting. eighth. rolls. 3. grace notes. partial) c. These solos should include accents. or. and use of various dynamics. or. Timpani etude with another instrument. Setting and changing pitches 2. Cross-sticking technique d. LEVEL 4 RPPC 212 Timpani 1. rests. and dotted sixteenth rhythms. with a larger chamber music setting. from “Method de Caisse-Claire” – DeLecluse (2nd half) 2. embellishments e. Four drum solo etude (easy). and staccato) b. Two drum sight reading with pitch changes. One snare drum solo from “Portraits in Rhythm” – Cirone (2nd half). LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Timpani 1. 3. One glockenspiel excerpt 4. One 4 mallet marimba solo (intermediate) LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum: (second level) Performance of two selections that includes the demonstration of changing meters (3/4 to 7/8. Basic stroke types (legato. Two drum timpani (includes some pitch changing) Sight-Reading.

Two-part Inventions (one line only) c. Material to be provided by instructor. Bach. Develop Sight-Reading. Sight-Reading single-line with possible double-stop material with intermediate rhythmic components. with a larger chamber music setting. Arpeggios in these keys in two octaves. or.) solo of recital level material. A prepared 2-mallet solo from Bach . A short. V7b9. Minor scales: pure. David Friedman. 2. harmonic. played in eighth note rhythms at q = 100.Sonatas and Partitas.4. J. Timpani performance as a duo with another instrument. Sight-reading: single-line material of moderate level. 5. Imaj7. 4. Minor scales (pure. ILRE 375 Recital Workshop for Performance Majors repertoire preparation. Vibraphone Technique b. Scales should be played in one and two octaves. 4. V7. LEVEL 5 RPPC 311 Marimba 1. or material provided by instructor. etc. Publisher d. Repertoire for this must be discussed with your private teacher. Chord voicings may be closed but must be voice-led. I-7 played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. . LEVEL 6 RPPC 312 Multiple Percussion A performance of one multi-instrument percussion (minimum four sound sources/ drums. Materials provided by instructor 3. and melodic. I-7. 3. 2. Imaj7 and b) II7b5. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Vibraphone 1. All scales performed in one/two octaves. four-mallet intermediate solo. Comping/improvising: Perform the progressions a) II-7. 5. or a short four-mallet intermediate solo.S. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 88. harmonic. Minimum tempo: q = 100. and melodic) in all keys. Charles Colin. Prepared pieces: two pieces selected from: a.

2. and various cowbells). Knowledge of accessory Afro-Cuban instruments (i. Read basic chart figures on drumset. jazz. bossa nova and Afro-Cuban. Triangle. though this component will not be a part of the senior recital material). guiro. Performance of a basic guaguanco rhythm (know all three drum parts individually). 4. etc. Ago-go. claves.slow to medium fast with variations and improvisation. Incorporate time keeping improvisation on drumset in the following styles: funk. LEVEL 7 PIPC 411 Hand Percussion (First Level) 1. Knowledge of the basic Brazilian percussion instrumentation. Tamborim.LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Drumset 1. 4. Bongos . Pandeiro. Conga Drums .e. Congas. maracas. Baio.. Cabasa. 2. Tempi with appropriate rhythms (will include some variations and improvisation). Sight-Reading (comparable to above). 3. 5. 3.Performance of timekeeping patterns from cha-cha to mambo. Play basic samba. Performance of one advanced four mallet marimba solo (Recital material). Demonstration of basic glockenspiel (bells) technique by a performance of an excerpt from the orchestral repertory (perform as part of jury. 2. Caxixi. Performance of one medium-difficult xylophone solo (Recital material). Shakers. LEVEL 7 RPPC 411 Mallet Percussion Performance 1. 3. Timbales . . with the following instruments: Surdo. Two prepared snare drum solos (from Cirone.Performance of tumbao rhythm at various tempi . Portraits in Rhythm).Performance of the martillo rhythm with variations and improvisation at various tempi (slow to medium fast).

Demonstrate ability to accompany in non-traditional styles on percussion (i. See Hand Percussion Principal above in this handbook for specific criteria.0 or 8.0 1. or vocal ballad.e. . steel drums. LEVEL 8 PIPC 412 Hand Percussion (Second Level) 1. fusion. hand percussion. Proficiency.e. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Multiple Percussion 1.LEVEL 8 RPPC 412 Senior Recital Sixty minutes of music. timpani solo. 2. funk. accompany in a rock.0 1. with a recording. Performance must include a marimba solo. and a vibraphone solo. The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final Exam. Demonstrate an improvisation for a predetermined song-style (i. etc. Drumset and/or other percussion instruments can utilize no more than 25% of the senior recital. 3. snare drum.0 or 3.0 1. Music with other instruments is encouraged. One prepared snare drum solo from the 1st half of Portraits in Rhythm. Note: For all of the above criteria. and ago-go bells). Demonstrate advanced control of criteria from two categories from Hand Percussion level 2 (PIPC 112). Cirone. the student may be asked to play a chart (to be given out by the adjudicator). vibraphone. total percussion. and multiple percussion solo.0 *Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset.0 2. or with a faculty member.0 1.). Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels.0 9. improvise on a samba with the conga drums or improvise on a samba groove with a surdo. Professional Music Required Lessons Multiple Perc Snare Drum Marimba Timpani Vibraphone Student Choice* Total Credits: Credits 4. marimba.

One must be from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. rolls. and staccato) b. Prepared pieces: two pieces selected from: .2. and melodic) in all keys. Minor scales (pure. rests. Basic dampening skills (abrupt. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Vibraphone 1. sixteenth. harmonic. etc. One easy/intermediate 4-mallet solo LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Multiple Percussion 1. 3/8. Consult with the Department Chair or Assistant Chair for details. Performance of a two-drum piece demonstrating: a. partial) c. played in eighth note rhythms at q = 100. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum: (Second level) Performance of two solo selections that includes the demonstration of changing meters (3/4.) with quarter. and use of various dynamics. LEVEL 4: PIPC 212 Timpani 1. One intermediate 4-mallet solo. This requirement may be substituted by study of another instrument by successfully passing the above timpani criteria prior to registering for the course. to 4/16. Setting and changing pitches. Basic stroke types (legato. 2. marcato. embellishments e. Rolls. These solos should include accents. Cross-sticking technique d. 3. and dotted sixteenth rhythms. One easy/intermediate 2-mallet xylophone solo 3. smooth. from “Method de Caisse-Claire” – DeLecluse (2nd half) 2. One snare drum solo from “Portraits in Rhythm” – Cirone (2nd half). Performance of an easy four drum etude. grace notes. dotted eighth. to 7/8. or. Two xylophone excerpts. 2. eighth. Scales should be played in one and two octaves.

c. Imaj7. Comping/improvising: Perform the progressions a) II-7. David Friedman. Must be at least 10 minutes in length. Proficiency. b. I-7. V7. Imaj7 and b) II7b5. One prepared snare drum solo from the 1st half of Portraits in Rhythm.0 or 3. I-7 played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills.0 1. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Multiple Percussion 1.0 or 7. Vibraphone Technique J. V7b9. Two-part Inventions (one line only) Develop Sight-Reading.a.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final Exam. 5. Minimum tempo: q = 100. Cirone. Final exam a performance project decided upon by the student and the teacher. 4.0 1.0 1.0 1. Music Education Majors Required Lessons Multiple Perc. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 88. Chord voicings may be closed but must be voice-led. LEVEL 6 PIPC 411 1.0 8. One easy/intermediate 4-mallet solo . One easy/intermediate 2-mallet xylophone solo 3. Bach. Snare Drum Vibraphone Drumset Timpani Total Credits: Credits 4.S. Publisher Materials provided by instructor 3. 2. Sight-reading: single-line material of moderate level. Charles Colin. Student Choice-any instrument. d. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. 2.

Minor scales (pure. Setting and changing pitches. etc. rests. Performance of a two-drum piece demonstrating: a. Vibraphone Technique b) J. smooth. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum Performance of two solo selections that includes the demonstration of changing meters (3/4. One must be from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. 3. grace notes. to 4/16. eighth. and dotted sixteenth rhythms.LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Multiple Percussion 1. Basic dampening skills (abrupt. 3/8. from “Method de Caisse-Claire” – DeLecluse (2nd half) 2. This requirement may be substituted by study of another instrument by successfully passing the above timpani criteria prior to registering for the course. marcato. harmonic. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Vibraphone 1.S. Cross-sticking technique d. Sight-reading: single-line material of moderate level. Publisher d) Materials provided by instructor 3.) with quarter. Prepared pieces: two pieces selected from: a) David Friedman. Scales should be played in one and two octaves. Charles Colin. and melodic) in all keys. Two-part Inventions (one line only) c) Develop Sight-Reading. LEVEL 4: PIPC 212 Timpani 1. rolls. to 7/8. These solos should include accents. One intermediate 4-mallet solo. 2. played in eighth note rhythms at q = 100. sixteenth. Performance of an easy four drum etude. partial) c. and use of various dynamics. Two xylophone excerpts. Basic stroke types (legato. Consult with the Department Chair or Assistant Chair for details. or. Rolls. dotted eighth. and staccato) b. Bach. . One snare drum solo from “Portraits in Rhythm” – Cirone (2nd half). embellishments e. 2.

Chord voicings may be closed but must be voice-led. Cirone.4. All Other Majors Required Lessons Snare Drum Marimba Timpani Total Credits: Credits 3. Minimum tempo: q = 100. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Multiple Percussion 1.0 1. One prepared snare drum solo from the 1st half of Portraits in Rhythm. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. One easy/intermediate 2-mallet xylophone solo 3. V7. I-7 played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. V7b9. 2.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts for 50% and the Final Exam. One easy/intermediate 4-mallet solo . 2. Imaj7 and b) II7b5. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Drumset 1. Two prepared snare drum solos (from Cirone. Comping/improvising: Perform the progressions a) II-7. Sight-Reading (comparable to above).0 1. Proficiency. bossa nova and Afro-Cuban. jazz. Read basic chart figures on drumset. Portraits in Rhythm). Incorporate time keeping improvisation on drumset in the following styles: funk. I-7.0 5. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 88. 4. 3. 5. Imaj7.

Prepared pieces: two pieces selected from: a) David Friedman. eighth. 2. Consult with the Department Chair or Assistant Chair for details. Sight-reading: single-line material of moderate level. marcato. These solos should include accents. Publisher d) Materials provided by instructor 3. partial) c) Cross-sticking technique d) Rolls.) with quarter. Charles Colin. rests. Two xylophone excerpts. to 7/8. and dotted sixteenth rhythms.S. Bach. Scales should be played in one and two octaves. One snare drum solo from “Portraits in Rhythm” – Cirone (2nd half). from “Method de Caisse-Claire” – DeLecluse (2nd half) 2. or. . This requirement may be substituted by study of another instrument by successfully passing the above timpani criteria prior to registering for the course. sixteenth. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Vibraphone 1. Two-part Inventions (one line only) c) Develop Sight-Reading. played in eighth note rhythms at q = 100. One must be from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess.LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Multiple Percussion 1. and melodic) in all keys. Vibraphone Technique b) J. 3/8. smooth. rolls. to 4/16. etc. dotted eighth. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Snare Drum Performance of two solo selections that includes the demonstration of changing meters (3/4. LEVEL 4: PIPC 212 Timpani 1. harmonic. 2. One intermediate 4-mallet solo. Performance of an easy four drum etude. and use of various dynamics. Performance of a two-drum piece demonstrating: a) Basic stroke types (legato. embellishments e) Setting and changing pitches. Minor scales (pure. and staccato) b) Basic dampening skills (abrupt. grace notes. 3.

Comping/improvising: Perform the progressions a) II-7. bossa nova and Afro-Cuban. I-7 played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Imaj7. V7. Minimum tempo: q = 100. Chord voicings may be closed but must be voice-led. I-7. Two prepared snare drum solos (from Cirone. V7b9. Read basic chart figures on drumset. 5. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 88. 4. Portraits in Rhythm). Imaj7 and b) II7b5. 3.4. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Drumset 1. . Incorporate time keeping improvisation on drumset in the following styles: funk. Sight-Reading (comparable to above). 2. jazz.

5.0 1. Chords may be in root or inverted position. and whole range of the instrument.0 or 6.0 or 15. Materials provided by instructor 4. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Vibraphone 1. 11. . Scales should be played in one octave. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. Proficiency. Prepared pieces. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Vibraphone 1. 3. Major scales in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. Sight-reading: single line material of an easy level.) The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam.0 16. 10. Diatonic modes in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160.Scales should be played in one octave. Demonstration of improvisation and comping ability on a modal tune. Minor scales (pure minor. 2.S. vibraphone. and melodic) should be executed the same as the major scales. marimba. 18. b.0 ** Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. hand percussion. total percussion. two octaves. and whole range of the instrument.0 6. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique numbers 7. Developing Sight-Reading d. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c.0 1. J. two octaves. harmonic. Two pieces selected from: a.VIBRAPHONE PRINCIPAL PIPC AND RPPC FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENTS Performance Major Required Lessons PIPC Vibraphone Drumset Timpani Marimba RPPC Vibraphone** Total Credits: Credits 7. or 26.0 1. 21.

2. 5. and whole range of instrument. Scale patterns to be played through root cycles in eighth note rhythm at q = 108. but voice-led. Imaj7. Solo should include use of chord tones with approach notes. I-7 progressions played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Improvisation should at least demonstrate skill with chord tone soloing. LEVEL 3 RPPC 211 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. Scales: Lydian b7. marimba. 4. Comping should demonstrate the utilization of both closed and open voicings along with voiceleading. V7. I-7.2. I-7. 4. This tune should be memorized. all diatonic modes. Two pieces selected from: a. I-7 progressions played in all keys should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Vibraphone 1. The performance should demonstrate playing melody (demonstrating rhythmic and melodic embellishment). Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. V7b9. Materials provided by instructor 3. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. Voicings may be closed. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c. improvisation and comping skills. Prepared pieces. vibraphone. Demonstration of swing feel with comping utilizing open voicings with tensions. Prepared pieces. .) Performance of two compositions played with a band (minimum of a trio). Maj 7 and b) II-7b5. Developing Sight-Reading d. and c) II7b5. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. Minimum tempo: q = 160. Scales should be played in one octave. Sight-reading: single line material of a moderate level. Scale patterns played through root cycles and played in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. 5.S. V7. Classical or jazz transcription (materials provided by instructor) 3.S. J. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. Maj7. V7. Imaj7 b) III-7. II-7. J. Comping in close position with tensions of a simple jazz standard. two octaves. Two pieces selected from: a. total percussion. hand percussion. III-7. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. V7b9. and altered scales played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. Sight reading: two voice selections of a moderate level. Also. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7.

ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. Also. Sight reading: two voice selections of a difficult level. swing. II-7. decided on by the student and teacher.S. J. V7b9. Memorized and expanded repertoire from the following time feels: ballad. 5.The two compositions should be in contrasting styles. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. Imaj7 b) III-7. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. This should be performed in a group setting. altered. Brazilian. 2. decided on by the student and teacher. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. Bossa. etc. I-7. Pop. lydian augmented. 6. Two pieces selected from: a. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. V7/II-7. and symmetrical diminished scales played in all keys at q = 160. Solo vibraphone performance with orchestrated melody and improvised solo. jazz waltz. Great American Songbook repertoire. two octaves. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. Scales should be played in one octave. . Scales: Whole tone. V7) c) II-7b5. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. V7 progressions played in all keys and used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. The compositions can be chosen from a variety of styles including jazz standards. and whole range of the instrument. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Vibraphone 1. V7. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. and d) Imaj7. 4. VI-7. Imaj7. Afro Cuban. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c. Classical or jazz transcription (materials provided by instructor) 3. and Afro-Cuban). I-7. Prepared pieces. II-7. Voicings should be open with at least one tension and voice-led.

Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c.S. LEVEL 5 RPPC 311 Vibraphone 1. Bossa. Prepared piece. decided on by the student and teacher. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. Performance of a composition played with a band (minimum of a trio). or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. hand percussion. total percussion. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. decided on by the student and teacher. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. Bill Molenhof Music of the Day e. Pop. Afro Cuban. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project.) A solo piece which demonstrates playing melody along with self accompaniment. The composition can be chosen from a variety of styles including the adaptation of classical piece. b. Two pieces selected from: a. The compositions can be chosen from a variety of styles including jazz standards. improvisation and comping skills. vibraphone. Pop. The performance should demonstrate playing melody (demonstrating rhythmic and melodic embellishment). etc. Classical repertoire.LEVEL 4 RPPC 212 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. Bossa. Brazilian Choro. ILRE 375 Preparation LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Vibraphone 1. jazz standard. Improvisation should demonstrate the ability to sound the changes via chord tone soloing as well play motivically through the changes. Comping should demonstrate a variety of voicing techniques conducive to the style of the composition. Performance should feature a minimum of two choruses of improvisation along with accompaniment. etc. marimba. Great American Songbook repertoire. J. . David Friedman Vibraphone Technique.

ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. marimba. Grading will be based upon a variety of musical issues including. 3. This should be presented as a 10-minute performance. decided on by the student and teacher. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Drumset 1. LEVEL 6 RPPC 312 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. Two voice selections of difficult level and four voice material of an easy level. Voicings should be open with tensions and voice-led. 2. LEVEL 7 RPPC 411 “JURY” Vibraphone . or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. 3. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. which demonstrates comping and improvisational skills. One from Whaley.) Solo or accompanied performance of two tunes which demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. but not limited to: dynamics phrasing. Snare drum Sight-Reading (comparable to above). total percussion. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. The tunes chosen should include a variety of chord types with the minimum harmonic movement containing one chord per measure. Comping/improvisation: Solo or accompaniment performance of a tune. 13-17) and one from Intermediate Snare Drum (pp. hand percussion. decided on by the student and teacher. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. The tune chosen should include a variety of chord types with the minimum harmonic movement containing one chord per measure.2. vibraphone. Afro-Cuban. Perform the following drumset styles: funk. Intermediate Snare Drum (pp. jazz. Sight-Reading. Two prepared snare drum solos. articulation and technical control. bossa nova.18-32).

LEVEL 8 RPPC 412 Senior Recital Vibraphone A performance of at least 60 minutes of music by the student and his/her group demonstrating a high degree of proficiency. 2. hand percussion. rolls. marimba. and the ability to set and change pitches on two timpani. embellishments. and multiple percussion performance are optional but should not exceed 25% of the recital. Functional knowledge of instrument. Drumset. cross-sticking. dampening. and maintenance. Music performed should be the same material.A performance by the student and his/her group performing tunes. LEVEL 8 PIPC 412 Timpani 1. . 2. Xylophone/Glockenspiel: Demonstration of basic xylophone and glockenspiel techniques. Marimba: Two pieces from selected marimba repertoire. timpani. which will be performed at the Senior Recital. Performance of an easy four drum solo etude. The performance may focus on one style but should have stylistic variations within the context of the performance. The demonstration may focus on one style but should have stylistic variation within the context of the performance. performance of a two drum solo demonstrating basic stroke types. Pieces should demonstrate four mallet techniques. construction. LEVEL 7 PIPC 411 Marimba 1.

LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Vibraphone 1. The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c.0 2. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. 11. and melodic) should be executed the same as the major scales.S. Chords may be in root or inverted position. vibraphone. Sight-reading: single line material of an easy level. Materials provided by instructor 3. J. hand percussion. 5.0 or 7.0 8. b. marimba. . or 26. Two pieces selected from: a. 10.Professional Music Required Lessons Vibraphone Student Choice * Total Credits Credits 6. Materials provided by instructor 4. and whole range of the instrument. Minor scales (pure minor. Developing Sight-Reading d. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Vibraphone 1. Diatonic modes in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. total percussion. 2.S. Proficiency. 18. J. Prepared pieces. Developing Sight-Reading d. two octaves. Two pieces selected from: a. Scales should be played in one octave. Major scales in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique numbers 7. harmonic. or steel pan. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c.Scales should be played in one octave. 2. two octaves. 21.0 *Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. and whole range of the instrument. Prepared pieces.0 or 5. 3. Sight-reading: single line material of a moderate level. Demonstration of improvisation and comping ability on a modal tune. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b.

I-7. 5. 4. Voicings should be open and voice. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. VI-7. and whole range of instrument. Two pieces selected from: a. III-7. V7. Scales should be played in one octave. 2. and symmetrical diminished scales played in all keys at q = 160. V7. ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. I-7. Scales: Lydian b7 and altered scales played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. I-7 progressions played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. I-7 progressions played in all keys should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Also. II-7. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Vibraphone 1. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. V7b9. two octaves. V7. Prepared pieces. I-7. Scale patterns to be played through root cycles in eighth note rhythm at q = 108. two octaves. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c.S. Maj 7 and b) II-7b5. Comping in close position with tensions of a simple jazz standard. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. but voice-led. Materials provided by instructor 3. Voicings may be closed. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c. J. V7 progressions played in all keys and used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Sight reading: two voice selections of a moderate level. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. Scales: Whole tone.led. II-7. V7b9. Minimum tempo: q = 160. 4. Imaj7. Scale patterns played through root cycles and played in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. Also. Scales should be played in one octave. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7.S. V7/II-7. I-7. Sight reading: two voice selections of a difficult level. V7. Minimum tempo: q = 160. Imaj7 b) III-7. 5. Materials provided by instructor 3. II-7. . and d) Imaj7. Imaj7. lydian augmented. 2. Voicings should be open with at least one tension and voice-led. and c) II7b5. and whole range of the instrument. Maj7. ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Vibraphone 1. J. Two pieces selected from: a. V7) c) II-7b5. Minimum tempo: q = 160. V7b9. Prepared pieces. Imaj7 b) III-7.4.

2. J. 10. Music Education Required Lessons Vibraphone Drumset Timpani Total Credits: Credits 6.0 1. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 1. 18. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. Student Choice-any instrument.Scales should be played in one octave.0 1. Must be at least 10 minutes in length. Final exam a performance project decided upon by the student and the teacher. Two pieces selected from: a. Must be at least 10 minutes in length. 21. Final exam a performance project decided upon by the student and the teacher.0 8. 11. Proficiency. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c. b. two octaves.S. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique numbers 7. Minor scales (pure minor. 3. Developing Sight-Reading .0 The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Vibraphone 1. or 26.0 or 5. 2. 2. harmonic.0 or 7. and whole range of the instrument. Student Choice-any instrument. Major scales in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160.5. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 1. and melodic) should be executed the same as the major scales. Prepared pieces.

and whole range of instrument. but voice-led. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Vibraphone 1.d. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. and whole range of the instrument. Imaj7. Sight reading: two voice selections of a moderate level. Imaj7 b) III-7. Prepared pieces. I-7. Scales should be played in one octave. . 4. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Vibraphone 1. I-7. 5. Demonstration of improvisation and comping ability on a modal tune. Scale patterns played through root cycles and played in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. I-7 progressions played in all keys should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Two pieces selected from: a. Maj7. Comping in close position with tensions of a simple jazz standard. 2.led. Scales: Lydian b7 and altered scales played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. V7b9. V7. Sight-reading: single line material of an easy level. Sight-reading: single line material of a moderate level. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c. V7. Maj 7 and b) II-7b5. Voicings should be open and voice. J. Minimum tempo: q = 160. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. Chords may be in root or inverted position. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c. 2. Voicings may be closed. Diatonic modes in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. Materials provided by instructor 3.S. V7b9. 4. V7. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. I-7 progressions played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Also. Scales should be played in one octave. 5. III-7. Materials provided by instructor 4. and c) II7b5.S. Minimum tempo: q = 160. two octaves. Two pieces selected from: a. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. II-7. Prepared pieces. J. Developing Sight-Reading d. Materials provided by instructor 3. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. two octaves.

Voicings should be open with at least one tension and voice-led. Scales: Whole tone. Imaj7. 4. 3. lydian augmented. Afro-Cuban. Imaj7 b) III-7. rolls. J. Functional knowledge of instrument. 13-17) and one from Intermediate Snare Drum (pp. Two prepared snare drum solos. 5. construction. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c. One from Whaley.18-32). Scales should be played in one octave. two octaves. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. V7b9. and symmetrical diminished scales played in all keys at q = 160. I-7. Two pieces selected from: a. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. dampening. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. V7. V7 progressions played in all keys and used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. I-7. Perform the following drumset styles: funk. and d) Imaj7. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Drumset 1. Sight reading: two voice selections of a difficult level. Prepared pieces.S. II-7. performance of a two drum solo demonstrating basic stroke types. and maintenance. Also. 2. V7) c) II-7b5. and the ability to set and change pitches on two timpani. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Timpani 1. and whole range of the instrument. Intermediate Snare Drum (pp. Scale patterns to be played through root cycles in eighth note rhythm at q = 108. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Vibraphone 1. II-7. jazz. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. embellishments. . bossa nova. Snare drum Sight-Reading (comparable to above). Performance of an easy four drum solo etude. ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. VI-7. 2. V7/II-7.5. 2. Materials provided by instructor 3. cross-sticking. Minimum tempo: q = 160.

0 6. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique numbers 7. Maj7. 3. Minimum tempo: q = 160. Two pieces selected from: a. or 26.All Other Majors Required Lessons Vibraphone Total Credits: Credits 6. V7b9. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c. Scales should be played in one octave. Developing Sight-Reading d. two octaves. b. harmonic. and whole range of the instrument. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Vibraphone 1. two octaves. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Vibraphone 1.S. Materials provided by instructor 3. J. 2. 11.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam.0 or 5. Maj 7 and b) II-7b5. I-7 progressions played in all keys should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Developing Sight-Reading d. Major scales in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. Proficiency. . Demonstration of improvisation and comping ability on a modal tune. Prepared pieces. Bach Two-part Inventions (one line only) c. and melodic) should be executed the same as the major scales. Chords may be in root or inverted position. Sight-reading: single line material of a moderate level. 5. V7. and whole range of the instrument. Diatonic modes in all keys played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. 21. Sight-reading: single line material of an easy level. 10. Minor scales (pure minor. Prepared pieces. Two pieces selected from: a. 4. Materials provided by instructor 4. J. Comping in close position with tensions of a simple jazz standard. 2. 18.0 or 5.Scales should be played in one octave. I-7. but voice-led.S. Voicings may be closed.

Materials provided by instructor 3. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. Imaj7. and d) Imaj7. V7. two octaves. Also. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. II-7. lydian augmented. Two pieces selected from: a. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Vibraphone 1. Also. II-7. Voicings should be open and voice. Prepared pieces. Minimum tempo: q = 160. I-7. ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. VI-7. Imaj7 b) III-7. Sight reading: two voice selections of a difficult level. V7. and c) II7b5. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c. Voicings should be open with at least one tension and voice-led. Scale patterns played through root cycles and in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. J. Scales: Whole tone. Scales: Lydian b7 and altered scales played in eighth note rhythm at q = 160. Scales should be played in one octave. 5. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. 4. V7b9. Scales should be played in one octave. ascending and descending diatonic arpeggios through the scales at q = 120. I-7. Comping/improvisation: a) II-7. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Vibraphone 1. Sight reading: two voice selections of a moderate level. David Friedman Vibraphone Technique b. 2.5. V7. 4. I-7. V7) c) II-7b5. Imaj7 b) III-7. Ian Finkel Solos for the Vibraphone Player d. and whole range of instrument. Bach Sonatas and Partitas for the Violin c. V7b9. and whole range of the instrument. III-7. 2. J. V7/II-7.led. Minimum tempo: q = 160.S. II-7. Scale patterns to be played through root cycles in eighth note rhythm at q = 108. . and symmetrical diminished scales played in all keys at q = 160.S. two octaves. 5. Two pieces selected from: a. V7 progressions played in all keys and used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Prepared pieces. Scale patterns played through root cycles and played in eighth note rhythm at q = 144. Materials provided by instructor 3. I-7 progressions played in all keys and should be used to demonstrate comping and improvisational skills. Imaj7.

Major scales played in eight note rhythm at q =72 Scales should be played in one and two octaves.0 *Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. marimba. scalar and intervallic exercises will need to be adapted for the range of either instrument. Performance Major Required Lessons PIPC Steelpan Student Choice* RPPC** Steelpan Total Credits Credits 7. Proficiency. Diatonic arpeggios (triads) q = 72 (2 octave range). or steelpan. for example: a. Traditional reggae. **Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. One notated (and approved) Level 1 prepared piece memorized. hand percussion. calypso or afro-cuban melody.0 3.0 or 15. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. vibraphone.0 or 6. 3. total percussion. The range of the soprano pan begins at middle C (C4) and extends to F#6. total percussion. C4-C6. Keys of C. The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Steelpan 1. . The range of the double-second steelpan typically extends from F#3 through B5.0 16. vibraphone. 2. marimba. hand percussion. 5. therefore. Bb. 4.0 6. with basic comping and improvisation. Be able to play a blues melody.Grade 2 b. ‘Rondo on Dame Lorraine’ and/or ‘Third Movement from Sonatina in C’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance. F.STEELPAN PRINCIPAL PIPC AND RPPC FINAL EXAM REQUIREMENTS The soprano (lead) pan or the double-second is typically is the instruments of choice for steelpan principals. Sight Reading of single line material.

Composition based on ‘I Got Rhythm’. q=84. I-IV. All aeolian. 3. I-#Idim7-II-7-V7b9 progression.F. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project.) CONTINUED STEELPAN 1. 2. fourths and sixths.4 Len ’Boogsie’ Sharpe (Tenor or Doublesecond parts) c. Alla Hornpipe by G. ‘Song without Words’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance-Grade 4 5. when possible. 3. 7. vibraphone. Sight reading: two voices. . memorized. dorian. Diatonic 7th arpeggios in eight note rhythms and triplets at q =72. total percussion. Keys of C.LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Steelpan 1. ‘Moods’ Movements 1. Handel (Double Seconds only) 6. Sight reading of single line material LEVEL 3 RPPC 311 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. 2. and inversions. 4. 4. Comping I-IV-V. hand percussion. All dominant seventh arpeggios. marimba. and phrygian and Lydian b7scales. decided on by the student and teacher. Bb. Perform melody. An approved Level 2 piece. Harmonic. Comping. and melodic minor scales in all keys eight-note rhythm at q=80 -100 Scales should be played in and two octaves. Melody and improvisation based on minor Blues changes. An approved Level 3 piece. comp changes. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. I-VI-I-V. I-VI-II-V progressions major and minor. 6. F. ‘Green Ballet’ 1st and 2nd Position by Vince Mendoza (Tenor or Double-second parts) b. V. ‘Serenade’ or ‘Mazurka’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance b. for example: a. Eb. memorized. 5. thirds. for example: a.

WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. 5. Raindrops by Liam Teague 6. hand percussion. Sight reading: two voices. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. Four Landlers by Franz Schubert from Graded Exams in Steelpan Performance. locrian. and phrygian and Lydian b7scales. afro-caribbean repertoire. Reid). Prepared piece a. Improvisation latin. ascending and descending. Voice-leading changes for approved standard jazz tune. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. Sabre Dance by Aram Khachatutian from Graded Exams in Steelpan Performance. Handel (Double Seconds) c. 3. whole tone and symmetrical diminished scales. ascending and descending. Comping (w/two or more mallets) jazz standard tune. . 3. 4. All aeolian. for example: a. ‘Moods’ Movements 1. 7. Narell. decided on by the student and teacher. Arrangement/adaptation of approved contemporary jazz piece for steelpan. vibraphone.3 Len ’Boogsie’ Sharpe b. 2. total percussion. D’Riviera.) CONTINUED STEELPAN 1. All mixolydian. fourths and sixths. marimba. I-#Idim7-II-7-V7b9 progression. LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 1. One traditional Level 3 piece (memorized) latin jazz and/or contemporary steelpan melody. (Samuels. dorian. q=84. Alla Hornpipe by G. 2. LEVEL 4 RPPC 212 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. thirds. Grade-3 5. 4.F. Grade 4 b. Diminished seventh arpeggios. Diminished seventh arpeggios.Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument.

‘The Honey Bee’ by Liam Teague Odd Meter Perform one odd meter composition (5. mixolydian. Level 4 PIPC 212 1. Chinese. Indian. LEVEL 5 RPPC 311 Steelpan Prepared Piece Student performs the solo (unaccompanied) or duo project for his/her ILRE 375 (Recital Workshop) course. Comping (w/two or more mallets) jazz standard tune. . Voice-leading changes for approved standard jazz tune. decided on by the student and teacher. whole tone and symmetrical diminished scales.7.) with or without accompaniment Exotic scales Scales (Arabic. For example: a. Steelpan materials. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. Green Ballet 3rd position by Vince Mendoza (Tenor and/or Doublesecond parts) 5. 6.ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. Japanese) Sight-Reading Steelpan sight-reading from sources comparable to Percussion Dept. 3. All lydian. All dominant seventh arpeggios. Performance afro-caribbean/afro-latin standard melody. decided on by the student and teacher. locrian. and inversions. 4. Prepared piece a. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. 2.9…. ‘Impressions’ by Liam Teague b.

2. Snare Drum Book List. One prepared piece from Garwood Whaley.) CONTINUED STEELPAN Prepared Piece A15-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher. based on concepts and materials studied in the lesson. “All American Drummer”. this performance should include accompanying musicians. marimba. decided on by the student and teacher. vibraphone. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT Prepared Piece A ten-minute performance project. Double Tenor or Double Second Prepared Pieces 1. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart or piece of music on chosen instrument. hand percussion. decided on by the student and teacher. Sight-Reading. 2. Two prepared pieces: one single line and one three or four-mallet piece. Solo or accompaniment performance of a tune. A two-voice selection of comparable level or four-voice selection of an easy level. LEVEL 6 RPPC 312 (Students may take the recital prep on any instrument within the percussion department – drumset. WITH FACULTY MEMBER OUTSIDE THE DEPARTMENT A ten-minute performance project. “Musical Studies for the Intermediate Snare Drummer”. One prepared rudimental solo from Charles Wilcoxon. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Drumset Snare Drum 1. trio or band or all-steelpan ensemble). 3. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. Comping and improvisation. (Student may use conventional duo. . Snare Drum Book List. or steel pan – or on their instrument with a faculty from another department or declare a secondary instrument. or from another appropriate source listed in the Percussion Dept. total percussion.LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Tenor.

LEVEL 8 RPPC 412 Senior Recital A sixty-minute performance to include the following: 1. Rudiments Demonstrate any six of the 26 American Rudiments as determined by the faculty member administering exam. bossa nova. This may include adaptations from European classical repertoire). shuffle. which will be performed at the Senior Recital.) CONTINUED STEELPAN Two pieces from notated solo repertoire for tenor or double-second. . The demonstration may focus on one style but should have stylistic variation within the context of the performance. Two pieces. 3. each memorized of advanced music for solo steelpan.Sight-Reading Snare drum sight-reading comparable to the above sources. LEVEL 7 RPPC 411 Jury A performance by the student and his/her group performing tunes. Performance of works being prepared for senior recital. some multi-mallet comping/and or voicing techniques and soloing. Ray Holman or Andy Narell. vibraphone. Perform approved/transcribed traditional jazz solo (minimum 3 choruses). 2. funk. marimba. hand percussion. ALTERNATE INSTRUMENT Prepared Piece Performance of one ten-minute or two five-minute pieces arranged for steelpans w/ rhythm section. calypso. rock. jazz waltz. Perform own arrangement/adaptation of traditional piece for solo steelpan which should involve single line melody. or steelpan. latin jazz and/or afro-caribbean styles. and mambo. 4. total percussion. Time Feels Perform the following time feels: swing. reggae. (Len ‘Boogsie’ Sharpe. Performances must display advanced stylistic awareness and improvisatory skills. Improvisation in jazz. LEVEL 7 PIPC 411 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. Music performed should be the same material. 5.

F. Diatonic arpeggios (triads) q = 72 (2 octave range). ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT OPTION Prepared Piece A 10-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher. marimba. One notated (and approved) Level 1 prepared piece memorized.0 or 5.0 2. vibraphone. Sight-Reading Sight-read and interpret an appropriate chart of music on chosen instrument. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Steelpan 1.) The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam. with basic comping and improvisation. Professional Music Required Lessons PIPC Steelpan Student Choice* Total Credits Credits 6. Major scales played in eight note rhythm at q =72 Scales should be played in one and two octaves. or steelpan. hand percussion. 2. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. Ten-minute performance project decided upon by the student and teacher. Keys of C. hand percussion. 3. 4.0 8. vibraphone.0 or 7. steelpan materials.0 * Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. Steelpan sight-reading comparable to level and Percussion Dept. Be able to play a blues melody. total percussion. for example: . Bb. Proficiency. marimba. or steelpan. 2. total percussion.LEVEL 8 PIPC 412 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset.) CONTINUED STEELPAN 1.

calypso or afro-cuban melody. and melodic minor scales in all keys eight-note rhythm at q=80 -100 Scales should be played in and two octaves. ‘Moods’ Movements 1.c. I-#Idim7-II-7-V7b9 progression. All lydian. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Steelpan 1. Composition based on ‘I Got Rhythm’. ‘Serenade’ or ‘Mazurka’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance b. mixolydian. Diminished seventh arpeggios. ‘Rondo on Dame Lorraine’ and/or ‘Third Movement from Sonatina in C’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Steelpan 1. dorian. Sight reading of single line material LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Steelpan 1. ‘Song without Words’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan PerformanceGrade 4 5. ascending and descending. Handel (Double Seconds) c. Sight reading: two voices. and phrygian and Lydian b7scales.F. Perform melody. whole tone and symmetrical diminished scales. Four Landlers by Franz Schubert from Graded Exams in Steelpan Performance. Grade-3 5. for example: a.3 Len ’Boogsie’ Sharpe b. 4. for example: a. An approved Level 2 piece. q=84. 2. Alla Hornpipe by G. 3. locrian. 3. One traditional Level 3 piece (memorized) latin jazz and/or contemporary steelpan melody. Comping I-IV-V. Harmonic. . thirds. Traditional reggae. I-VI-II-V progressions major and minor. All aeolian.Grade 2 d. 6. Diatonic 7th arpeggios in eight note rhythms and triplets at q =72. 5. when possible. comp changes. Sight Reading of single line material. 2. 4. memorized. fourths and sixths.

Performance afro-caribbean/afro-latin standard melody. 4. chart library. either solo or with recorded accompaniment. LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. Sight-Reading Sight-read/interpret an appropriate chart or piece on chosen instrument. Chart Reading and Interpretation (Steelpan) Steelpan sight-reading and interpretation from sources comparable to Percussion Dept. 6. hand percussion. Chart Reading and Interpretation (Steelpan) Steelpan sight-reading and interpretation from sources comparable to Percussion Dept. total percussion. Voice-leading changes for approved standard jazz tune. LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 (Student may take the private lesson on any instrument within the percussion department: drumset. marimba.2. (MATERIALS TO BE DETERMINED) ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT OPTION Prepared Piece A 10-minute performance project decided by the student and teacher.) CONTINUED STEELPAN A 10-minute performance project decided by the student and the teacher. total percussion. Comping (w/two or more mallets) jazz standard tune. 3. vibraphone. or steelpan. vibraphone. Green Ballet 3rd position by Vince Mendoza (Tenor and/or Double-second parts) 5. . All dominant seventh arpeggios. or steelpan. marimba. This performance must be with accompanying musicians. ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENT Prepared Piece A 10-minute performance project decided on by the student and teacher. and inversions. either solo or with recorded accompaniment. hand percussion.) CONTINUED STEELPAN Prepared Piece A 10-minute performance project decided by the student and the teacher. chart library. Prepared piece a.

2.0 8. calypso or afro-cuban melody. Major scales played in eight note rhythm at q =72 Scales should be played in one and two octaves. for example: a. I-VI-II-V progressions major and minor. An approved Level 2 piece. Sight Reading of single line material. Diatonic 7th arpeggios in eight note rhythms and triplets at q =72. Diatonic arpeggios (triads) q = 72 (2 octave range). with basic comping and improvisation. Keys of C. Bb. Be able to play a blues melody. 4.Sight Reading Music appropriate for level. 3. One notated (and approved) Level 1 prepared piece memorized. ‘Serenade’ or ‘Mazurka’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance . Music Education Required Lessons PIPC Steelpan Total Credits Credits 8. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Steelpan 1. 4. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. Traditional reggae. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Steelpan 1. memorized. when possible. Comping I-IV-V.0 or 7.Grade 2 b. Harmonic. and melodic minor scales in all keys eight-note rhythm at q=80 -100 Scales should be played in and two octaves. 2.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam. for example: a. 5. 3. ‘Rondo on Dame Lorraine’ and/or ‘Third Movement from Sonatina in C’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance. Proficiency. F.0 or 7.

Four Landlers by Franz Schubert from Graded Exams in Steelpan Performance. 3. Green Ballet 3rd position by Vince Mendoza (Tenor and/or Double-second parts) 5. ascending and descending. Alla Hornpipe by G. Composition based on ‘I Got Rhythm’. One traditional Level 3 piece (memorized) latin jazz and/or contemporary steelpan melody. All lydian. whole tone and symmetrical diminished scales. Sight reading of single line material LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Steelpan 1. Diminished seventh arpeggios. Prepared piece a. q=84. 4. comp changes. fourths and sixths. Sight reading: two voices. I-#Idim7-II-7-V7b9 progression. All dominant seventh arpeggios. thirds. Handel (Double Seconds) c. ‘Song without Words’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan PerformanceGrade 4 5. mixolydian. 4. 6. 2. ‘Moods’ Movements 1.F.3 Len ’Boogsie’ Sharpe b. locrian.b. for example: a. 6. 3. 2. Grade-3 5. Perform melody. and inversions. . LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Steelpan 1. dorian. and phrygian and Lydian b7scales. All aeolian. Performance afro-caribbean/afro-latin standard melody. Voice-leading changes for approved standard jazz tune. Comping (w/two or more mallets) jazz standard tune.

with basic comping and improvisation. Major scales played in eight note rhythm at q =72 Scales should be played in one and two octaves. Bb. ‘Rondo on Dame Lorraine’ and/or ‘Third Movement from Sonatina in C’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance. Two prepared pieces: one single line and one multiple mallet piece.LEVEL 5 PIPC 311 Tenor.0 or 5. 2. LEVEL 1 PIPC 111 Steelpan 1. Keys of C.0 6. 2.Grade 2 . F. Piece decided by teacher and student.0 The private teacher’s grade accounts fro 50% and the Final Exam. (proper sticking. 2. Play a 3-minute piece on secondary steelpan instrument of choice. Double Tenor or Double Second or Cello Prepared Pieces 1.0 or 5. Jury or Recital grade accounts for the other 50% of student’s total grade for private lesson instruction at all levels. sustained notes. Sight-Reading. 4. slow and fast passages. One notated (and approved) Level 1 prepared piece memorized. for example: c. Diatonic arpeggios (triads) q = 72 (2 octave range). LEVEL 6 PIPC 312 Steelpan 1. 3. dynamics. Be able to play a blues melody. grace notes and multiple-mallet technique. All Other Majors Required Lessons PIPC Steelpan Total Credits Credits 6. Prepared piece that demonstrates full range of performance techniques. A two-voice selection of comparable level or four-voice selection of an easy level. Proficiency.

I-VI-II-V progressions major and minor. 6. Sight Reading of single line material. thirds. Comping I-IV-V. LEVEL 2 PIPC 112 Steelpan 1. Perform melody. Traditional reggae. mixolydian. 3. fourths and sixths. whole tone and symmetrical diminished scales. dorian. calypso or afro-cuban melody.3 Len ’Boogsie’ Sharpe b. Sight reading: two voices. 2. Diminished seventh arpeggios. Diatonic 7th arpeggios in eight note rhythms and triplets at q =72. ‘Moods’ Movements 1. 3. Four Landlers by Franz Schubert from Graded Exams in Steelpan Performance. 4.d. locrian. . and inversions. when possible. ascending and descending. Grade-3 5. Harmonic. ‘Song without Words’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan PerformanceGrade 4 5. All dominant seventh arpeggios. All aeolian.F. I-#Idim7-II-7-V7b9 progression. and melodic minor scales in all keys eight-note rhythm at q=80 -100 Scales should be played in and two octaves. An approved Level 2 piece. for example: a. Composition based on ‘I Got Rhythm’. Sight reading of single line material LEVEL 3 PIPC 211 Steelpan 1. All lydian. q=84. 5. LEVEL 4 PIPC 212 Steelpan 1. and phrygian and Lydian b7scales. 2. comp changes. 4. 2. One traditional Level 3 piece (memorized) latin jazz and/or contemporary steelpan melody. for example: a. Handel (Double Seconds) c. memorized. Alla Hornpipe by G. ‘Serenade’ or ‘Mazurka’ from Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance b.

Performance afro-caribbean/afro-latin standard melody. 6. Percussion Department Steelpan Supplemental Materials Graded Exams in Solo Steelpan Performance Levels 1.4 Compositions for Solo Steelpan by: • Ray Holman • Len ‘Boogsie’ Sharpe • Vince Mendoza • Liam Teague . Green Ballet 3rd position by Vince Mendoza (Tenor and/or Double-second parts) 5. Prepared piece a. Comping (w/two or more mallets) jazz standard tune. 4.3. Voice-leading changes for approved standard jazz tune.

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