Final Exam Study Guide

as of 12/8/10

The Final Exam is 3:15 – 5:15 PM on Saturday, Dec. 11th. The Final Exam is still being finalized, but will be approximately 25 - 30 % ‘new material portion’ and 70 - 75 % ‘comprehensive portion’. Since the exam is two hours, you can expect 30 to 38 questions. Scantron extra credit will be given (the amount of this extra credit, as usual, will depend on the class average for the exam). The ‘new material portion’ covers everything after Exam 3, oxidation numbers and redox reactions, sections 7.6 through 7.10 in the text (skip 7.11). My study suggestions for this ‘new material’: • Review lecture notes carefully. • Read sections 7.6 through 7.10 in the text. • Do Practice Quiz K. • Do the following Chapter 7 homework problems: 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82, 84, 86, 102. The ‘comprehensive portion’ covers everything up to and including Exam 3. My study suggestions for this ‘comprehensive portion‘: • Review all lecture notes carefully. • Review Exams 1, 2, 3. • Review Practice Quizzes A through L. • Review the “Atoms in Motion” chapter of the Supplemental Reading text for this course (you can skip all other reading assignments from the Supplemental Reading text). • If you feel you need additional work on certain topics, review those sections of the text and do the associated assigned end-of-chapter homework problems (you should be able to figure out which problems are pertinent). Note: just because a topic covered in lecture this semester did not show up on one of the previous exams does NOT mean it cannot appear on the ‘comprehensive portion’ of the Final exam. If a given question or topic was part of a practice quiz, assigned end-of-chapter homework, or an example discussed in lecture, then it is ‘fair game’ for this exam! Information to be given with the Final Exam: NOTE: periodic tables and calculators will be provided 8 -1 Speed of light in a vacuum = 2.99792458 x 10 m s Planck’s Constant = 6.626069 x 10-34 J s Mass of an electron = 9.109382 x 10-28 g 1 amu = 1.660539 x 10-27 kg 1 inch = 2.54 cm, exactly Density of liquid water = 1.00 g/mL 1 Angstrom (Ǻ) = 1 x 10-10 m, exactly Avogadro’s Number: 1 mole = 6.022142 x 1023 o o T( F) = 9/5 * T( C) + 32 Rydberg Equation (H atom only): 1 / λ = RH ( 1/nf2 - 1/ni2 ) where RH = 1.097373 x 107 m-1 or as written in the text: 1 / λ = R∞ ( 1/m2 - 1/n2 ) where n > m and R∞ = 1.097373 x 107 m-1 Electron energy levels for the H atom: En = (-2.18 x 10-18 J) (1/n2 ) and ∆E = (-2.18 x 10-18 J) [1/nf2 - 1/ni2 ] where i and f refer to the initial and final states. 1 J = 1 kg m2 s-2 Time-independent Schroedinger Wave Equation: H ψ = E ψ DeBroglie Equation: λ = h / mv Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle: ∆x ∆(mv) ≥ h / 4π or ∆E ∆t ≥ h / 4π

Hg22+ and Pb2+ compounds. Hg22+ and Pb2+ compounds. Activity Series of Metals in Aqueous Solution: Metal Lithium Potassium Barium Calcium Sodium Magnesium Aluminum Manganese Zinc Chromium Iron Cobalt Nickel Tin Lead Hydrogen Copper Silver Mercury Platinum Gold Oxidation Reaction Li (s) → Li+ (aq) + e– K (s) → K+ (aq) + e– Ba (s) → Ba2+ (aq) + 2 e– Ca (s) → Ca2+ (aq) + 2 e– Na (s) → Na+ (aq) + e– Mg (s) → Mg2+ (aq) + 2 e– Al (s) → Al3+ (aq) + 3 e– Mn (s) → Mn2+ (aq) + 2 e– Zn (s) → Zn2+ (aq) + 2 e– Cr (s) → Cr3+ (aq) + 3 e– Fe (s) → Fe2+ (aq) + 2 e– Co (s) → Co2+ (aq) + 2 e– Ni (s) → Ni2+ (aq) + 2 e– Sn (s) → Sn2+ (aq) + 2 e– Pb (s) → Pb2+ (aq) + 2 e– H2 (g) → 2 H+ (aq) + 2 e– Cu (s) → Cu2+ (aq) + 2 e– Ag (s) → Ag+ (aq) + e– Hg (l) → Hg2+ (aq) + 2 e– Pt (s) → Pt2+ (aq) + 2 e– Au (s) → Au3+ (aq) + 3 e– Ease of Oxidation highest lowest . Na+. etc. Sulfate anion. Nitrate. Cl–. or I–. Assume any ionic compound that contains none of the above listed soluble ions is insoluble. Assume all acids are water soluble.Formal charge: FC = (# of valence e–‘s) – (# of lone pair e–‘s) – ½ (# of shared e–‘s) Oxidation Number: ON = (# of valence e–‘s) – (# of lone pair e–‘s) – (# of shared e–‘s. acetate or perchlorate anions.). Ammonium cation. K+. if the more EN atom) Bond order: BO = ½ [(number of bonding electrons) – (number of antibonding electrons)] Solubility Guidelines: An ionic compound is probably soluble if it contains one of the following ions: Group 1A cations (Li+. except Ba2+. Br–. except Ag+.