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Alaina Storck UDL Lesson Plan Assignment Sensory Poetry Unit 3-Days

Lesson Overview
Title: Sensory Poetry Day One Author: Alaina Storck Subject: Reading/Language Arts Grade Level(s): 68 Duration: 1 Day Unit Description This first lesson of three is part of a unit that focuses on sensory poetry, including identifying effective descriptive language, using imaginative language to create a sensory effect, and writing free verse poems using a combination of the five senses. In this set of lessons, students will learn to identify and use descriptive imagery based on the five senses, understand and create similes and metaphors, and collaborate to write sensory poems about the world around them. Students will be exposed to different forms of sensory descriptions, learn the basics of poem writing, and have multiple opportunities to create their own sensory poems by the end of the third day. Lesson Description for Day In this lesson, students will identify descriptive language in given poems, create a list of sensational words, and collaborate to create a sensory description of the classroom. State Standards Common Core ELA Standards for Language: 3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Common Core ELA Standards for Writing: 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Goals
Unit Goals: 1. Students will identify and use descriptive language in poetry. 2. Students will explain the purpose and effect of using sensory imagery when describing something. 3. Students will use a combination of the five senses to describe familiar objects and places. 4. Students will compose multiple sensory poems, alone and in groups, using what they have learned about descriptive language and imagery. Lesson Goals: 1. Students will identify descriptive language in different forms of poetry. 2. Students will construct a list of sensual words as a class. 3. Students will collaborate to create a description of the classroom.

Methods
Anticipatory Set: Begin by asking students to imagine their favorite placetheir grandparents kitchen, the beach they go to on vacation, the soccer field, etc. Have them think of adjectives that describe that place. Give personal example: model descriptive adjectives based on the five senses. Share with students the lesson goals and objectives: that they will identify descriptive words in poems, work as a class to make a list of strong sensory words, and in partners, groups, or individually create a description of the classroom through the five senses. Discuss the importance of using descriptive languagewhen discussing something or somewhere unfamiliar with a friend and to make their writing more interesting and engaging for the reader. Have students share their place and the descriptive words they have brainstormed. On a chalk or white board, list the different words given by students. After 3-4 minutes of sharing, introduce the five senses. As a class, categorize the words by the five senses, using a different color and column for each sense. Students will record the words on a hand-out that includes visual representations of the senses. Also include a category for words that dont fit

into a particular sensory category. If one or two of the senses have less words than the others (i.e tactile & taste) brainstorm with the class descriptive words that fit these categories. Highlight the strongest words in each category, and repeat the importance of descriptive language.
Introduce and Model New Knowledge: Present students with new information appropriate to the lesson, highlighting the vocabulary for the five senses: tactile, visual, auditory, olfactory, and gustatory. Use PowerPoint to present new vocabulary for the senses: visual (sight), auditory (hearing), olfactory (smell), tactile (touch), and gustatory (taste). For each provide index cards with the new vocabulary word, the corresponding sense, and examples of descriptive adjectives for each. Also provide examples of poor sensory words. For example: Sound: piercing (instead of irritating), soothing (instead of soft), thundering (instead of loud). Give students a few minutes alone or in pairs to go over the index cards. Encourage them to read the definitions and examples of sensory words aloud. Ask them to discuss why certain words are better than others. Hand out T.S Eliots poem Morning at the Window. Show Youtube video of visual representation of poem (see resources). Provide a Think Aloud of how to pick out sensory words from the first stanza. For the rest of the poem, ask students to highlight the words or groups of words that invoke sensory responses. Have them highlight these words in the same colors that were used for the graphic organizer. Go over the rest of the poem, and have students share the words they chose.

Provide Guided Practice: Give students a choice to work alone or with a partner in this activity. Ask each student or pair of students to choose a poem or poems. Students will be able to choose from poetry in print and books in the classroom, (audio copies of books should be available in the listening center for students who require decoding support or who may have low vision. Or books should be scanned into the computer so these students can access the content using a screen reader. The content of web sites can also be accessed by using a screen

reader), or students can explore www.poetryfoundation.org where there are multiple examples of animated interpretations of poems, and www.poetryarchive.org where there are recordings of authors reading their poetry allowed. Give students time to browse their resources. Ask them to use the provided handout to record the sensory words they encounter, or students can highlight them on the text. Students will have a choice of how to share their new knowledge. They can dictate what they have learned to the teacher, they can write it down, or they can share the highlighted text. When students return to the large group, ask children to share what they have learned and write it on the original list of sensory words from the beginning of the lesson. The class should now have a large list of sensory words. Ask students if they want to add any words to the list besides the ones they encountered in their exploration. Go over the list one final time reiterating the importance of descriptive words and sensory images. Ask students how they think the words improve the poetry. Provide Independent Practice: Once again, students choose to work alone or in pairs. They will use the class-created sensory words chart, as well as the index cards of the five senses to create a sensory description of the classroom. They can choose to do so in paragraph or sentence form, or by using the provided graphic organizer and bullet form. They also will have the choice of writing or performing a poem, or giving an oral presentation of the description. Computers will be provided for those who prefer/need to use them. For students who struggle with the activity, a template will be provided with a paragraph describing the classroom, with blanks that will be filled in with sensory words. Wrap-Up Students can volunteer to share their description of the classroom with the whole class, or with another student in the class. Those who choose to abstain may, but they must share their work with the teacher. They are expected to show a grasp of the five senses, use appropriate and varied sensory words, accurately portray the classroom and be creative in doing so. When students are finished presenting ask the following questions: What are the new vocabulary words for the five senses? Why is it helpful to use sensory words when describing an object, place, or experience? How do strong sensory words help make a description more exciting?

Assessment
Formative/Ongoing Assessment: Provide ongoing assessment throughout the lesson. Observe and encourage student participation in class discussion, asking and answering questions, and volunteering comments and ideas. Visit students during partner word and provide direction, correct any errors, and affirm successes. Did student's responses accurately answer the questions? Summative/End Of Lesson Assessment: At the end of the lesson, collect descriptive paragraph if written, or evaluate oral presentation by asking these questions: Did student's responses accurately answer the questions? Did their presentation reflect a strong grasp of all five senses and vivid sensory words? Were their responses creative and accurately portray the classroom?

Materials
Web Sites

Poetry Archive Edit | Delete www.poetryarchive.org Poetry Foundation Edit | Delete www.poetryfoundation.org

Books & Articles

A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein (HarperCollins 1981) Edit | Delete Sketches From a Spy Tree by Tracie Vaughn Zimmer (Clarion Books 2005)

Edit | Delete

Something Permanent by Cynthia Rylant (Harcourt Children's Books 1994) Edit | Delete Beautiful photographs.

Video & Audio Resources

Morning at the Window: Visual/Audio Reading Edit | Delete http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OQISy56qBI

Other Resources

"Morning at the Window" T.S Elliot poem Edit | Delete

Lesson Overview
Title: Sensory Poetry Day 2 Author: Alaina Storck Subject: Reading/Language Arts Grade Level(s): 68 Duration: 1 Day Unit Description This second lesson of three is part of a unit that focuses on sensory poetry, including identifying effective descriptive language, using imaginative language to create a sensory effect, and writing free verse poems using a combination of the five senses. In this set of lessons, students will learn to identify and use descriptive imagery based on the five senses, learn the basic rules of free verse poetry, and collaborate to write sensory poems about the world around them. Students will be exposed to different forms of sensory descriptions, learn the basics of poem writing, and have multiple opportunities to create their own sensory poems by the end of the third day. Lesson Description for Day

In this lesson, students will focus on poetic techniques that add to sensory description: imagery, simile, metaphor. Students will also call on their recently mastered knowledge of sensory words to create examples of simile, metaphor and imagery in regard to the five senses. They will also be exposed to multiple examples in written, visual and oral text. State Standards Common Core ELA Standards for Language: 3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Common Core ELA Standards for Writing: 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Common Core ELA Standards for Reading: Literature: 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Goals
Unit Goals: 1. Students will identify and use descriptive language in poetry. 2. Students will explain the purpose and effect of using sensory imagery when describing something. 3. Students will use a combination of the five senses to describe familiar objects and places. 4. Students will compose multiple sensory poems, alone and in groups, using what they have learned about descriptive language and imagery.
Lesson Goals: Students will recognize and generate examples of imagery, metaphor, and simile to create sensory descriptions. Students will understand and employ the literary devices of imagery, metaphor, and simile.

Student will evaluate the value of these literary devices in creating sensory descriptions, especially in poetry.

Methods
Anticipatory Set: Ask students to recall some of the strong sensory words we learned yesterday. Reiterate the importance of descriptive language. Hand out and read aloud a list of sentences and ask students to raise their hands if they feel they create strong descriptive language. Example of sentences: This night is as dark as the bottom of the ocean. Her laughter was an explosion. The hot chocolate tasted like Christmas morning. Her hair was silk and sunshine. Ask students to turn to their neighbor or write in their journals why they did or didnt feel the sentence vividly described the object or idea it represented. After a few minutes of discussion, ask students if they would like to share what they discussed with the class. If students felt that the sentences didnt create strong images, ask them why. Then share with class the lesson objectives: Students will recognize and generate examples of imagery, metaphor, and simile to create sensory descriptions. Students will understand and employ the literary devices of imagery, metaphor, and simile. Student will evaluate the value of these literary devices in creating sensory descriptions, especially in poetry

Introduce and Model New Knowledge: Present students with new information appropriate to the lesson, highlighting the poetic devices of figurative language, imagery, simile, and metaphor. Provide a handout with the following definitions:

-Figurative language is a tool that an author employs (or uses) to help the reader visualize (or see) what is happening in a story or poem. Some common types of figurative language are: imagery, simile, metaphor, -A simile is a comparison using like or as. It usually compares two dissimilar (un-alike) objects. For example: His feet were as big as boats. We are comparing the size of feet to boats. These are not similes: She looked like she was mad (because you are not making a comparison). He had the same hair as his brother (because they are not dissimilar). -A metaphor states that one thing is something else that it really isnt. It is a comparison, but it does NOT use like or as to make the comparison. For example: Her hair is silk. The sentence is comparing (or stating) that hair is silk. These are not metaphors: The room is ugly (because the room is ugly). Her hair is like silk (this is a simile, because it uses like). Read the handout out loud and answer any questions students might have. -Imagery is the name given to the elements in a poem that spark off the senses. Despite "image" being a synonym for "picture", images need not be only visual; any of the five senses can respond to what a poet writes. Show the video: Similes and Metaphors for Youtube. Be sure to stop at various points in the video to reinforce the concepts and ask students to answer the video questions before the video gives the answer.

Provide Guided Practice:

Hand out copies of Willow and Ginkgo by Eve Merriam (copies should also be available in text form on computers for the use of screen readers and textto-speech). Have students underline or highlight the similes in the text and circle the items/ideas being compared. Students can work alone or in small groups. Do a Think-Aloud of picking out the similes in the first stanza, then have students finish the rest of the poem themselves. Go over the poem as a class, asking students to explain why they picked a line as a simile and what it was comparing. Using the same the same resources as yesterday, have students choose at least one poem to pick out the metaphors and similes. They can work independently or in groups of up to three. Ask them to compile a list of the similes and metaphors they encounter, either by highlighting them, copying and pasting them if on the computer or writing them down in their journal or guided worksheet. Provide Independent Practice: Independently, students will choose from three projects to show their grasp of the difference between simile and metaphor. They will also generate their own examples of both. Choice one: using a list of subjects to compare, students will create metaphors and similes based on a formula. This activity can be completed orally or in written form. Choice two: students will take a piece of blank white paper and fold it into fourths. In one block, they will write a simile and illustrate it. In the block immediately to the right, they will write the same sentence as a metaphor. They will do the same for the other two blocks. Choice three: Students will create their own list of metaphors and similes, avoiding clichs, and compile examples either on the computer or on poster board.

Wrap-Up
Have students return to their seats with the examples they created during independent practice. Ask each student or group of students to share one example of a simile or metaphor they created. On a SMART board or large piece of paper, make a class list of the examples given, which the students can use tomorrow when they are writing their sensory poems. Ask students to list, write, or share with a partner what they learned about similes, metaphors, descriptive language and imagery. Remind students that these techniques make their writing more vivid and interesting and will be useful when they are writing their sensory poems tomorrow.

Assessment
Formative/Ongoing Assessment: Provide ongoing assessment throughout the lesson. Observe and encourage student participation in class discussion, asking and answering questions, and volunteering comments and ideas. Visit students during partner word and provide direction, correct any errors, and affirm successes. Did student's responses accurately answer the questions? Summative/End Of Lesson Assessment: None in this lesson.

Materials
Video & Audio Resources

Similes and Metaphors http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHBWZDVMVqA&feature=related Great visual/audio aid, strong definitions and humorous examples to help students remember and engage in learning. Web Sites

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Poetry Archive www.poetryarchive.org Poetry Foundation www.poetryfoundation.org

Books & Articles


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A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein (HarperCollins 1981) Sketches From a Spy Tree by Tracie Vaughn Zimmer (Clarion Books 2005) Something Permanent by Cynthia Rylant (Harcourt Children's Books 1994) Beautiful photographs.

Lesson Overview Title: Sensory Poetry Day 3 Author: Alaina Storck Subject: Reading/Language Arts Grade Level(s): 68 Duration: 1 Day Unit Description This final lesson of three is part of a unit that focuses on sensory poetry, including identifying effective descriptive language, using imaginative language to create a sensory effect, and writing free verse poems using a combination of the five senses. In this set of lessons, students will learn to identify and use descriptive imagery based on the five senses, learn the basic rules of free verse poetry, and collaborate to write sensory poems about the world around them. Students will be exposed to different forms of sensory descriptions, learn the basics of poem writing, and have multiple opportunities to create their own sensory poems by the end of the third day. Lesson Description for Day In this third lesson, students will create multiple sensory poems using a combination of the five senses, and including metaphor, simile, and sensory language. State Standards

Common Core ELA Standards for Language: 3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Common Core ELA Standards for Writing: 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

Goals
Unit Goals: 1. Students will identify and use descriptive language in prose and poetry. 2. Students will explain the purpose and effect of using sensory imagery when describing something. 3. Students will use a combination of the five senses to describe familiar objects and places. 4. Students will compose multiple sensory poems, alone and in groups, using what they have learned about descriptive language and imagery Lesson Goals: Students will 1. create sensory poems using simile, metaphor and sensory language. 2. incorporate a combination of the five senses in their poetry 3. compose multiple sensory poems, alone and in groups, using what they have learned about descriptive language and imagery.

Methods
Anticipatory Set: Begin by reading the teacher example of a sensory poem: My Kitchen. Be sure to give students a written copy, with text adjustments if needed. Before reading the poem aloud tell students to listen/read for examples of sensory language (and which sense is being portrayed), metaphor and simile.

My kitchen sounds like a party, with banging pots, sizzling bacon, laughing voices. It smells of garlic and cinnamon sugar. My kitchen is a hug warm and comforting. The air tastes of tomato sauce and ricotta cheese. It is blue and white, and light streams in through the open blinds Read the poem through two times, then as a class pick out the examples. Ask students if the poem succeeds in creating a mental picture of the kitchen. Why or why not? Share with the class the lesson goals: that they will be creating their own sensory poems, and that in the poems they will be expected to use sensory language, metaphor and simile. Introduce and Model New Knowledge: Introduce sensory poetry to the class. Use handouts and PowerPoint to introduce the definition and formula for sensory poems. Tell students that sensory poems create a descriptive mind picture or an object/place or event, because the words used (sensory language, metaphor and simile) echo the readers own sensory experience of similar events or objects. Highlight sections of My Kitchen that create a mind picture for the reader. Explain how the poem defers from a simple prose description of a kitchen (doesnt follow grammatical rules, highly descriptive, the language used is more important that what is being described). Explain that free verse poem doesnt have to rhyme or follow any particular structure. This will be the type of poem they will be writing. Share the basic formula for sensory poems: Subject sounds like Subject feels like Subject tastes like Subject smells like Subject looks like Create a sensory poem about the classroom, using the formula. Model how you choose strong sensory words and use simile and metaphor. Have

students help pick out sensory experiences from the classroom, and help with language if they volunteer. Write the poem you created on the board and read it aloud for the class. Once again, highlight the sensory descriptions and figurative language. Provide Guided Practice: Break students into to groups of 5 or 6. Using the resources compiled the last two days (list of sensory words, definitions of metaphor/simile, list of metaphor simile, examples of professional poems) each group is responsible for composing a sensory poem about the school cafeteria. The poem should contain examples of all five senses, but can be adjusted to allow for creativity. Tell them to be prepared to share their poems with the class. As students work together, walk around to each group to provide guidance and keep them on task. After about fifteen minutes, return to large group. Each group will share its sensory poem. As a class, pick out the similarities and differences in each poem. Explain how even when describing the same place, peoples experiences can be different. Highlight a few exemplary similes/metaphors or sensory words. If a group moved beyond the basic formula, highlight for the class how they did so and how it enhanced the poem. Collect the group poems and create a class sensory poem display. Provide Independent Practice: Independently, or in pairs, students will spend the rest of the class period composing at least three sensory poems about different places or events. They should use the resources mentioned above as guides to do so. The sensory poems can be composed in a variety of ways. Students can write them, type them on the computer, perform them orally, create visual poetry like those at poetryfoundation.org, create a song or a rap, make a collage poem, or any other format they can think of as long as the result is a poem which uses sensory language, simile and metaphor and portrays at least three of the five senses. If students havent completed their poems by the end of class they can work on them at home as well. Poems are due the beginning of class the next day.

Wrap-Up At the beginning of class the next day the whole class will participate in a poetry showcase. Each student will share one sensory poem of their choice. They can perform the poem if they feel comfortable, or share it in written form and a volunteer or the teacher will read it aloud. Students will participate in a peer review of their classmates poetry. For each student, the rest of the class will fill out a peer review slip that asks them to evaluate the students use of sensory language, incorporation of the senses, simile and metaphor, creativity and depiction of place/event.

Assessment
Formative/Ongoing Assessment: Provide ongoing assessment throughout the lesson. -Observe and encourage student participation in class and group discussion, asking and answering questions, and volunteering comments and ideas. -Visit students and provide direction, correct any errors, and affirming successes. -Did student's responses accurately answer the question? Summative/End Of Lesson Assessment: Collect students three sensory poems if in physical form, or evaluate their oral presentation. For each poem, evaluate students on their use of sensory language, incorporation of the senses, simile and metaphor, creativity and depiction of place/event. Materials Web Sites
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Poetry Archive www.poetryarchive.org Poetry Foundation www.poetryfoundation.org

Books & Articles -A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein (HarperCollins 1981) -Sketches From a Spy Tree by Tracie Vaughn Zimmer (Clarion Books 2005) -Something Permanent by Cynthia Rylant (Harcourt Children's Books 1994) Beautiful photographs.

Lessons were adapted from: CAST UDL Lesson Builder. (2006). The Lifecycle of Butterflies. Retrieved from http://lessonbuilder.cast.org/explore.php?op=static&pid=butterflies_1