C M Y K

WILKES-BARRE, PA MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 50¢
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The Times Leader
Former Penn State football coach
suffered injury in fall at home.
NATION & WORLD, 5A
Paterno breaks
pelvis, in hospital
Nanticoke parade, Legion
dinner, W-B business mixer
CLICK, 1C
Smile, you’re on
the Click page
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BRAUN DOES NOT FIT
STEROIDS IMAGE
Ryan Braun oesn’t fit the image
fans conjure up when they hear
that a baseball slugger has
been accused of using perform-
ance-enhancing drugs. Since
he joined the
Milwaukee
Brewers in
2007, Braun
has belted big
home runs not
with cartoon-
ishly large
muscles, but
with a sweet
swing and an ultra-quick bat.
Last season, he helped drive
the Brewers to the playoffs and
was voted the NL’s Most Valua-
ble Player. Now Braun finds
himself fighting a 50-game
suspension after news leaked
that he has tested positive for
a banned substance. He main-
tains his innocence. 1B
SPORTS
SHOWCASE
NFL
EAGLES 26
DOLPHINS10
JETS 37
CHIEFS10
BRONCOS13
BEARS10
FALCONS 31
PANTHERS 23
GIANTS 37
COWBOYS 34
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 8A
Editorials 13A
B SPORTS:
Scoreboard 1B
C CLICK: Birthdays 3C
TV/Movies 4C
Puzzles 5C
Comics 6C
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
WEATHER
Madelyn Evan.
Sunny, milder.
High 42. Low 23.
Details, Page 6B
As we move closer to Christmas, holiday-themed
fare dominates events and activities as the days of
anticipation and planning dwindle.
HEARTH AND HOME are the focus today at the
Pittston Memorial Library at 47 Broad St. as it
hosts “Family Movie Night” starting at 6 p.m. Gath-
erings of a different sort are on tap in two other
locations as the Osterhout Free Library at 71 S.
Franklin St. in Wilkes-Barre puts on a good, old-
fashion “Board Game” night tonight through Dec.
19, and the Hoyt Library on Wyoming Avenue in
Kingston hosts “An Afternoon of Elvis Songs” with
tribute artist Jimmy T. today, 4 to 5 p.m.
CALLING ON ALL THOSE NAMED CLARENCE
because on Tuesday, the holiday B&W classic “It’s a
Wonderful Life” will be screened for free at the
Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock, at 2
and 7 p.m. For an even older classic piece of enter-
tainment, George Ballanchine’s “The Nutcracker”
will be performed by the New York City Ballet and
presented live on screen at Movies 14, 24 E. North-
ampton St., Wilkes-Barre, and Cinemark 20, 40
Glenmaura National Blvd., Moosic, at 6 p.m.
IT’S BEEN A GREAT YEAR FOR MEMORA-
BLE CHARACTERS and on Wednesday Barba-
ra Walters will be taking a look at “The Most
Fascinating People of 2011” from 9:30 to 11 p.m.
on ABC. Among those getting a look are The
Donald (Trump, that is), Katy Perry and Pippa
Middleton.
THE SOUNDS OF THE SEASON will be the
highlight of “Holiday Joy: A Celebration of Christ-
mas” for the NEPA Philharmonic’s performance on
Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Scranton Cultural Center
on Washington Avenue and on Friday at 7 p.m. at
the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-Barre. The guests
will be the Empire Brass and Maria Elisabeth von
Trapp, the granddaughter of those von Trapps, the
ones who inspired “The Sound of Music.”
THE COLLEGE FOOTBALL
BOWL season swings into action
Saturday with three games you
won’t want to miss. (OK, you
probably won’t really care if you
miss them, but at least it’s col-
lege football.) Temple faces
Wyoming at 2 p.m., followed by
Ohio vs. Utah State at 5:30 p.m. and
San Diego State vs. Louisiana-La-
fayette at 9 p.m. All games are on ESPN.
5
THINGS
YOU NEED
TO KNOW
THIS WEEK
Just about every day, as soonas
school lets out, 13-year-old Jillian
Spakand12-year-oldEthanCrake
headtothe West PittstonLibrary.
“I get my homework done and
hang out with my friends,” Spak
saidona recent Wednesday after-
noon. “If one of them needs help
with something like algebra, I’ll
help them.”
More than just a place to read a
magazine or use a computer, the
library in recent years has be-
come a kindof communitycenter
where patrons take yoga classes,
sign up for bus trips to New York
and meet for activities as diverse
as weekly craft sessions and sea-
sonal (bring mittens and ear
muffs at 5:45 p.m. Sunday!)
Christmas caroling.
The West Pittston Library is
one of five non-profit organiza-
tions impacted by recent flood-
T H E T I M E S L E A D E R 2 01 1 G I V I N G G U I D E
Donations sought to aid library’s journey home
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Director of the
West Pittston
Library Anne
Bramblett Barr
said friends and
staff of the li-
brary are grateful
for its temporary
headquarters in
the Insalaco
Complex on
Wyoming Avenue.
Still, it will be
good to return to
its old home on
Exeter Avenue,
she said.
West Pittston Library, flooded
out in September, needs help
to get back up to speed.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
See LIBRARY, Page 9A
ries working for the county. A lot of good
peoplewent throughthis building, alot of
hard-working people.”
Joe Devizia has also informed commis-
sioners that he will retire as county hu-
man services director at the end of the
Ed Holleran started working in county
government as a carpenter, making
$3,200 a year.
He didn’t expect to stay long.
Several sets of county commissioners
and 35 years, five months later, the Pitt-
ston Township resident has informed
county officials he will be retiring effec-
tive Dec. 30.
The 65-year-old has been overseeing
county building and grounds since 2001.
“I have to start slowing down sooner or
later,” he said. “I have a lot of goodmemo-
year – a position he has held since the
start of 2006.
Veteran county assistant solicitor Neil
O’Donnell also has notified the adminis-
tration of his retirement plans.
County Pension Coordinator Rick
Hummer saidhe has receivedabout 35in-
quiries from employees contemplating
retirement in recent weeks – significantly
more than usual.
Incomparison, a total 33 people hadre-
tired in the county this year as of the end
of October, with approvals for 10
Retirement pace picks up
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Ed Holleran is retiring from the Luzerne County Building and Grounds Department at the end of December.
More county workers eyeing departure
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
“I have to start slowing down
sooner or later. I have a lot of
good memories working for
the county. ”
Ed Holleran
See RETIREES, Page 7A
The differences between Luzerne Coun-
ty towns are stark when it comes to the
numbers of families in each who are living
in poverty, but elected leaders of the mu-
nicipalities with the highest and lowest
numbers both say their towns are great
places to live.
Poverty levels in municipalities – and
even in smaller Census tracts – are among
the data included in the
2010 American Commu-
nity Survey five-year esti-
mates released by the
U.S. Census Bureau last
week.
According to that data, Edwardsville
borough has the highest percentage of
families living at or below the national
poverty level of any municipality in the
county – 28.1 percent.
Rice Townshiphas the smallest percent-
age – 0.4 percent of all families in that mu-
nicipality.
Wilkes-Barre has the highest number of
families at 1,673 living at or belowpoverty
level, or 18.1 percent of all families.
The data actually put the borough of
Jeddo at the highest poverty level, but be-
cause the town is so small, with 98 people
living in 47 homes, the margin of
U . S . C E N S U S
Information
reveals
county’s
highs, lows
Poverty level data don’t change area
leaders’ minds about what places
their communities are.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
See LEVELS, Page 14A
INSIDE: Census
aids in local
decision mak-
ing, 14A.
6 09815 10011
Braun
K
PAGE 2A MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Andrews, Estelle
Edwards, Nancy
Gallagher, Ronald
Kutz, Stephen
Mackiewicz, Gertrude
Maslowski, Richard
Morris, Stanley
Owens, Carol
Powell, Edward
Silveri, Raymond Jr.
Washik, Leonard
OBITUARIES
Page 8A
BUILDING
TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – No players
matched all five winning
numbers drawn in Sunday’s
Cash 5 so today’s jackpot
will be worth $225,000.
Lottery officials said 55
players matched four num-
bers and won $241.50 each
and 2,093 players matched
three numbers and won
$10.50 each.
• None of the tickets sold
for the Powerball matched
all six numbers drawn Sat-
urday evening, which were:
04-19-33-41-59
Powerball: 9
Power Play: 5
Players matching all five
numbers and the Powerball
would have won or shared
the $67 million jackpot. The
prize goes to an estimated
$78 million for Wednesday.
Tickets that match the
first five numbers, but miss
the Powerball, win
$200,000 each, and there
were three of those. They
were sold in: Indiana(1), Min-
nesota(1) and Texas(1).
There was one Power Play
Match 5 winner in Maryland
(1).
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER – 0-5-7
BIG 4 – 6-7-8-5
QUINTO – 8-5-3-7-3
TREASURE HUNT
03-06-16-20-29
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER – 5-8-5
BIG 4 – 2-6-7-0
QUINTO – 3-8-0-1-6
CASH 5
10-20-25-28-32
DETAILS
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Issue No. 2011-346
ASHLEY - Police are investi-
gating an early morning slash-
ing Saturday that left one man
with more than 40 stitches in
his face.
Isaac Taylor of Shickshinny
was cut with a box cutter dur-
ing an argument with another
man outside a residence at 99
N. Main St. around 1 a.m., said
Ashley police chief Phil Collot-
ty.
Taylor was treated and re-
leased at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
WILKES-BARRE – Pernan-
drew Marble of Bank Street
said someone took a wallet,
coat and television set from his
vehicle Friday at 21 Bank St.
• John Velehoski of Moosic
said someone stole welding
lead from 575 N. River St. on
Friday.
FREELAND – State police
said they will charge Michael
Banja, 47, of Freeland, with
driving under the influence
after a crash at the intersection
of Graham Street and Johnson
Street at 12:45 a.m. Thursday.
State police said Banja struck
an unoccupied vehicle with his
Hummer H3.
HOLLENBACK TWP. – State
police said they will charge
Matthew Rose, 31, of Hobbie,
with driving under the influen-
ce and possession of a stolen
vehicle after a single-vehicle
crash at the intersection of
Ridge Road and Moyers Grove
Road at 9 p.m. Tuesday.
State police responding to
the crash said they found Rose
to be under the influence of
alcohol and that the vehicle
Rose was driving had been
reported stolen out of Wilkes-
Barre.
Rose was taken to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter for treatment of injuries he
suffered in the crash.
BLACK CREEK TWP. – State
police arrested and said they
will charge Janet K. Gendimen-
ico, 48, of Sugarloaf Township,
with driving under the influen-
ce after a single-vehicle crash
on Tomhicken Road Thursday.
State police said Gendimen-
ico lost control of her Ford
Taurus, crossed the opposing
lane of traffic and struck a util-
ity pole at 2:08 a.m.
DORRANCE TWP. – A state
police fire marshal determined
a fire that damaged a house at
8255 Blue Ridge Trail on Friday
morning was an accident.
The two-story, wood-framed
house owned by Paul and Mi-
chelle Nichols of Wapwallopen
sustained severe damage.
No one was home at the
time, but seven dogs died in the
blaze that was discovered by a
passerby around 11:05 a.m.,
state police said.
Dorrance Township Fire
Chief Duane Seltzer said the
American Red Cross is assisting
the displaced residents.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
said Charles Miller, 24, of Hazle
Township was charged with
harassment Saturday after he
grabbed Desiree George, 30,
also of the township, by the
neck and shoved her during an
argument on Grant Street.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
said a traffic citation was filed
against Alexandra Liso, 19, of
Airmont, N.Y., after a two-vehi-
cle crash on state Route 309
around 10:15 a.m. Saturday.
Liso pulled out a Dunkin
Donuts store and into the path
of a car driven by Cynthia Ca-
rey, 55, of Drums who was
traveling south on Route 309,
state police said.
Carey received minor injuries
and was taken to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter, Plains Township, for treat-
ment. She was wearing a seat-
belt and the airbag in her 2010
Toyota Corolla activated, state
police said.
Liso and two passengers in
her 2005 Toyota Scion, Amy Lo,
19, of Quincy, Mass., and Mi-
chael Curley, 19, of Ringwood,
N.J., were wearing seatbelts and
were not injured.
Citation for vehicles entering
or crossing roadways was filed
against Liso, state police said.
Both vehicles were towed
from the scene.
HANOVER TWP. – Township
police reported the following:
• John Robinson of Hickory
Lane, Shickshinny, reported
Sunday the windshield and
passenger door window of his
1989 Mercury Grand Marquis
were smashed while the car
was parked at his workplace,
M.P.W. Industrial Water on
Stewart Road.
Robinson said he arrived for
work at 4 a.m. and returned at
12:30 p.m. Sunday to find the
damage.
A rock was found on the floor
of the front passenger side and
the roof also was dented.
• The pumping station on
Delaney Street for the Wyoming
Valley Levee System was dam-
aged over the weekend. The
entrance door was kicked in
and the interior was damaged
sometime between Friday night
and 2 p.m. Sunday.
• Residents of a house on
Monarch Road reported Thurs-
day two men in their 30s were
allowed into the residence after
they asked permission to check
the lights.
When the residents asked for
identification the men left in a
light-gray van.
• A resident of house on
South Main Street reported two
white males, approximately 19
to 20 years old, offered her “a
deal” for “Omaha steaks” on
Saturday afternoon.
When the female homeowner
questioned the men they left in
a small, dark green pickup
truck.
POLICE BLOTTER
WAYNESBURG, Pa. —Theex-
pansion of natural gas drilling in
Pennsylvania, and the resulting
demandfor morepipelines tocar-
rygas across thestate’s Marcellus
Shale regions, is stoking worry
that there’s not enough regula-
tionandgovernment oversight of
the pipes.
Hundreds of miles of high-pres-
sure pipelines have already been
built with no federal or state gov-
ernment safety checks, construc-
tion standards, inspections or
monitoring, The Philadelphia In-
quirer reported Sunday.
The state’s Public Utility Com-
mission is poised to receive au-
thority to enforce federal safety
rules from lawmakers, though a
proposed law would still leave
many unregulated across a wide
swatch of the state.
In Dallas Township, two natu-
ral gas companies are construct-
ing gathering pipelines from the
state’s Northern Tier gas fields to
connect to the Transco interstate
pipeline.
Drilling and pipeline compa-
nies maintain that the steel pipes
are safe and built to federal stan-
dards whether required or not.
“We’re all about making sure
we have safe and reliable oper-
ations in the commonwealth,”
David J. Spigelmyer, vice presi-
dent of Chesapeake Energy and
the new chairman of the Marcel-
lus Shale Coalition trade group,
told the newspaper.
Other companies said they use
independent inspectors and, if
need be, upgrade and repair pipe-
lines beforeanythingcanhappen.
Consol Midstreampointed out
that it hired inspectors who iden-
tified flawed welds in a pipe near
Waynesburg. The company fired
thewelders andmadetherepairs.
Additionally, the company said
that by using a stronger grade of
steel and examining all welds, it
ensured that the pipeline exceed-
ed federal requirements.
“While we are not required to
do this, we felt it was very impor-
tant to employ additional over-
sight and inspection services
than is customary to protect our
and the public’s best interest,”
Joe Fink, Consol’s manager,
wrote in an email to the paper.
While many welcome compa-
nies’ self-vigilance, there are calls
for more government oversight.
While environmental inspec-
tors do watch for any pipeline
damage to streams and land-
scapes, the sheer surge of con-
struction of pipelines has been
massive for state regulators.
Much of the gas in Pennsylva-
nia still arrives from western
fields by way of interstate trans-
mission lines. Those are regulat-
ed by the federal Pipeline and
Hazardous Materials Safety Ad-
ministration. In urban areas, the
Pennsylvania Utility Commis-
sion regulates gas lines.
But neither has kept track of
what gathering pipelines have
been built in the Marcellus Shale
fields.
“We have no idea,” said Paul
Metro, the PUC’s top pipeline-
safety regulator told the newspa-
per, which reported that under
federal regulations, a rural area is
defined as one with 10 or fewer
homes along each mile of pipe,
within a quarter-mile-wide right
of way.
Lack of pipeline regs causes concern
Newspaper reports hundreds
of pipelines being built with
no government safety checks.
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON—MaryPower
is 92 and worried about surviving
another frigid New England win-
ter because deep cuts in federal
home heating assistance benefits
mean she probably can’t afford
enough heating oil to stay warm.
She lives in a drafty trailer in
Boston’s West Roxbury neighbor-
hood and gets by on $11,148 a year
inpensionandSocial Securityben-
efits. Her heatingaidhelpthis year
will drop from $1,035 to $685.
With rising heating oil prices, it
probably will cost her more than
$3,000 for enough oil to keep
warmunlesssheturnsher thermo-
stat down to 60 degrees, as she
plans.
“I will just havetocrawl intobed
with the covers over me and stay
there,” said Power, a widow who
worked as a cashier and waitress
until she was 80. “I will do what I
have to do.”
Thousands of poor people
across the Northeast are bracing
for a difficult winter with substan-
tially less home heating aid com-
ing fromthe federal government.
“They’re playing Russian rou-
lette withpeople’s lives,” saidJohn
Drew, who heads Action for Bos-
ton Community Development
Inc., which provides aid to low-in-
come residents in Massachusetts.
That view is shared by home
heat aid advocates across NewEn-
gland and into New York and
Pennsylvania. Most of those states
have cut benefits. Pennsylvania’s
minimumbenefit is droppingfrom
$300 last year to $100, Wolfe said.
In New Hampshire, the issue
couldflare just as the state votes in
the Republican presidential pri-
mary.
Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine,
said she hopes the candidates will
take up the region’s heating aid
crunch because it underscores
how badly the country needs a
comprehensive energy policy.
Several Northeast states already
have reduced heating aid benefits
to families as Congress considers
cutting more than $1 billion from
last year’s $4.7 billionLowIncome
Home EnergyAssistance Program
that servednearly 9 millionhouse-
holds.
FamiliesinNewEngland, where
the winters are long and cold and
people rely heavily on costly oil
heat, are expected to be especially
hard hit. Many poor and elderly
people on fixed incomes struggle
with rising heating bills that can
runintothousands of dollars. That
canforcethemtocut backonother
necessities like food or medicine.
“The winter of 2011-12 could be
memorable for the misery and suf-
feringof thousands of frigidhouse-
holds,” NewHampshire’s Concord
Monitor newspaper said in an edi-
torial. “Heating oil prices are ex-
pectedtohit recordhighs, andfed-
eral fuel assistance may reach a re-
cord lowfor recent years.”
Higher home heating oil prices
and more families seeking aid due
to the sour economy are straining
resources. There’s a 10 percent
surge in newapplicants in Boston,
Drewsaid.
“Our whole programcould hit a
rock soon,” said Mark Wolfe of the
National Energy Assistance Direc-
tors’ Association.
Families can expect to pay, on
average, about $3,300 to heat a
home with oil this winter in New
England, Wolfe said. That’s about
$500 more than last winter. About
half of the region’s homes use oil
heat.
Congress, which is locked in a
bitter battle over reducing spend-
ing, still must decide how much
money to give the programfor the
budget year that began Oct. 1.
In fall 2008, amid concerns
about rising fuel prices, the gov-
ernment nearlydoubledfuel assist-
ance, releasing$5.1billiontostates
for the following winter.
But last February, President Ba-
rack Obama proposed cutting the
program nearly in half, calling for
about $2.5 billion. The House is
considering $3.4 billion for fuel as-
sistance, while the Senate reviews
a $3.6 billion proposal.
In Maine, one of the coldest
states, theaveragebenefit hasbeen
reducedby about $500. The state’s
average benefit last winter was
about $800 among 63,842 house-
holds served. The average income
of recipients was $16,757. About
80 percent of Maine households
use oil heat.
“It’s a very serious situation,”
Dale McCormick, director of Mai-
neHousing, a state agency that ad-
ministers heating aid, said. “We
can’t send out money we don’t
have.”
Northeast cuts heating aid to poor
AP FILE PHOTO
Thousands of low-income people across the Northeast, especially those who rely on oil heat, are
bracing for a difficult 2011 winter with substantially less heating aid coming fromWashington.
Families in New England are
expected to be especially
hard hit.
By ANDREWMIGA
Associated Press
“They’re playing Russian roulette with people’s
lives.”
John Drew
Heads of Action for Boston Community Development Inc.
LOS ANGELES — Holly-
wood’s holidays are off to a dread-
ful start: Fewerpeoplewent tothe
movies the last two weekends
than during the box-office hush
that followed the Sept. 11 attacks
10 years ago.
Domestic revenues tumbled to
a 2011 low of about $77 million
this weekend, when the star-fil-
led, holiday-themed romance
“NewYear’s Eve” debutedat No. 1
withaweak$13.7million, accord-
ing to studio estimates Sunday.
It’s the worst weekend in more
than three years, since the week-
end after Labor Day in 2008,
when revenues amounted to
$67.6 million, according to box-
office tracker Hollywood.com.
And it comes after an $81million
total a week earlier that had been
this year’s previous low.
“It’s unbelievable how bad it
is,” said Hollywood.com analyst
Paul Dergarabedian.
Jonah Hill’s comedy “The Sit-
ter” opened at No. 2 with just $10
million.
Divided by this year’s average
ticket price of $7.96, the com-
bined $158 million haul means
only an estimated 19.8 million
peoplewent tothemoviesthelast
twoweekends. Basedonthe aver-
age ticket price, this year’s top-
grossing film, “Harry Potter and
the Deathly Hallows: Part 2,”
drew more people all by itself
over opening weekend.
The two lowest-grossing back-
to-back weekends of the last dec-
ade came amidthe nation’s shock
after the 2001 terrorist attacks,
when one of the last things on
people’s minds was catching a
film.
Box office
dips below
post-9/11
Holidays off to bad start as
cinemas see worst weekend in
more than three years.
By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
HAZLETON
Police make arrest in rape
Police on Sunday said they arrested
Jabhar Mullings, 33, of East Broad
Street after they were called to the area
of Seventh and Hayes streets to in-
vestigate a reported rape.
After an investigation, Mullings was
charged with rape, indecent deviate
sexual intercourse, sexual assault,
indecent assault, unlawful restraint,
simple assault and harassment, police
said.
He was arraigned and committed to
the Luzerne County Correctional Facil-
ity for lack of $75,000 bail.
WASHINGTON, D.C.
FEMA deadline approaching
The Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency reminds flood victims of
tropical storms Lee and Irene that only
two days remain to register and apply
for federal disaster assistance. The
deadline is Wednesday.
To register or check the status of an
application already filed, call 1-800-621-
FEMA (3362). 711 or Video Relay Ser-
vice (VRS) should also call 1-800-621-
3362. Applicants with a speech dis-
ability or hearing loss who use TTY
should call 1-800-462-7585. For those
who have a disability and need assist-
ance, a call to FEMA will get them
help.
Operators are on call seven days a
week 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. It is also easy to
register online at www.DisasterAssis-
tance.gov.
WILKES-BARRE
Bikes being collected
Those with new or slightly used
bikes in good shape can help the less
fortunate by donating the two-wheeler
to the Second Annual Jenni Sunshine
Foundation Holiday Bicycle Drive
Give-Away.
The foundation is collecting bikes to
be given to children at the Kirby
Health Center Family House in Wilkes-
Barre on Dec. 20. The foundation also
accepts Wal-Mart gift cards for bicy-
cles.
The Kirby Health Center, a branch of
the Salvation Army, is the only home-
less shelter in the area that keeps the
whole family together. The Jenni Sun-
shine Foundation is a non-profit corpo-
ration based in Wilkes-Barre and a
member of the Chamber of Commerce.
Along with the bikes, children will
receive tooth brushes and toothpaste
donated by Frederick Dental of Wilkes-
Barre.
To donate, call 570-270-3280. Mone-
tary donations or gift cards can be
mailed to Jenni Sunshine Foundation,
P.O. Box 2743, Wilkes-Barre, PA18703.
The foundation is also collecting
winter coats for children. Coats can be
dropped off Monday through Friday at
the foundation office at 35 S. Franklin
St. (lower level), Wilkes-Barre, or at
McDermott & McDermott Realty in
Shavertown. The foundation website is
at http://www.jennisunshinefounda-
tion.org.
DALLAS
Drilling Coalition will meet
The Gas Drilling Awareness Coali-
tion will hold a general membership
meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the
American Legion Post 672 on Route
415, across from Leggio’s.
The Gas Drilling Awareness Coali-
tion includes Luzerne County citizens
who believe natural gas drilling by
horizontal fracturing and its associated
industries will bring problems to this
populated and developed area.
HAZLE TWP.
Cops: Man gave false ID
State police said Joseph Thomas
Dougherty pulled a knife and identified
himself as a Wilkes-Barre police officer
when he confronted two people in the
parking lot of the Sheetz store at the
intersection of Airport Road and state
Route 309 after an alleged traffic vio-
lation early Sunday morning.
State police located Dougherty, 31, of
Wilkes-Barre, at state Route 940 and
Stockton Road around 1:50 a.m. He
showed signs of intoxication and told
state police he was a police officer,
state police said.
When troopers tried to take him into
custody he resisted arrest, state police
said.
Dougherty will be charged with
driving under the influence, resisting
arrest, impersonating a public servant,
simple assault, harassment and public
drunkenness, state police said.
I N B R I E F
More than10hours of interviews with
10 of the highest-ranked Luzerne Coun-
ty manager applicants left home rule
transition committee members ener-
gized.
“I think we all came away from the
process knowingwe’ve got several high-
caliber applicants,” said county Coun-
cilman-elect Harry Haas.
Councilwoman-elect Linda McClos-
ky Houck said she is optimistic.
“We have some excellent applicants,”
she said.
The applicants work indifferent parts
of the country, said home rule charter
drafter and Councilman-elect Rick Mo-
relli.
“There are some applicants I feel are
worthwhile for us to go after – they’re
that good,” Morelli said. “The bottom
lineis thefinalists arepeoplewhohavea
lot of experience, alot of credentials and
I think have what we’re looking for in
this very important position.”
The manager will oversee daily oper-
ations under home rule, which takes ef-
fect with the swearing-in of the council-
elect on Jan. 2. The new council will
choose the manager.
The transition committee, which in-
cludes the council-elect, started with 72
applicants and selected 15 for inter-
Manager hopefuls impress panel
Houck Morelli Williams Brominski Curry
Transition committee interviews 10
county manager applicants as
countdown to new era ticks down.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
See CANDIDATES, Page 7A
GETTING READY FOR A HOLIDAY TRADITION
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
R
udolf Schleich guides rehearsal Sunday afternoon at Wilkes University’s Dorothy Dickson Darte Center with students for the upcoming
performance of ‘The Nutcracker’ by Ballet Northeast Thursday through Sunday. The choreography is by the dancers of Ballet Northeast
with special appearances by young dancers courtesy of The Degnan Ballet Center, according to Ballet Northeast’s website.
WEST PITTSTON -- A recently reo-
penedAgolino’s Restaurant was thesetting
Sunday for a special holiday party that
brought together mili-
tary veterans from
World War II through
the Iraqi conflict.
Almost 50 members
and guests of Morning-
star American Legion
Post 904 from West
Wyoming held their an-
nual party, an event or-
ganizers said provides
an opportunity for old
friends to get together.
It makesfor averydif-
ferent Christmas than
the one George Yurko
celebrated in 1942,
when he shipped out
just two days before
Christmas. Yurko, who
served 38 months in the
Army174thBombDisposal Squad, saidhe
really enjoys the party.
“It’s a great time of year to just be happy
and jolly,” he said.
Others said that happy, jolly feeling is
made better by spending it withfellowvet-
erans.
“The year is always hectic and everyone
is busy,” said Post Commander Rick Yaro-
savich, who served with the Army mecha-
See VETERANS, Page 7A
Holiday
reunites
veterans
West Wyoming Legion brings
together area former servicemen
from several wars, conflicts.
By JANINE UNGVARSKY
Times Leader Correspondent
“This is a
time to
just get
together in
fellowship
and let
each other
know we
care.”
Rick Yarosavich
Post commander
INSIDE: See
Click photos, 1C
KINGSTON -- The law firm of Hourigan,
Kluger & Quinn will sponsor a free showing
of the Disney holiday movie “The Search for
Santa Paws” Saturday at the Kirby Center for
the Performing Arts in
downtown Wilkes-Barre.
Doors will open at 12:30
p.m. and the movie will
start at 2 p.m. Pre-movie
entertainment will start at
1:30 p.m. with choral mu-
sic, bell ringers, dancers
and a juggler.
The movie is open to all families with chil-
dren under 12 years old. All children must be
accompaniedby anadult. Seatingwill be lim-
ited to the first 1,800 people on a first-come,
first-served basis. Everyone attending the
movie will get free popcorn and choice of wa-
ter or juice. Children will receive free hats
and gloves courtesy of HKQ.
This is the third year in a row that the law
firm, headquartered in Kingston with offices
inScranton, has sponsoreda free holiday mo-
vie at the Kirby Center.
“With the September flooding in the
Wyoming Valley, high unemployment and a
Kingston law firm sponsors film for kids
Hourigan, Kluger & Quinn says “The
Search for Santa Paws” at the Kirby
Center a treat during rocky time.
By SARA POKORNY
spokorny@timesleader.com
The movie is
open to all
families with
children under
12 years old.
See MOVIE, Page 7A
LAFLIN – The decision last week
by Yatesville to discontinue police
coverage by neighboring Laflin will
be discussed at tonight’s council
meeting, said Laflin Mayor Dorothy
Yazurlo.
She said she was made aware of
the decision after Yatesville council
voted on the matter at its monthly
meeting on Wednesday.
“I am very surprised by their deci-
sion,” said Yazurlo Sunday. “We have
been good neighbors and we gave
them excellent police protection.”
Attempts to reach Yatesville coun-
cil members were unsuccessful Sun-
day.
Yazurlo said because the coverage
was included in the borough’s budget
it will be discussed at the meeting
scheduled for 7 tonight at the munic-
ipal building at 47 Laflin Road.
Yatesville’s decision to end police service surprises Laflin
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 4A MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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PANAMA CITY, Panama —
Former military strongman Man-
uel Antonio Noriega was flown
home to Panama on Sunday to be
punished once again for crimes
he committed during a career
that saw him
transformed
from a close
Cold War ally
of Washington
to the vilified
target of a U.S.
invasion.
Noriega left
Orly airport,
south of Paris, on a flight oper-
ated by Spain’s Iberia airlines. He
was delivered directly to the air-
craft by a four-car convoy and
motorcycles that escorted him
from the French capital’s La
Sante prison.
The French Justice Ministry,
in a one-line statement, said
France turned Noriega over to
Panamanian officials on Sunday
in accordance with extradition
proceedings. It was the only offi-
cial remark.
Noriega’s return comes after
more than 20 years in U.S. and
French prisons for drug traffick-
ing and money laundering. Pana-
ma convicted himduring his cap-
tivity overseas for the slayings of
two political opponents in the
1980s, and in a third case involv-
ing the death of troops who aid-
ed one of the opponents in a re-
bellion.
He was sentenced to 20 years
for each of the three cases, and
Panamanian officials say he will
be sent straight to a jail cell when
he lands. The ex-general, whose
pockmarked face earned him the
nickname “Pineapple Face,”
could eventually leave prison un-
der a lawallowing prisoners over
70 to serve out their time under
house arrest.
A doctor was reported to be
among the team of Panamanian
officials escorting the 77-year-old
ex-dictator back to Panama.
“He was very impatient, very
happy. He’s going home,” one of
his French lawyers, Antonin
Levy, said by telephone Saturday
night, a day after his last visit
with Noriega.
Noriega is returning to a great-
ly changed nation.
El Chorrillo, his boyhood
neighborhood and a downtown
slum that was heavily bombed
during the 1989 invasion, now
stands in the shadow of luxury
high-rise condominiums that
have sprung up along the canal
since the United States handed
over control of the waterway in
2000.
The rotting wooden tene-
ments of the community have
been replaced by cement hous-
ing blocks, and Noriega’s former
headquarters have been torn
down and converted into a park
with basketball courts.
While some Panamanians in-
sist on punishment for the man
who stole elections and dis-
patched squads of thugs to beat
opponents bloody in the streets,
others believe his return means
little.
“In politics, he won’t have any
great impact, because the people
of Panama have other concerns,”
said Marco Gandasegui, a sociol-
ogy professor at Panama’s Cen-
ter for Latin American Studies.
Panama is plagued by rising
street crime, and has become a
center for money laundering.
The country also is struggling
with an ambitious plan to ex-
pand the canal, and to balance
foreign investment in tourism
and mining against concerns
they could harm the environ-
ment.
“I don’t think Noriega has any-
thing hugely important to say,”
said retired Gen. Ruben Dario
Paredes, who headed Panama’s
army before Noriega took over in
the early 1980s. “The things he
knows about have lost relevance,
because the world has changed
and the country has, as well.”
Others think it’s time to for-
give and forget.
“This man has paid for his
crimes, and it looks like he can
hardly walk anymore,” said reti-
ree Hildaura Velasco, 67. “If he
dies in prison, or at home, what
does it matter?”
And then there are those who
harbor a certain nostalgia for the
Noriega era, prior to the U.S. in-
tervention and before a spike in
street gangs and drug violence.
“He did bad things, but he also
did good things,” said Sabina
Delgado, 60, a mother of six who
has lived her whole life in El
Chorrillo, which has been hit by
a wave of violent gang crime.
“Imagine, when he was here, the
country didn’t have as much
crime. There weren’t as much
drugs, there was more control.”
Hatuey Castro, 82, a member
of the anti-Noriega opposition
who was detained and beaten by
Noriega henchmen, begs to dis-
agree.
“Noriega was responsible for
the invasion and those who died
in the operation,” he said. “He
dishonored his uniform, there
was barely a shot and he went off
to hide. He must pay.”
Though other U.S. conflicts
have long since pushed himfrom
the spotlight, the 1989 invasion
that ousted Noriega was one of
the most bitterly debated events
of the Cold War’s waning years.
As he rose in the Panamanian
military during the 1970s and
1980s, Noriega cooperated close-
ly with the CIA, helping the U.S.
combat leftist movements in La-
tin America by providing infor-
mation and logistical help. He al-
so acted as a back channel for
U.S. communications with un-
friendly governments such as
Cuba’s.
But Noriega was playing a dou-
ble game. He also began working
with Colombia’s Medellin drug
cartel, and made millions mov-
ing cocaine to the United States.
As the Cold War waned, and
the U.S. war on drugs gained
prominence, Noriega’s drug ties
became a source of increasing
tension. After a U.S. grand jury
indicted him on drug charges in
1988, tensions escalated between
his forces and U.S. troops sta-
tioned around the Panama Ca-
nal. A U.S. Marine was killed in
one clash. President George
H.W. Bush also accused Norie-
ga’s men of abusing a U.S. Navy
serviceman and his wife.
On Dec. 20, 1989, more than
26,000 U.S. troops began moving
into Panama City, clashing with
Noriega loyalists in fighting that
left sections of the city devastat-
ed.
Noriega returns to Panama to serve time
AP PHOTO
A car carrying former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega approaches a plane at Orly airport, near Paris on Sunday. The 77-year old
former Panamanian strongman was pronounced fit enough to be extradited to his homeland of Panama, which he fled in 1989.
Former strong-man leader
was removed from power in a
1989 invasion by the U.S.
By JUAN ZAMORANO
Associated Press
Noriega
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 5A
JEFFERSON CITY, MO.
Cops: Ex-deputy kills 2
A
uthorities in Missouri said a former
sheriff’s deputy is suspected of
killing his ex-wife and her new boy-
friend before leading officers on a high-
speed chase that ended with a shootout
at an upscale hotel hosting a Christmas
party.
The Missouri State Highway Patrol
on Sunday identified the murder vic-
tims as 32-year-old Annette Durham, of
Salem, and 39-year-old Steven Strot-
kamp.
The suspected shooter — former
Dent County Sheriff’s Deputy Marvin
Rice — was in fair condition at a Co-
lumbia hospital after being wounded in
the shootout.
Rice was captured at the Capitol
Plaza Hotel in Jefferson City, where
about 500 doctors, nurses and their
families had gathered for a Christmas
party.
TEHRAN, IRAN
Iran won’t return drone
Iran will not return a U.S. surveil-
lance drone captured by its armed
forces, a senior commander of the
country’s elite Revolutionary Guard
said Sunday.
Gen. Hossein Salami, deputy head of
the Guard, said in remarks broadcast
on state television that the violation of
Iran’s airspace by the U.S. drone was a
“hostile act” and warned of a “bigger”
response. He did not elaborate on what
Tehran might do.
“No one returns the symbol of ag-
gression to the party that sought secret
and vital intelligence related to the
national security of a country,” Salami
said.
Iranian television broadcast video
Thursday of Iranian military officials
inspecting what it identified as the
RQ-170 Sentinel drone.
ALBANY, N.Y.
Passenger advocate wanted
Two New York lawmakers have
called for a passenger advocate at air-
ports to immediately act on complaints
by passengers over security screenings.
U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer and state
Sen. Michael Gianaris of Queens want
the Transportation Security Adminis-
tration to create the position at all
airports.
The proposal to be released Sunday
was prompted by an elderly woman’s
recent claims that she was strip
searched by security officials at Kenne-
dy Airport, which the TSA denies,
saying it doesn’t conduct strip search-
es. Others have since made similar
claims.
The TSA said Saturday that it is
planning its own advocacy service.
TRIPOLI, LIBYA
Militia and army clash
Revolutionary fighters clashed with
national army troops near Tripoli’s
airport, leaving one person dead, offi-
cials said Sunday. The violence reflects
the difficulties Libya’s new leaders face
as they try to stamp their authority on
the disparate militias that overthrew
Moammar Gadhafi.
Army spokesman Sgt. Abdel-Razik
el-Shibahy said fighters from the west-
ern mountain town of Zintan, who
control Tripoli’s international airport,
opened fire on two occasions on Sat-
urday on the convoy of Gen. Khalifa
Hifter, the commander of the fledgling
national army.
El-Shibahy accused the Zintan revo-
lutionaries of trying to assassinate
Hifter, and said one guard was killed
and four others wounded in the second
attack.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Yes, Santa, I was a good dog this year
Santa poses Sunday with a Yorkshire
terrier in San Jose, Calif. Santa came
to be photographed with pets to raise
funds for the Silicon Valley Humane
Society.
STATE COLLEGE — Joe Paterno
fracturedhis pelvis againfollowinga fall
at his home but will not need surgery, a
personclosetothefamilytoldTheAsso-
ciatedPress onSunday.
The former Penn State football coach
was expected to make a full recovery af-
ter slipping Saturday and was admitted
tothehospital thenext
day, the person added.
The person spoke on
condition of anonymi-
tybecauseof thesensi-
tivity of the situation.
Paterno, who turns
85 on Dec. 21, is also
undergoing radiation
and chemotherapy for what his family
has said is a treatable form of lung can-
cer. Son Scott Paterno has said doctors
are optimistic his father would make a
full recovery fromthe illness.
Paterno initially hurt his pelvis after
hewas blindsidedonthesidelineduring
preseason practice in August. It was de-
termined Paterno should remain in the
hospital nowto facilitate his regimen of
cancer treatments while recovering
fromthe pelvis injury, the APwas told.
The person declined to identify the
hospital tomaintainthefamily’sprivacy.
An operator at the hospital in State Col-
lege, Mount Nittany Medical Center,
said Sunday there was no patient listing
for Paterno.
Paterno was firedlast monthinthe af-
termath of child sex-abuse charges
against former defensive coordinator
JerrySandusky, whomaintains his inno-
cence. Paternoisnotatargetof theinves-
tigation.
Sandusky is scheduled to appear in
courtTuesdayafterbeingchargedNov. 5
with the first set of child sex-abuse alle-
gations that spanned years. Amid
mounting criticism that school leaders
shouldhavedonemoretoprevent theal-
legedabuse, trustees dismissedPaterno
four dayslater andacceptedschool Pres-
ident Graham Spanier’s resignation un-
der pressure.
Paterno hasn’t spoken publicly since
his firing Nov. 9. He was diagnosedwith
cancer several dayslater duringafollow-
up visit to the doctor for a bronchial ill-
ness, his family has said.
Paterno breaks pelvis after a fall
The former Penn State football
coach was expected to make a full
recovery after home slip.
By GENARO C. ARMAS
AP Sports Writer
Paterno
JOHANNESBURG, South
Africa — The hard-fought deal
at a global climate conference in
South Africa keeps talks alive
but doesn’t address the core
problem: The world’s biggest
carbonpolluters aren’t willingto
cut emissions of greenhouse gas-
es enough to stave off dangerous
levels of global warming.
With many
scientists say-
ing time is run-
ning out, a big-
ger part of the
solution may
have to come
fromthe rise of
climate-friend-
ly technolo-
gies being de-
veloped out-
side the U.N.
process.
“We avoided
a train wreck
and we got
some useful in-
cremental de-
cisions,” said
Alden Meyer,
of the Wash-
ington-based
Union of Con-
cerned Scien-
tists. “The bad
news is that we
did very little
here to affect the emissions
curve which is accelerating, and
the impacts of climate change
which are climbing day by day.”
Scientists say that if levels of
greenhouse gases continue to
rise, eventually the world’s cli-
mate will reach a tipping point,
with irreversible melting of
some ice sheets and a several-
foot rise in sea levels.
They cannot pinpoint exactly
when that would happen, but
the two-decade-long climate ne-
gotiations have been focused on
preventing global temperatures
from rising more than 2 degrees
Fahrenheit above current levels
by the end of this century.
A report released before the
Durban talks by the U.N. Envi-
ronment Programme saidgreen-
house gas emissions need to
peakbefore 2020for the worldto
have a shot of reaching that tar-
get. It said that’s doable only if
nations raise their emissions
pledges.
In Durban, they did not.
Sunday’s deal extends by five
years the Kyoto Protocol, the
1997agreement that has binding
emissions targets for some in-
dustrial countries but not the
world’s biggest carbon polluters,
China and the United States.
The Durban agreement also
envisions a new accord with
binding targets for all countries
to take effect in 2020. And it sets
up the bodies that will collect,
govern and distribute tens of bil-
lions of dollars to poor countries
hit by climate change.
Climate talks have been
bogged down by rifts between
rich and poor, between fully in-
dustrialized nations and emerg-
ing economies, about how to
share the burden of reducing
greenhouse emissions.
Climate
confab
falls short
of solution
World’s biggest carbon
polluters won’t cut emissions
of greenhouse gases.
BEIRUT—Syrian troops battled army
defectors Sundayinclashes that set sever-
al military vehicles ablaze. The fighting
and other violence around the nation
killed at least eight people, activists said.
For the first time, an act of violent pro-
test against President Bashar Assad’s re-
gime spilled across the border into Jor-
dan, where about a dozen Syrians at-
tacked their embassy Sunday in the capi-
tal, Amman, injuring at least two
diplomats and four other consulate em-
ployees.
The 9-month-old uprising against Sy-
ria’s authoritarian President Bashar As-
sad has grown increasingly violent in re-
cent months as once-peaceful protesters
take up arms and defected soldiers who
havejoinedtheuprisingfight backagainst
the army. The U.N. says more than 4,000
people have been killed since March.
Oppositionactivists calledfor ageneral
strike starting Sunday in a bid to squeeze
the government and push it to stop its
bloody crackdown. Assad has refused to
buckleunder Arabandinternational pres-
sure to step down and has shown no sign
of easing his crackdown, which has in-
cluded assaults by the military on un-
armed protesters.
Now, fighting between loyalist forces
and defectors calling themselves the Free
Syrian Army threatens to push the con-
frontation into civil war.
In one of Sunday’s clashes, which took
place before dawn in the northwestern
town of Kfar Takharim, two of the mili-
tary’s armored vehicles were set ablaze,
saidtheBritish-basedSyrianObservatory
for Human Rights.
Threeother vehicleswereburnedinan-
other clash near the southern village of
Busraal-Harir, thegroupsaid. Similar bat-
tles tookplaceinseveral other parts of the
south, said the Observatory and another
activist group called the Local Coordina-
tion Committees.
The Observatory said two people were
killed in the clash with defectors in Kfar
Takharim. Two other people who went
missing days ago were tortured to death
in the central province of Homs, and one
person was shot at a checkpoint in the
southern province of Daraa, the group
said.
AP PHOTO
Men raise their shoes as a sign of disrespect during a protest Sunday demanding the release of Syrian refugee Ahmed
al-Shureiqi in front of the Syrian Embassy in Amman, Jordan. The embassy says a dozen of its nationals living in Jordan
have beat up consulate employees, wounding at least two diplomats and several others, including a Syrian security guard.
An embassy statement says its guards have arrested one of the attackers, identified as Syrian refugee Ahmed al-Shureiqi.
Syrian troops battle defectors
An act of violent protest against
President Bashar Assad’s regime
spills across the border into Jordan.
By BASSEMMROUE
Associated Press
LONDON — Deep cracks are emerg-
ing in Britain’s coalition government,
with one of its top officials lashing out at
Prime Minister David Cameron on Sun-
dayfor decidingtoblockEuropeanUnion
treaty changes designed to save the euro.
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg
called the decision “bad for Britain” and
saidhe is “bitterly disappointed” over the
outcomeof last week’s EUsummit during
which Britain was the only nation to re-
ject a tighter fiscal alliance in the bloc
aimed at ending Europe’s worst financial
crisis in generations.
Last year, Clegg’s Liberal Democrats
party joined with Cameron’s larger Con-
servative PartyinBritain’s first governing
coalition since World War II after an in-
conclusive national election.
The coalitionhas an84-seat majority in
the 650-seat House of Commons. One of
its biggest ideological differences in-
volves EU rules and regulations and the
degree to which they affect government
decisions and London’s standing as Eu-
rope’s top financial market.
The Conservatives have long con-
tained many “euro-skeptics,” while the
Lib Dems are the most pro-EUof any ma-
jor Britishparty, includingthe opposition
Labour Party.
Clegg warned “there is a danger that
theU.K. will beisolatedandmarginalized
within the European Union,” adding that
Britain is “retreating further to the mar-
gins of Europe.”
He said he will now do everything he
can “to ensure this setback does not be-
come a permanent divide” in Britain’s
coalition government.
After the EUsummit inBrussels, Clegg
publicly backedCameron’s decisionto re-
ject the proposed new European treaty
because it didn’t contain adequate safe-
guards for Britain and wasn’t in the coun-
try’s interests.
But during an interviewwith BBCtele-
vision on Sunday Clegg said that when
Cameron told him of his decision during
a 4 a.m. phone call on Friday, “I said this
was bad for Britain. I made it clear that it
was untenable for me to welcome it.”
Cameron will comment on the summit
in the House of Commons today.
Clegg calls EU treaty plan ‘bad for Britain’
Deputy Prime Minister is
disappointed over the outcome of
last week’s summit to save euro.
By CASSANDRA VINOGRAD
Associated Press
AP FILE PHOTO
Britain’s Prime
Minister David
Cameron, left,
and Deputy
Prime Minister
Nick Clegg
cross paths
inside the
handball arena
at the 2012
London Olym-
pic Park in
London, in May.
Clegg has crit-
icized Cam-
eron’s move to
block European
Union treaty
changes and
leaving Britain
isolated in
Europe.
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
By ARTHUR MAX
and KARL RITTER
Associated Press
Scientists say
that if levels
of greenhouse
gases contin-
ue to rise,
eventually the
world’s cli-
mate will
reach a tip-
ping point,
with irrevers-
ible melting of
some ice
sheets and a
several-foot
rise in sea
levels.
C M Y K
PAGE 6A MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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DUBAI, United Arab Emirates
— About 18 months before the
Egyptian uprising that would
doomHosni Mubarak, a U.S. dip-
lomatic cable was sent from Cai-
ro. It described Mubarak as the
likely president-for-life and said
his regime’s ability to intimidate
critics and rig elections was as
solid as ever.
Aroundthesametime, another
dispatchtothe State Department
came from the American Embas-
sy in Tunisia. In a precise fore-
shadowingof therevolts tocome,
it said the country’s longtime
leader, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali,
had “lost touch” and faced esca-
lating anger from the streets, ac-
cording to once-classified me-
mos posted by Wikileaks.
So what was it? Was America
blindsided or bunkered down for
the Arab Spring?
The case is often made that
Washington was caught flatfoot-
ed and nowmust adapt to dimin-
ished influence in a Middle East
with new priorities. But there is
an alternative narrative: that the
epic events of 2011 are an oppor-
tunity to enhance Washington’s
role in a region hungry for de-
mocracy and innovation, and to
form new strategic alliances.
There is no doubt that Wash-
ington was jolted by the downfall
of its Egyptian and Tunisian al-
lies. The revolutions blew apart
the regimes’ ossified relation-
ships with the U.S. and cleared
the way for long-suppressed Isla-
mist groups that eye the West
with suspicion.
But declaring a twilight for
America in the Mideast ignores a
big caveat: The Persian Gulf.
There are deep U.S. connections
among the small but economical-
ly powerful and diplomatically
adept monarchies, emirates and
sheikdoms, which so far have rid-
den out the upheavals and are in-
creasingly flexing their political
clout around the Arab world.
The Gulf Arabs and America
are, in many ways, foreign policy
soul mates. Bothshare grave mis-
givings about Iran’s expanding
military ambitions and its nucle-
ar program. The Gulf hosts cru-
cial U.S. military bases —includ-
ing the Navy’s 5th Fleet head-
quarters in Bahrain — and is an
essential part of the Pentagon’s
strategic blueprint for the Mid-
east after this year’s U.S. with-
drawal from Iraq.
In summary: America’s influ-
ence took blows from the Arab
Spring, but also remains hitched
to the rising stars in the Gulf.
“America has lost the predict-
ability of friends like Mubarak,”
said Sami Alfaraj, director of the
Kuwait Center for Strategic Stud-
ies. “But, at the same time, its al-
lies intheGulf areontherise. SoI
would call it a shuffle for Amer-
ica. Maybe a step back in some
places, but not in others.”
Led by hyper-wealthy Saudi
Arabia and Qatar, the Gulf rulers
have stepped up their games in
various ways as the region’s polit-
ical center of gravity drifts in
their direction.
NATO’s airstrikes in Libya got
important Arab credibility from
warplane contributions by Qatar
and the United Arab Emirates.
The Gulf’s six-nation political
bloc also has triedto negotiate an
exit for Yemen’s protest-battered
president, Ali Abdullah Saleh,
and has taken the lead in Arab
pressures on Syria’s Bashar As-
sad, one of Iran’s most crucial
partners.
Yet the Gulf rulers’ desire for
change stops at their own bor-
ders. In March, they authorized a
Saudi-led military force to help
their neighbor, Bahrain, defend
its 200-year-old unelected Sunni
dynasty against pro-reform pro-
tests by the island’s Shiite major-
ity.
And here lies one of the para-
doxes for U.S. statecraft in the
Middle East: to align with rulers
who are firmly vested in the sta-
tus quo, but not be cast as the
spoilers of the Arab uprisings.
“No one is immune from the
waves of change,” said Nicholas
Burns, a former No. 3 official at
the State Department. “There’s
certainly an effort to advise the
Gulf Arabs to continue to get on
the side of reform.”
Burns believes the Arab Spring
has taught U.S. diplomats valua-
ble lessons in patience and per-
spective.
“We are witnessing something
that is transformative and whose
full impact will play out over
years, maybe decades, ahead,”
said Burns, a professor of diplo-
macy and international politics
at Harvard’s Kennedy School of
Government. “Here is one of
those times when the U.S. has to
not overact and overreact.”
But when events move fast,
that may not be the easiest advice
to follow. Mubarak was a loyal
guardian of Egypt’s groundbreak-
ing 1979 peace treaty with Israel,
and there is no certainty that
whoever succeeds him will do
likewise. Meanwhile, the Palesti-
nians have overridden U.S. objec-
tions andaskedthe U.N. for state-
hood.
“Our ability to influence is lim-
ited today more than at any time
in the last 35 years,” said Graeme
Bannerman, a former State De-
partment analyst on Mideast af-
fairs, at a conference in Novem-
ber co-sponsored by the United
States Institute of Peace.
That assessment may have
some traction in places such as in
Tunisia or Egypt, where the U.S.
is widely viewed as tainted by its
long alliance with Mubarak.
But ask about America’s pull in
other Mideast points — the free-
spending Gulf, the new proto-
state in Libya, even slow-healing
Iraq and its Iran-friendly govern-
ment — and the conversation is
different. It is more measured
about how the U.S. fits into the
new Mideast. There is more talk
about the arc of history rather
than the latest sound bite.
“It’s too early to tell whether
U.S. influence has diminished or
indeed any change will happen
because the Arab Spring is still in
process,” said Nawaf Tell, former
director of the University of Jor-
dan Strategic Studies Center.
Tell sees the Arab Spring as the
death rattle of the Arab revolu-
tions and coups defined by the
all-powerful state and embodied
by winner-take-all leaders:
Egypt’s Gamal Abdel-Nasser
(1954), Libya’s Moammar Gadha-
fi (1969), the1970 putsch in Syria
that brought Hafez Assad to pow-
er in Syria and now a dynasty-in-
peril under his son, Bashar, and
so on.
“These regimes have exhaust-
ed their revolutionary credibility
and have seen their legitimacy go
bankrupt,” Tell said. And as with
any big unraveling, there are new
rules in the aftermath.”
This may mean a less privi-
leged position for U.S. interests
and more legwork for Washing-
ton’s envoys, said Morris Reid,
managing director of the Wash-
ington-based BGR Group, which
works often in liaison roles be-
tween Mideast officials and U.S.
companies.
Arab uprisings create political jolt for U.S.
AP FILE PHOTO
A protestor holds a dagger and chants slogans during a demonstration on Dec. 6 demanding the prosecution of President Ali Abdullah
Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen. The deep U.S. connections in the Persian Gulf have so far ridden out the upheavals.
Question remains whether
state department was caught
blindslided by foreign actions.
By BRIAN MURPHY
Associated Press
C M Y K
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more expected at next week’s re-
tirement board meeting.
Hummer said most inquiries
came from employees who are
exploring their options in light
of the Jan. 2 switch to home rule
government and the potential
for budget-related staff cuts in
2012.
Holleran said a lot of his co-
workers think he is leaving be-
cause he is unhappy with the
switch to home rule.
“No, just the opposite,” he
said. “I wish them the best be-
cause whatever they do is going
to fall on our shoulders, the
shoulders of taxpayers,” Holler-
an said.
Staffing cuts concern him, he
said. The proposed 2012 budget
proposes $229,933 in cuts to the
building and grounds depart-
ment next year.
“I have a feeling there are go-
ing to be a lot of hard times. I
hope somebody can figure out a
way to soften the blow,” he said.
County officials have period-
ically turned to special early-re-
tirement incentives to reduce
the work force, but that probably
won’t be an option until 2013.
The state pension law allows
the employee pension fund to
pay for an early-retirement in-
centive only every five years, and
the last incentive was in 2008,
when 127 employees retired.
These employees received 30
percent increases in their ser-
vice time, boosting their pen-
sions.
The county borrowed $11.52
million to fund its own incentive
in 2005, offering workers a flat
$20,000 and $1,000 for each full
year of service. A total 145 work-
ers took advantage of the offer.
It’s unlikely the new home
rule County Council will explore
this option because most of
council-elect members cam-
paigned on plans to reduce debt
and oppose new borrowing.
RETIREES
Continued from Page 1A
struggling economy, we know
that a lot of people in our com-
munity are hurting,” said attor-
ney Joe Quinn, a principal in the
law firm. “Hopefully, the free
movie at the Kirby will bring a
smile to some of their faces and
bring some holiday cheer to our
friends and neighbors.”
This year’s movie, “The
Search for Santa Paws,” is a
heartwarming tale about the
power of giving and the true
meaning of Christmas.
For more information, con-
tact Hourigan, Kluger and
Quinn at (570) 287-3000 or visit
our web site at www. HKQLAW-
.com.
MOVIE
Continued from Page 3A
views by telephone or videocon-
ference. Five declined inter-
views, and the group inter-
viewed the remaining 10 on
Wednesday and Thursday night
in the commissioners’ meeting
room at the county courthouse.
Committee members agreed
to keep the names of applicants
confidential, though the final-
ists may be publicly inter-
viewed.
The committee members
were instructed to rank the 10
by today, and consultant Ken
Mohr will compile the results.
Transition member Chris-
topher Kersey, a charter drafter,
said the committee has some
“good options.” He believes sev-
eral of the 10 would “make ex-
cellent county managers.”
“There were some candidates
who looked good on paper but
sounded just as good and maybe
even better once we were able
to talk to them and they were
able to explain their back-
grounds and experience and
hopes and goals for Luzerne
County,” Kersey said.
Councilman-elect Rick Wil-
liams said the committee mem-
bers came to the interviews pre-
pared.
“The transition committee is
working hard and very well to-
gether,” he said. “I’m impressed
at the seriousness and clarity in
which members asked ques-
tions of the candidates.”
The applicants also re-
searched Luzerne County and
details about the new home rule
government, said Councilman-
elect Edward Brominski.
“They did research on us,”
Brominski said. “Whoever we
select is going to bring innova-
tive ideas and plans into Lu-
zerne County and is going to be
a person interested in the coun-
ty.”
Councilwoman-elect Elaine
Maddon Curry said all 10 are
“top-notch.”
“Some of them viewed this as
an interesting challenge, an op-
portunity for them to do some-
thing in a government with a
new beginning,” she said.
Committee member Jim Hag-
gerty, a charter drafter, said one
applicant referred to the coun-
ty’s switch to a new government
as the “World Series for profes-
sional managers.”
“A professional challenge is
not something that comes along
all the time,” Haggerty said.
Councilman-elect Jim Bobeck
said the committee will discuss
the next step of the selection
process at the Wednesday meet-
ing, which begins at 6:30 p.m. in
the courthouse.
“I think most of us left with
the same impression, that there
are some very strong and good
candidates,” Bobeck said.
Background and references
checks must also be completed,
and face-to-face interviews will
also help the committee further
judge candidates, said Council-
man-elect Tim McGinley.
“We’re going to have to select
a person who will have a very
enormous charge to basically
run the day-to-day operations of
the county, with its 1,700 em-
ployees and over $121 million
budget,” McGinley said.
Councilman-elect Eugene
Kelleher said he is confident the
council will choose the right ap-
plicant, and he is eager to see
how his rankings compare to
those of other committee mem-
bers.
“I feel really good about the
people conducting the inter-
views and the people we inter-
viewed,” he said.
CANDIDATES
Continued from Page 3A
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
County Councilmen-elect Harry Haas, left, introduces himself to
home rule transition consultant Ken Moore at the start of the
first transition committee meeting after the Nov. 8 election.
nized infantry from 1968 to 1971.
“This is a time to just get together
in fellowship and let each other
know we care.”
“We do get together for Memo-
rial Day,” saidPost ViceCommand-
er Matt Kearns, who served in the
Army National Guard for nine
years, including a year in Kuwait
during Operation Iraqi Freedom,
“but this is a way for everybody to
get together and see everyone and
have some fun for the holidays.”
The vets all agreed there is an-
other special reason to get togeth-
er, too: tohonor thewidows of post
members.
“We look forward to getting to-
gether with the widows,” said
Membership Chairman Frank Per-
finski, a past post commander and
a Navy veteran who served in
World War II and Korea. “It’s im-
portant for us to support each oth-
er andthewidows. Their husbands
wereour members andour friends.
We can’t forget them.”
MaryMatani cametotheparties
with her husband, Mario, until he
died in 2003.
“I think of him,” she said of her
husband, who served in the Navy
in World War II and Korea. “It
makesmefeel goodthat I’minclud-
edandtoget toseeall hisfriends. It
makes me remember all the good
times.”
Matani had a new good time to
remember when event Chairman
Brian Semanski came around to
hertablewithasmall bagfull of col-
ored dice and said the person who
drew the green die would win the
poinsettia centerpiece. Matani was
the lucky winner at her table.
“I never win anything! This is
great,” she said.
Semanski, a former Air Force
master sergeant who spent four
years in active service in Vietnam
and the Gulf War and 22 years in
the reserves, said sharing holiday
joyiswhat thepartyisall about. He
said he and fellow organizers are
happy Agolino’s Restaurant reco-
vered fromthe September flood in
time for the party.
“We love having the party here.
Joe (Agolino) andhis great staff do
all the work for us every year,” he
said. “It’s agreat for all of us tohave
such a nice time in a great estab-
lishment for the holidays.”
VETERANS
Continued from Page 3A
“We look forward to get-
ting together with the
widows. It’s important
for us to support each
other and the widows.
Their husbands were our
members and our
friends. We can’t forget
them.”
Frank Perfinski
Membership Chairman
K
PAGE 8A MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
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O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
G enetti’s
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
John Anthony Wolfe
12/12/50 - 12/1/10
Love, Your Kelly Ann
xo xo
Happy Birthday
in Heaven, Daddy
Became An Angel
4 Years Ago
JOHN RICHARD
BLANNARD
4/15/87 ~ 12/12/07
To You, O Lord,
We Humbly Entrust Tis Young Man,
So Precious In Your Sight.
Take Him Into Your Arms
And Welcome Him Into Paradise,
Where Tere Will Be No Sorrow,
No Weeping Nor Pain,
But Te Fullness Of Peace And Joy
With Your Son And Te Holy Spirit
Forever And Ever. Amen
Sadly Missed And Forever Loved!
Mom, Dad, Brothers Lee, Adam,
Corey, Family And Friends
ADAMS – Raymond, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 11:30 a.m. Tuesday in
the Church of St. Patrick, White
Haven. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today and 10:30 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday in the Joseph Lehman
Funeral Home, Berwick Street,
White Haven.
ANDERSON – June, funeral 10:30
a.m. today in the Harold C. Snow-
don Funeral Home Inc., 140 N.
Main St., Shavertown.
BURCICKI – Michael, funeral 9 a.m.
Tuesday in the Simon S. Russin
Funeral Home, 136 Maffett St.,
Plains Township. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Ss.Pe-
ter & Paul Catholic Church,
Plains. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today.
DAVID – William, friends may call 6
to 8 p.m. today in the McCune
Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain
Blvd., Mountain Top.
DURKIN – Thomas, funeral with a
Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
Tuesday in Queen of the Apostles
Church, 715 Hawthorne St., Avo-
ca. Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m.
and 6 to 9 p.m. today in Kiesinger
Funeral Services Inc., 255 McAl-
pine St., Duryea. There will be no
procession from the funeral
home to the church, family and
friends are asked to go directly to
the church.
GREEN – Edna, funeral 9:30 a.m.
today in the McCune Funeral
Home, 80, S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in the St. Mary’s
Church, Dorrance.
HADDLE – J. William, funeral noon
Tuesday in The Richard H. Disque
Funeral Home Inc., 2940 Memo-
rial Highway, Dallas. Friends may
call 10:30 a.m. until time of ser-
vice.
HARRISON – Kim, funeral 7 p.m.
today in the Green Street Baptist
Chapel, 25 Green St., Edwards-
ville. Friends may call 6 p.m. until
service time in the Green Street
Chapel.
JOHNSON – Warren, memorial
service 1 p.m. Dec. 31, in the Holy
Trinity Lutheran Church, 813
Wyoming Ave., Kingston.
KINNEY – Evan, interment 11 a.m.
today in Sacred Heart Cemetery,
Dorchester Drive, Dallas. Every-
one is asked to go directly to the
cemetery.
KOPCZA – Edgar, Mass of Christian
Burial 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in
the Holy Mother of Sorrows
Polish National Catholic Church
of Dupont. Friends may call 9 a.m.
until the time of service in the
church.
LISPI – Rachael, funeral 9 a.m.
today in the Graziano Funeral
Home Inc., Pittston Township.
Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30
a.m. at St. Joseph Morello Parish
at St. Rocco’s R.C. Church.
MEEHAN – Joseph Sr., funeral 9:30
a.m. today in the Corcoran Funer-
al Home, Inc., 20 S. Main St.,
Plains Township. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Bene-
dict’s Parish, St. Dominic’s
Church, Parsons section of
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
8:30 to 9:30 a.m.
MODESKI – Stanley, funeral 9 a.m.
today in Sacred Heart of Jesus
Rectory, Duryea. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Immac-
ulate Conception Church, West
Pittston.
POWELL – Edward, funeral 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the Hugh B. Hughes &
Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044
Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
STEADELE – Roberta funeral noon
Tuesday in Maple Hill Cemetery,
Hanover Township. Friends are
asked to go directly to Maple Hill
Cemetery Chapel on Tuesday.
Friends may call 6 to 8 p.m. today
in the George A. Strish Inc. Funer-
al Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley.
ZIM– J. Eugene, funeral 9:30 a.m.
today in the Wroblewski Funeral
Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity
Church, Swoyersville.
FUNERALS
Carol Lee Owens,
68, of Mehoopa-
ny, passed away
at The Regional
Hospital of Scran-
ton on Wednes-
day, December 7.
She was the
daughter of the
late Osi and Lydia Schoeler Mont-
gomery.
Carol was a graduate of Laurel
High School, Montana, and she was
of the Episcopal faith.
She was employed by Wyoming
County as the information specialist
at the Wyoming County Conserva-
tion District. Carol enjoyed helping
people.
Carol was precededindeathbyher
brother, Keith Montgomery.
She is survived by her husband,
William C. Owens, of Mehoopany;
sons, Michael James Owens of St. Pe-
tersburg, Fla., and Kevin Patrick
Owens of Austin, Texas and several
nieces and nephews.
Amemorial service will be held at
the Harding-Litwin Funeral Home,
123 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock, on
Saturday, December 17, at 2 p.m.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the donor’s favorite charity.
Carol Lee Owens
December 7, 2011
Stanley J. Morris, 65, of Wilson
Street, Larks-
ville, passed
away on Satur-
day at the
Wilkes-Barre
General Hospi-
tal.
He was born
inKingston, on
Oct. 31, 1946. He was the son of
Mary Krysiuk Morris & the late
David Morris.
He was a graduate of Larksville
High School.
He was the proprietor of the
Morris Brothers Construction,
Larksville.
He was an associate member of
the Larksville American Legion
Post 655.
His hobbies include being an
avid softball player, bowler and en-
joying shooting darts, being in-
volved in many leagues through-
out our area.
He lovedspendingtime withhis
family, but most especially being
therefor his grandchildren, attend-
ing their various sporting and so-
cial events.
He was preceded in death by his
brother Anthony Morris.
Surviving are his mother, Mary
Morris, Edwardsville; daughters,
Christina Salus and her husband,
Dave, Shavertown; Lisa Bruns, Ed-
wardsville, four grandchildren, Er-
ic, Jessica, Sarah and Nathan; sis-
ters, Lorraine Sleboda, Mountain
Top; Melanie Morris, Edwards-
ville, brothers DavidMorris, Audu-
bon; Bernard Morris, Larksville;
Robert Morris, Dallas; Thomas
Morris, Dallas; numerous nieces
and nephews and great-nieces and
great-nephews.
Funeral services will be held
on Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from the
Andrew Strish Funeral Home, 11
Wilson St., Larksville. A Mass of
Christian Burial is at 10 a.m. in St.
John the Baptist Church, Larks-
ville. Interment will follow in St.
John’s Cemetery, Dallas.
Family and friends may call to-
day from 6 to 8 p.m. and on Tues-
day from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to the Luzerne County
SPCA.
Stanley J. Morris
December 10, 2011
E
dward S. Powell, 81, of Idetown
Road, Dallas, died on Friday at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born in Wanamie, he was the son
of the late Stephen and Lucy Paw-
lowski. He graduatedfromNewport
High School, class of 1947.
He served in the U.S. Army dur-
ing the Korean Conflict.
Edward had resided on Idetown
Road in Dallas for the past 56 years.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed as a salesman for White-
man Tower Paper Co. Earlier, he
was employed by Zoeller Paper
Company.
Mr. Powell was a 50-year member
of Idetown United Methodist
Church. He was past president of
the Lehman Fire Company.
He was active with the IremTem-
ple for 50 years, serving as Poten-
tate in 1983.
Hewas Captainof theArabEmer-
itus Patrol for many years.
Edward was a member of George
M. Dallas Lodge No. 531F&AMand
Caldwell Consistory, Bloomsburg.
Preceding him in death was his
sister Bernadeen Hagenbach.
Surviving are his beloved wife of
61 years, the former Dorothy Ogin;
sister Barbara Haydock, Alden;
brother-in-law Robert Hagenbach,
and many nieces and nephews.
Funeral will be held on Tues-
dayat1:30p.m. fromthe Hugh
B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral
Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort, with the Rev. Robert Ryder,
pastor of the Lehman-Idetown Unit-
ed Methodist Church, officiating.
Interment will be in Chapel Lawn
Memorial Park, Dallas. Friends may
call today from 5 to 8 p.m. at the fu-
neral home. A Masonic Service will
be conducted at 6 p.m.
Memorial contributions, if desir-
ed, can be made to P.A.P. Fund at
the Oncology Office, 387 Pierce St.,
Kingston, or to the Lehman Ide-
town United Methodist Church,
Box 12, Lehman, PA18627.
Edward S. Powell
December 9, 2011
STEPHEN M. KUTZ, 53, of
MountainTop, passedaway Friday
evening, December 9, 2011, at Jef-
ferson Hospital, Philadelphia.
Arrangements are pending
from the Desiderio Funeral Home
Inc., 436S. MountainBlvd., Moun-
tain Top.
R
ichard J. Maslowski, 58, of
Nanticoke died Saturday, De-
cember 10, 2011 at his home.
Born January 20, 1953 in Anna-
polis, Md., he was a son of Julie Pe-
ters Maslowski, Nanticoke, and
the late John J. Maslowski Jr.
He had been employed at Price
Chopper, Wilkes-Barre, in the pro-
duce department and later in the
bakery, prior to retiring.
He was a member of Holy Trans-
figuration of Our Lord Ukrainian
Catholic Church, Nanticoke.
Surviving, in addition to his
mother, are his grandmother, Alice
Maslowski, Wilkes-Barre; a sister,
Mary Waclawski, Nanticoke, and
brothers, JohnJ. Maslowski III and
his wife, Sonia, Dallas, and David
Maslowski and his wife, Jennifer,
Duryea; nieces, nephews and cou-
sins.
Funeral services will begin
Wednesday at 10:15 a.m. from Da-
vis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E.
Broad St., Nanticoke, followed by
Divine Liturgy in Holy Transfig-
uration Church, 240 Center St.,
Hanover section of Nanticoke.
Interment will beinSt. Nicholas
Cemetery, Sheatown.
Visitation will be Tuesday from
5 to 7 p.m. at the funeral home
with Panachyda at 6 p.m.
Richard J.
Maslowski
December 10, 2011
E
stelle H. Andrews, 86, of Pitt-
ston, passedawayThursday, De-
cember 8, 2011in Wilkes-Barre Gen-
eral Hospital.
She was born in Berwick, daugh-
ter of the late EdwardandHelenRu-
pinski Jeconis. She was a graduate
of Larksville High School, and at-
tendedclasses at PennState Univer-
sity Extension. She was employed
for over 20 years in the real estate
field, working as an agent for Jane
Kopp Realty and other local firms.
She was a member of St. Ignatius
Church, Kingston. Estelle enjoyed
playing bridge and shuffleboard, as
well as gardening. She especially
loved traveling and just being with
friends.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Franklin (Frank) An-
drews, brother Edward Jeconis, and
sister Florence Sparwelis.
She is survived by her daughter,
Estelle B. Andrews, and her hus-
band, Fred Dietz, Walnut Creek,
Calif.; sisters Frances Zambito,
Courtdale, and Gloria Hill, Over-
land Park, Kansas, and brother Wal-
ter Jeconis, Larksville; as well as
nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated Wednesday at 10 a.m.
inSt. Ignatius Church, Kingston. In-
terment will be in the parish ceme-
tery, Pringle, immediately follow-
ing the Mass.
Friends may call Wednesday
from 9 a.m. until time of service at
the church.
There will alsobe a memorial ser-
vice held on Thursday at 2 p.m. fol-
lowed by a celebration of Estelle’s
life for her Wesley Village friends in
the activities roomof the Partridge-
Tippett Skilled Nursing Center at
Wesley Village, Jenkins Township.
Estelle H. Andrews
December 8, 2011
N
ancy S. Edwards, 85, formerly of
Wilkes-Barre, died on Wednes-
day, December 7, 2011, at her resi-
dence at The Village at Greenbriar,
Dallas.
She was born January 5, 1926, in
Kingston, to the late Guy A. and Le-
ola Snyder Smith. She graduated
from Wyoming Seminary and at-
tended Hood College, Frederick,
Md. She then graduated from Drex-
el University, Philadelphia.
Nancy was an instructor for the
Practical Nursing program at the
Wilkes-Barre Vo-Tech. She was a
member of Church of Christ Unit-
ing, Kingston. She also was a mem-
ber of the Luzerne County Histori-
cal Society.
Preceding her in death were her
husband, Homer E. Edwards, 1988;
brother Theodore S. Smith; sister
Janet Conklin.
Surviving are son T.H. Edwards
and his wife, Donna, Camp Hill, Pa.;
daughter Debra Evans and her hus-
band Harris, Kingston Township;
grandchildren, Karen Rhinehart
and her husband, Charles, Camp
Hill, Pa.; Thomas Edwards, New
Cumberland; great-grandchildren,
Emma and Robby Rhinehart as well
as nieces and nephews.
Private funeral service will be
held at the Hugh B. Hughes & Son
Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort, withher pastor, the
Rev. Dr. Carol AnnFleming, officiat-
ing. The interment will be in Oak
Lawn Cemetery, Hanover Town-
ship.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions, if desired, can be made
to the American Red Cross, 256 N.
Sherman St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702, or to the charity of the do-
nor’s choice.
Nancy S. Edwards
December 7, 2011
G
ertrude Mackiewicz, age 93, of
Plymouth passed away peace-
fully on Friday, December 9, 2011,
just twoweeks beforeher 94thbirth-
day.
Born December 24, 1917, in
Larksville, she was the daughter of
the late Andrew and Stella Gieda.
She spent all of her life in the area
and was a 1936 graduate of Larks-
ville High School.
Gertrudewas a member of theAll
Saints Parish of Plymouth. Prior to
her retirement, she had been em-
ployed by the American Tobacco
Company, Regina Garment Inc. and
the LBJ Garment Company. Her
memberships included the ILGWU,
the Democratic Association and the
4th Ward Women’s Association of
Larksville, the Ladies Auxiliary of
the Larksville Hose Company and
the PTA of St. Mary’s Parocial
School in Plymouth.
She loved to bake, cook and cro-
chet. Inthe fall, canningwas a must.
Gertrude enjoyedlife andher family
and she was always ready to lend a
helping hand.
She was married to Chester
Mackiewicz of Larksville on April
29, 1939. They spent 29 wonderful
years together until Chester passed
away in 1968.
She was preceded in death, in ad-
dition to her parents and her hus-
band, by her sisters, Clara Javick
and her husband, Nicholas; Lottie
Suppon and her husband, Mike;
Stella Medura and her husband,
Stanley; a brother, Raymond Gieda;
brothers-in-law, Clem, Zig, Frank
and Ray, and sisters-in law, Thelma
and Florence; a grandson, Mark Sit-
kowski, and a daughter-in-law, Car-
ol Mackiewicz.
Survivingare her lovingchildren,
a daughter, Arlene Sitkowski, and
her husband, Paul, of South Caroli-
na, and a son, Gary R. Mackiewicz,
with whom she resided in Ply-
mouth. She is also survived by
grandchildren, Robert P. Sitkowski
and his wife, Tonya; David Mack-
iewicz and his wife, Mara; Dr. Ste-
phanie Mackiewicz and her fiancé,
Michael Richers, and Amy Fair-
weather and her husband, Shawn,
and great grandchildren, Nikkole
and Nathan Sitkowski, David Jr., Al-
lison and Robert Mackiewicz.
Gertrude will be sadly missed by
all.
The funeral will be held Tuesday
at 9:30 a.m. fromthe S. J. Grontkow-
ski Funeral Home, 530 West Main
Street, Plymouth, followed by a
Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in All Saints Parish, Plymouth. In-
terment will be in St. Mary’s Nativ-
ity Cemetery, Plymouth Township.
Friends may call today from 5 to 9
p.m.
In lieu of flowers, contributions,
if desired, may be made to the Guid-
ingEye, the Associationof the Blind
or the Alzheimer’s Association.
Please visit www.sjgrontkowski-
funeralhome.com to offer online
condolences to Gertrude’s family.
Gertrude Mackiewicz
December 9, 2011
Leonard
Bernard Wash-
ik, 90, of Hun-
tersville, for-
merly of Nanti-
coke, and Gil-
bert, Pa., died
Sunday, De-
cember 11,
2011 at Lake Norman Regional
Medical Center.
He was born in Nanticoke on
September 9, 1921, to the late Mar-
tin and Victoria Washik. Leonard
served during World War II as a
merchant seaman. He retired from
Flemming Foods, where he
worked for 15 years.
He is survived by his son, Barry
Washik, and wife Heather of Hun-
tersville; 11 grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be
held at Holy Trinity Church in
Nanticoke at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may
be made to EWTN (Catholic Televi-
sionNetwork), 5817 OldLeeds Road,
Irondale, AL 35210.
Samuel S. James, Funeral Service
Lic. of Huntersville is serving the
family. www.samuelsjamesfsl.com.
Leonard Bernard Washik
December 11, 2011
Ronald J. Gal-
lagher, 61, of Old
Forge, died unex-
pectedly Satur-
day morning at
CMC Hospital.
Born in Taylor,
he was the son of
the late Martin
and Katherine DeCapua Gallagher
Sabuto.
He attended Old Forge High
School and prior to retirement he the
owner of R.G. Masonry.
He was a member and Past Presi-
dent of the Old Forge Lions Club, the
Old Forge VFW Post 4954, the West
Side Social Club, Avoca; Acacia
Lodge No. 579 F &AM, Taylor, and a
25 year member of the Plasterer’s
Union.
While being involved with the Li-
ons Club, he was a very active volun-
teer for many local eye banks.
He was preceded in death by his
former wife, Mary Ann Welc Gallagh-
er.
Surviving are sons, Ronald and
wife Michelle Gallagher, Scranton;
Robert and wife Theresa Gallagher,
and Mark and wife Tanya Gallagher
of Old Forge; a brother, Eugene, Old
Forge, and a sister, Kathleen, wife of
Joseph Vancosky, Moosic. Also sur-
viving are 14 grandchildren, Doroth-
ea, Rebecca, Megan, Matthew, Ni-
cholas, Dana, Danielle, Carrie, Mi-
chael, Mark, Brooke, Leslie, Ryan
and Marissa, and a great-grand-
daughter, Madison, two step-broth-
ers, John Sabuto and wife Mary Ann
and Robert Sabuto of Old Forge, and
a step-sister, Margaret, wife of Mi-
chael Wilcinsky, Pittston; aunts, niec-
es, nephews and cousins.
The funeral will be Wednesday at
9:30 a.m. from the Stefanelli Funeral
Home Inc., 721 South Main Street,
Taylor, with Mass at 10 a.m. in St.
Ann’s Basilica Parish, 1233 St. Ann
Street, Scranton.
Interment will be in Old Forge
Cemetery.
Friends may call on Tuesday from
5 to 9 p.m. at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contri-
butions may be made in Ron’s memo-
ry to the Old Forge Lions Club, c/o
Rory Giovannucci, 530 Fallon Street,
Old Forge, PA18518.
To leave a condolence or sign an
online guest book, please visit
www.stefanellifuneralhome.com.
Ronald J.
Gallagher
December 10, 2011
R
aymondD. Silveri Jr., 79, passed
away Saturday, December 10,
2011 in Golden Living Center, East
Mountain Boulevard, Wilkes Barre.
He was born in Pittston, August 26,
1932, son of the late Raymond Sr.
and Hilda Wilson Silveri.
He graduated fromPittston High
School Class of 1951. Ray was an Ar-
my veteran of the Korean War.
He was a member of the Minor
Congregational United Church of
Christ, Wyoming Lodge 468 F.&
A.M., Caldwell Consistory of Scran-
ton and Irem Temple, Dallas.
He was a former employee of Ri-
dolfi Brothers, Pittston, and prior to
his retirement he was employed by
Craft Oil, Avoca. Ray enjoyed work-
ing on cars, hunting and fishing.
Preceded in death by his wife,
Catherine Silveri, in 2008; brother
Albert Silveri.
He is survived by sons, Raymond
Silveri, Wyoming, andhis girlfriend,
Barbra Wasko, and her son, Ryan;
Fred Silveri and his wife, Cathy,
Plains; daughter, Elizabeth Silveri,
Moosic; grandchildren, William Si-
monson and Cassy Silveri; sister,
Lorraine Hastie, West Pittston.
The funeral will be held Wednes-
day at 11 a.m. at the Howell-Lussi
Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming Ave-
nue, West Pittston. The Rev. Wayne
Shontz will officiate. Friends may
call at the funeral home Tuesday
from5 until 8 p.m. Wyoming Lodge
468 will conduct masonic services
at 7 p.m. at the funeral home. Inter-
ment will be in Pittston Cemetery.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be sent to Shriners’ Chil-
dren’s Hospital, 2900 Rocky Point
Road, Tampa, FL 33607.
Raymond D. Silveri Jr.
December 10, 2011
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 9A
➛ N E W S
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waters featured in this year’s Giv-
ing Guide. These organizations
rely on grants and donations and
face reduced funds and possible
cuts in services due to the trying
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couraged to learn about the orga-
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consider remembering the orga-
nization or organizations of their
choice with a donation during
this holiday season.
Next month, director Anne
Bramblett Barr expects, the li-
brary will go home – back to the
renovated and revamped Exeter
Avenue location that was inun-
dated with floodwaters in Sep-
tember.
Since October, the library has
been the grateful recipient of
rent-free space in the Insalaco
Shopping Center on Wyoming
Avenue, in the former Blockbus-
ter Video store. It’s been a terrific
location, Bramblett Barr said, be-
cause it’s visible to people who
previously hadn’t thought about
joining.
“We’ve hadabout 50 newmem-
bers each month,” she said.
Still, she’ll be glad to return to
Exeter Avenue, where “lots of
kids were able to walk or ride
bikes to get there but they’re not
allowed (to cross busy Wyoming
Avenue by themselves) to come
here.”
Proof of how important the li-
brary is to the community, volun-
teers cleaned the damaged build-
ing and moved about 11,500
saved books to dry storage space
donated by Cliff and Ruth Mel-
berger.
Allied Services donated 20
computers and a printer. Millers-
ville University and Bucks Coun-
ty Public Library gave book-
shelves andcomputer tables. The
Wyoming Area Key Club raised
$10,000 for the library.
“Local businesses, East Moun-
tain Inn, Boscov’s, Genetti’s,
Wyoming Valley West School
District – they all gave us things,”
Bramblett Barr said.
But toget backuptospeed, the
library still needs to replace such
equipment as a projector, projec-
tor screen and CD player and to
renovate a donated copier. It also
needs funds to pay license fees
for children’s educational soft-
ware and software for the public-
access computers.
This week’s library activities
include story time at 1 p.m. Fri-
day, which includes a craft for
adults and children; and an out-
door caroling session for all ages
that begins at 5:45 p.m. Sunday.
After the library “goes home”
toExeter Avenue, Bramblett Barr
predicted, it will host a busier
schedule classes and programs.
And, as it has beenfor decades,
it will be a place to borrow a
book, as an avid reader said as
she checked out a copy of “The
Help.”
“The book is always better
than the movie,” said the 61-year-
old West Pittston resident, who
gave her name as Marilyn.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
The West Pittston Library doesn’t need donations of books at this point, but can use money to re-
place equipment that was damaged in the floodwaters of September.
• Renovation of donated used
copier: $1,000
• Projector: $500
• Projector screen: $250
• Software licenses for children’s
educational software: $300
• Software licenses for public
access computers: $400
• CD Player: $50
W E S T P I T T S T O N
L I B R A R Y W I S H L I S T
LIBRARY
Continued from Page 1A
The West Pittston Library is one of
five agencies and nonprofit orga-
nizations affected by the flooding
in September that will be featured
in this year’s Giving Guide.
Donations can be sent to:
The West Pittston Library, 300
Exeter Ave., West Pittston, PA
18643, or to the Luzerne Founda-
tion, 140 Main St., Luzerne, PA
18709, which has set up a fund for
the library. When donations are
made, please note “TL Giving
Guide” in your letter or on the
memo line of the check.
T H E T I M E S L E A D E R
2 01 1 G I V I N G G U I D E
BUCKFIELD, Maine — The
Maine guys known for creating
colorful geysers from Diet Coke
and Mentos candies say they’ve
set adistancerecordfor avehicle
with soda-and-candy-powered
propulsion.
Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz
created a single-seat rocket car
powered by 54 bottles of Coke
Zero and 324 Mentos. They said
the Mark II traveled239 feet, im-
proving upon last year’s 220 feet
with only half the fuel. They
posted video of a 209-foot at-
tempt online.
Voltz said Thursday the part-
ners incorporated a simple pis-
ton-and-cylinder mechanism to
get the vehicle moving. He said
it’s powerful enough that people
shouldn’t try the experiment at
home.
The Buckfield-based enter-
tainers shot to fame five years
ago when they wore lab coats
and goggles during their online
videos demonstrating elaborate
geysers set to music.
A little bit of fizz and sugar provides car fuel
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 10A MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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timesleader.com
WASHINGTON — Mitt Rom-
ney and Newt Gingrich’s trailing
rivals derided the leading presi-
dential contenders on Sunday as
insufficiently conservative, each
trying to find a second wind in
the race to become the Republi-
can nominee with time running
out before voting begins.
Rep. Michele Bachmann of
Minnesota combined the two
leaders into a “Newt Romney”
character. Rep. Ron Paul of Texas
said Gingrich and Romney
“come from the same mold.”
Texas Gov. Rick Perry said vot-
ers aren’t looking for a fact-spew-
ing “robot.”
All attempted to claw their
way back into the campaign that
has suddenly become a two-man
race.
“As I was studying the candi-
dates, especially Newt Gingrich
and Mitt Romney, it is very clear
that there’s not a dime’s worth of
difference between the two of
them, because both of themhave
advocated for the health care
mandate. In Newt Gingrich’s
case for 20 years.
And in Mitt Romney’s case he’s
the only governor in the United
States’ history to put into place
socialized medicine,” Bachmann
said.
Iowa’s lead-off caucuses are
coming quickly. The candidates
have spent months —if not years
— preparing for the nominating
process that starts Jan. 3.
Perry spent Sunday in Iowa
and planned to return Wednes-
day for a marathon bus tour
across the state.
Gingrich and Romney, mean-
while, planned competing events
on Monday in New Hampshire,
where Gingrich will end the day
debating former Utah Gov. Jon
Huntsman, Lincoln-Douglass
style.
Both front-runners planned to
return to Iowa later in the week.
Gingrich, Bachmann, Perry and
former Sen. Rick Santorum
planned to attend an event with
former Arkansas Gov. Mike
Huckabee on Wednesday, and all
planned to participate in the
campaign’s 13th debate on
Thursday.
Yet the topsy-turvy race re-
mains fluid, and the struggling
candidates are hoping to deflate
Romney and Gingrich by noting
similarities on issues that could
concern conservatives.
Romney and Gingrich at one
time backed requiring individu-
als to purchase health insurance,
although both decry the federal
provision in Democrats’ health
care law.
Both also supported the Wall
Street bailout, government subsi-
dies for ethanol and the science
suggesting humans play a role in
climate change — all toxic
among the party’s orthodox.
Romney, the former Massa-
chusetts governor making his
second bid for the presidency,
has amassed a considerable cam-
paign bank account and has built
a formidable political machine.
Gingrich, a former House speak-
er, has seen resurgence in polling
and fundraising after a near-melt-
down this summer.
In short time, he has worked to
build an organization but his
challenge remains matching the
public’s interest with the nuts
and bolts of a traditional cam-
paign.
The pair’s rivals, though, are
unwilling to concede that the
race is down to the two. An NBC
News/Marist poll released Sun-
day shows Gingrich surging to
more than 42 percent support to
Romney’s 23 percent in South
Carolina; in Florida the former
speaker is favored by 44 percent
of those polled, to Romney’s 29
percent. None of the rest of the
field breaks 10 percent in either
state.
With focused criticism, they’re
working to cast the pair as clones
and unacceptable to the party’s
conservative base, which has
huge sway in deciding the nomi-
nation.
Campaigning in Ames, Iowa,
Perry said Romney’s past sup-
port for health care mandates
should haunt him.
“He can deny it as many times
as he wants,” Perry told about
150 people in a coffee shop near
Iowa State University. “But that
is what he thinks.”
Earlier in the day, he said vot-
ers “are looking for somebody
who’s got values that are based
with a deep rudder in the water.”
“And I am consistent in my
conservative values. I have been
consistent. And Americans are
looking for someone who is go-
ing to make the right decisions,
not someone who can either read
a teleprompter perfectly or spit
out by memory a list of names.”
Perry’s comments hinted at his
ownstumbles. As he campaigned
last week, he confused Iraq and
Iran during a campaign stop in
South Carolina. He later said
there were eight members of the
nine-justice Supreme Court and
mangled Justice Sonia Soto-
mayor’s name during an inter-
viewwithThe Des Moines Regis-
ter.
Similarly, Paul has struggled
to find footing despite legions of
loyal supporters. The libertarian-
leaning favorite of a hardcore
slice of the electorate, Paul has
aggressively challenged Gin-
grich over “hypocrisy” in ads
running in Iowa. He also chal-
lenged Romney’s bone fides.
“I think they come from the
same mold. They’re about the
same,” Paul said. “They’re,
they’re both on the defensive.
They’re both explaining them-
selves. And I even said that last
night that why should we have a
nominee that’s going to spend
most of their time explaining
themselves and deciding what,
what position they were on and
when?.”
Santorum, too, sought to cast
the pair as unacceptable, saying
they differed on peripheral issues
during Saturday’s debate but not
on core conservative issues.
“Gingrich and Romney are in
the same place,” said Santorum,
who left Washington after losing
his 2006 Senate re-election bid in
Pennsylvania.
And former Utah Gov. Jon
Huntsman, who did not meet the
threshold to participate in Satur-
day evening’s debate in Iowa,
said Republicans should take an-
other look at everyone’s record.
“People are shopping. They
are listening very, very carefully,”
he said.
Yet there are roughly three
weeks until Iowa’s caucuses and
much can change in a race that
has been remarkably fluid. Con-
servatives have yet to rally be-
hind a single candidate and Gin-
grich’s record, as well as Rom-
ney’s, could provide the other
candidates a chance to climb
from behind.
Bachmann spoke on CBS’
“Face the Nation.” Perry ap-
peared on “Fox News Sunday.”
Paul spoke on NBC’s “Meet the
Press.” Santorumspoke toCNN’s
“State of the Union.” Huntsman
was interviewed on ABC’s “This
Week.”
Trailing GOP rivals doubt leaders’ records
AP PHOTO
Republican presidential candidates, from left, Rick Santorum, Rick Perry, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul and Michele Bach-
mann stand together before their debate Saturday in Des Moines, Iowa.
Other contenders are trying
to win the race with only
Iowa’s caucuses approaching.
By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 11A
➛ N E W S
F
O
O
T
B
A
LL CO
N
T
E
S
T
T
H
E
U
LTIM
A
T
E
P
O
W
E
R
P
O
I
N
T
S
W
I
N
$
1
,
0
0
0
W
E
E
K
L
Y
•••• POWER POINTS OFFICIAL RULES ••••
1. Object of the game is to amass as many of the 136 weekly
points as you can. Simply review the week’s schedule of games,
listed on entry form, and decide which game you are SUREST
of picking a winner in. Write in name of your projected winner
on the 16-point line, and so on down to the 1-point line, which
game you fgure to be a tossup. Next, fll in Tiebreaker 1, the total
points scored by both teams in the week’s designated game. If
this step fails to produce a winner, the judges apply Tiebreaker 2,
total offensive yardage from scrimmage in this game. If a winner
still doesn’t emerge, a drawing will be held among those contes-
tants still tied. Decisions of the judges are fnal. The weekly con-
testant from among all participating newspapers who tallies the
most of the 136 points will win $1000. Local prizes to be decided
by newspapers
2. Any entry form that does not contain a legible name, address,
etc., will be disqualifed.
3. Entries that fail to forecast a winner from each and every game
will be disqualifed, as will entries that fail to distinguish between
the Jets and Giants of New York and other similar-sounding team
names
4. No points are awarded on tie games or in case any game is not
played for any reason during its scheduled week.
5. Entering POWER POINTS constitutes permission by contes-
tant for his or her name and photograph to be used for news and
reasonable promotional purposes at no charge.
6. Employees of this newspaper and their immediate families are
ineligible to participate.
7. Any inquiry about or protest of weekly results must be made
by noon on the Friday following the announcement of winners.
8. No purchase necessary. Facsimile game entry forms will be
accepted. Enter contest by dropping entry form into POWER
POINTS container at participating co-sponsors.
9. Weekly deadline for entry will be 2 p.m. Thursdays except
when noted otherwise on weekly entry form
10. Neither this newspaper nor any co-sponsor will be respon-
sible for illegible entry forms or those lost, stolen or damaged in
any way or entries mis-directed or arriving postage due or for any
claim or injury by contestants made in connection to any activity
involved in entering contest. Entrants assume all liabilities.
11. Limit: one entry per person per week. Each entry must rep-
resent the original work of one entrant, “group” entries; “systems”
or other attempt to enter multiple entries will be disqualifed. Fill-
ing out extra forms and putting your friends’ and relatives’ names
on them violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior
to grading.
12. Contestants must have reached the age of eight (8) years by
the Sunday of any week’s play.
Please cut along dotted line
HOW TO PLAY
136 TOTAL POINTS
Week 15
Games of Dec. 15-18
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Name__________________________________________________
Address________________________________________________
City, State (zip)_________________________________________
Day Phone ( )__________________________________________
Night Phone ( )_________________________________________
Select a winner from each of the week’s
games, listed below. Select in descending
order of your CONFIDENCE in your
choices. Win points at left for each
correct selection toward possible total of
136 points. See complete rules below. You
must be at least 8 (eight) years old to enter.
To enter, clip along dotted line, then place
game entry in POWER POINTS container
at co-sponsors’ retail outlet(s). Entrants
must list name, address and phone number
below.
LIMIT:
You may enter only one coupon
per week.
DEADLINE: 2 P.M. THURSDAY
TIEBREAKER 1
Total points scored
(both teams) in
COLTS game.
TIEBREAKER 2
Total offensive yards
(both teams) in this
game
Jacksonville at Atlanta
Dallas at Tampa Bay
Miami at Buffalo
Washington at NY Giants
Tennessee at Indianapolis
Carolina at Houston
Green Bay at Kansas City
Cincinnati at St. Louis
THIS WEEK’S GAMES
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WASHINGTON—After a dre-
ary summer marred by the fight
over government borrowing,
rank-and-file Democrats say they
are growing more optimistic
about President Barack Obama’s
political prospects in 2012. They
cite his tougher, more populist
tone and what they view as a
chaotic primary fight among Re-
publicans.
Many Democrats acknowl-
edged that high unemployment
and economic uncertainty create
formidable obstacles for the in-
cumbent. But interviews with
more than a dozen Democratic
activists across the nation found
support for Obama’s more force-
ful message against GOP law-
makers and interest in rebutting
the presidential candidates.
Several pointed to Obama’s
speech last week in Kansas,
where he argued that the middle
class had been under duress for
the past decade and economic
policies must give everyone a
“fair shot and a fair share.”
“He didn’t have his voice and
we didn’t have our voice,” said
David Leland, an attorney in Co-
lumbus, Ohio, and former state
party chairman. “But now he has
successfully turned that particu-
lar corner and most people are
much more enthusiastic and
much more fired up about it.”
Added Illinois Sen. Dick Dur-
bin, the second-ranking Senate
Democrat: “What he said in Kan-
sas brought us back down to ba-
sics.” DurbintoldCNN’s “State of
the Union” on Sunday that “this
is a make-or-break moment for
the middle class in America.”
Entering 2012, Obama faces a
set of economic numbers that
have improved but that no in-
cumbent would relish: unem-
ployment of 8.6 percent in No-
vember, down from 9 percent in
October; consumer confidence of
56, well below the level where a
president typically gets re-elect-
ed; and an economy that has cre-
ated 100,000 or more jobs five
months in a row — the first time
that has happened since April
2006.
Politically, Obama’s approval
rating, as measured by Gallup,
has been in the low 40s during
the fall and hasn’t topped 50 per-
cent since last May. Polls typical-
ly show about three-quarters of
voters view the nation on the
wrong track. Republicans have
blamed Obama for high unem-
ployment and rising debt, con-
tending that his policies have
failed to lift America from reces-
sion.
“No amount of rhetoric or new
slogans is going to change this
president’s record,” said Republi-
can National Committee spokes-
man Sean Spicer. “On issue after
issue —fromjobcreationtoa $15
trillion debt, voters are ready to
change direction because of the
president’s failed promises and
policies.”
Nonetheless, a month before
thefirst voteintheGOPnominat-
ing race, many Democrats said
they were encouraged by the top-
sy-turvy contest. Former Massa-
chusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and
former House Speaker Newt Gin-
grich have been battling for the
lead while businessman Herman
Cain, who’s now dropped out,
and Texas Gov. Rick Perry stum-
bled after rising in polls.
“Obama has not been every-
thing I’ve wanted him to be but
he’s sure a heck of a lot better
than any of the Republicans who
have raised their hands,” said
Tom Bordeaux, a Democrat and
former Georgia legislator who
was recently elected to an alder-
man seat in Savannah, Ga.
MaryGail Gwaltney, amember
of the Democratic National Com-
mittee from Las Cruces, N.M.,
said she felt stronger about Oba-
ma now “because I’m looking at
the other party’s field and they
don’t have a strong candidate.”
Democrats, who have targeted
Romney through the airwaves,
indicated that they would give
Gingrich similar treatment, la-
beling the former Georgia con-
gressman the “original tea par-
tier” in a Web video released Sun-
day by the Democratic National
Committee that highlighted his
stances on Medicare, Social Se-
curity and taxes.
As Obama confronts the GOP
field, many Democratic stalwarts
said the president’s tone and
message will be pivotal.
Many activists said they were
unhappy with Obama’s attempt
to reach concessions with Repub-
licans last summer during sum-
mer negotiations over the gov-
ernment’s borrowing limit. But
they said they were reassured
when he proposed a jobs bill in
September and hit the road try-
ing to sell the package.
Democrats optimistic for Obama in 2012
AP FILE PHOTO
President Barack Obama talks about the economy Dec. 6 at Osawatomie High School in Osawato-
mie, Kansas. Democrats feel Obama has a more forceful message against the Republicans.
Activists cite president’s
tougher, more populist tone
as a positive approach.
By KEN THOMAS
Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 12A MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
“I am deeply saddened at the
potential loss of any of my
municipalities.”
State Rep. Tarah Toohil
The Republican from Butler Township recently
expressed her disappointment at a redistricting plan
that would split the 116th Legislative District in southern Luzerne County.
A map depicting the changes is expected to be released today.
A
UNG SAN SUU Kyi,
the iconic leader of
Myanmar’s pro-de-
mocracy movement,
shook hands with U.S. Secreta-
ry of State Hillary Clinton and
had a private dinner with her
on Dec. 2 in Yangon. This
would have been unimaginable
just half a year ago.
After meeting with the coun-
try’s new president, Thein
Sein, Clinton praised the steps
he has taken for political re-
form, including the release of
political prisoners anddialogue
with pro-democracy forces.
She said the United States will
consider upgrading diplomatic
relations with Myanmar.
However, Clinton stopped
short of explicitly referring to
the possibility of lifting Wash-
ington’s economic sanctions
against Myanmar, saying Sein’s
reforms had only just begun.
She also warned the regime
against military cooperation
with North Korea.
Clinton’s visit to Myanmar,
also called Burma, is the first
stepfor Presi-
dent Barack
Obama’s new
security
strategy,
which de-
fines the
Asia-Pacific
region as a
“top priority.” Having been un-
der autocratic military rule for
years, Myanmar is nowmaking
steady progress toward democ-
racy. This development can on-
lybe verybeneficial tothe Unit-
ed States and its allies.
In order for the Myanmar re-
gime to claim that democracy
has taken root solidly in the
country, it must release all po-
litical prisoners, reconcile itself
with ethnic minorities and
amend the Constitution, which
provides legal foundation for
the military’s rule.
We hope the nation’s new
government will pluck up the
courage to make such bold
moves.
The Asahi Shimbun, Tokyo
WORLD OPINION
Myanmar begins move
to democratic governance
Suu Kyi
T
HE MARKETS reac-
ted relatively calmly
early last week to the
threat by ratings agen-
cyStandardandPoor’s todown-
grade the entire eurozone, in-
cluding France and Germany.
In theory, this raises the pos-
sibility that these countries’
borrowing costs will rise. In
practice, the bond yield for Ita-
ly, for instance, remains signif-
icantly lower thanit was a week
ago. For France and Germany,
the warning reinforces the case
for their eurozone reforms tobe
passed.
The credibility of the ratings
agencies has never recovered
from their misjudgments prior
tothe credit crunch–but that is
not to say they are wrong now.
Many European states are run-
ning large deficits and even
Germany, whose own fiscal
governance is sound, is vulner-
able because of its exposure to
riskier investments.
But the whole point of the
deal struck by German Chan-
cellor Angela Merkel and
French President Nicolas Sar-
kozy is that it addresses the un-
derlying problems of individual
economies.
These eurozone reforms are
hard to reconcile with the prin-
ciple of national sovereignty, as
governments might well find
when they put them to their
electorates. But of themselves
the Franco-German proposals
would make for better econom-
ic management in Europe, and
it is in our interests that the eu-
rozone should be stable.
London Evening Standard
Reform the eurozone
T
HE PLEDGE BY 60
foreign ministers, in-
cluding Canada’s, to
support Afghanistan
politically and financially be-
yond the 2014 departure of in-
ternational troops is a welcome
one.
Afghanistanis nolonger front
andcenter ontheglobal stageof
troubled conflict zones, having
been overtaken by Syria, Libya
andother nations. However, the
war-torncountrystill desperate-
ly needs the worldtoremainen-
gaged, to safeguard the advanc-
es made over the last decade, to
defeat or secure a settlement
with the Taliban and assist in
the transfer of responsibility for
security to Afghan troops.
Without the West’s and Cana-
da’s continued commitment,
Afghanistan could again be-
come a source of terrorism and
instability.
Afghans cannot and should
not be abandoned.
The Globe and Mail, Toronto
Don’t desert Afghanistan
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and InterimCEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
Ticket Tom bids farewell
to Misericordia students
T
o all the Misericordia University stu-
dents whom I have had the pleasure of
knowing over more than 21 years: At
this time of retiring, the tickets are done,
the ink pen is put down. But the memories
will stay with me forever.
God bless and a very merry Christmas!
TomMatinas
Formerly “Ticket Tom”
Swoyersville
Toohil should challenge
legislative redistricting
T
here is a quote remaining on state Rep.
Tarah Toohil’s 2010 campaign website:
“The 116th Legislative District, that’s
my home and I love it and I know that
these people deserve better.”
Apparently, they deserved better for only
two years. Today, the Legislative Redis-
tricting Committee is expected to give
final approval to a plan that splits the 116th
Legislative District – the Greater Hazleton
Area – into two legislative districts. Major-
ity Leader Mike Turzai and other insiders
have wheeled and dealed since the prelimi-
nary plan was approved, and those deals
will restore many of Northeastern Penn-
sylvania’s legislative districts.
However, Mr. Turzai was expressly clear
with his negotiators: No changes would be
permitted to the 116th and the Greater
Hazleton Area will be split in two.
For years, southern Luzerne County has
been referred to as the Greater Hazleton
Area. The reason is plain and simple: unity
and commonality of purpose. Greater
Hazleton proudly supports its own cham-
ber of commerce, health alliance and eco-
nomic development agency. Despite the
organization and cooperative effort provid-
ed by local government officials and pri-
vate enterprise, Greater Hazleton always
has struggled to obtain its share of county,
state and federal funds.
How can these struggles be eased by
fracturing the region’s representation in
Harrisburg?
Ms. Toohil’s silence on the redistricting
plan has been deafening. If she truly
“loves” her home and wants to provide
“better” service to her constituents in the
116th, then she needs to confront her lead-
ership and tell them how damaging their
redistricting plan is to the Greater Hazle-
ton Area. She has the power to correct this
wrong.
Her correction of this wrong will, by
default, cure another ill of the Republican
redistricting plan. The 119th Legislative
District is my home and I love it; I ran for
office to serve its constituents. Like the
116th, the 119th has its own chamber, and
the cooperation displayed by the communi-
ties and local governments in the South
Valley has astounded me. They too need a
singular voice in Harrisburg.
On behalf of the great people of Luzerne
County’s South Valley and Greater Hazle-
ton Area, I implore Ms. Toohil to argue for
what is right and offer true representation
and leadership to our region.
State Rep. Gerald J. Mullery
Newport Township
Work together to attack
root causes of poverty
T
he extent to which poverty exists in the
greatest country in the world is aston-
ishing. This was pointed out recently in
an article in “Time” and on an edition of
“60 Minutes.” The magazine article sug-
gested that in 2010, 46.2 million Americans
lived below the poverty line, the most
since the Census Bureau began keeping
track in 1959.
The poverty rate is 15.1 percent, which
matches peaks after recessions in the early
1980s and ’90s but which otherwise has
not reached this level since 1965. It was
around 1965 that the federal anti-poverty
program was started as part of the Great
Society program.
Here are the myths that the article
points out:
• Poverty does not live in the suburbs.
• Poverty is simply about not having
enough income.
• Getting people out of poor neigh-
borhoods is the answer.
• Focusing on individuals is the key to
poverty alleviation.
• Poverty is inevitable.
Poverty affects all age groups. For exam-
ple, Social Security helped to cut the pov-
erty rate for older adults. Cash assistance
and food stamps are government programs
that assist in reducing poverty, but it is
known that many families and individuals
are having great problems despite the
existence of these programs today due to
cutbacks and other factors.
Throughout Luzerne County and much
of the Pocono-Northeast, the same condi-
tions prevail. We are fortunate to have a
social support system that can be, and is,
an amazing provider of help: the Commis-
sion on Economic Opportunity, Help Line,
many types of nonprofit agencies, county
human services and much more. The ques-
tion becomes this: Is it enough with the
region experiencing the highest unemploy-
ment rate in the entire commonwealth?
There are no easy solutions. If there
were, they would have been found a long
time ago. Perhaps the acronym RARE
should be utilized. It stands for this: Rec-
ognition of the problem, Actions to change
current conditions, Responses to the ac-
tions and Equality so that everyone facing
these problems can be served equally.
This nation and this region have faced
severe issues in the past. Instead of politi-
cal blame games, what we need are solu-
tions and consensus-building that histor-
ically have enabled comebacks to occur. It
is time for the coming together of the best
minds in America and those throughout
this wonderful region to attack the root
causes of poverty and correct the current
conditions that have adversely affected so
many families that find themselves in a
position they do not want to be.
Howard J. Grossman
Executive director
Jewish Family Service of Greater Wilkes-Barre
Mayor Kuren fails to do
what’s best for W-B Twp.
W
ilkes-Barre Township Mayor Carl
Kuren, wake up. You are doing a
disservice to all township residents
because of your lack of action on volunteer
fire chief John Yuknavich.
Where is the code of ethics, or conduct
policy, for employees? There should be a
suspension or termination.
The mayor should resign. He is making
a laughingstock of the township.
Township residents made a big mistake
by not electing John “Red” Bryan mayor.
Shame on all of you. Change was absolute-
ly necessary.
Joseph Naperkowski
Wilkes-Barre
Council campaigner
thanks her supporters
I
thank everyone who gave me support
throughout my campaign for Luzerne
County Council.
I am inspired by the dedicated men and
women working to support their families,
pay off bills and provide a memorable
holiday for the children in their lives. I
admire all individuals serving to protect
our nation and freedom.
Keeping a basic daily work ethic cannot
be forgotten. This spirited effort is recog-
nized now and will be for years ahead by
those who benefit from your labor.
One of the biggest compliments I re-
ceived during my campaign came from
members of the community who knew my
father, Edward Dobash. He worked as a tile
setter after he served four years in the U.S.
Navy during World War II.
One individual stated, “He was a hard
worker, and his only fault was being too
courteous.” I hope I can live up to my
father’s legacy and take pride in his modest
lifestyle.
Growing up in Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia gave me a rich heritage. Every task
completed makes a difference. Materialism
is not important. The greatest presents are
time, patience and understanding.
I extend to all my deepest respect,
thanks and wishes for a blessed holiday.
Kathy Dobash
Hazleton
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the
writer’s name, address and daytime
phone number for verification. Letters
should be no more than 250 words. We
reserve the right to edit and limit writers
to one published letter every 30 days.
• E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com
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SEND US YOUR OPINION
C M Y K
PAGE 14A MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Do you remember hearing sto-
ries – or telling them – about
how one area in your town was
Irish, another one Polish, and
wonder how much the makeup
of those locales has changed?
Or maybe you plan to move to
another town and want to find a
neighborhood with demograph-
ics similar to your own.
The U.S. Census Bureau last
week released a wealth of the
most up-to-date data on smaller
communities that could answer
your questions – everything
from the ancestry of people liv-
ing in your neighborhood to the
number of families there with
elementary school-aged chil-
dren.
The information comes from
the bureau’s 2010 American
Community Survey five-year es-
timates – surveys taken in more
than 9.6 million homes across
the United States between 2006
and 2010.
The American Community
Survey, or ACS, is an ongoing
survey that provides data every
year, giving communities cur-
rent information they can use to
plan investments and services.
Informationfromthesurveygen-
erates data that help determine
how more than $400 billion in
federal and state funds are dis-
tributed each year, according to
the Census Bureau.
To help communities, state
governments and federal pro-
grams, the bureau asks about
age, sex, race, family and rela-
tionships, income and benefits,
health insurance, education, vet-
erans status, disabilities, where
you work and howyou get there,
where you live and how much
you pay for some essentials.
All this detail is combined into
statistics that areusedtohelpde-
cide everything from school
lunch programs to new hospi-
tals.
“These estimates are ideal for
public officials to use to make
key decisions,” Census Bureau
Director Robert Groves said.
“School boards will find them
helpful in forecasting demand
for classroom space, teachers
and workforce training pro-
grams, andthey will be a tremen-
dous asset to planners in identi-
fying traffic concerns and build-
ing roads and transit systems to
ease commutes.”
Groves said local govern-
ments will also find them useful
in forecasting needs for services
such as police and fire protec-
tion.”
And this year marks the sec-
ond year that the bureau pooled
survey results from five consec-
utive years. That’s significant be-
cause by pooling several years of
survey responses, the ACS can
generate detailed statistical por-
traits of much smaller geogra-
phies with more accuracy.
Previously, when the bureau
relied on 12 months or 36
months of pooled survey data,
the information was only accu-
rate enough to provide a picture
of larger geographical areas –
those with populations greater
than 65,000 or greater than
20,000, respectively.
Now, for example, one can go
to the Census Bureau website,
search for information on the
Parsons section of Wilkes-Barre
and find that the neighborhood
of 2,360 residents is about one-
quarter Irish, one-quarter Pol-
ish, 16 percent German, 11 per-
cent Italian and a mix of other
ethnicities that comprise less
than 10 percent of the popula-
tion.
Survey puts key numbers into focus
Ethnicity, age, wealth and
more determined by
American Community Survey.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
Find data about your community
at www.census.gov.
O N T H E N E T
error is too great to consider
those survey results accurate.
The Times Leader reported
in October poverty was on the
rise in the county, based on
American Community Survey
2009 one-year estimates re-
leased at the time. But one-year
estimates only provide reliable
data for geographic locations
with populations of 65,000 or
more. Estimates based on five
years of data provide reliable da-
ta for much smaller popula-
tions.
In 2002, 12.9 percent of all
residents in Luzerne County
lived below the poverty level.
By 2009, that rose to 13 percent,
according to the one-year esti-
mates. The percentage of fam-
ilies living in poverty increased
from 9.1 to 9.5.
Edwardsville Mayor Bernard
Dubaskas attributes the 28 per-
cent figure to a large number of
residents living in the Hilltop
and Eagle Ridge low-income
housing developments.
Even with so many residents
living in poverty, the town
brings in enough taxes because
of the businesses located there
in the Narrows, Gateway and
Mark II shopping centers, he
said.
Dubaskas said the borough
has an income tax rate among
the lowest in the county and no
property tax increase is planned
for next year.
“We have a lot of good people
working here and trying to get
by. And the town has a lot to
offer,” he said, pointing to a
quality police department, plen-
tiful stores and restaurants and
a slowly developing Main
Street.
Rice Township Supervisor
Chairman George Venesky said
he was surprised to learn that
the township has the lowest
poverty rate in the county, but
he can understand how even
residents living below the pov-
erty level can afford to live
there.
Four upscale housing devel-
opments provide adequate prop-
erty taxes to enable the town-
ship to tax at relatively low
rates – an earned income tax of
0.5 percent and a property tax
of 0.026 mills, the third-lowest
in the county, Venesky said.
Many homes in the Ice Pond
North development are ap-
praised in the $500,000 to
$600,000 range, he said, adding
that “the services provided are
outstanding.”
Unfortunately, because of the
low poverty level, he doesn’t
think the township would qual-
ify for federal or state block
grants. But it’s not as if the
township is in dire need of im-
provements.
“We’re just in a very enviable
position compared to the rest of
the county. (Housing develop-
ment has) been a boon to us,
and we’re one of the few munici-
palities who will end the year
with a surplus,” he said.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
A home on Ice Harvest Drive in the Ice Lakes development in Rice Township is among the high-end properties found in the munici-
pality with the lowest percentage of families living at or below poverty level in the county.
LEVELS
Continued from Page 1A
PHILADELPHIA — Cardinal
John P. Foley, a jovial, popular
priest of theArchdioceseof Phila-
delphia who rose from working-
class roots to become a “prince of
the church” and the Vatican’s
longtime spokesman on Catholic
social teachings, diedSunday. He
was 76.
Foley was perhaps best known
to American audiences as host
for 25 years of
NBC’s annual
broadcast of
the pope’s
Christmas
Mass at St. Pe-
ter’s Basilica.
Once de-
scribed as “the
nicest guy in
the Vatican” by the National Ca-
tholic Reporter, Foley had leuke-
mia. He died at Villa St. Joseph,
the archdiocesan home for re-
tired priests in Darby, Pa., the
town where he was born.
Citing fatigue and declining
health, he returned to the arch-
diocese in February after four
years as Grand Master of the
Equestrian Order of the Holy Se-
pulchre of Jerusalem, a papal
knighthood based in Rome.
For the previous 23 years, he
had served as first president of
the Pontifical Council for Social
Communications, with particu-
lar responsibility for explaining
church teachings to electronic
news media.
When he stepped down from
the council in 2007, the year he
was made cardinal, he was the
longest-serving head of any ma-
jor office in the Vatican.
“I was pleased he was able to
come home during the final
months of his life,” Philadelphia
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput
said Sunday from Rome.
Cardinal
Foley is
dead at
age 76
Priest of the Archdiocese of
Philadelphia hosted NBC’s
Christmas Mass.
By DAVID O’REILLY
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Foley
Vick returns
as Birds fly by Fish
ter, and later sent Miami quarterback
Matt Moore to the sideline witha head
injury.
The underachieving Eagles (5-8)
won for only the second time in the
past sixgames andstill needasweepof
the final three games to have any
chance of repeatingas NFCEast cham-
MIAMI — Early in the game, Mi-
chael Vick’s helmet went rolling into
his end zone, an apt symbol for the di-
rection of the Philadelphia Eagles’ sea-
son.
Time to concede? Not quite. Not
against theself-destructiveMiami Dol-
phins.
Vick made a triumphant return from
aninjurybythrowingfor 208yards and
a touchdown, and the Eagles totaled
nine sacks and beat the Miami Dol-
phins 26-10 Sunday.
Philadelphiatookadvantageof three
takeaways to score 24 points during a
nine-minute span in the second quar-
pions.
“We’ve been through a lot, a lot of
games we were supposed to win and
didn’t finish,” Vick said. “I’mproud we
won today.”
The Dolphins (4-9) had a three-
game home winning streak snapped
and sank deeper into last place in the
AFCEast.
“We’vebeenonaroll,” receiver Bran-
don Marshall said. “It stinks that our
momentumwas stopped.”
JasonBabinledtheEagles’ passrush
with three sacks to increase his season
total to 15, and he forced a fumble.
Moore’s replacement, J.P. Losman,
was sackedby PhillipHunt for a safety.
Vick, backafter missingthree games
with broken ribs, won for only the
fourth time in his past 12 starts. He
went 15 for 30, including a 34-yard
touchdown pass to DeSean Jackson,
and shook off four sacks.
“I’mina lot of pain, but I just wanted
to finish and get through the game,”
Vick said. “I got hit a lot, and it kind of
wore me down. I tried to hang in
there.”
Vick, whohadsaidhe wouldrunless
in the wake of the injury, carried only
twice but didscramble several times to
extend plays. LeSean McCoy rushed
for only38yards, but scoredtwotouch-
downs to hike his season total to17.
Eagles quarterback
Michael Vick pas-
ses during the first
half of an NFL game
against the Miami
Dolphins in Miami.
Vick finished with
208 yards passing.
QB, defense carry Eagles past Dolpins
AP PHOTO
Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean McCoy (25) celebrates a touchdown with teammate Danny Watkins during the first half of an NFL game against
the Miami Dolphins in Miami.
Victory keeps Philadelphia’s slim playoff hopes alive
26
EAGLES
10
DOLPHINS
By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer
See EAGLES, Page 2B
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011
timesleader.com
There are two huge rebuilding jobs this sea-
soninWyomingValleyConferenceboys basket-
ball.
The one is no surprise – Berwick, where the
school district found a new
coach from West Virginia to
revive a program that is 5-64
over the past three seasons.
Jason Kingery is also the
Dawgs’ fourth different head
coach in as many seasons.
He’s the fifth if football coach
Gary Campbell’s brief time
theretofinishout the2009-10
seasonis counted.
The other is a huge sur-
prise – Holy Redeemer. Yes,
the Royals – the conference’s
premier program – has lost
their entire starting lineup,
including6-foot-11PennState
center Peter Alexis and all-
star selections Austin Carr
andSteve Ruch.
WhetherRedeemerisrebuildingorreloading
will be determined over the next fewweeks be-
fore the WVCseasonstarts Jan. 3.
“We’re young,” Redeemer coachMarkBelen-
ski said. “We graduated seven seniors who
H . S . B OY S B A S K E T B A L L
DON CAREY\THE TIMES LEADER
Valley West’s James McCann will be on of
the top players in the WVC this season.
Rebuilding
on tap for
2 squads
PREVIEW: Usually powerful Redeemer
lost plenty to graduation, while Berwick
looks to get on winning track.
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
“We’ll be
compet-
itive. I just
hope every
night we
show up,
play our
best and
give it our
all.”
Mark Belenski
Redeemer coach
See PREVIEW, Page 4B
INSIDE: Team capsules, schedule, Page 5B
MILWAUKEE — Ryan Braun certainly
doesn’t fit the image fans conjure up when
they hear that a baseball slugger has been ac-
cusedof usingperformance-enhancingdrugs.
Since he joined the Mil-
waukee Brewers in 2007,
Braun has belted big home
runs not with cartoonishly
large muscles, but with a
sweet swing and an ultra-
quick bat. Last season, he
helped drive the Brewers to
the playoffs and was voted
theNL’s Most ValuablePlay-
er.
NowBraunfindshimself fightinga50-game
suspension after news leaked that he has test-
ed positive for a banned substance. He stead-
fastly maintains his innocence.
Aspokesman for Braun said in a statement
issuedtoESPNandTheAssociatedPress that
there are “highly unusual circumstances sur-
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Braun doesn’t
fit stereotype
of steroid user
By CHRIS JENKINS
AP Sports Writer
Braun
See BRAUN, Page 2B
New Orleans.22
Tennessee.......17
Indianapolis ...10
Baltimore......24
Kansas City ...10
N.Y. Jets ........37
Minnesota .....28
Detroit ...........34
Houston.........20
Cincinnati .......19
Tampa Bay .....14
Jacksonville ..41
Atlanta ............31
Carolina .........23
Philadelphia..26
Miami ...............10
Chicago ...........10
Denver .............13
Buffalo.............10
San Diego......37
Oakland...........16
Green Bay.....46
N.Y. Giants ....37
Dallas.............34
Today’s Game
St. Louis
at Seattle
8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
New England34
Washington...27
San Francisco19
Arizona ...........21
NATI ONAL FOOTBAL L L EAGUE: WEEK 1 4
ARLINGTON, Texas — Eli Man-
ning ended New York’s four-game los-
ing streak in style, leading the Giants
to two touchdowns in the final 3:14 to
beat the Dallas Cowboys 37-34 Sunday
night in a showdown for first place in
the NFC East.
Dallas appearedto tie the game with
a 47-yardfieldgoal as time expired, but
New York called a timeout. Given an-
other chance to force overtime, rookie
DanBailey’s kickwas blockedbyJason
Pierre-Paul — who also had a sack for
a safety and forced a fumble.
Ironically, Bailey missed a game
winning kick under similar circum-
stances last weekat Arizona. Baileyap-
peared to kick a game-winning field
goal that was disallowedbecause Cow-
boys coach Jason Garrett had called a
timeout. On the following play, Bailey
missed the field goal.
The Giants (7-6) and Cowboys are
tied atop the division, but this victory
gives New York the inside track. The
teams will meet again in the season fi-
nale, on NewYear’s Day, at the Giants’
home field.
Dallas lost its second straight.
The Giants had trailed 34-22 with a
little over three minutes left in the
game.
AP PHOTO
New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning gestures during the first half of
an NFL game against the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday in Arlington, Texas.
Manning led the Giants to a 37-34 victory.
Giants rally from 12 down
to take a crucial victory
37
GIANTS
34
COWBOYS
By JAIME ARON
AP Pro Football Writer
K
PAGE 2B MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
LEAGUES
Back Mountain Youth Soccer will
host an indoor soccer league
beginning Jan. 13th through March
for ages U6 to high school age at
the Penn State Lehman Campus
gym. Games will be played on
weekends. All area intramural and
travel teams are welcome. Individ-
ual players seeking a team can
sign up online as well. Divisions will
be set to ensure fair competition.
More information and sign up
sheets are available online at
www.bmysa.org. Registration
closes Dec. 31st.
MEETINGS
Hanover Area Boys Soccer will be
holding a booster meeting Monday,
Dec. 12th at 7 p.m. at the Hanover
Area Jr/Sr high school cafeteria.
Nominations of officers will be
accepted as well as plans for the
upcoming 2012 season. All parents
of soccer players in grades 8
though 11 are encouraged to attend.
Kingston Forty Fort Little League
will be meeting Monday, Dec. 12th
at 7 p.m. at the Kingston Rec
Center. All interested members are
encouraged to attend.
Moosic Raiders Jr. Football will be
accepting uniform and equipment
returns on Monday, Dec. 12th from
6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the football
field. Trophies may also be picked
up. For more information, please
visit www.moosicraiders.com.
The Lady Patriot Girls Basketball
Booster Club will be holding their
monthly meeting in the lobby of
the high School at 7 p.m. on Mon-
day, Dec. 12th. Events for the
upcoming season will be discussed.
Also, the booster club will be
selling $1 raffle tickets and is com-
piling a basketball program to be
sold at home games. Please see
any booster club member or girls
basketball player to complete a
form. All parents of the players are
encouraged to attend these meet-
ings.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Moosic Mets Baseball 17U Showcase
Team is now accepting online
registrations for their upcoming
winter tryout for the 2012 summer/
fall season. Varsity level players
graduating in years 2015 to 2013
are eligible. For more information
and to register, visit www.moosic-
mets.net.
UPCOMING EVENTS
The 16th annual Tip-Off Basketball
Tournament Finals, sponsored by
the Lady Spartans of Wyoming
Valley West and the Rotary Club of
Plymouth, will take place at the
WVW gym on Tuesday, Dec. 13th.
Junior varsity will play at 4:30
p.m., the varsity consolation game
at 6 p.m. and the varsity cham-
pionship game at 7:30 p.m.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
NFL
Favorite Points Underdog
SEAHAWKS 10 Rams
Thursday
FALCONS 11 Jaguars
Saturday
Cowboys NL BUCS
Sunday
GIANTS NL Redskins
Packers 14 CHIEFS
Saints NL VIKINGS
BEARS NL Seahawks
BILLS NL Dolphins
TEXANS 6.5 Panthers
Titans 6.5 COLTS
Bengals NL RAMS
RAIDERS 1 Lions
Patriots 5.5 BRONCOS
EAGLES 1.5 Jets
CARDS 7 Browns
Ravens 2 CHARGERS
Monday
49ERS NL Steelers
College Football
Favorite Points Underdog
Saturday
Temple 7 Wyoming
Utah St 3 Ohio U
San Diego St 5.5 UL-Lafayette
December 20
Fla Int’l 4.5 Marshall
December 21
Tcu 11.5 La Tech
December 22
Boise St 13 Arizona St
December 24
So Miss 6.5 Nevada
December 26
Missouri 3.5 N Carolina
December 27
Purdue 2 W Michigan
NC State 1 Louisville
December 28
Toledo 3 Air Force
Texas 4 California
December 29
Florida St 3 Notre Dame
Baylor 9 Washington
December 30
Byu 2.5 Tulsa
Rutgers 2 Iowa St
Miss St 6.5 Wake Forest
Oklahoma 15.5 Iowa
December 31
Texas A&M 9.5 Northwestern
Ga Tech 3 Utah
Illinois 3 Ucla
Vanderbilt 2.5 Cincinnati
Auburn 1 Virginia
January 2
Houston 6 Penn St
Georgia 2.5 Michigan St
S Carolina 1 Nebraska
Florida 2 Ohio St
Oregon 6 Wisconsin
Oklahoma St 3.5 Stanford
January 3
Michigan 1.5 Va Tech
January 4
Clemson 3.5 W Virginia
January 6
Arkansas 7 Kansas St
January 7
Pittsburgh 5.5 Smu
January 8
Arkansas St 1 No Illinois
January 9
Lsu PK Alabama
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
LIGHTNING -$120/even Devils
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
NO LINE REPORT: On the NFL board, there is no line on the Vikings - Saints
game due to Minnesota RB Adrian Peterson (questionable); there is no line on the
Dolphins - Bills game due to Miami QB Matt Moore (questionable); there is no line
on the Steelers - 49ers game due to Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger (question-
able).
Miami Pro Bowl tackle Jake
Long left the game in the first
quarter withabackinjury, andaf-
ter that the Dolphins hadtrouble
blocking Philadelphia. The Ea-
gles’ short-yardage defense stuff-
ed Miami on four possessions,
twice on fourth down and twice
to force kicks.
“The Eagles have been incon-
sistent like we have,” Marshall
said. “But that’s a teamwith a lot
of talent. At any moment they
can be an undefeated team, or
look like one.”
The Dolphins went 3 for 18 on
third- and fourth-down conver-
sions. The nine sacks of their
QBs equaled a franchise record
set in1999, andtheoffensiveline-
men took responsibility for the
loss.
“All the blame is squarely on
our shoulders,” guard Richie In-
cognito said. “We got Matt hurt.
They’re a physical group. They
just beat us one on one.”
Moore threw only his second
interception in the past six
games, lost a fumble and was
sacked four times. He left the
game midway through the sec-
ond half after being hit from be-
hind as he threw an incomplete
pass.
Miami’s lone touchdown was
set up by an early blocked punt.
Marshall washeldtofourcatches
for 27 yards.
“There comes a time when we
as players andcoaches havetodo
a better job of getting guys in-
volved that need to be involved,”
Marshall said. “It just didn’t
seemlike we had anything on of-
fense in the second half that
could attack what they were
throwing at us.”
TheDolphins’ offensiveinepti-
tude negated a lot of good work
by their defense. McCoy, who
cameintothegamesecondinthe
NFL in rushing, averaged only
1.4yardson27carries. JasonTay-
lor sacked Vick twice in first
eight minutes to increase his ca-
reer total to 138
1
⁄2, which ranks
sixth all time.
Miami’s Jimmy Wilson
blocked a punt to set up the
game’s first score, which came
when Moore hit Brandon Mar-
shall on third down for a 16-yard
score.
AgamblebytheDolphins then
backfired when they tried a 55-
yard field goal that fell short.
Vick took advantage of the field
position to drive his team 54
yards for a tying touchdown,
which McCoy scored on a 2-yard
run.
Turnovers by Miami on con-
secutive possessions led to 10
points for the Eagles.
Kurt Coleman intercepted
Moore’s pass when he threw
deepintotriplecoverage, andhis
return to the 1 set up a touch-
down run by McCoy.
On the next series, Asante Sa-
muel forced a fumble by Davone
Bess and recovered, and the Ea-
gles kicked a field goal. After
Moore lost a fumble when
sacked by Babin, the Eagles then
moved73yards injust four plays,
and Vick’s strike to a wide-open
Jackson made it 24-7.
“We played like men today,”
Babinsaid. “Dowehaveachance
for the playoffs? Maybe. We were
kind of out of it, but guys in this
locker room decided, ‘We’re go-
ingtoplayandhavefunandshow
you guys we love the game.’ I
think that really rang true the
whole day.”
EAGLES
Continued from Page 1B
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
(7:15 p.m.)
Abington Heights at Wyoming Valley West
Lake-Lehman at Dallas
Meyers at Coughlin
Weatherly at MMI Prep
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Northampton at Holy Redeemer, 6:15 p.m.
Berwick at East Stroudsburg South, 7 p.m.
Coughlin at Meyers 7:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Scranton Prep, 7:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Scranton, 7:15 p.m.
North Schuylkill at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at GAR, 7:15 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Holy Cross at Hanover Area, 4:30 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Central Penn at Luzerne CCC, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Central Penn at Luzerne CCC, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY, DEC. 13
BOYS BASKETBALL
(7:15 p.m.)
Holy Redeemer at Nanticoke
Meyers vs. Holy Cross, at Marywood University
Pittston Area at Hanover Area
Scranton Prep at GAR
Williamsport at Crestwood
Wyoming Seminary at Tunkhannock
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Salem Christian at MMI Prep, 6 p.m.
Hanover Area at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Dallas, Meyers at Wyoming Valley West Tip-Off
Tournament, TBA
HS BOWLING
Milton at Berwick, 3 p.m.
Columbia Montour Vo Tech at Hazleton Area, 3
p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Delaware Valley at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Scranton at Hazleton Area, 4:30 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Berwick, 4:30 p.m.
Abington Heights at Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
Lake Lehman at Valley View, 4:30 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Elk Lake, 4:30 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Scranton Prep, 7 p.m.
HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.)
Lake Lehman at Lackawanna Trail
Wyoming Area at Scranton Prep
Delaware Valley at Hazleton Area
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 14
BOYS BASKETBALL
(7:15 p.m. unless noted)
Hazleton Area at Whitehall
MMI Prep at Panther Valley, 7:30 p.m.
Northwest at Hughesville
Wyoming Area at Lake-Lehman
Wyoming Valley West at Shamokin
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Holy Cross at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Abington Heights, 7:15 p.m.
Lake Lehman at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m.
Meyers at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m.
Pittston Area at GAR, 7:15 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Dunmore at Wyoming Area, 4 p.m.
Nanticoke at Pittston Area, 4 p.m.
Coughlin at Meyers, 4:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.)
Scranton at Berwick
Honesdale at Coughlin
Columbia Montour CTC at Nanticoke
Western Wayne at Tunkhannock
West Scranton at Crestwood
Abington Heights at Pittston Area
Wallenpaupack at Wyoming Valley West
Meyers at Blue Ridge
Dallas at Elk Lake
THURSDAY, DEC. 15
BOYS BASKETBALL
(7:15 p.m. unless noted)
Abington Heights at Tunkhannock
Hanover Area at Coughlin
Holy Cross at Holy Redeemer
Meyers at Crestwood
Midd-West at Berwick
Pittston Area at Carbondale, 7:30 p.m.
Williamsport at GAR
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Coughlin at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at Millville, 7:15 p.m.
Scranton Prep at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Lackawanna Trail, 7:15 p.m.
Williamsport at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
HS RIFLE
Southern Lehigh vs. Berwick, 4 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Scranton Prep at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Wyoming Valley West, 4 p.m.
West Scranton at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Coughlin at Lake Lehman, 4:30 p.m.
Dallas at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m.
Hanover Area at Elk Lake, 4:30 p.m.
Berwick at Scranton, 4:30 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Abington Heights, 4:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Hanover Area at Valley View
FRIDAY, DEC. 16
BOYS BASKETBALL
(7:15 p.m. unless noted)
Benton at Northwest
Hughesville at Tunkhannock
Nanticoke at Riverside
Wyoming Area at Wyoming Seminary
Lackawanna Trail Invitational
Lake-Lehman vs. Laekland, 6:30 p.m.
Lackawanna Trail vs. Mid Valley, 8 p.m.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Lake Lehman at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Danville, 7:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Crestwood at Blue Mountain Tournament
Hazleton Area, Pittston Area at King of the Moun-
tain Tournament
Dallas at Jarvis Wildcat Memorial Tournament
HS SWIMMING
East Stroudsburg at Delaware Valley, 4 p.m.
Lake Lehman at West Scranton, 4:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, DEC. 17
BOYS BASKETBALL
Coughlin at Wyoming Seminary, 2:15 p.m.
Dallas at Carbondale, 2:30 p.m.
GAR at Crestwood
Hanover Area at Panther Valley
Hazleton Area at Quakertown
Holy Redeemer at Abington Heights
Nanticoke at Berwick
Pittston Area at Holy Cross
Tunkhannock at Elk Lake, 3:30 p.m.
Lackawanna Trail Invitational
6:30 p.m. consolation; 8 p.m. championship
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Berwick at Lake-Lehman, 2 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Dunmore, 2:15 p.m.
MMI Prep at Col-Mont Vo-Tech, 2:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin, 2:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Berwick at Exeter Duals, 9 a.m.
Coughlin at Phoenixville Tournament
Wyoming Seminary at Beast of the East
Hanover Area at Towanda Duals
Hazleton Area, Pittston Area at King of the Moun-
tain Tournament
Wyoming Area at Valley View, 7 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Wyoming Valley West, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Jarvis Wildcat Memorial Tournament
SUNDAY, DEC. 18
HS WRESTLING
Wyoming Seminary at Beast of the East
COLLEGE MEN'S BASKETBALL
Lebanon Valley at Misericordia, 2 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN — St. Louis at Seattle
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS — New Jersey at Tampa Bay
SOCCER
2:50 p.m.
ESPN2 — Premier League, Manchester City at
Chelsea
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CHARLOTTEBOBCATS—SignedGKembaWalk-
er.
GOLDENSTATEWARRIORS—Waived GCharlie
Bell. Rescinded their qualifying offer to F Reggie
Williams.
NEW YORK KNICKS—Signed G Mike Bibby, G
ImanShumpert andCJoshHarrellson. Re-signedF
Jared Jeffries.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Announced C center
Spencer Hawes accepted the team’s qualifying of-
fer.
TORONTO RAPTORS—Signed C Aaron Gray.
WASHINGTONWIZARDS—Re-signed CHamady
Ndiaye.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CAROLINA HURRICANES—Recalled F Drayson
Bowman from Charlotte (AHL). Placed G Brian
Boucher on injured reserve.
American Hockey League
AHL—Suspended Hamilton RW Brian Willsie one
game because of a spearing incident in a Dec. 9
game against Toronto.
PROVIDENCEBRUINS—Signed DJordon South-
orn.
ECHL
ECHL—Suspended Bakersfield’s Hans Benson
one game as a result of his actions in Dec. 10 game
at Stockton.
READINGROYALS—Signed FChase Watson and
F Todd Griffith.
COLLEGE
AUBURN—Suspended TB Mike Dyer indefinitely
for violating undisclosed team rules.
CINCINNATI—Suspended F Yancy Gates, C
Cheikh Mbodj and F Octavius Ellis six games
apiece and G Ge’Lawn Guyn one game, for their
part during a brawl with Xavier on Dec. 10.
XAVIER—Suspended G-F Dez Wells and G Lan-
den Amos for four games each, G Mark Lyons two
games and G Tu Holloway one game, for their part
during a brawl with Cincinnati on Dec. 10.
N H L
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Philadelphia................. 28 18 7 3 39 101 81
N.Y. Rangers ............... 27 17 6 4 38 83 60
Pittsburgh..................... 30 17 9 4 38 94 75
New Jersey .................. 28 14 13 1 29 71 80
N.Y. Islanders .............. 27 9 12 6 24 62 88
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston........................... 28 18 9 1 37 94 59
Toronto.......................... 29 15 11 3 33 91 94
Buffalo........................... 29 15 12 2 32 79 79
Montreal ........................ 30 12 11 7 31 74 77
Ottawa........................... 30 13 13 4 30 91 105
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida ........................... 30 16 9 5 37 82 77
Washington .................. 28 15 12 1 31 88 89
Winnipeg....................... 29 13 12 4 30 82 92
Tampa Bay.................... 29 12 15 2 26 75 96
Carolina......................... 31 9 18 4 22 79 108
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago ......................... 30 18 8 4 40 99 92
Detroit ............................ 28 18 9 1 37 89 62
St. Louis......................... 29 17 9 3 37 71 62
Nashville........................ 29 14 11 4 32 77 79
Columbus...................... 29 8 17 4 20 71 99
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota...................... 30 20 7 3 43 79 64
Vancouver ..................... 29 18 10 1 37 97 71
Edmonton...................... 30 14 13 3 31 83 80
Calgary .......................... 29 14 13 2 30 73 80
Colorado........................ 30 13 16 1 27 78 91
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas............................. 28 16 11 1 33 73 78
Phoenix.......................... 29 15 11 3 33 77 76
San Jose........................ 27 15 10 2 32 75 64
Los Angeles .................. 29 13 12 4 30 65 67
Anaheim........................ 29 8 16 5 21 67 95
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Saturday's Games
Montreal 2, New Jersey 1
N.Y. Rangers 4, Buffalo 1
Vancouver 4, Ottawa 1
Pittsburgh 6, N.Y. Islanders 3
Philadelphia 5, Tampa Bay 2
Detroit 7, Winnipeg 1
Boston 5, Columbus 3
St. Louis 1, San Jose 0
Nashville 3, Anaheim 2
Minnesota 4, Phoenix 1
Calgary 3, Edmonton 0
Dallas 2, Los Angeles 1
Sunday's Games
Chicago 3, San Jose 2, OT
N.Y. Rangers 6, Florida 1
Monday's Games
New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Los Angeles at Boston, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m.
A H L
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. John’s ................ 26 15 7 4 0 34 94 81
Manchester ............. 28 16 10 0 2 34 76 73
Portland................... 25 12 10 1 2 27 67 77
Worcester ............... 22 10 6 3 3 26 60 57
Providence.............. 28 10 15 1 2 23 60 90
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Norfolk..................... 26 16 9 0 1 33 95 72
Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton.................. 26 14 7 1 4 33 80 69
Hershey................... 25 13 7 3 2 31 88 74
Syracuse................. 24 11 10 2 1 25 80 81
Binghamton ............ 27 9 16 1 1 20 61 82
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Connecticut............. 26 15 8 1 2 33 83 76
Adirondack.............. 25 14 9 1 1 30 76 65
Albany...................... 25 12 10 2 1 27 61 76
Bridgeport ............... 26 11 11 3 1 26 77 87
Springfield............... 25 12 12 1 0 25 75 73
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Charlotte ................. 26 15 9 1 1 32 73 67
Milwaukee............... 22 14 7 0 1 29 68 58
Chicago................... 23 10 9 1 3 24 63 66
Peoria...................... 27 11 14 1 1 24 84 86
Rockford.................. 24 10 13 1 0 21 75 85
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto.................... 26 15 7 3 1 34 82 71
Rochester ............... 26 11 11 3 1 26 70 74
Lake Erie................. 26 11 13 1 1 24 62 69
Grand Rapids ......... 24 10 11 1 2 23 75 75
Hamilton.................. 25 10 13 1 1 22 53 77
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Oklahoma City........ 26 19 6 0 1 39 80 57
Houston................... 26 15 4 2 5 37 77 62
Abbotsford .............. 27 18 8 1 0 37 69 61
San Antonio ............ 25 11 14 0 0 22 55 75
Texas....................... 23 10 12 0 1 21 68 71
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Sunday's Games
Worcester 5, St. John’s 3
Manchester 5, Portland 4, SO
Springfield 5, Bridgeport 1
Hamilton 2, Rochester 1
Grand Rapids at Chicago, 4 p.m.
Providence 3, Connecticut 2
Charlotte at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m.
Norfolk at Hershey, 5 p.m.
Rockford at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Peoria at Houston, 6:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Worcester at Springfield, 6 p.m.
Binghamton at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
C O L L E G E
B A S K E T B A L L
Major Scores
EAST
Boston College 66, Stony Brook 51
Fairfield 58, New Hampshire 52
Quinnipiac 62, Vermont 58
Sacred Heart 84, Lafayette 79
MORE
MIDWEST
Dayton 72, SC-Upstate 68
Illinois 80, Coppin St. 63
Kansas St. 79, North Florida 68, OT
W. Michigan 54, S. Illinois 43
SOUTH
Alabama 62, Detroit 54
Alabama St. 88, Texas Wesleyan 80
Elon 109, Lynchburg 67
Florida St. 75, UNC Greensboro 60
Furman 85, Jacksonville 79
Marshall 82, Iona 63
Murray St. 76, Memphis 72
NC State 65, NC Central 60
South Alabama 102, Alcorn St. 62
South Florida 83, Florida A&M 59
Tulane 59, Jacksonville St. 51
Virginia Tech 73, Norfolk St. 60
Winthrop 79, Virginia-Wise 70
SOUTHWEST
FIU 58, Stephen F. Austin 56
UTEP 73, New Mexico St. 69
FAR WEST
Cal St.-Fullerton 91, E. Washington 76
California 73, Jackson St. 46
Idaho 73, Seattle 62
UC Riverside 75, Montana St. 73
Washington St. 93, Santa Clara 55
S K I R E P O R T
LEBANON, N.H. (AP) —Latest skiingconditions, as
supplied by SnoCountry Mountain Reports. Condi-
tions are subject to change due to weather, skier/
rider traffic and other factors. Be aware of changing
conditions. For more information go to www.sno-
country.com
Sunday, Dec. 11
NORTHEAST
New Jersey
Campgaw Mtn — Plan to Open
12
⁄15
Hidden Valley — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Mountain Creek —Opening Soon for Snow Sports
New York
Belleayre —Sun 3:36 pmpacked powder machine
groomed 10 - 14 base 3 of 55 trails, 6% open
2 of 8 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 9a-4p;
Big Tupper — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Brantling Ski Slopes — Opening Soon for Snow
Sports
Bristol Mountain — Reopen
12
⁄14 Dec 25: 12p-6p
Dec 31: 8a-10p, Jan 01: 8a-10p;
Buffalo Ski Club — Plan to Open
12
⁄26
Cockaigne — Closed for 2011-2012 Season
Dry Hill — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Four Seasons — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Sat/Sun: 10a-4:30p; Open Sat/Sun;
GoreMountain—Sun4:13pm1newpackedpowd-
er machine groomed 4 - 15 base 7 of 95 trails
10% open, 3 miles, 38 acres, 2 of 13 lifts, sm Mon-
Fri: 8:30a-4p
Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p;
Greek Peak — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Holiday Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄23 Tue-Thu:
3p-9p
Fri: 12p-9p; Sat: 9a-9p; Sun: 9a-5p; Open Tue-Sun;
Holiday Valley — Plan to Open
12
⁄14
HoliMont — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Hunter Mountain — Sun 8:02 am packed powder
machine groomed 1 - 36 base 6 of 55 trails
4% open, 2 of 10 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat:
8:30a-5p; Sun: 8:30a-4p;
Kissing Bridge — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Labrador Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Maple Ski Ridge —Opening Soon for SnowSports
McCauley — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Mt Peter — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Oak Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄17 Open Thu-Sun;
Peek’ n Peak — Plan to Open
12
⁄16 Mon-Wed :
9:30a-9p
Thu-Fri 9:30a-10p; Sat/Sun: 8:30a-10p; 8:30a-10p;
Plattekill — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Royal Mountain — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Sawkill Family Ski Center — Opening Soon for
Snow Sports
Snow Ridge — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Song Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Swain — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Thunder Ridge — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Titus Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Toggenburg — Plan to Open
12
⁄17 Sat: 9a-7p
Sun: 9a-4:30p;
Tuxedo Ridge — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
West Mountain — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Whiteface — Sun 7:14 am variable machine
groomed 5 - 10 base 7 of 85 trails, 8% open
3miles, 34acres, 2of 11lifts, smMon-Fri: 8:30a-4p;
Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p;
WillardMountain—OpeningSoonfor SnowSports
WindhamMtn —Sun 4:29 pmvariable 4 - 30 base 7
of 49 trails
15% open, 2 miles, 44 acres, 1 of 10 lifts, sm Mon-
Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 8a-4p;
Woods Valley — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Osceola Tug Hill XC—Sun 5:55 am15 newpacked
powder machine groomed 4 - 6 base 18 of 18 trails,
40 miles Mon-Fri: 10a-5p; Sat/Sun: 10a-5p;
Pineridge XC — Sun 6:29 am packed powder ma-
chine groomed 1 - 3 base 2 of 19 trails, 2 miles
Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 9a-4p;
Pennsylvania
Alpine Mountain —Opening Soon for SnowSports
Bear Creek — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Big Boulder — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Blue Knob — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Blue Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Boyce Park — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Camelback — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Eagle Rock — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Elk Mountain — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Hidden Valley — Sun 7:29 am variable machine
groomed 8 - 32 base 3 of 30 trails
4%open, 3of 9lifts, smSat/Sun: 10a-4p; Dec12-15:
Not Open;
Jack Frost — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Liberty Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Mount Pleasant — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Mystic Mountain at Nemacolin Woodlands — Plan
to Open
12
⁄22
Roundtop — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Seven Springs — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Shawnee Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Ski Big Bear —Plan to Open
12
⁄17 machine groomed
Ski Denton — Opening Soon for Snow Sports
Ski Sawmill — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Sno Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄16
Spring Mountain — Plan to Open
12
⁄17
Tussey Mountain — Opening Soon for Snow
Sports
Whitetail — Plan to Open
12
⁄12
Crystal Lake XC—Plan to Open
12
⁄17 Mon-Fri: 9a-5p
Sat/Sun: 9a-5p;
G O L F
Dubai World Championship
Scores
Sunday
At Jumeirah Golf Estates (Earth Course)
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Purse: $7.5 million
Yardage: 7,675;Par: 72
Final
Alvaro Quiros, Spain................ 68-64-64-67—269
Paul Lawrie, Scotland...............65—73-66-67—271
Luke Donald, England ............. 72-68-66-66—272
Peter Hanson, Sweden............ 64-72-71-67—274
Charl Schwartzel, South
Africa.......................................... 69-71-68-67—275
Louis Oosthuizien, South
Africa.......................................... 72-67-66-71—276
Francesco Molinari, Italy ......... 71-68-68-69—276
Robert Rock, England ............. 68-69-71-69—277
Shane Lowry, Ireland............... 69-70-68-70—277
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain.......... 71-68-70-69—278
Graeme McDowell, Northern
Ireland ........................................ 71-71-71-66—279
Rory McIlory, Northern
Ireland ........................................ 66-71-71-71—279
Sergio Garcia, Spain................ 67-73-68-71—279
Martin Kaymer, Germany ........ 73-71-64-71—279
Robert Karlsson, Sweden....... 73-72-68-66—279
Paul Casey, England................ 72-66-70-72—280
Johan Edfors, Sweden ............ 72-68-72-68—280
David Lynn, England................ 69-72-70-69—280
Fredrik Andersson Hed,
Sweden...................................... 75-66-72-69—282
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark ... 70-73-70-69—282
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium..... 72-74-67-69—282
Hennie Otto, South Africa ....... 70-75-71-67—283
George Coetzee, South
Africa.......................................... 74-73-69-67—283
Jaco Van Zyl, South Africa...... 69-70-72-72—283
Ian Poulter, England................. 73-69-68-73—283
Thomas Aiken, South Africa... 69-73-75-67—284
Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain... 72-70-74-68—284
Jamie Donaldson, Wales ........ 75-69-69-71—284
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark ......... 73-70-71-71—285
Gregory Bourdy, France,......... 70-73-71-71—285
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano,
Spain.......................................... 70-71-72-72—285
Edoardo Molinari, Italy............. 71-73-68-73—285
Lee Westwood, England ......... 73-69-69-74—285
Mark Foster, England .............. 76-71-70-69—286
Ernie Els, South Africa............. 74-69-73-70—286
Matteo Manassero, Italy .......... 73-68-72-73—286
Retief Goosen, South Africa... 74-69-75-69—287
Lorenzo Gagli, Italy.................. 72-71-73-71—287
Felipe, Aguilar, Chile................ 70-77-68-72—287
David Horsey, England............ 69-72-73-73—287
Alexander Noren, Sweden...... 70-72-70-75—287
Thomas Levet, France............. 70-75-69-74—288
Richie Ramsay, Scotland ........ 74-69-70-75—288
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain. 71-77-71-71—290
Anders Hansen, Denmark....... 74-73-69-74—290
Simon Dyson, England............ 77-75-69-70—291
Ross Fisher, England .............. 68-74-75-74—291
Gregory Havret, France........... 72-72-72-76—292
Raphael Jacquelin, France..... 74-67-74-77—292
Rhys Davies, Wales................. 73-73-69-77—292
Joost Luiten, Netherlands ....... 76-71-73-73—293
Peter Lawrie, Ireland ................ 75-74-71-73—293
James Morrison, England........ 75-70-76-73—294
Scott Jamieson, Scotland........ 72-72-79-73—296
Michael Hoey, Northern
Ireland ........................................ 75-72-76-73—296
Christian Nilsson, Sweden...... 76-73-73-75—297
Darren Clarke, Northern
Ireland ........................................ 76-72-75-76—299
Franklin Templeton
Shootout Scores
Sunday
At Tiburon Golf Club (Gold Course)
Naples, Fla.
Purse: $3 million
Yardage: 7,288; Par: 72
Final Round
Scramble
Keegan Bradley/Brendan Steele,
$470,000............................................63-62-59—184
Mark Calcavecchia/Nick Price,
$375,000............................................63-63-61—187
Rory Sabbatini/Jhonattan Vegas,
$375,000............................................67-60-60—187
Charles Howell III/Justin Leonard,
$205,000............................................68-62-58—188
Jerry Kelly/Steve Stricker,
$205,000............................................64-65-59—188
Chad Campbell/Chris DiMarco,
$163,750............................................68-63-59—190
Stewart Cink/Bo Van Pelt,
$163,750............................................70-62-58—190
Kenny Perry/Scott Stallings,
$163,750............................................67-62-61—190
Rickie Fowler/Camilo Villegas,
$163,750............................................65-63-62—190
Jason Dufner/Sean O’Hair,
$150,000............................................66-64-61—191
Greg Norman/Scott McCarron,
$145,000............................................69-62-61—192
Anthony Kim/Webb Simpson,
$140,000............................................67-63-63—193
E C H L
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Wheeling. 21 14 7 0 0 28 74 55
Elmira ...... 24 14 10 0 0 28 81 81
Trenton.... 24 9 12 1 2 21 72 82
Reading... 25 8 12 3 2 21 67 88
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Kalama-
zoo ........... 23 14 7 0 2 30 83 79
Chicago... 23 13 7 2 1 29 72 71
Cincinnati. 18 8 7 0 3 19 56 57
Toledo ..... 22 9 12 0 1 19 68 72
South Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
South
Carolina... 24 14 9 0 1 29 68 57
Gwinnett .. 26 10 8 5 3 28 72 79
Greenville 21 13 8 0 0 26 69 68
Florida ..... 25 12 11 1 1 26 87 80
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Mountain Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Alaska...... 24 18 4 1 1 38 81 44
Utah ......... 23 13 9 0 1 27 56 65
Colorado . 23 12 8 0 3 27 85 81
Idaho........ 24 9 12 2 1 21 68 85
Pacific Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Las
Vegas ...... 25 14 7 1 3 32 79 67
Stockton.. 24 12 9 1 2 27 65 72
Ontario..... 22 11 9 1 1 24 67 64
Bakers-
field .......... 25 6 16 3 0 15 64 87
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Sunday's Games
Kalamazoo 5, Toledo 4, SO
South Carolina 3, Gwinnett 2, SO
Wheeling 4, Reading 2
Bakersfield 5, Stockton 2
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
F I G H T
S C H E D U L E
Dec. 17
At Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, N.J. (SHO), Andre
Ward vs. Carl Froch, 12, for Froch’s WBC Super
World and WBC super middleweight titles;Bowie
Tupou vs. Donnell Holmes, 10, heavyweights.
Dec. 31
At Yokohama (Japan) Cultural Gymnasium, Ta-
kashi Uchiyama vs. Jorge Solis, 12, for Uchiyama’s
WBAWorld junior lightweight title;Celestino Caball-
ero vs. Satoshi Hosono, 12, for Caballero’s WBA
World featherweight title.
At Anaheim (Calif.) Convention Center (SHO), Ta-
voris Cloud vs. Zsolt Erdei, 12, for Cloud’s IBF light
heavyweight title;Rico Ramos vs. Guillermo Rigon-
deaux, 12, for Ramos’ WBA World junior feather-
weight title.
C O L L E G E
F O O T B A L L
NCAA Division III Football Playoff Glance
First Round
Saturday, Nov. 19
Franklin 24, Thomas More 21
Kean 34, Christopher Newport 10
Salisbury 62, Western New England 24
St. John Fisher 23, Johns Hopkins 12
Delaware Valley 62, Norwich 10
Wesley 35, Hobart 28
Wabash 38, Illinois College 20
Centre 51, Hampden-Sydney 41
Mount Union 47, Benedictine (Ill.) 7
Wisconsin-Whitewater 59, Albion 0
St. Thomas (Minn.) 48, St. Scholastica 2
Monmouth (Ill.) 33, Illinois-Wesleyan 27
Mary Hardin-Baylor 34, Redlands 13
McMurry 25, Trinity (Texas) 16
North Central (Ill.) 59, Dubuque 13
Linfield 30, Cal Lutheran 27
Second Round
Saturday, Nov. 26
Salisbury 49, Kean 47
St. John Fisher 27, Delaware Valley 14
Mount Union 30, Centre 10
Wabash 29, North Central (Ill.) 28
Wesley 49, Linfield 34
Wisconsin-Whitewater 41, Franklin 14
St. Thomas (Minn.) 38, Monmouth (Ill.) 10
Mary Hardin-Baylor 49, McMurry 20
Quarterfinals
Saturday, Dec. 3
Mount Union 20, Wabash 8
Wisconsin-Whitewater 34, Salisbury 14
St. Thomas (Minn.) 45, St. John Fisher 10
Wesley 27, Mary Hardin-Baylor 24
Semifinals
Saturday, Dec. 10
Mount Union 28, Wesley 21
Wisconsin-Whitewater 20, St. Thomas (Minn.) 0
Championship
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Friday, Dec. 16
At Salem Stadium
Salem, Va.
Mount Union (14-0) vs. Wisconsin-Whitewater
(14-0), 7 p.m.
roundingthiscasewhichwill sup-
port Ryan’s complete innocence.”
ESPN cited two sources Satur-
day in first reporting the result,
saying Braun tested positive for
elevated levels of testosterone,
adding that a later test by the
World Anti-Doping Agency lab in
Montreal determined the testos-
terone was synthetic. Braunis ap-
pealing, according to people fa-
miliar withthe case.
And fans may be inclined to be-
lieve Braun, given his clean-cut
image and that he hasn’t tested
positiveorevenbeensuspectedof
using banned substances in the
past. And, perhaps above all, the
fact that he doesn’t look like a hu-
manscience experiment.
But there is a long history of
athletesaccusedof takingbanned
drugs insisting they did so to re-
cover from injuries. Sports medi-
cine experts acknowledge the
drugs may help, raising the possi-
bility Braun might have been do-
ing just that.
NormanFost, a professor of pe-
diatricsanddirectorof thebioeth-
ics program at the University of
Wisconsin, saidvigorous exercise
breaks down microscopic muscle
fibers.
“Onetheoryisthatanabolicste-
roids hasten the repair of those
muscle fibers, and allow you to
work out harder,” Fost said.
Dr. Susannah Briskin, a pri-
mary care sports medicine physi-
cian with Rainbow Babies and
Children’s Hospital in Cleveland,
says the potential injury recovery
benefits associated with anabolic
steroidshavebeentestedonalim-
itedbasis but only onanimals.
BRAUN
Continued from Page 1B
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ N F L
STANDINGS, STATS
DENVER — Tim Tebow led
Denver to another comeback
victory, with Matt Prater’s
51-yard field goal with 8:34 left
in overtime giving the Broncos
a 13-10 win over the Chicago
Bears on Sunday.
Prater’s 59-yarder with 3
seconds left in regulation tied
the score.
It was Denver’s sixth straight
win, and half of them have
come in OT since Tebow was
promoted to starter.
After failing to score on their
first 11 possessions, the AFC-
West leading Broncos (8-5)
erased a 10-0 deficit in the final
2:08 of regulation.
Tebow hit Demaryius Tho-
mas with a 10-yard touchdown
pass, then got the ball back
with 58 seconds left and drove
Denver downfield for Prater’s
kick.
The Bears (7-6) won the toss
in overtime and were in field
goal range when Marion Bar-
ber coughed up the football at
the Broncos 34 and Elvis Du-
mervil recovered.
Texans 20, Bengals 19
CINCINNATI — Rookie T.J.
Yates led the biggest drive in
Houston Texans history, throw-
ing a 6-yard touchdown pass
with 2 seconds left for a 20-19
victory that brought the first
playoff berth in franchise histo-
ry.
With their seventh straight
win, the Texans (10-3) moved
to the threshold of their first
playoff berth. They clinched
the AFC South title a few min-
utes later when Tennessee lost
to New Orleans.
Saints 22, Titans 17
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Drew
Brees threw two touchdown
passes to Marques Colston in
the fourth quarter to lead New
Orleans to its fifth straight
victory.
The NFC South-leading
Saints (10-3) had little trouble
picking up yards, but struggled
to score until Brees and Col-
ston connected on passes of 35
and 28 yards.
Patriots 34, Redskins 27
LANDOVER, Md. — Tom
Brady threw for 357 yards and
three touchdowns, and Rob
Gronkowski set an NFL single-
season record for most touch-
down catches by a tight end as
New England won its fifth
straight.
Gronkowski snagged his 14th
and 15th scoring receptions,
moving him past Antonio
Gates and Vernon Davis. Gates
had 13 in 2004, and Davis
matched that total in 2009.
Ravens 24, Colts 10
BALTIMORE — Terrell
Suggs had three sacks and
forced three fumbles to keep
Indianapolis winless.
Baltimore (10-3) limited the
Colts (0-13) to 167 yards — 53
through three quarters. Were it
not for a touchdown on the
game’s final play, Indianapolis
would have been held without
a TD for the second time since
the 2003 season opener.
Falcons 31, Panthers 23
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Matt
Ryan threw two fourth-quarter
touchdown passes to rookie
Julio Jones and Atlanta erased
a 16-point deficit.
Ryan threw for 320 yards and
tied a career high with four
touchdowns passing. Atlanta
(8-5) avoided a costly loss to
stay alive in the NFC wild card
race.
Lions 34, Vikings 28
DETROIT — Backup Joe
Webb fumbled deep in Lions
territory in the final seconds,
and Detroit escaped with a
much-need victory.
Matthew Stafford threw for
two scores in the first quarter
to give Detroit one of its three-
touchdown leads. The Lions
(8-5) had lost five of seven, and
played without defensive tack-
le Ndamukong Suh, who is
serving the second game of his
two-game suspension.
Packers 46, Raiders 16
GREEN BAY, Wis. — Aaron
Rodgers threw for 281 yards
with two touchdowns and an
interception in less than three
full quarters’ worth of work,
Ryan Grant had two touch-
downs rushing and Charles
Woodson picked off a pass
against his former team.
With the win, the Packers
ran their record to 13-0 —
leaving them three games
short of completing a perfect
regular season. And they did it
with a near-perfect perform-
ance.
Chargers 37, Bills 10
SAN DIEGO — Philip Rivers
threw three touchdown passes,
two to Antonio Gates, and the
San Diego Chargers beat the
Buffalo Bills 37-10 Sunday to
keep their playoff hopes alive.
Buffalo (5-8) lost its sixth
straight game and was elim-
inated from playoff contention
for the 12th straight year. The
Chargers (6-7) have won two
straight following their six-
game losing streak.
Cardinals 21, 49ers 19
GLENDALE, Ariz. — John
Skelton stepped in for the
injured Kevin Kolb and threw
for 282 yards and three touch-
downs, and the Arizona Cardi-
nals rallied to hand the San
Francisco 49ers just their third
loss of the season.
Jets 37, Chiefs 10
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
— Mark Sanchez threw two
touchdown passes and ran for
two more scores as the Jets
kept pace in the AFC playoff
race.
The Jets got things started
quickly by scoring 28 points in
the first half and were helped
by an inept Chiefs offense that
managed 4 total yards in the
first two quarters.
Shonn Greene had a season-
high 129 yards rushing and a
score, and Santonio Holmes
and LaDainian Tomlinson each
caught touchdown passes for
the Jets (8-5), who have won
three straight and improved to
6-1 at home.
Tyler Palko was sacked five
times for the Jets in a miser-
able outing by the penalty-
plagued Chiefs (5-8), a week
after he earned his first victory
as a starter against Chicago.
Jaguars 41, Buccaneers 14
Maurice Jones-Drew scored
four times, setting the fran-
chise record for career touch-
downs, and Jacksonville rolled
up 41 unanswered points.
Jones-Drew finished with 136
total yards, including 85 on the
ground against one of the
league’s worst run defenses.
R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Denver Broncos quarterback TimTebow (15) walks off the field
after the Broncos beat the Chicago Bears 13-10 in overtime of
an NFL game Sunday in Denver.
Tebow works magic
on Bears for victory
The Associated Press
N A T I O N A L F O O T B A L L L E A G U E
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
New England ......................................... 10 3 0 .769 396 274 5-1-0 5-2-0 7-2-0 3-1-0 4-1-0
N.Y. Jets................................................. 8 5 0 .615 327 270 6-1-0 2-4-0 6-5-0 2-0-0 3-2-0
Buffalo .................................................... 5 8 0 .385 288 341 4-2-0 1-6-0 3-6-0 2-2-0 1-3-0
Miami ...................................................... 4 9 0 .308 256 246 3-4-0 1-5-0 3-6-0 1-3-0 1-3-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Houston................................................ 10 3 0 .769 330 208 5-1-0 5-2-0 8-2-0 2-1-0 4-0-0
Tennessee........................................... 7 6 0 .538 266 251 4-3-0 3-3-0 5-4-0 2-2-0 1-3-0
Jacksonville ......................................... 4 9 0 .308 193 252 3-4-0 1-5-0 3-7-0 1-2-0 3-2-0
Indianapolis.......................................... 0 13 0 .000 184 382 0-6-0 0-7-0 0-9-0 0-4-0 0-3-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Baltimore ................................................ 10 3 0 .769 320 202 7-0-0 3-3-0 7-2-0 3-1-0 4-0-0
Pittsburgh............................................... 10 3 0 .769 282 198 6-1-0 4-2-0 8-3-0 2-0-0 3-2-0
Cincinnati................................................ 7 6 0 .538 285 270 3-3-0 4-3-0 6-5-0 1-1-0 2-3-0
Cleveland ............................................... 4 9 0 .308 178 254 3-4-0 1-5-0 3-7-0 1-2-0 0-4-0
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Denver..................................................... 8 5 0 .615 269 302 3-3-0 5-2-0 6-3-0 2-2-0 3-2-0
Oakland................................................... 7 6 0 .538 290 354 3-3-0 4-3-0 5-5-0 2-1-0 2-2-0
San Diego............................................... 6 7 0 .462 324 299 4-3-0 2-4-0 5-5-0 1-2-0 2-3-0
Kansas City ............................................ 5 8 0 .385 173 305 2-4-0 3-4-0 3-7-0 2-1-0 2-2-0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
N.Y. Giants ............................................. 7 6 0 .538 324 349 3-3-0 4-3-0 4-6-0 3-0-0 2-2-0
Dallas ...................................................... 7 6 0 .538 317 281 5-2-0 2-4-0 5-4-0 2-2-0 2-2-0
Philadelphia............................................ 5 8 0 .385 297 292 1-5-0 4-3-0 4-6-0 1-2-0 4-1-0
Washington ............................................ 4 9 0 .308 229 290 2-5-0 2-4-0 4-5-0 0-4-0 1-4-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
x-New Orleans....................................... 10 3 0 .769 415 286 6-0-0 4-3-0 6-3-0 4-0-0 4-1-0
Atlanta..................................................... 8 5 0 .615 300 267 4-2-0 4-3-0 6-4-0 2-1-0 2-2-0
Carolina.................................................. 4 9 0 .308 313 355 2-5-0 2-4-0 2-8-0 2-1-0 1-3-0
Tampa Bay ............................................. 4 9 0 .308 232 370 3-4-0 1-5-0 3-6-0 1-3-0 2-3-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
y-Green Bay..................................... 13 0 0 1.000 466 278 6-0-0 7-0-0 10-0-0 3-0-0 4-0-0
Detroit............................................... 8 5 0 .615 367 305 4-3-0 4-2-0 6-5-0 2-0-0 3-2-0
Chicago............................................ 7 6 0 .538 301 255 5-2-0 2-4-0 6-3-0 1-3-0 2-2-0
Minnesota........................................ 2 11 0 .154 274 364 1-5-0 1-6-0 2-7-0 0-4-0 0-5-0
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
y-San Francisco .................................. 10 3 0 .769 307 182 6-1-0 4-2-0 8-2-0 2-1-0 3-1-0
Arizona ................................................. 6 7 0 .462 253 288 4-2-0 2-5-0 6-5-0 0-2-0 3-2-0
Seattle................................................... 5 7 0 .417 216 246 3-3-0 2-4-0 4-4-0 1-3-0 2-1-0
St. Louis ............................................... 2 10 0 .167 140 296 1-5-0 1-5-0 1-9-0 1-1-0 0-4-0
x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division
Thursday's Game
Pittsburgh 14, Cleveland 3
Sunday's Games
New Orleans 22, Tennessee 17
Baltimore 24, Indianapolis 10
N.Y. Jets 37, Kansas City 10
Detroit 34, Minnesota 28
Houston 20, Cincinnati 19
Jacksonville 41, Tampa Bay 14
Atlanta 31, Carolina 23
Philadelphia 26, Miami 10
New England 34, Washington 27
Arizona 21, San Francisco 19
Denver 13, Chicago 10, OT
San Diego 37, Buffalo 10
Green Bay 46, Oakland 16
N.Y. Giants 37, Dallas 34
Monday's Game
St. Louis at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 15
Jacksonville at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 17
Dallas at Tampa Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 18
New Orleans at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Houston, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 19
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
Saints 22, Titans 17
New Orleans......................... 3 3 3 13 — 22
Tennessee............................ 0 3 7 7 — 17
First Quarter
NO—FG Kasay 25, 9:54.
Second Quarter
Ten—FG Bironas 43, 6:37.
NO—FG Kasay 29, :15.
Third Quarter
NO—FG Kasay 22, 3:51.
Ten—Locker 6 run (Bironas kick), 2:19.
Fourth Quarter
NO—Colston 35 pass from Brees (Kasay kick),
12:39.
NO—Colston 28 pass fromBrees (run failed), 7:01.
Ten—Washington 40 pass from Locker (Bironas
kick), 5:58.
A—69,143.
NO Ten
First downs ........................... 24 17
Total Net Yards .................... 437 373
Rushes-yards ....................... 26-114 17-59
Passing.................................. 323 314
Punt Returns......................... 3-18 4-34
Kickoff Returns..................... 2-42 5-121
Interceptions Ret.................. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 36-47-0 18-36-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 2-14 2-12
Punts...................................... 5-49.8 5-45.2
Fumbles-Lost........................ 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards.................... 11-95 8-54
Time of Possession............. 37:33 22:27
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—New Orleans, Ivory 13-53, Sproles
5-33, P.Thomas 6-22, Brees 2-6. Tennessee,
Locker 6-36, Johnson 11-23.
PASSING—New Orleans, Brees 36-47-0-337.
Tennessee, Locker 13-29-0-282, Hasselbeck
5-7-0-44.
RECEIVING—New Orleans, Colston 7-105,
Sproles 7-58, P.Thomas 6-35, Graham 5-55,
Moore 4-20, Henderson 3-36, Collins 2-4, Mea-
chem 1-15, Gilmore 1-9. Tennessee, Washington
6-130, Johnson 5-43, L.Hawkins 3-49, Williams
2-62, Stevens 1-31, Ringer 1-11.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Ravens 24, Colts 10
Indianapolis........................... 0 3 0 7 — 10
Baltimore ............................... 10 7 7 0 — 24
First Quarter
Bal—T.Smith 8 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick),
10:09.
Bal—FG Cundiff 36, 1:20.
Second Quarter
Bal—Rice 6 run (Cundiff kick), 10:07.
Ind—FG Vinatieri 22, 3:06.
Third Quarter
Bal—Pitta 7 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 3:41.
Fourth Quarter
Ind—Tamme13 pass fromOrlovsky (Vinatieri kick),
:00.
A—71,187.
Ind Bal
First downs ........................... 12 24
Total Net Yards .................... 167 358
Rushes-yards ....................... 16-50 37-146
Passing.................................. 117 212
Punt Returns......................... 2-8 4-59
Kickoff Returns..................... 4-120 1-30
Interceptions Ret.................. 1-0 1-0
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 17-37-1 23-31-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 4-19 2-15
Punts...................................... 6-44.7 3-48.3
Fumbles-Lost........................ 3-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards.................... 3-15 5-40
Time of Possession............. 23:52 36:08
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Indianapolis, D.Brown 9-28, Addai
2-16, Carter 5-6. Baltimore, Rice 26-103, T.Smith
1-16, Leach 3-14, R.Williams 7-13.
PASSING—Indianapolis, Orlovsky 17-37-1-136.
Baltimore, Flacco 23-31-1-227.
RECEIVING—Indianapolis, Garcon 5-46, Wayne
4-41, Collie 4-25, Tamme 1-13, Clark 1-12, Hill 1-5,
D.Brown 1-(minus 6). Baltimore, Rice 6-46, Boldin
5-57, T.Smith 5-48, Pitta 3-29, Dickson 2-19, Evans
1-21, Leach 1-7.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Jets 37, Chiefs 10
Kansas City........................... 3 0 0 7 — 10
N.Y. Jets................................ 7 21 7 2 — 37
First Quarter
NYJ—Sanchez 1 run (Folk kick), 8:40.
KC—FG Succop 53, 4:36.
Second Quarter
NYJ—Holmes 4 pass from Sanchez (Folk kick),
10:02.
NYJ—Greene 7 run (Folk kick), 3:56.
NYJ—Tomlinson19pass fromSanchez (Folk kick),
1:15.
Third Quarter
NYJ—Sanchez 3 run (Folk kick), 4:06.
Fourth Quarter
KC—Urban 24 pass from Palko (Succop kick),
12:58.
NYJ—Pouha safety, 3:37.
A—79,088.
KC NYJ
First downs ........................... 13 24
Total Net Yards .................... 221 314
Rushes-yards ....................... 21-65 42-159
Passing.................................. 156 155
Punt Returns......................... 2-14 4-43
Kickoff Returns..................... 6-120 3-65
Interceptions Ret.................. 0-0 1-0
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 16-32-1 13-21-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 5-39 3-26
Punts...................................... 7-51.3 7-44.9
Fumbles-Lost........................ 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards.................... 11-128 4-22
Time of Possession............. 22:18 37:42
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Kansas City, Battle 10-33, Jones 5-12,
Palko 1-12, Urban 1-7, McCluster 4-1. N.Y. Jets,
Greene 24-129, Tomlinson 9-14, Powell 6-10, San-
chez 2-4, Kerley 1-2.
PASSING—Kansas City, Palko 16-32-1-195. N.Y.
Jets, Sanchez 13-21-0-181.
RECEIVING—Kansas City, Bowe 6-69, Breaston
4-44, Baldwin 2-28, Urban 2-28, Battle 2-26. N.Y.
Jets, Keller 4-34, Greene 3-58, Tomlinson 2-50,
Holmes 2-12, Baker 1-17, P.Turner 1-10.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Lions 34, Vikings 28
Minnesota........................... 7 7 7 7 — 28
Detroit.................................. 21 10 0 3 — 34
First Quarter
Det—Tulloch fumble recovery in end zone (Hanson
kick), 12:56.
Det—T.Young 57 pass from Stafford (Hanson
kick), 9:45.
Det—Pettigrew 12 pass from Stafford (Hanson
kick), 5:54.
Min—Shiancoe 7 pass from Ponder (Longwell
kick), 1:51.
Second Quarter
Det—A.Smith 30 interception return (Hanson kick),
12:33.
Min—Harvin 6 pass from Ponder (Longwell kick),
7:36.
Det—FG Hanson 30, 1:05.
Third Quarter
Min—Webb 65 run (Longwell kick), 4:21.
Fourth Quarter
Det—FG Hanson 26, 12:17.
Min—Gerhart 2 pass from Webb (Longwell kick),
7:54.
A—63,988.
Min Det
First downs ........................... 29 13
Total Net Yards .................... 425 280
Rushes-yards ....................... 35-269 21-72
Passing.................................. 156 208
Punt Returns......................... 2-22 1-28
Kickoff Returns..................... 2-63 5-119
Interceptions Ret.................. 0-0 3-49
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 23-44-3 20-29-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 4-43 5-19
Punts...................................... 2-48.5 6-47.7
Fumbles-Lost........................ 5-3 0-0
Penalties-Yards.................... 5-37 10-76
Time of Possession............. 28:46 31:14
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Minnesota, Webb 7-109, Gerhart
19-90, Harvin 4-40, Booker 3-17, Ponder 2-13. De-
troit, K.Williams 12-43, Morris 4-13, Johnson 1-11,
Stafford 2-4, Burleson 1-1, Brown 1-0.
PASSING—Minnesota, Ponder 11-21-3-115, Webb
12-23-0-84. Detroit, Stafford 20-29-0-227.
RECEIVING—Minnesota, Harvin10-69, Aromash-
odu 4-47, Shiancoe 3-33, Gerhart 3-19, Camarillo
2-31, Rudolph1-0. Detroit, Pettigrew6-57, T.Young
4-87, Johnson 3-29, Burleson 3-25, K.Williams
2-17, Brown 1-9, Morris 1-3.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Texans 20, Bengals 19
Houston............................... 3 0 7 10 — 20
Cincinnati ............................ 6 10 3 0 — 19
First Quarter
Hou—FG Rackers 46, 9:51.
Cin—FG Nugent 22, 4:54.
Cin—FG Nugent 47, 2:31.
Second Quarter
Cin—Simpson 17 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
3:02.
Cin—FG Nugent 49, :06.
Third Quarter
Hou—Dreessen 6 pass from Yates (Rackers kick),
12:27.
Cin—FG Nugent 28, 2:07.
Fourth Quarter
Hou—FG Rackers 33, 5:31.
Hou—Walter 6pass fromYates (Rackers kick), :02.
A—41,202.
Hou Cin
First downs ........................... 25 16
Total Net Yards .................... 412 285
Rushes-yards ....................... 28-144 29-101
Passing.................................. 268 184
Punt Returns......................... 4-30 0-0
Kickoff Returns..................... 5-59 3-47
Interceptions Ret.................. 0-0 1-23
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 26-44-1 16-28-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 5-32 1-5
Punts...................................... 2-51.5 4-46.5
Fumbles-Lost........................ 4-3 2-2
Penalties-Yards.................... 5-50 3-27
Time of Possession............. 31:44 28:16
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Houston, Tate 8-67, Foster 15-41,
Yates 5-36. Cincinnati, Benson 21-91, Scott 6-4,
Hawkins 1-4, Dalton 1-2.
PASSING—Houston, Yates 26-44-1-300. Cincin-
nati, Dalton 16-28-0-189.
RECEIVING—Houston, Daniels 7-100, Walter
6-76, Foster 4-33, Jones 3-39, Tate 3-30, Dreessen
3-22. Cincinnati, Green 5-59, Gresham3-45, Simp-
son 2-38, Scott 2-15, Caldwell 2-10, Hawkins 1-22,
Benson 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Houston, Rackers 47
(WR).
Jaguars 41, Buccaneers 14
Tampa Bay.......................... 7 7 0 0 — 14
Jacksonville........................ 0 28 0 13 — 41
First Quarter
TB—Blount 1 run (Barth kick), 9:24.
Second Quarter
TB—Freeman 13 run (Barth kick), 14:09.
Jac—Cloherty 8 fumble return (Scobee kick), 7:36.
Jac—Jones-Drew1 run (Scobee kick), 2:05.
Jac—Collins fumble recovery in end zone (Scobee
kick), 1:53.
Jac—Jones-Drew 5 pass from Gabbert (Scobee
kick), :04.
Fourth Quarter
Jac—Jones-Drew 5 pass from Gabbert (Scobee
kick), 10:22.
Jac—Jones-Drew1 run (run failed), 2:31.
A—62,562.
TB Jac
First downs ........................... 15 21
Total Net Yards .................... 280 325
Rushes-yards ....................... 24-110 33-116
Passing.................................. 170 209
Punt Returns......................... 4-(-2) 1-5
Kickoff Returns..................... 1-0 1-19
Interceptions Ret.................. 2-12 3-14
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 17-32-3 19-33-2
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 3-14 1-8
Punts...................................... 5-37.8 7-41.4
Fumbles-Lost........................ 6-4 2-0
Penalties-Yards.................... 12-97 8-80
Time of Possession............. 27:11 32:49
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Tampa Bay, Blount 18-74, Freeman
4-26, Madu 1-6, Lumpkin 1-4. Jacksonville, Jones-
Drew 27-85, D.Harris 1-24, Bolen 1-10, Gabbert
4-(minus 3).
PASSING—Tampa Bay, Freeman 16-30-2-181,
J.Johnson 1-2-1-3. Jacksonville, Gabbert
19-33-2-217.
RECEIVING—Tampa Bay, Parker 3-35, Williams
3-35, Briscoe 3-20, Winslow 2-38, Lumpkin 2-18,
Lorig 1-22, Benn 1-7, Blount 1-6, Madu 1-3. Jack-
sonville, Jones-Drew 6-51, Dillard 5-45, Osgood
3-23, Lewis 2-77, West 2-19, Thomas 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Falcons 31, Panthers 23
Atlanta............................... 7 0 10 14 — 31
Carolina ............................ 7 16 0 0 — 23
First Quarter
Atl—White 5 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 5:29.
Car—Shockey 6 pass from Newton (Mare kick),
:03.
Second Quarter
Car—Applewhite safety, 7:12.
Car—D.Williams 74 run (Mare kick), 6:51.
Car—Olsen 44 pass from Newton (Mare kick),
3:03.
Third Quarter
Atl—FG Bryant 30, 10:55.
Atl—Rodgers 31 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick),
8:55.
Fourth Quarter
Atl—Jones 17 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 12:42.
Atl—Jones 75 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 4:17.
A—72,680.
Atl Car
First downs ........................... 18 19
Total Net Yards .................... 394 416
Rushes-yards ....................... 28-86 23-157
Passing.................................. 308 259
Punt Returns......................... 2-14 4-11
Kickoff Returns..................... 1-23 5-89
Interceptions Ret.................. 2-33 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 22-38-0 19-39-2
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 3-12 2-17
Punts...................................... 6-47.8 6-42.7
Fumbles-Lost........................ 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards.................... 5-50 5-50
Time of Possession............. 30:43 29:17
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Atlanta, Turner 21-76, Snelling 3-6,
Rodgers 1-4, Ryan 3-0. Carolina, D.Williams 7-87,
Newton 7-36, Stewart 8-29, A.Edwards 1-5.
PASSING—Atlanta, Ryan 22-38-0-320. Carolina,
Newton 19-39-2-276.
RECEIVING—Atlanta, White 7-84, Gonzalez 7-82,
Jones 3-104, Rodgers 2-39, Douglas 2-12, Snelling
1-(minus 1). Carolina, Smith 6-125, Stewart 4-27,
Olsen 2-53, Naanee 2-29, LaFell 2-28, Shockey
2-10, D.Williams 1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Atlanta, Bryant 46 (WL).
Carolina, Mare 36 (WL).
Eagles 26, Dolphins 10
Philadelphia.......................... 0 24 0 2 — 26
Miami ..................................... 7 0 3 0 — 10
First Quarter
Mia—Marshall 16 pass fromMat.Moore (Carpenter
kick), 9:47.
Second Quarter
Phi—McCoy 2 run (Henery kick), 13:34.
Phi—McCoy 1 run (Henery kick), 11:56.
Phi—FG Henery 40, 8:49.
Phi—D.Jackson 34 pass from Vick (Henery kick),
4:43.
Third Quarter
Mia—FG Carpenter 22, 4:52.
Fourth Quarter
Phi—Hunt safety, 9:02.
A—67,823.
Phi Mia
First downs ........................... 18 11
Total Net Yards .................... 239 204
Rushes-yards ....................... 32-51 26-109
Passing.................................. 188 95
Punt Returns......................... 5-22 3-32
Kickoff Returns..................... 1-7 1-27
Interceptions Ret.................. 1-35 1-7
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 15-30-1 17-29-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 4-20 9-60
Punts...................................... 10-41.9 6-53.5
Fumbles-Lost........................ 1-1 3-2
Penalties-Yards.................... 7-69 7-81
Time of Possession............. 31:21 28:39
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Philadelphia, McCoy 27-38, Vick 2-9,
Brown 3-4. Miami, Bush 14-103, Thomas 7-4, Los-
man 2-1, Mat.Moore 1-1, Hilliard 2-0.
PASSING—Philadelphia, Vick15-30-1-208. Miami,
Mat.Moore 11-19-1-95, Losman 6-10-0-60.
RECEIVING—Philadelphia, D.Jackson 4-59, Ce-
lek 4-39, McCoy 3-33, Avant 2-35, Cooper 1-29,
Maclin 1-13. Miami, Bush 5-27, Marshall 4-27, Fa-
sano 3-56, Bess 2-12, Thomas 2-9, Hartline 1-24.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Miami, Carpenter 55
(WL).
Patriots 34, Redskins 27
New England.................... 14 6 14 0 — 34
Washington ...................... 10 10 7 0 — 27
First Quarter
NE—Wilfork fumble recovery in end zone (Gost-
kowski kick), 12:06.
Was—FG Gano 24, 6:42.
NE—Gronkowski 11 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 5:49.
Was—Gaffney 9 pass fromGrossman (Gano kick),
1:20.
Second Quarter
Was—Moss 49 pass from Banks (Gano kick),
14:49.
NE—FG Gostkowski 23, 8:54.
Was—FG Gano 25, 2:13.
NE—FG Gostkowski 24, :00.
Third Quarter
NE—Gronkowski 37 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 12:05.
Was—Anderson 6 pass from Grossman (Gano
kick), 6:58.
NE—Welker 24pass fromBrady (Gostkowski kick),
4:26.
A—77,825.
NE Was
First downs ........................... 22 25
Total Net Yards .................... 431 463
Rushes-yards ....................... 20-79 34-170
Passing.................................. 352 293
Punt Returns......................... 2-18 0-0
Kickoff Returns..................... 2-39 6-117
Interceptions Ret.................. 1-2 1-0
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 22-37-1 20-33-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 1-5 2-8
Punts...................................... 3-45.0 3-37.3
Fumbles-Lost........................ 0-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards.................... 4-47 8-73
Time of Possession............. 23:51 36:09
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—New England, Woodhead 8-41,
Green-Ellis 5-19, Faulk 3-11, Brady 4-8. Washing-
ton, Helu 27-126, Royster 6-44, Grossman 1-0.
PASSING—New England, Brady 22-37-1-357.
Washington, Grossman 19-32-1-252, Banks
1-1-0-49.
RECEIVING—New England, Welker 7-86, Gron-
kowski 6-160, Hernandez 5-84, Ochocinco 1-15,
Underwood 1-7, Woodhead 1-4, Faulk 1-1. Wash-
ington, Gaffney 6-92, Stallworth 4-96, Moss 3-81,
Anderson 2-12, Helu 2-6, Royster 2-6, Young 1-8.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
Cardinals 21, 49ers 19
San Francisco......................... 3 9 7 0 — 19
Arizona .................................... 0 7 7 7 — 21
First Quarter
SF—FG Akers 46, 4:39.
Second Quarter
SF—FG Akers 22, 14:02.
Ari—Doucet 60 pass from Skelton (Feely kick),
7:10.
SF—FG Akers 27, 1:58.
SF—FG Akers 22, :00.
Third Quarter
SF—Gore 37 run (Akers kick), 12:24.
Ari—Fitzgerald 46 pass from Skelton (Feely kick),
9:04.
Fourth Quarter
Ari—Roberts 3 pass from Skelton (Feely kick),
11:50.
A—60,808.
SF Ari
First downs ........................... 12 12
Total Net Yards .................... 233 325
Rushes-yards ....................... 21-90 23-55
Passing.................................. 143 270
Punt Returns......................... 4-93 5-44
Kickoff Returns..................... 4-100 0-0
Interceptions Ret.................. 2-16 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 18-37-0 20-29-2
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 5-32 2-14
Punts...................................... 7-53.1 7-46.6
Fumbles-Lost........................ 0-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards.................... 5-35 4-45
Time of Possession............. 30:56 29:04
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—San Francisco, Gore 10-72, Hunter
8-20, K.Williams1-7, Ale.Smith1-(minus 3), Walker
1-(minus 6). Arizona, Wells 15-27, Skelton 6-25,
Stephens-Howling 2-3.
PASSING—SanFrancisco, Ale.Smith18-37-0-175.
Arizona, Skelton 19-28-2-282, Kolb 1-1-0-2.
RECEIVING—San Francisco, Crabtree 7-63,
K.Williams 4-42, Hunter 2-19, Ginn Jr. 2-14, Miller
2-5, V.Davis 1-32. Arizona, Fitzgerald 7-149, Dou-
cet 3-73, King 3-16, Stephens-Howling 2-22, Taylor
2-13, Roberts 2-8, Wells 1-3.
MISSEDFIELDGOALS—San Francisco, Akers 50
(WR).
Broncos 13, Bears 10
Chicago............................ 0 0 7 3 0 — 10
Denver ............................. 0 0 0 10 3 — 13
Third Quarter
Chi—Barber 9 run (Gould kick), 5:19.
Fourth Quarter
Chi—FG Gould 57, 14:55.
Den—D.Thomas10 pass fromTebow(Prater kick),
2:08.
Den—FG Prater 59, :03.
Overtime
Den—FG Prater 51, 8:34.
A—76,487.
Chi Den
First downs ........................... 12 20
Total Net Yards .................... 245 345
Rushes-yards ....................... 38-159 34-124
Passing.................................. 86 221
Punt Returns......................... 2-36 8-73
Kickoff Returns..................... 1-25 0-0
Interceptions Ret.................. 1-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 12-19-0 21-40-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 4-29 5-15
Punts...................................... 11-47.8 8-45.4
Fumbles-Lost........................ 1-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards.................... 8-69 4-28
Time of Possession............. 31:47 34:39
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Chicago, Barber 27-108, Bell 9-40,
Hanie 2-11. Denver, Tebow12-49, McGahee17-34,
J.Johnson 2-18, Ball 1-13, Larsen 1-5, D.Thomas
1-5.
PASSING—Chicago, Hanie 12-19-0-115. Denver,
Tebow 21-40-1-236.
RECEIVING—Chicago, Bell 5-24, Knox 3-37, Bar-
ber 2-32, R.Williams 2-22. Denver, D.Thomas
7-78, Willis 4-75, Ball 4-37, Decker 3-33, J.Johnson
2-11, McGahee 1-2.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Denver, Prater 28 (BK).
Chargers 37, Bills 10
Buffalo ................................... 0 0 10 0 — 10
San Diego ............................. 7 9 14 7 — 37
First Quarter
SD—Gates 9 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 7:52.
Second Quarter
SD—Tolbert 1 run (kick blocked), 14:16.
SD—FG Novak 47, 6:41.
Third Quarter
Buf—FG Rayner 37, 11:43.
Buf—Scott fumble recovery in end zone (Rayner
kick), 10:11.
SD—Gates 2 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 4:11.
SD—Gregory 26 interception return (Novak kick),
4:02.
Fourth Quarter
SD—Crayton 26 pass from Rivers (Novak kick),
9:01.
A—62,494.
Buf SD
First downs ........................... 17 23
Total Net Yards .................... 281 366
Rushes-yards ....................... 20-96 32-150
Passing.................................. 185 216
Punt Returns......................... 0-0 1-14
Kickoff Returns..................... 4-96 2-42
Interceptions Ret.................. 0-0 3-73
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 15-37-3 24-33-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 1-10 2-24
Punts...................................... 2-35.5 3-39.7
Fumbles-Lost........................ 0-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards.................... 1-5 5-50
Time of Possession............. 24:27 35:33
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Buffalo, Spiller 12-46, Fitzpatrick 5-26,
Choice 1-12, Thigpen 1-8, J.White 1-4. San Diego,
Mathews 20-114, Tolbert 6-21, Weddle1-10, Hester
3-7, Volek 2-(minus 2).
PASSING—Buffalo, Fitzpatrick 13-34-2-176, Thig-
pen 2-3-1-19. San Diego, Rivers 24-33-0-240.
RECEIVING—Buffalo, St.Johnson 4-116, Spiller
3-10, Hagan 2-28, Nelson 2-20, Caussin 2-19,
Choice 1-2, L.Smith 1-0. San Diego, Gates 7-68,
Mathews 6-34, Jackson 5-55, Crayton 3-37, Floyd
2-29, McMichael 1-17.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—Buffalo, Rayner 53
(WR).
Packers 46, Raiders 16
Oakland............................. 0 0 7 9 — 16
Green Bay......................... 14 17 12 3 — 46
First Quarter
GB—Grant 47 run (Crosby kick), 11:57.
GB—Taylor 4 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
4:10.
Second Quarter
GB—FG Crosby 34, 13:07.
GB—Nelson 37 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
9:14.
GB—Grant 6 run (Crosby kick), 7:06.
Third Quarter
GB—FG Crosby 38, 12:41.
Oak—Bush 2 run (Janikowski kick), 8:15.
GB—FG Crosby 49, 3:31.
GB—Walden 5 fumble return (kick blocked), 2:48.
Fourth Quarter
GB—FG Crosby 33, 14:21.
Oak—McClain safety, 11:01.
Oak—Boss 5 pass from Palmer (Janikowski kick),
4:43.
A—70,524.
Oak GB
First downs ........................... 23 22
Total Net Yards .................... 355 391
Rushes-yards ....................... 29-117 24-136
Passing.................................. 238 255
Punt Returns......................... 0-0 2-26
Kickoff Returns..................... 4-41 2-67
Interceptions Ret.................. 1-0 4-18
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 24-43-4 17-32-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 1-7 4-26
Punts...................................... 5-49.4 1-40.0
Fumbles-Lost........................ 1-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards.................... 11-89 5-35
Time of Possession............. 31:20 28:40
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Oakland, Bush 23-78, Palmer 2-12,
Reece 2-12, Murphy 1-10, Cartwright 1-5. Green
Bay, Grant 10-85, Kuhn 10-46, Saine 1-7, Flynn
3-(minus 2).
PASSING—Oakland, Palmer 24-42-4-245, Le-
chler 0-1-0-0. Green Bay, Rodgers 17-30-1-281,
Flynn 0-2-0-0.
RECEIVING—Oakland, Heyward-Bey 5-78, Boss
5-43, Murphy 4-70, Reece 4-5, Bush 3-19, Cart-
wright 2-16, Schilens 1-14. Green Bay, Driver 4-75,
Nelson 3-81, Cobb 2-45, J.Jones 2-29, G.Jennings
2-20, Saine 2-14, Grant 1-13, Taylor 1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.
N F L T O D A Y
SCOREBOARD
St. Louis (2-10) at Seattle (5-7), 8:30 p.m. A year
ago, they met todecidetheNFCWest title. Now, it’s
a game ESPN can’t be thrilled to televise.
STARS
Passing
• T.J. Yates, Texans, led an 80-yard winning drive
in the final minutes, hitting Kevin Walter with a
6-yard TD pass with 2 seconds remaining for a
20-19 victory over Cincinnati. Yates had a key
17-yard scramble on the drive, and finished 26 of 44
for 300 yards with two touchdowns.
• Matt Ryan, Falcons, went 22 of 38 for 320 yards
and his four TDs matched a career high in a 31-23
win at Carolina.
• Tom Brady, Patriots, completed 22 of 37 passes
for 357 yards with three touchdowns in a 34-27 win
at Washington.
•TimTebow, Broncos, had a rare productive pass-
ingtoday, going21of 40for 236yards andoneTDin
a 13-10 overtime victory against Chicago. Tebow
has guidedDenver tosix straight wins andthetopof
the AFC West.
Rushing
• Shonn Greene, Jets, rushed for 129 yards on 24
carries and had 58 yards on three receptions in a
37-10 win over Kansas City.
• Ray Rice, Ravens, eclipsed 1,000 yards rushing
for the season with 103 yards in a 24-10 win over
Indianapolis. He also scored a TD.
• Maurice Jones-Drew, Jaguars, set a franchise
scoring record as he ran for two TDs and caught two
touchdown passes in a 41-14 romp over Tampa
Bay. He has 71 career TDs.
• Reggie Bush, Dolphins, ran for 103 yards in a
26-10 loss to Philadelphia.
• QB Joe Webb, Vikings, ran seven times for 109
yards in relief of Christian Ponder, including a
65-yard TD, in a 34-28 loss at Detroit.
• Rookie Roy Helu, Redskins, rushed 27 times for
126 yards in a 34-27 loss to New England.
•Ryan Mathews, Chargers, ran for 114 yards on 20
carries in a 37-10 rout of Buffalo.
Receiving
• Marques Colston, Saints, made seven catches
for 105 yards and scored twice in a 22-7 win at Ten-
nessee. Nate Washington made six receptions for
130 yards and one TD for the Titans.
•RookieJulioJones, Falcons, hadjust threecatch-
es, but he covered 104 yards and scored twice in a
31-23 win at Carolina. Steve Smith made six recep-
tions for 125 yards for the Panthers.
• Percy Harvin, Vikings, had a career-high 10 re-
ceptions for 109 yards and a score in a 34-28 loss at
Detroit.
• TE Rob Gronkowski, Patriots, had six receptions
for 160 yards and two TDs in a 34-27 victory at
Washington. Gronkowski set the mark for most
touchdown catches in a season by a tight end with
15.
•Larry Fitzgerald, Cardinals, hadsevenreceptions
for 149 yards, including a 46-yard TD, in a 21-19 win
over San Francisco. On the TD play, Fitzgerald
passed1,000 yards for the season for the sixth time
in his eight years in the NFL, the past five in a row.
• Stevie Johnson, Bills, caught four passes for 116
yards, but Buffalo lost 37-10 at San Diego.
Special Teams
•Doug Prater, Broncos, kicked a 59-yard field goal
totieChicagowith3seconds remaining, thenmade
a 51-yarder in overtime to lift Denver to a13-10 win.
• Mike Nugent, Bengals, made four field goals in a
20-19loss toHouston, hittingfrom22, 47, 49and28
yards.
•DavidAkers, 49ers, alsohadfour fieldgoals, from
46, 22, 27 and 22, but San Francisco lost \.
Defense
• Jason Babin led the Eagles’ pass rush with three
sacks to increase his season total to 15. Philadel-
phia had nine sacks to tie a franchise mark, with
Trent Colealsogettingthreeina26-10winat Miami.
•Green Bay went to13-0 helped by five takeaways,
including four interceptions of Carson Palmer, one
by former Raiders CB Charles Woodson, in the
Packers’ 46-16 rout.
• Terrell Suggs had three sacks and forced three
fumbles as part of an overwhelming defensive per-
formance by the Ravens, who kept the Indianapolis
Colts winless with a 24-10 victory. DE Dwight Free-
ney, Colts, had two sacks to go over 100 for his ca-
reer.
• Vikings DE Jared Allen had three sacks for the
secondtimeagainst Detroit thisseason, puttinghim
at 100
1
⁄2 sacks over his eight-year career. But Min-
nesota lost 34-28.
PLAYOFF PICTURE
Houston (10-3) is in the playoffs for the first time
since the NFL expanded back to the city in 2002.
The Texans rallied to win 20-19 at Cincinnati, clinch-
ingtheAFCSouthwhenTennesseelost toNewOr-
leans. ... The Saints (10-3) secured at least a wild-
card berth when they won and Chicago lost to Den-
ver.
MILESTONES
DrewBrees, Saints, went 36 for 47 for 337 yards in
a 22-17 victory at Tennessee and joined Johnny
Unitas as the only quarterbacks to throw a touch-
down pass in 40 straight games. He also extended
his NFL-record streak of games with 20 or more
completions to 33. ... Rob Gronkowski, Patriots, set
the mark for most touchdown catches in a season
by a tight end, grabbing his 14th an 11-yard pass
from Tom Brady in the first quarter at Washington.
He broke the record of 13 by Antonio Gates in 2004,
then matched by Vernon Davis in 2009. He added
another lateinthegame. ... Patriots WRWes Welker
becameoneof threeplayers inNFLhistory withfour
100-catch seasons, joining Jerry Rice and Marvin
Harrison.
STATS
Tom Brady of the Patriots upped his career touch-
down pass total to 294, moving ahead of Warren
Moon (291) into sixth place all time. Brady also sur-
passed the 4,000-yard mark for the fourth time in
his career in a 34-27 win at Washington. ... The
Redskins amassed a season-high 463 yards but
lost for the eighth time in nine games. ... QB Mark
Sanchez, Jets, ran for two TDs in a 37-10 romp over
Kansas City, giving him a career-high five for one
season. The Jets had a season-high five sacks. ...
C M Y K
PAGE 4B MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
got a lot of time. We’ll be compet-
itive. I just hope every night we
show up, play our best and give it
our all.”
Nomatter howBerwickfares in
its eight games prior to its first
conference game, it will still be a
ground-up project for Kingery. He
left Scott Township, his alma ma-
ter where he coached the team to
two state playoff berths including
the Class 2A state finals last sea-
son, for the toughest coaching job
in the WVC.
“I’ve been looking into the Ber-
wick program for the past six
years,” said Kingery, who also
coached in Charlotte, N.C., and
Richmond, Va. “My wife is origi-
nally from Berwick, and I’ve kept
track with the basketball program
there.
“Our kids arereally, reallywork-
ing hard. They’ve bought into the
system in a short two and a half
weeks.”
Until the WVCseasonstarts, all
18 teams will be trying to smooth
out the rough edges in exhibition
play.
Here’s a quick overview of the
three divisions. Gone is Division
IV after St. Michael’s dropped out
theWVCandWest SideTechelim-
inated all sports:
DIVISIONI OUTLOOK
Division I will be the most com-
petitive by far, with all five teams
having a shot of knocking off the
others on any given night.
Defending champion Wyoming
Valley West was the hands-down
favorite until standout Eugene Le-
wis transferred to Meyers. The
Spartans, though, remain the fa-
vorites and have the division’s top
player in guard James McCann.
Hazleton Area gained valuable
experiencelast seasonandhas the
horses to run with anybody.
Whether the Cougars have the
size to match up with some oppo-
nents will be determined during
the season.
Coughlin returns plenty of tal-
ent, albeit undersized. The Cru-
saders showedalot of grit last sea-
son as they embark on a new sea-
son with newcoach Mike Day.
Crestwood has plenty of holes
tofill, perhapstoomanyfor thepe-
rennial conference power to chal-
lenge. Pittston Area is a wild card
and could finish anywhere in the
division.
DIVISIONII OUTLOOK
Despite the heavy losses to
graduation, Redeemer remains
the division’s top dog. The Royals
haveplentyof sizeandsomelimit-
ed experience in the backcourt
group.
Tunkhannock will need to find
some missing pieces in order to
haveas solidof aseasonas in2010-
11.
Dallas has plenty of athletic tal-
ent and a newcoach in Doug Mill-
er. Shane Dunn, a 6-foot-4 senior,
isarguablythebest returningplay-
er in the division.
Former Pittston Area coach Al
Brogna crossed the Susquehanna
River to take over at Wyoming Ar-
ea, a program that has been the
WVC’s second worst over the past
five seasons. The worst has been
Berwick, which has won only 24
times in its last 155 games.
DIVISIONIII OUTLOOK
GAR returns its entire starting
lineup and was the prohibitive fa-
vorite. That was until Lewis trans-
ferredfromValleyWest toMeyers.
Now the defending champion
Mohawks are running neck-and-
neck with the Grenadiers. That is,
if Lewis suits up. Valley West has
signedthetransfer waiver, soit ap-
pear the issue is headingtoa hear-
ing before the District 2 Athletic
Committee. Based on when the
hearing is and Lewis’ commit-
ment to play in an all-star football
game, it’s possible he won’t be ina
Meyers uniform until after the
NewYear if at all.
After those two, Lake-Lehman,
Nanticoke and Hanover Area
shouldfall inplaceinnoparticular
order. All are solid, but don’t have
the overall talent to challenge ei-
ther GAR or Meyers.
Northwest, the defending
champion of the departed Divi-
sion IV, could figure in the mix
with those three. Two other Divi-
sion IV transplants – MMI Prep
andWyomingSeminary–lackthe
experience needed to crack the
upper half of the division.
DISTRICT PLAYOFFS
The Class 4A and Class A tour-
naments will use open formats
due to a smaller number of teams.
HereishowtheClass3Aand2A
tournaments break down:
CLASS 3A: The Wyoming Val-
ley Conference will qualify five
teams and the Lackawanna Con-
ferencewill qualifythree. Thefirst
roundwill be: WVCNo. 1vs. WVC
No 5; Lackawanna No. 2 vs. WVC
No. 3; Lackawanna No. 3 vs. WVC
No. 2; and Lackawanna No. 1 vs.
WVCNo. 4.
CLASS 2A: The WVCwill qual-
ify three teams andthe Lackawan-
na League will qualify five. The
first round will be: Lackawanna
No. 1 vs. Lackawanna No 5; WVC
No. 2 vs. Lackawanna No. 3; Lack-
awanna No. 2 vs. WVCNo. 3; and
WVCNo. 1vs. Lackawanna No. 4.
TOP FIVE PLAYERS
It’s strange not having a Re-
deemer player on the list, but
that’s the case.
Darrell Crawford, GAR: The
electrifying quarterback on the
football team is also a star on the
hardwood. His gridiron moves
translate smoothly to the tight
confines of the basketball court.
And like in football, he can score
and score often.
Shane Dunn, Dallas: Dunn is
coming off such an outstanding
football season, it’s easy to forget
he a heck of a basketball player as
well. He earned Division II first-
team honors last season, leading
theMountaineers witha13.5scor-
ing average and 75 field goals dur-
ing the WVCseason in 2010-11.
Eugene Lewis, Meyers: This is
assuming Lewis gets cleared to fi-
nally play for the Mohawks. Sure
Lewis has verbally committed to
PennState for football, but toreal-
ly appreciate his off-the-chart ath-
letic ability a trip to a gymnasium
is needed.
James McCann, Valley West:
McCann was considered the sec-
ond-best player in Division I. Now
with Lewis gone, McCann inher-
its thethrone. He’s a smoothpoint
guard with the ability to score. No
player madea bigger jumpinpres-
ence than McCann last season.
Rasheed Moore, Meyers:
Moore was sort of the fifth guy in
Meyers’ lineup when last season
started. But as the season materi-
alizedintoa DivisionII title, the 6-
foot-5 forward asserted himself
more and more and was playing a
well as anyone late in the season.
Only a junior, he should only get
better.
Also keep an eye on: Coughlin’s
Marcus Cobb and Phil Trout;
GAR’s Shaliek Powell and Matt
Sharpe; Hazleton Area’s Tyler
Plaksa; and Meyers’ Ryan Krawc-
zeniuk.
CIRCLE ONTHE CALENDAR
Games playedJan. 28will befor
theCoachesvs. Cancerfundraiser.
Donations will be accepted and
shirts will be on sale.
The Lackawanna Conference
will have its event the same week-
end. The District 2 teams – both
boys andgirls –raised$74,000last
season, nearly doubling the total
fromtwo years ago.
PREVIEW
Continued fromPage 1B
W V C B O Y S B A S K E T B A L L
2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 1 S T A T I S T I C S
Statistics are for WVC divisional games only.
RETURNING PLAYERS ARE IN BOLD.
DIVISION I
COUGHLIN G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Marcus Cobb.................................... 13 54 12 21 36 .583 141 10.8
Chris Grullon...................................... 12 38 0 39 59 .661 115 9.6
Phil Trout .......................................... 12 34 14 24 38 .632 108 9.0
Matt Dobash ...................................... 13 41 20 13 22 .591 115 8.8
Ian Jeremiah..................................... 13 34 0 11 21 .524 69 5.3
Devon Davis..................................... 12 21 0 15 27 .556 57 4.8
CRESTWOOD G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Jonathan Wojnar............................... 13 54 32 31 46 .674 171 13.2
Dave Piavis........................................ 13 35 2 38 54 .704 110 8.5
Austin Powell ..................................... 13 35 7 11 18 .611 90 6.9
John Fazzini ..................................... 13 30 9 18 27 .667 87 6.7
Joey Pickett ....................................... 13 25 3 24 33 .727 77 5.9
Alex Culver ........................................ 12 27 2 12 23 .522 68 5.7
HAZLETON AREA G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Dwaine Gilley .................................... 13 63 0 41 64 .641 167 12.8
Tyler Plaksa...................................... 13 56 3 36 43 .837 151 11.6
Danny Fogarty................................... 13 38 20 10 16 .625 106 8.2
Sal Blasi ............................................ 13 32 18 3 4 .750 85 6.5
Travis Buckner ................................ 13 32 7 5 7 .714 76 5.8
Frankie Vito...................................... 13 22 6 2 5 .400 54 4.2
PITTSTON AREA G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Steve Stravinski .............................. 13 79 17 8 15 .533 179 13.8
Steve Sklanka.................................. 12 42 5 45 60 .750 134 11.2
Joe Coyne.......................................... 13 50 0 33 72 .458 133 10.2
Jordan Houseman........................... 13 29 6 19 33 .576 83 6.4
R.J. Emmett ....................................... 13 22 13 7 8 .875 64 4.9
Chris Kovaleski ............................... 13 8 0 11 12 .917 27 2.1
WYO. VALLEY WEST G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Eugene Lewis.................................... 13 94 1 51 73 .699 240 18.5
James McCann................................ 13 72 22 35 39 .897 201 15.4
Jonathan Gimble............................. 13 46 2 9 13 .692 103 7.9
Ryan Hoinski.................................... 13 29 8 13 26 .500 81 6.2
Jalen McClary.................................... 7 11 4 3 6 .500 29 4.1
Brett Good........................................ 8 11 3 3 4 .750 28 3.5
DIVISION II
BERWICK G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Kyle Miller........................................ 13 34 15 17 28 .607 100 7.6
Jimmy Gaizick................................ 13 30 8 19 22 .864 87 6.7
Luke McDanel................................... 12 20 7 12 25 .480 59 4.9
Brandon Dougherty ......................... 13 25 1 9 24 .375 60 4.6
Eric May ........................................... 10 14 4 5 10 .500 36 3.6
Anthony Melito............................... 13 10 3 7 18 .389 30 2.3
DALLAS G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Shane Dunn..................................... 13 75 9 16 38 .421 175 13.5
Travis DeBona ................................. 13 40 16 28 36 .778 124 9.5
Marc Noyalis..................................... 12 37 0 15 25 .600 83 6.9
Steve Zapoticky ............................... 13 27 0 30 60 .500 84 6.5
Jason Simonovich ........................ 13 26 5 7 18 .389 64 4.9
Paul Brace....................................... 12 18 2 13 22 .591 51 4.3
HOLY REDEEMER G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Peter Alexis ...................................... 13 112 2 41 65 .631 267 20.5
Steve Ruch....................................... 13 47 15 29 40 .725 138 10.6
Austin Carr........................................ 13 36 13 19 34 .559 104 8.0
John McCarthy................................. 13 35 7 7 12 .583 94 7.2
Adam Dunsmuir ............................... 12 21 11 5 11 .520 58 4.8
Tim Lambert ..................................... 13 15 6 15 18 .833 52 4.0
TUNKHANNOCK G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Mike Papi .......................................... 13 85 28 33 37 .892 231 17.7
Rich Condeelis................................. 12 49 19 29 40 .725 146 12.1
James Hawk.................................... 13 53 0 18 28 .643 124 9.5
A.J. Bevan ....................................... 13 24 4 15 19 .789 67 5.2
Allen Coolbaugh .............................. 13 16 8 10 21 .476 50 3.8
Tyrin Alguire................................... 12 9 9 4 5 .800 31 2.4
WYOMING AREA G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Ryan Carey....................................... 13 49 18 32 44 .727 148 11.3
Cody Gates....................................... 13 48 0 16 35 .457 112 8.6
Louis Vullo...................................... 13 32 6 12 22 .545 82 6.3
Randy McDermott ............................ 11 24 1 10 18 .556 59 5.4
Bart Chupka.................................... 13 27 0 4 6 .667 58 4.5
Mike Carey........................................ 10 8 4 2 5 .400 22 2.2
DIVISION III
GAR G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Mike Polakoski .................................. 6 35 14 1 4 .250 85 14.2
Darrell Crawford.............................. 13 51 24 28 42 .667 154 11.8
Shaliek Powell ................................. 13 51 4 22 43 .512 128 9.8
Isiah Francis..................................... 13 47 2 13 31 .419 109 8.4
Matt Sharpe...................................... 13 35 9 25 44 .568 104 8.0
Christian Skrepenak ...................... 13 33 0 11 38 .289 77 5.9
HANOVER AREA G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Bilal Floyd .......................................... 13 67 21 25 58 .431 180 13.8
Cory Dickson..................................... 12 60 10 6 13 .461 136 11.3
Aaron Springer .................................. 13 44 6 12 31 .387 106 8.2
Shaquille Rolle ................................ 13 44 5 12 18 .667 105 8.1
Mike Kellerer...................................... 13 31 16 5 7 .714 83 6.4
Martin Steve..................................... 13 21 0 9 19 .474 51 3.9
LAKE-LEHMAN G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Chris O’Connor ............................... 13 58 0 20 29 .690 136 10.5
Kevin Bohan..................................... 13 39 8 2 8 .250 88 6.8
Dylan Wasylyk................................... 13 32 0 9 20 .450 75 5.8
Chad Carey........................................ 13 19 7 14 26 .538 59 4.5
Jesse Hauze...................................... 13 19 13 4 8 .500 55 4.2
Jared Novitski.................................. 13 20 11 3 5 .600 54 4.2
MEYERS G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Keyton Winder................................... 12 84 4 30 48 .625 202 15.5
Ryan Krawczeniuk.......................... 13 53 17 24 30 .800 147 11.3
Rasheed Moore............................... 13 48 2 31 44 .705 129 9.9
Ross Lavan........................................ 13 42 20 12 16 .750 116 8.9
Nahjee Brown.................................... 13 30 7 12 25 .480 79 6.1
Eddie Walters .................................. 12 18 0 3 7 .429 39 3.3
MMI PREP G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Ryan Forte ......................................... 13 72 26 25 29 .862 195 15.0
Fran Swankoski................................. 10 33 1 19 40 .475 86 8.6
Aaron Kollar..................................... 13 25 8 19 33 .576 77 5.9
Alex Van Hoeklein .......................... 12 28 1 12 19 .632 69 5.8
George Gera..................................... 12 29 1 25 34 .735 84 7.0
R.J. Kupsho...................................... 13 9 0 3 8 .375 21 1.6
NANTICOKE G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Cael Evans......................................... 13 80 4 22 44 .500 186 14.3
Kevin Zaykoski................................ 13 41 1 20 25 .800 103 7.9
Josh Decker ..................................... 13 30 12 10 17 .588 82 6.3
Zak Matulewski................................ 12 32 3 5 8 .625 72 6.0
Brandon Kairo ................................. 13 27 0 21 32 .656 75 5.8
Cody Bukowski .................................. 12 18 3 10 22 .455 50 4.2
NORTHWEST G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Bret Rutkoski.................................... 12 55 5 14 21 .667 129 10.8
Devon Mazonkey........................... 13 50 19 17 24 .708 136 10.5
Christian Foley............................... 13 46 9 29 49 .592 130 10.0
Paul Ascenzi .................................... 13 41 0 17 27 .630 99 7.6
Garret Yustat .................................. 11 16 8 7 17 .412 47 4.3
Kyle Cragle ..................................... 10 10 4 2 2 1.000 30 3.0
WYOMING SEMINARY G FG 3s FTM FTA FT% PTS PPG
Josh Lefkowitz............................... 10 45 13 19 37 .514 122 12.2
Kai Smith .......................................... 12 49 0 22 39 .564 120 10.0
Jason Ellis ...................................... 13 31 15 2 3 .667 79 6.1
Chib Onwunaka............................... 12 28 0 13 18 .722 69 5.8
Dylan Lefkowitz ............................... 13 19 1 12 24 .500 51 3.9
Alex Barilla...................................... 12 19 0 2 3 .667 40 2.1
OLD FORGE – Pittston
Area’s boys basketball team
scored a 51-24 victory over Old
Forge to win the championship
game in the Marseco Memorial
Tournament Sunday night.
Pittston Area was led by
Steve Stravinski with 24
points.
Steve Sklanka added 9 points
for the Patriots.
Old Forge was led by Dave
Arjust with nine points.
PITTSTON AREA (51)
Houseman 1 2-4 4, Schuab 0 0-0 0, Crawford
0 0-0 0, Sklanka 3 2-2 9, K. Kovaleski 0 0-0 0,
McDermott 0 0-0 0, C. Kovaleski 3 0-0 6,
Bykowski 1 1-3 3, Stravinski 9 4-6 24, Tobish 0
1-2 1, Gross 2 0-0 4. Totals 19 10-19 51.
OLD FORGE (24)
Wahl 1 0-0 2, Maneth 1 1-2 4, Aversa 1 2-2 4,
Argonish 0 1-2 1, Carey 1 0-3 2, Tomasetti 0 0-0
0, Arjust 4 0-0 9, Chromey 0 2-5 2, Rizzo 0 0-0 0,
Rachko 0 0-0 0, Cipollina 0 0-0 0. Totals 8 6-14
24.
Pittston Area...................... 9 16 13 14 - 51
Old Forge........................... 4 7 6 7 - 24
Three-point FGs: Sklanka, Stravinski 2, Maneth,
Arjust.
Northwest 61,
Wyoming Area 43
Dave Mazonkey scored 16
and Christian Foley had 13 to
lead Northwest past Wyoming
Area in the consolation game.
Wyoming Area was led by
Lou Vallo with 16 points.
NORTHWEST (61)
Mazonkey 7 2-5 16, Foley 5 2-5 12, Nelson 2
0-4 5, Yustat 2 4-6 8, Tomko 3 0-0 8, Cragle 2
1-2 3, Sirak 4 0-1 8. Totals 24 10-23 61.
WYOMING AREA (43)
Jo.Zezza 2 0-0 6, Adonizio 1 0-0 2, Grove 0
1-2 1, Je.Zezza 0 0-0 0, Vallo 5 5-5 16, Carey 2
0-2 6, Barcelon 0 0-0 0, Klus 0 0-1 0, Drving
Hawk 1 0-0 2, Kirby 0 0-0 0, Chupka 5 0-0 10.
Totals 16 6-10 43.
Northwest ........................ 20 18 13 10 - 61
Wyoming Area................ 11 3 19 10 - 43
Three-Point FGs: Nelson, Tomko 2, Jo. Zezza
2, Vallo, Carey 2.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Pittston Area 54,
Old Forge 41
Mia Hopkins scored 24
points, grabbed 10 rebounds
and had five steals to lead
Pittston Area past Old Forge in
the championship game of the
Marseco Memorial Tourna-
ment at Old Forge.
Also scoring in double fig-
ures for Pittston Area was Allie
Barber with 10 points.
Old Forge was led by Lauren
Carey with 16 points.
PITTSTON AREA (54)
Barber 2 6-8 10, Fereck 0 0-0 0, Waleski 1
2-6 4, Mitchell 1 0-0 2, Rabender 2 0-1 4, O’Neill
3 1-2 9, Hopkins 8 8-12 24. Totals 17 17-29 54.
OLD FORGE (41)
Viella 0 0-0 0, Barnik 0 4-4 4, Malia 1 0-0 2,
Carey 5 5-14 16, Lee 1 1-4 4, Bierlya 2 0-0 6,
Nemest 2 0-0 5, Tansley 1 2-2 4. Totals 12 12-24
41.
Pittston Area ................... 10 7 10 27 - 54
Old Forge......................... 5 15 12 9 - 41
Three-point FGs: O’Neill 2, Carey, Lee, Bierlya
2, Nemest.
Mid Valley 56,
Wyoming Area 36
Mid Valley’s Danielle Terrar-
ella scored a tournament re-
cord 36 points to lead Mid
Valley past Wyoming Area in
the consolation game.
Wyoming Area was lead by
Serra Degram with 8 points.
MID VALLEY (56)
Guinnes 0 1-2 1, Terrarella 10 16-18 36,
Grgats 0 0-2 0, Jackson 3 3-7 9, Verespy 0 0-0 0,
Reynolds 0 0-2 0, Keyasko 0 0-2 0, Roshak 0 0-0
0, Ronco 1 0-0 2, Hughes 2 1-2 6, Kline 1 0-2 2,
Talarico 0 0-0 0. Totals 17 21-37 56.
WYOMING AREA (36)
Degram 4 0-1 8, N.Turner 1 2-6 4, Radzailka
3 0-0 6, Cumbo 0 0-0 0, Blarnett 1 5-7 7,
Thornton 0 1-2 1, Delucca 1 0-0 2, Bott 0 0-0 0,
Coolbaugh 2 0-0 4, F.Turner 0 0-0 0, Dileo 1 0-0
2, Bonita 0 0-0 0, Meluim 0 0-0, Hiedalavage 1
0-0 2. Totals 14 8-16 36.
Mid Valley........................ 19 17 10 10 - 56
Wyoming Area................ 9 5 10 12 - 36
Three-point FGs: Hughes.
L O C A L R O U N D U P
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Pittston Area’s Jordan Houseman, left, steals the ball fromOld
Forge’s Jake Manetti in the championship game of the Anthony
’Badger’ Marseco Tournament at Old Forge High School on
Sunday night.
Pittston Area’s Grace O’Neill, left, drives past Old Forge’s Tay-
lor Nemetz in the championship game of the Anthony ’Badger’
Marseco Tournament at Old Forge High School on Sunday night.
Patriot boys, girls
win tournament titles
The Times Leader staff
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — JaMy-
chal Green scored 21 points and
No. 16 Alabama rebounded from
a two-game losing streak to beat
Detroit 62-54 on Sunday night.
Tony Mitchell added 15 points
and freshman Nick Jacobs
chipped in 13 in his first start for
the Crimson Tide (8-2), who
returned to a more character-
istic defensive form after losses
to Georgetown and at Dayton.
Detroit (5-7) trailed by 22
points late in the first half and
failed to approach its 75.9-point
scoring average. The Titans
shot 32 percent (17 of 53) and
missed all 12 3-point attempts.
Murray St. 76, Memphis 72
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Donte
Poole hit a career-best six 3-
pointers and scored 20 points to
help Murray State remain one of
only nine teams in Division I
that are still unbeaten.
The Racers (10-0) took con-
trol early then had to weather a
late Memphis rally to hold on
for the victory. Murray State
was up 71-60 with just under 2
minutes left before Memphis
(5-3) scored eight straight
points to make it a one-posses-
sion game.
Illinois 80, Coppin St. 63
D.J. Richardson scored 20
points to lead four players in
double figures as Illinois re-
mained one of nine undefeated
teams in the nation.
After Illinois jumped out to a
17-point lead in the opening
minutes of the second half,
Coppin State went on a 20-5 run
to cut the lead to 59-57.
T O P 2 5 B A S K E T B A L L
Alabama snaps two-game losing streak
The Associated Press
CHICAGO — Patrick Sharp
steered in a loose puck off a
rebound at 4:26 of overtime to
give the Chicago Blackhawks a
3-2 victory over the San Jose
Sharks on Sunday night.
Antti Niemi stopped Marian
Hossa’s shot from the top of the
right circle, but kicked the puck
toward the goal line. Sharp
swooped in to bury the re-
bound for his sixth goal in his
last six games, helping Chicago
improve to 4-0-1 in its last five.
Chicago’s Andrew Brunette
scored on deflection with 1:06
left in the third period and
Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery
pulled for an extra attacker to
tie it 2. Following a Chicago
timeout and a faceoff in the
Sharks’ zone, Brunette tipped
in Hossa’s shot from the top of
the slot.
Rangers 6, Panthers 1
NEW YORK — Derek Stepan
scored twice, including a pretty
coast-to-coast goal just after the
Rangers killed a penalty, and
New York beat Florida.
Stepan also assisted on Mar-
ian Gaborik’s goal late in the
second period that made it 5-1
and seemed to take what spring
remained out of the Panthers.
New York looked nothing like a
team playing for the second
night in a row, putting away the
Panthers for their fourth win in
six games.
Brad Richards, Artem Anisi-
mov and former Panthers de-
fenseman Steve Eminger also
scored for New York. Erik Gud-
branson scored for Florida,
which has lost two in a row
following a three-game winning
streak.
N H L
Sharp’s OT goal gives Chicago a win
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 5B
➛ B O Y S B A S K E T B A L L
was the team’s fourth-leading scorer,
so finding some offense punch will
be key. So will be finding someone to
run an offensive that relies more on
patience than explosiveness.
4. COUGHLIN
Coach: Mike Day
10-11 WVC record: 4-9, tied 4th Div. I;
8-14 overall
10-11 postseason: none
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Matt Dobosh, F;
Chris Grullon, F;
Joe Ellis, G
Key players:
Marcus Cobb, 5-11,
Sr.; Devon Davis,
6-2, Sr.; Eric
Heffers, 6-0, Sr.;
Ian Jeremiah,
6-0, Sr.; Phil Trout, 6-0, Sr.; Connor
Flaherty, 6-2, Jr.; Nate Oliver, 5-10,
So.
Outlook: Day was one of the best big
men ever to wear a Coughlin uni-
form. The 1992 grad left the school
as its all-time leader in rebounds,
blocked shots and assists. He inher-
its a team that is very athletic and
quick, but lacks size once again.
The Crusaders suffered their first
losing season in the past five sea-
sons, but many guys received valua-
ble on-the-job training. Cobb (10.8
ppg), Trout (9.0 ppg), Jeremiah (5.3
ppg) and Davis (4.8 ppg) all showed
flashes of becoming very good
players. If they can elevate their
play, Coughlin could be a surprise
team. A possible dark horse for the
divisional title.
5. PITTSTON AREA
Coach: Alan Kiesinger
10-11 WVC record: 4-9, tied 4th Div. I;
8-14 overall
10-11 postseason: none
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Joe Coyne, F; R.J.
Emmett, G
Key players:
Chris Kovaleski,
6-4, Sr.; Shaun
McDermott, 6-0,
Sr.; Steve Sklan-
ka, 5-10, Sr.; Steve
Stravinski, 6-4,
Sr.; Jordan Houseman, 6-0, Jr.;
James Tobish, 6-2, Jr.; Kyler Kova-
leski, 6-1, So.; Mason Gross, 6-4, So.;
Michael Schwab, 5-8, So.
Outlook: Pittston Area had its worst
season since posting just five victo-
ries in 2005-06. However, Kiesinger
likes the way the younger players
have developed and with a solid
group of returning starters the
Patriots could improve on last sea-
son’s mark.
Stravinski (13.8 ppg) returns as the
team’s leading scorer and 3-point
threat. Skalanka (10.2 ppg) and
Houseman (6.4 ppg) are return to
the lineup, with Houseman among
the better athletes in the WVC. Chris
Kovaleski, McDermott and Schwab
also saw some time in the varsity
games.
The Partiots were hit-or-miss most
of last season, but that could change
with a year of experience under
their belts. Consistency will be the
key to improvement and success.
DIVISION II
1. HOLY REDEEMER
Coach: Mark Belenski
10-11 WVC record: 12-1, 1st Div. II; 24-5
overall
10-11 postseason:
D2-3A champion;
lost 56-41 to
Lancaster Ca-
tholic in PIAA
quarterfinals
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Peter Alexis, C;
Austin Carr, G;
Adam Dunsmuir,
G; Tim Lambert, G; John McCarthy,
F; Stephen Ruch, F
Key players: Will Cavanaugh, 6-1, Sr.;
Ryan DeRemer, 5-10, Sr.; Dalton Ell,
6-4, Sr.; Mike Morrison, 6-6, Jr.; Brian
Banas, 6-2, So.; Mike Boutanos, 5-8,
So.; John Kane, 6-5, So.; Mariano
Medico, 5-8, So.; Mike Prociak, 6-7,
So.; Shaheal Wallace, 6-2, So.
Outlook: Redeemer lost its entire
starting lineup – including Penn
State recruit Alexis – and its sixth
man to graduation. For the first time
in the school’s five-year history, the
Royals will take the court without a
Division I prospect on the floor.
Cavanaugh, Ell and Prociak saw the
most varsity time last season and
that was barely enough to dent the
stat sheet. What the Royals lack in
experience, they make up for in size
as they’ll have the biggest frontcourt
across the line.
WYOMING VALLEY CONFERENCE
BOYS BASKETBALL CAPSULES
Teams are listed in predicted order of
finish.
DIVISION I
1. WYOMING VALLEY WEST
Coach: George Reimiller
10-11 WVC re-
cord: 11-2, 1st Div.
I; 18-7 overall
10-11 postseason:
D2/4-4A runner-
up; lost 87-60 to
Penn Wood in
PIAA play-in
game
State classifica-
tion: 4A
Key players lost:
Eugene Lewis
(transferred to Meyers)
Key players: Jonathan Gimble, 6-7,
Sr.; Ryan Hoinski, 5-9, Sr.; James
McCann, 5-9, Sr.; Brett Good, 5-10,
Jr.; Jaquan Ingram, 6-5, Jr.; Mike
Baur, 6-3, So.; Steve Doroskewicz,
6-2, So.
Outlook: Valley West posted its first
winning season since going 14-12 in
the 2006-07 season. It will be diffi-
cult to match last season’s victory
total with the departure of Lewis,
who led Division I in scoring last
season with an 18.5 average.
However, the Spartans are far from
devoid of talent. McCann (15.4 ppg)
was second in scoring in the division.
The four-year starter elevated his
game tremendously last season and
netted 22 3-pointers in WVC play.
Gimble and Hoinski are two-year
starters. Gimble (7.9 ppg) adds size
while Hoinski (6.2 ppg) does the
little things that don’t show up in a
boxscore. Ingram showed flashes in
limited play, while Good filled in
nicely when the Spartans ran into
some personnel issues late in the
season.
2. HAZLETON AREA
Coach: Mike Joseph
10-11 WVC record: 8-5, 3rd Div. I; 13-10
overall
10-11 postseason: Lost 48-44 to
Wyoming Valley
West in D2/4-4A
semifinals
State classifica-
tion: 4A
Key players lost:
Joel Espinal, F/C;
Danny Fogerty, G;
Dwaine Gilley, F
Key players:
Travis Buckner,
6-0, Sr.; Adam
Hauze, 6-2, Sr.; Tyler Plaksa, 5-11, Sr.;
Frankie Vito, 6-3, Sr.;
Sal Blasi, 5-11, So.; Kyle Karmonick,
6-3, So.
Outlook: Hazleton Area went
through a rare rebuilding project last
season. The Cougars, though, should
see some returns for the rough road
in 2010-11.
Plaksa is back at point guard. His 11.6
point average is the best among
returning players. Blasi (6.5 ppg)
and Vito (4.2 ppg) gained valuable
experience and should improve on
last season. Blasi had 18 3-pointers
during the WVC season. Buckner
(5.8 ppg) played very well down the
stretch. They all run the floor very
well.
The weak spot is size. Karmonick
saw limited varsity time as a fresh-
man. The lack of height will probably
mean the Cougars will have to out-
hustle opponents and run the floor
smoothly to be successful. They
could challenge for the division if
things fall into place.
3. CRESTWOOD
Coach: Mark Atherton
10-11 WVC record: 9-4, 2nd Div. I; 12-11
overall
10-11 postseason:
Lost 48-46 in
2OT to Abington
Heights in D2-3A
quarterfinals
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Alex Culver, G/F;
Joey Picket, G;
Austin Powell, G;
Dave Piavis, F; Jonathan Wojnar, G
Key players: John Fazzini, 6-2, Sr.;
Josh Jones, 5-9, Sr.; Mike Judge,
6-0, Sr.; Jake Prohaska, 6-4, Sr.;
Steve Roberts, 6-0, Jr.; Brandon
Cole, 5-11, So.; Chris Fazzini, 6-3, So.;
Brady Gallagher, 5-7, So.
Outlook: The Comets are coming off
their first double-digit loss season
since finishing 19-11 in 2003-04. The
perennial WVC power has plenty of
work to do to get back to the top of
the heap. Replacing Wojnar – who
was the team’s heart and soul – will
be a very difficult task.
The Fazzini brothers – John (6.7 ppg)
and Chris (3.2 ppg) – are the only
returning players who saw action in
every WVC game last season. John
For the first time since Redeemer
was formed, it’s not the prohibitive
favorite to win the division. But the
Royals certainly will be a contender
if things fall into place. It may take
awhile, though.
2. TUNKHANNOCK
Coach: Bob Miller
10-11 WVC record: 10-3, 2nd Div. II;
15-10 overall
10-11 postseason: Lost 61-37 to
Abington Heights
in D2-3A third-
place game
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Allen Coolbaugh,
G; Rich Condee-
lis, F/G; Mike
Papi, F/G
Key players:
Tyrin Alguire,
5-9, Sr.; A.J. Bevan, 6-2, Sr.; Derik
Franklin, 6-1, Sr.; James Hawk, 6-10,
Sr.; Al Kristunas, 6-4, Sr.; Alex Zaner,
5-11, Sr.; Jordan Faux, 5-9, Jr.; Brian
Stephenson, 6-1, Jr.; Austin Yanora,
5-6, Fr.
Outlook: Tunkhannock has three
huge holes to fill. Papi and Condeelis
were the team’s best shooters and
leading scorers. Papi graduated
while Condeelis didn’t come out to
concentrate on baseball. Plus, peppy
point guard Coolbaugh needs to be
replaced.
The Tigers hope Hawk (9.5 ppg), the
tallest player in the WVC, continues
to develop. He had some impressive
games last season and played much
tough than his sophomore season.
Bevan (5.2 ppg) also returns to the
starting lineup. Alguire (2.4 ppg)
also saw varsity duty last season.
After those players, Tunkhannock is
going to need a handful of new faces
to make an impact to have similar
success as last season.
3. DALLAS
Coach: Doug Miller
10-11 WVC record: 5-8, 3rd Div. II; 12-11
overall
10-11 postseason: Lost 50-40 to
Holy Redeemer
in D2-3A quarter-
finals
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Travis DeBona, G;
Marc Noyalis, C;
Jordan Richard-
son, G/F; Stephen
Zapoticky, F/C
Key players:
Donnie Behm, 6-0, Sr.; Paul Brace,
5-11, Sr.; Shane Dunn, 6-4, Sr.; Bob
Saba, 5-9, Sr.; Jason Simonovich,
6-5, Jr.; Allen Fell, 6-6, Fr.
Outlook: Miller takes over a Dallas
team that a lot like several in the
recent past. The Mountaineers have
some outstanding athletes – Brace,
Dunn and Simonovich were football
stars in the fall – but how it trans-
lates to the hardwoods in the ques-
tion.
Dunn (13.5 ppg) is the best of the
bunch and is a returning Division II
all-star. Simonovich (4.9 ppg) and
Brace (4.3) logged the most time of
the other returning players. Howev-
er, the Mountaineers lost their pe-
rimeter threat DeBona to gradua-
tion, leaving a big void beyond the
arc.
Dallas returns the most proven
talent to the division and could
challenge for the title if Redeemer
and Tunkhannock don’t develop
quick enough.
4. WYOMING AREA
Coach: Al Brogna
10-11 WVC record: 2-11, 4th Div. II; 3-19
overall
10-11 postseason:
none
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Ryan Carey, G;
Randy McDer-
mott, F/C; Cody
Gates, C
Key players: Joe
Adonizio, 5-11, Sr.;
Mike Carey, 5-11,
Sr.; E.J. Driving Hawk, 6-0, Sr.; Matt
Klus, Sr.; Vinny Latona, Sr.; Dan
Newhart, 6-0, Sr.; Lou Vullo, 5-11, Sr.;
Bart Chupka, 6-2, Jr.; Trent Grove,
6-1, Jr.; Jordan Zezza, 5-9, Jr.
Outlook: Brogna, a former head
coach at Pittston Area, takes over a
program that has won only four
games over the past two seasons.
The task of rebuilding Wyoming
Area, which has had middling suc-
cess in the past, is a tough one.
Shooting guard Vullo (6.3 ppg) is the
only starter set. The rest of the
lineup will probably be Carey (2.2
ppg) at the point, Zezza (1.8 ppg) at
the off-guard and Chupka (5.4 ppg)
and Grove handling things inside.
Grove played sporadically last sea-
son, but closed out the campaign
with a couple solid games.
Athletically, the Warriors are a pretty
strong team and should be able to
hustle their way to a few more
victories that last season.
5. BERWICK
Coach: Jason Kingery
10-11 WVC record: 0-13, 5th Div. II; 1-21
overall
10-11 postseason: none
State classification: 3A
Key players lost: Luke McDanel, G
Key players:
Jimmy Gaizick,
6-2, Sr.; Jeremy
Clausen, 6-0, Jr.;
Zach Ladonis,
6-2, Jr.; Eric May,
5-8, Jr.; Kyle
Miller, 6-2, Jr.;
Anthony Melito,
5-6, So.
Outlook: Kingery
will try to fix a
program that has
had four head coaches in the past
three seasons. He comes with an
impressive resume, leading Scott
(W.Va.) High School to the 2A state
title game last season and a state
berth in 2008-09, its first since the
1942-43 season.
The top scorers returning are Miller
(7.6 ppg), Gaizick (6.7 ppg), May (3.6
ppg), Melito (2.3 ppg) and Clausen
(2.0 ppg). Kingery likes the hustle
and dedication of the group, but a
lack of a big-time scorer and experi-
enced big men will hurt Berwick
throughout. The Dawgs have won a
combined five games the past three
seasons. Anything above that total
this season would be a good founda-
tion for the future.
DIVISION III
1. GAR
Coach: Paul Brown
10-11 WVC record: 10-3, 2nd Div. III;
16-7 overall
10-11 postseason: Lost 42-41 in 2 OT
to Holy Cross in D2-2A quarterfinals
State classification: 2A
Key players lost: Mike Polakoski, G
Key players:
Darrell Crawford,
5-9, Sr.; Zach
Ellis, 5-11, Sr.;
Shaliek Powell,
6-1, Sr.; Iawntye
Ricks, 6-6, Sr.;
Matt Sharpe, 5-11,
Sr.; Christian
Skrepenak, 6-10,
Jr.; Isaiah Francis,
6-3, So.
Outlook: GAR
returns its entire starting lineup,
making the Grenadiers the early
favorite for the division.
Crawford (11.8 ppg) and Sharpe (8.0
ppg) form one of the top backcourts
in the WVC. Both can run the offense
and score, with Crawford hitting 24
3-pointers in WVC play last season.
Powell (9.8 ppg) can work inside or
outside and does a lot of things
extremely well. Skrepenak (5.9 ppg)
doesn’t provide much offense, but
can clogged up the middle. Francis
(8.4 ppg) really came on when
Polakoski was lost for the season
with an injury. Ellis (4.1 ppg) will
probably be the sixth man.
The only question is how strong the
bench will be. If the Grenadiers stay
injury free, they could unseat
Meyers.
2. MEYERS
Coach: Pat Toole
10-11 WVC record: 13-0, 1st Div. III;
24-3 overall
10-11 postseason: D2-2A runner-up;
lost 56-33 to Imhotep Charter in
PIAA second round
State classification: 2A
Key players lost:
Nahjee Brown, G;
Ross Lavan, G/F;
Chris McGavin, G;
Keyton Winder, F
Key players:
Dominic John-
son, 6-2, Sr.;
Eugene Lewis,
6-3, Sr. (Valley
West transfer);
Jalen Miller, 6-5,
Sr.; Alex Pape, 6-3, Sr.; Fabian Smith,
5-11, Sr.; Eddie Walters, 6-4, Sr.; Ryan
Krawczeniuk, 6-2, Jr.; Rasheed
Moore, 6-5, Jr.; C.J. Szafran, 5-8, Jr.;
Tyriek Steward, 6-3, So.
Outlook: Meyers lost three huge
pieces to its championship team, but
return two significant parts. Krawc-
zeniuk (11.3 ppg) started as a fresh-
man and is a perimeter threat.
Moore (9.9 ppg) really came on over
the latter part of the season, estab-
lishing himself as a force on the
boards.
The third piece – Valley West trans-
fer Lewis – might not fall into place.
A hearing before the District 2
Athletic Committee will determine
that. His presence would push the
Mohawks to the divisional favorite.
Miller and Walters are tough guys
who will do the hard work inside.
Steward is a tremendous jumper, but
need to polish other aspects of his
game. With or without Lewis, the
Mohawks are a formidable team.
3. NANTICOKE
Coach: Ken Bartuska
10-11 WVC record: 8-5, 4th Div. III;
9-14 overall
10-11 postseason:
Lost 59-36 to
West Scranton in
D2-3A quarterfi-
nals
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Cody Bukowski,
G; Cael Evans, F
Key players:
Brian Bevan, 6-0, Sr.; Josh Decker,
6-3, Sr.; Brandon Kairo, 6-4, Sr.; Evan
Reakes, 5-10, Sr.; Joey Yudichak, 5-10,
Sr.; Kevin Zaykoski, 6-2, Sr.; Luke
Casey, 6-5, So.; Tyler Myers, 5-7, So.
Outlook: Nanticoke has two huge
holes to fill. Evans was one of the
steadiest big men in the WVC in his
four-year career and was the team’s
leading scorer. Bukowski ran the
offense.
There is some size to replace Evans,
but only Kairo (5.8 ppg) logged any
significant minutes last season.
Replacing his scoring will also be
difficult. Zaykoski (7.9 ppg) and
Decker (6.3 ppg) might be able to
pick up some of the slack, but Deck-
er is trying to overcome some injury
issues. Yudichak brings some experi-
ence to the point guard spot.
The Trojans will probably fall in the
middle of the divisional pack, but
could surprise in the second-half
season.
4. LAKE-LEHMAN
Coach: Brian Cutter
10-11 WVC record: 4-9, 5th Div. III;
9-13 overall
10-11 postseason:
none
State classifica-
tion: 3A
Key players lost:
Chad Carey, F;
Jesse Hauze, G;
Adam Weaver, G;
Dylan Wasylyk, F
Key players:
Kevin Bohan, 6-2,
Sr.; Chris Connor,
6-5, Sr.; Kevin Katchko, 5-8, Sr.;
Jared Novitski, 6-2, Sr.; Cody Poep-
perling, 6-0, Sr.; Tom Boyle, 6-1, Jr.;
Jared James, 6-1, Jr.; Bill Hillman,
5-11, Jr.
Pete Borum, 6-6, So.;
Outlook: Lehman came very close to
breaking a streak of 18 consecutive
losing seasons in 2010-11, losing four
games by five points or less. As
Cutter starts his third season, he
believes this is the best group he has
had.
Three starters return in Bohan (6.8
ppg), O’Connor (10.5 ppg) and point
guard Poepperling (1.0 ppg). James
(4.8 ppg) was slated to start, but
missed most of the season with a
knee injury. He is back, but big man
Borum won’t return until late be-
cause of an injury. Novitski (4.2 ppg)
leads a bench that has depth and a
decent amount of experience.
This could be the season where the
final record ends up on the winning
side.
5. HANOVER AREA
Coach: Steve Harnischfeger
10-11 WVC record: 9-4, 3rd Div. III;
16-9 overall
10-11 postseason:
Lost 63-43 to
Holy Cross in
D2-2A third-place
game
State classifica-
tion: 2A
Key players lost:
Bilal Floyd, G;
Cory Dickson, G;
Mike Kellerer, F;
Aaron Springer,
G
Key players: Austin Bogart, 5-11, Sr.;
ShaQuille Rolle, Sr.; Martin Steve,
6-7, Sr.
Outlook: The Hawkeyes were gutting
by graduation, losing four of their
top five scorers.
Rolle (8.1 ppg) is the only player back
who demonstrated the ability to
score on a fairly regular basis. He
also appears to be the only “basket-
ball guy” with any significant varsity
experience. Steve (3.9) also started
and will bring size and toughness
inside. However, his sport is football,
where he is drawing Division I in-
terest. Bogart is the school’s all-time
leading scorer … in soccer. He hasn’t
played in basketball in quite some
time, but has shown he could be a
key part.
Hanover Area has posted consec-
utive winning seasons, but that
streak could end if the Hawkeyes
don’t find some answers sooner than
later.
6. NORTHWEST
Coach: Jerry Blazick
10-11 WVC record: 8-5, 1st Div. IV;
13-10 overall
10-11 postseason:
none
State classifica-
tion: 2A
Key players lost:
Paul Ascenzi, F;
Bret Rutkoski, G
Key players:
Christian Foley,
6-3, Sr.; Jeff
Nelson, 5-9, Sr.;
Dalton Tomko, 5-8, Sr.; Garret Yustat,
5-10, Sr.; Kyle Cragle, 6-1, Jr.; Devon
Mazonkey, 6-3, Jr.; Alex Sirak, 6-3,
Jr.; John Maul, 6-5, So.
Outlook: Northwest won’t have a
divisional championship to defend as
the remnants of Division IV have
been absorbed into Division III.
However, the Rangers are probably
in the best shape of the three Divi-
sion IV leftovers.
Northwest returns six of its top eight
players, with perimeter threat Ma-
zonkey (10.5 ppg) and agile inside
man Foley (10.0 ppg) expected to
pace the offense. The Rangers,
though, will need more from them
and others as the competition will be
tougher.
The difference could be defense and
rebounding. The divisional frontrun-
ners are incredibly athletic and will
likely cause match-up problems. The
Rangers will probably finish any-
where between third and sixth.
7. WYOMING SEMINARY
Coach: C.J. Kersey
10-11 WVC record: 7-6, 2nd Div. IV;
8-14 overall
10-11 postseason:
none
State classifica-
tion: 2A
Key players lost:
Dylan Lefkowitz,
G; Chib Onwuna-
ka, F; Kai Smith, F
Key players:
Sam Hwang, 6-0,
Sr.; Josh Lef-
kowitz, 6-0, Sr.;
Jason Ellis, 5-8,
Jr.; E.J. Flippen, 6-2, Jr.; Ander
Gonzalez, 5-11, Jr.; Alex Barilla, 6-3,
So.; Brad Sedor, 5-11, So.; Seth Call-
ahan, 5-10, Fr.
Outlook: The Blue Knights have a
couple backcourt veterans returning
in Lefkowitz (12.2 ppg) and Ellis (6.1
ppg). Both are capable from hitting
outside the arc. After that, though,
the experience meter takes a plunge.
Barilla (2.1 ppg) played quite a bit
and will be the Blue Knights’ big
man. But with a lack of size through-
out, Seminary will be at a disad-
vantage in the paint almost every
game. Hwang and Sedor saw limited
action. The rest of the top eight are
newcomers to varsity play.
With only two seniors on the rosters,
the Blue Knights will be in rebuild
mode for the most part. And that
means finishing in the upper half of
the division will be difficult.
8. MMI PREP
Coach: Joe Flanagan
10-11 WVC re-
cord: 4-9, 3rd
Div. IV; 6-17
overall
10-11 postseason:
Lost 49-44 to
Susquehanna in
D2-A semifinals
State classifica-
tion: A
Key players lost:
Ryan Forte, G;
Fran Swankoski, F
Key players: George Gera, 5-8, Sr.;
T.J. Wenner, 6-2, Sr.; Aaron Kollar,
5-7, Jr.; R.J. Kupsho, 5-7, So.; Cory
Rogers, 5-11, Fr.
Outlook: The Preppers only lost two
starters, but they are big losses.
Forte was an excellent perimeter
scorer while Swankoski liked to mix it
up inside. So MMI will lack scoring
and – as it seems every season – size
inside.
Point guard Kollar (5.9 ppg) is back
and brings a feistiness to a team
that will have to gut out victories.
Gera (7.0 ppg) also returns. Kupsho
saw some varsity action as well.
Wenner is the tallest player on the
roster, but didn’t see a lot of time as
a junior.
The WVC smallest school has an
uphill battle in the division. However,
the experience could come in handy
come time for the District 2 Class A
playoffs.
-- By JOHN ERZAR
W V C T E A M - B Y - T E A M C A P S U L E S
Reimiller
Joseph
Atherton
Day
Kiesinger
Belenski
Bob Miller
Doug Miller
Kingery
Brogna
Brown
Toole
Bartuska
Cutter
Harnischfeger
Blazick
Kersey
Flanagan
Division I and II Schedule
(All games 7:15 p.m.)
First-Half Season
Tuesday, Jan. 3
Berwick at Pittston Area
Hazleton Area at Coughlin
Wyoming Area at Holy Redeemer
Wyoming Valley West at Crestwood
Friday, Jan. 6
Coughlin at Wyoming Valley West
Crestwood at Pittston Area
Hazleton Area at Dallas
Holy Redeemer at Berwick
Tunkhannock at Wyoming Area
Tuesday, Jan. 10
Crestwood at Hazleton Area
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
Pittston Area at Coughlin
Wyoming Area at Berwick
Wyoming Valley West at Tunkhannock
Friday, Jan. 13
Berwick at Tunkhannock
Coughlin at Crestwood
Hazleton Area at Pittston Area
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Valley
West
Wyoming Area at Dallas
Tuesday, Jan. 17
Coughlin at Wyoming Area
Dallas at Berwick
Pittston Area at Holy Redeemer
Tunkhannock at Crestwood
Wyoming Valley West at Hazleton Area
Friday, Jan. 20
Berwick at Hazleton Area
Dallas at Coughlin
Crestwood at Wyoming Area
Holy Redeemer at Tunkhannock
Pittston Area at Wyoming Valley West
Jan. 22-26
Playoffs if necessary
Second-Half Season
Friday, Jan. 27
Berwick at Wyoming Area
Coughlin at Holy Redeemer
Hazleton Area at Crestwood
Pittston Area at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Valley West at Dallas
Tuesday, Jan. 31
Berwick at Dallas
Hazleton Area at Tunkhannock
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Area
Pittston Area at Crestwood
Wyoming Valley West at Dallas
Thursday, Feb. 2
Dallas at Pittston Area
Friday, Feb. 3
Coughlin at Hazleton Area
Crestwood at Berwick
Tunkhannock at Holy Redeemer
Wyoming Area at Wyoming Valley
West
Tuesday, Feb. 7
Coughlin at Pittston Area
Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Tunkhannock at Berwick
Wyoming Area at Hazleton Area
Friday, Feb. 10
Dallas at Wyoming Area
Pittston Area at Hazleton Area
Wyoming Valley West at Berwick
Tunkhannock at Coughlin
Holy Redeemer at Crestwood
Tuesday, Feb. 14
Berwick at Coughlin
Crestwood at Dallas
Hazleton Area at Holy Redeemer
Wyoming Area at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Valley West at Pittston Area
Friday, Feb. 17
Berwick at Holy Redeemer
Crestwood at Coughlin
Dallas at Tunkhannock
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Valley West
Pittston Area at Wyoming Area
Feb. 19-23
Playoffs in necessary
Division III Schedule
First-Half Season
Tuesday, Jan. 3
Hanover Area at GAR
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
MMI Prep at Meyers
Northwest at Wyoming Seminary
Friday, Jan. 6
Lake-Lehman at GAR
Meyers at Hanover Area
Northwest at Nanticoke
Wyoming Seminary at MMI Prep
Tuesday, Jan. 10
Lake-Lehman at Hanover Area
Meyers at Northwest
MMI Prep at GAR
Nanticoke at Wyoming Seminary
Friday, Jan. 13
GAR at Northwest
Hanover Area at Wyoming Seminary
Meyers at Lake-Lehman
MMI Prep at Nanticoke
Tuesday, Jan. 17
GAR at Nanticoke
Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep
Northwest at Hanover Area
Wyoming Seminary at Meyers
Thursday, Jan. 19
Hanover Area at MMI Prep
Lake-Lehman at Northwest
Nanticoke at Meyers
Wyoming Seminary at GAR
Saturday, Jan. 21
GAR at Meyers
Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Seminary
MMI Prep at Northwest
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
Jan. 23-26
Playoffs if necessary
Second-Half Season
Friday, Jan. 27
GAR at Hanover Area
Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke
Meyers at MMI Prep
Wyoming Seminary at Northwest
Tuesday, Jan. 31
GAR at Lake-Lehman
Hanover Area at Meyers
MMI Prep at Wyoming Seminary
Nanticoke at Northwest
Friday, Feb. 3
GAR at MMI Prep
Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman
Northwest at Meyers
Wyoming Seminary at Nanticoke
Tuesday, Feb. 7
Lake-Lehman at Meyers
Nanticoke at MMI Prep
Northwest at GAR
Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area
Friday, Feb. 10
Hanover Area ay Northwest
Meyers at Wyoming Seminary
MMI Prep at Hanover Area
Northwest at Lake-Lehman
Friday, Feb. 14
GAR at Wyoming Seminary
Meyers at Nanticoke
MMI Prep at Hanover Area
Northwest at Lake-Lehman
Friday, Feb. 17
Hanover Area at Nanticoke
Meyers at GAR
Northwest at MMI Prep
Wyoming Seminary at Lake-Lehman
Feb. 18-24
Playoffs in necessary
W V C B O Y S B A S K E T B A L L S C H E D U L E
CLASS 4A
2010-2011...........Scranton 97, Wyo. Val. West 66
2009-2010............Scranton 43, Hazleton Area 36
2008-2009......Williamsport 60, Hazleton Area 57
2007-2008.......Abington Hts. 87, Williamsport 76
2006-2007 ...Hazleton Area 50, Abington Hts. 40
2005-2006Hazleton Area 48, Wyo. Val. West 43
2004-2005............Hazleton Area 51, Scranton 46
2003-2004 ...........Hazleton Area 59, Scranton 57
2002-2003Wallenpaupack 46, Hazleton Area 45
2001-2002........Williamsport 78, Abington Hts. 51
Note: Teams that lost to District 4 Williamsport
were crowned District 2 champions
CLASS 3A
2010-2011Holy Redeemer 42, West Scranton 29
2009-2010 .Abington Hts. 56, Holy Redeemer 40
2008-2009......Crestwood 44, Holy Redeemer 42
2007-2008 ........Scranton Prep 44, Crestwood 41
2006-2007..............Crestwood 60, Honesdale 55
2005-2006........Crestwood 52, Scranton Prep 44
2004-2005.......Crestwood 54, Wyoming Area 49
2003-2004.............Crestwood 46, Valley View 43
2002-2003 ..............Nanticoke 47, Valley View 45
2001-2002Scranton Prep 56, Wallenpaupack 44
CLASS 2A
2010-2011........................Riverside 49, Meyers 36
2009-2010.................Holy Cross 53, Dunmore 37
2008-2009 ................Holy Cross 46, Riverside 36
2007-2008.........................Holy Cross 48, GAR 41
2006-2007..Bishop Hoban 61, Mountain View 54
2005-2006..Bishop Hoban 66, Mountain View 57
2004-2005 ...........Bishop Hoban 63, Dunmore 49
2003-2004.......................Carbondale 60, GAR 59
2002-2003..........................GAR 72, Northwest 64
2001-2002 ....Bishop Hannan 67, Bishop O’Reilly
64
CLASS A
2010-2011 ...........Old Forge 47, Susquehanna 24
2009-2010 ..................Old Forge 41, MMI Prep 37
2008-2009..................Old Forge 55, MMI Prep 41
2007-2008...........Old Forge 51, Susquehanna 30
2006-2007 .........Old Forge 51, Bishop O’Hara 48
2005-2006....Bishop O’Reilly 53, Bishop Hannan
49
2004-2005....Bishop O’Reilly 85, Bishop Hannan
63
2003-2004........Bishop O’Reilly 70, Old Forge 51
2002-2003........Bishop O’Reilly 64, Old Forge 47
2001-2002........Seton Catholic 65, Forest City 56
R E C E N T D I S T R I C T 2 B O Y S
T I T L E G A M E S
C M Y K
PAGE 6B MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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MENTIONCODE: FSPC
ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 35/18
Average 40/25
Record High 64 in 1979
Record Low -1 in 1958
Yesterday 38
Month to date 295
Year to date 1343
Last year to date 1570
Normal year to date 1646
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00”
Month to date 1.69”
Normal month to date 0.95”
Year to date 58.57”
Normal year to date 35.96”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 7.45 -1.06 22.0
Towanda 3.96 -0.52 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 5.87 -0.39 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 40-44. Lows: 22-26. Sunny and
calm today.
The Poconos
Highs: 47-51. Lows: 25-35. Mostly sunny
skies and calm conditions.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 40-43. Lows: 20-32. Mostly sunny
and calm.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 43-47. Lows: 28-32. Sunny skies
and calm conditions.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 49-54. Lows: 29-42. Mostly sunny
and calm.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 40/27/.18 30/15/sn 23/6/s
Atlanta 53/32/.00 50/39/c 63/42/pc
Baltimore 42/23/.00 47/30/s 51/34/pc
Boston 38/28/.01 47/34/s 47/35/s
Buffalo 36/25/.00 42/32/s 44/37/pc
Charlotte 49/28/.00 51/37/pc 60/37/s
Chicago 45/27/.00 38/34/pc 39/36/c
Cleveland 37/21/.00 42/29/s 43/36/c
Dallas 53/36/.00 52/45/c 63/60/c
Denver 44/18/.00 43/22/pc 38/25/c
Detroit 36/19/.00 39/30/pc 42/33/c
Honolulu 82/71/.02 80/67/r 80/67/r
Houston 57/40/.00 62/49/c 71/64/pc
Indianapolis 40/19/.00 42/31/s 44/36/c
Las Vegas 55/36/.00 58/43/c 57/41/sh
Los Angeles 59/47/.00 60/48/sh 61/44/sh
Miami 80/73/.12 80/72/sh 78/65/pc
Milwaukee 46/25/.00 39/33/pc 41/34/c
Minneapolis 37/19/.00 37/28/i 34/27/pc
Myrtle Beach 54/36/.00 58/43/sh 62/42/s
Nashville 48/19/.00 51/36/pc 58/43/c
New Orleans 54/45/.00 65/53/pc 67/56/pc
Norfolk 47/39/.00 54/39/s 56/38/pc
Oklahoma City 47/25/.01 49/41/c 54/53/sh
Omaha 41/20/.01 36/28/c 36/34/sh
Orlando 81/63/.02 76/61/sh 77/57/pc
Phoenix 70/45/.00 67/48/sh 61/44/r
Pittsburgh 37/16/.00 41/27/s 46/32/pc
Portland, Ore. 40/35/.00 42/30/pc 43/32/c
St. Louis 49/28/.00 47/36/pc 48/42/sh
Salt Lake City 39/19/.00 41/30/pc 40/26/c
San Antonio 51/46/.02 60/54/c 72/65/c
San Diego 60/48/.00 59/47/sh 58/48/c
San Francisco 53/43/.00 56/42/pc 56/45/s
Seattle 40/37/.02 46/33/pc 46/39/sh
Tampa 78/61/.00 80/60/pc 79/55/pc
Tucson 70/40/.00 62/46/sh 58/42/sh
Washington, DC 43/29/.00 47/32/s 51/34/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 43/36/.00 46/39/sh 47/40/r
Baghdad 55/39/.00 63/40/s 65/41/pc
Beijing 50/18/.00 40/23/s 38/22/s
Berlin 39/30/.00 44/31/sh 43/35/sh
Buenos Aires 88/66/.00 83/57/pc 76/58/sh
Dublin 46/36/.00 48/37/r 40/35/sh
Frankfurt 37/25/.04 42/34/c 41/35/c
Hong Kong 61/50/.00 67/57/pc 66/56/pc
Jerusalem 59/43/.00 63/46/s 60/42/c
London 48/36/.00 45/39/s 51/41/r
Mexico City 68/43/.00 72/45/pc 75/43/pc
Montreal 36/23/.00 39/28/s 34/21/c
Moscow 34/30/.00 33/30/c 31/28/c
Paris 50/30/.00 45/41/r 48/42/sh
Rio de Janeiro 81/68/.00 77/68/s 80/70/s
Riyadh 64/46/.00 67/48/s 69/44/s
Rome 64/52/.00 61/49/r 62/45/sh
San Juan 83/73/.24 83/74/t 84/75/t
Tokyo 55/39/.00 55/44/s 50/43/s
Warsaw 37/28/.00 38/27/pc 39/34/c
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Philadelphia
47/31
Reading
45/25
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
40/26
41/26
Harrisburg
43/28
Atlantic City
51/32
New York City
46/36
Syracuse
42/28
Pottsville
42/25
Albany
43/27
Binghamton
Towanda
43/26
42/24
State College
40/26
Poughkeepsie
45/25
52/45
38/34
43/22
57/44
37/28
60/48
56/45
46/36
28/13
46/33
46/36
39/30
50/39
80/72
62/49
80/67
38/30
30/15
47/32
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:20a 4:35p
Tomorrow 7:20a 4:35p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 6:44p 8:50a
Tomorrow 7:49p 9:29a
Last New First Full
Dec 17 Dec 24 Jan 1 Jan 9
High pressure is
dominating the
region and will
continue to give
us beautiful
sunny days until
the middle of the
week! When you
head out the
door today, grab
your jacket! On
Tuesday, mild
tempera†ures
will stick around
giving us a most-
ly sunny day.
Wednesday will
start out partly
cloudy and warm
up to 45. Clouds
will increase
throughout the
day and a late
night shower is
possible. On
Thursday, we
could see an
early morning
flurry or two, but
then as we warm
up to 50, clouds
and rain will take
over for the
remainder of the
day. Friday will
bring partly
sunny skies with
a flurry.
- Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system centered over the Upper Midwest will bring rain and
snow showers to portions of Minnesota and Wisconsin today. Meanwhile, a low pressure system
approaching the southern Pacific Coast will bring a chance of rain to Southern California. There will
be a chance for some rain and higher elevation snow showers throughout the Southwest.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Sunny, milder
TUESDAY
Mostly
sunny
44°
26°
THURSDAY
Råin
and
clouds
50°
33°
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny, a
flurry
40°
34°
SATURDAY
Mostly
sunny
40°
26°
SUNDAY
Mostly
sunny
35°
25°
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny to
cloudy
45°
30°
42
°
23
°
C M Y K
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THE TIMES LEADER MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011
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SANTA CHRISTMAS PARADE
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PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Clarissa Davis of Nanticoke and daughter Avery, 16 months
Leah Huffman of Nanticoke and her son, Robert, 3
Janan Trotter, 14, left, Elizabeth Colemire, 13, Lovelia Pascuzzo,
15, Rita Stedner, 13, and Gabriella Pezzella, 13, all from Nanticoke
Dara Purse of Springfield, Pa., left; Misa Dudrick of Dallas, Sandra
Dudrick of Nanticoke, Dan Dudrick of Dallas, and Misa and Dan’s
children, Lily, 2, and Danny, 3
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John Maday, Great Wilkes-Barre Chamber Of Commerce, left; Lore
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cy Valunas, DWBBA member; her husband, Allan Valunas, and
Lori Charnogursky, PennStar Bank
Holly Lloyd, left, Heather Lloyd, Arianna Warnagiris and Destiny
Warnagiris of Coughlin High School
Jon, left, and Michelle Wise of Dunkin Donuts, Patricia Butler and
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C M Y K
PAGE 2C MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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United Methodist Homes’
Wesley Village Campus hosted a
breakfast celebration for 32
resident veterans and 12 veterans
from the Wilkes-Barre Veterans’
Association on Nov. 7. Honorees
entered the celebration under an
allée of flags waved by Wesley
Village staff. At the conclusion of
the meal, all veterans in attend-
ance received personalized cer-
tificates and a flag pin, both
provided by Veterans of the
Vietnam War in Pittston. Receiv-
ing his flag pin from Activity
Director Tami Chesniak is Myers
Manor resident and Army veter-
an Vincent Mammarella.
Wesley Village hosts
breakfast celebration
The Northeast Regional Can-
cer Institute recently received an
$8,372 grant from The Blue
Ribbon Foundation of Blue Cross
of Northeastern Pennsylvania to
support a cancer screening and
education program for 500 unin-
sured and underinsured resi-
dents from Lackawanna, Luzerne
and Wayne counties. The Cancer
Institute will partner with six free
and federally qualified health
clinics to identify program partic-
ipants and help them overcome
barriers such as financial status,
communication, transportation
and fear of the healthcare sys-
tem. In addition, all patients
identified without a medical
home will be connected to a
primary care provider. At the
check presentation, from left:
Bob Durkin, president, Cancer
Institute; Laura Toole, community
and patient services director,
Cancer Institute; and Cynthia A.
Yevich, executive director, The
Blue Ribbon Foundation of Blue
Cross of Northeastern Penn-
sylvania.
Blue Ribbon presents
funds to Cancer Institute
DALLAS: Daddow-Isaacs
Dallas American Legion Post
672 will hold its annual chil-
dren’s Christmas party on Sun-
day at the Post home. Santa will
arrive at 1 p.m., courtesy of the
Dallas Fire and Ambulance
Association. There will also be a
clown on hand to make bal-
loons. Refreshments will be
served and gifts given to chil-
dren up to age eight. John Emil
Sr. is the chairman and Joe
Kelley is the co-chairman of the
event. For more information,
contact Clarence J. Michael at
675-0488.
DALLAS: A V.F.W. service
officer or claims consultant will
be available for scheduled ap-
pointments 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. on Friday at state Senator
Lisa Baker’s office, 22 Dallas
Shopping Center. All veterans,
not just V.F.W. members, can
request an appointment by
calling 675-3931.
EXETER: The Adam Kalma-
nowicz American Legion Post
833 will hold a Christmas get
together at 6:30 tonight at the
Villa Foglia, Wyoming Avenue.
MCLEAN, VA.: USS Iwo Jima
(LPH2/LHD7) Shipmates Orga-
nization is holding a reunion for
all ships company and em-
barked Navy and Marine Corps
personnel June 6-10 at the
Crowne Plaza Hotel, Tysons
Corner. Anyone interested in
attending should contact Robert
G. McAnally at 152 Frissell St.,
Hampton, Va. 23663; phone
757-723-0317; or email yu-
jack@megalink.net.
NANTICOKE: The West Side
Auxiliary will meet 5 p.m.
Thursday at the Parkway Inn,
Kirmar Avenue, Alden.
PLAINS TWP.: The Plains
American Legion Auxiliary will
hold its monthly meeting 6 p.m.
Tuesday in the Legion hall. All
members are asked to attend
and new members are welcome.
The 2012 membership drive is
now taking place. Members are
also reminded to pay their dues.
SWOYERSVILLE: The Ca-
tholic War Veterans Memorial
Post 1601 will meet 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Swoyersville
American Legion. Commander
Donald Rakus will conduct this
important meeting and all mem-
bers are urged to attend.
The Home Association meet-
ing will take place immediately
following the Post meeting.
President John Tobias will pre-
side.
The Christmas dinner will be
served at this meeting along
with the installation of officers.
Menu for the dinner is steak or
lobster tail. All members should
place their orders by Tuesday by
calling 287-4730. No reserva-
tions will be accepted after this
date.
WYOMING: The West Wyom-
ing American Legion Morning
Star Post 904 recently voted to
retain all present officers. Offi-
cers are Commander Richard
Yarasavich, First Vice-Com-
mander Mathew Kerns, Second
Vice-Commander Joseph Gran-
teed, Chaplain Paul Shaffer III,
Sergeant of Arms/Service Offi-
cer Ronald Semanski, Adjutant
Joseph Herbert, Membership
Chairman Frank Perfinski, His-
torian Daniel Grescavage, Home
Association President George C.
Yurek, Home Association Vice-
President Robert Jones and
Treasurer Leonard Karrott.
Service men and women from
World War II, Korea, Vietnam,
Lebanon, Granada, Panama,
The Gulf War, Iraq and Afghan-
istan conflicts are eligible for
membership. The first year is
free and a $20 payment must be
paid up front for the second year
membership. Dec. 31 is the last
day for free membership.
For more information call
Frank Perfinski, membership
chairman, at 693-3202.
NEWS FOR
VETERANS
Three boxes of used books
purchased from Friends of the
Osterhout Library Book Sale are
helping our soldiers in Afghan-
istan stay well read. Dave Gron-
kowski of Plymouth purchased
the books during the book sale in
June and sent them to his son,
Sgt. Michael Gronkowski, serving
in Afghanistan. His son set up
what he called ‘Osterhout Library
Far East Annex,’ loaning books to
his fellow soldiers. The library
was a huge hit. The unit is sched-
uled to move and Sgt. Gronkow-
ski has decided to leave the
makeshift library behind so the
people of Afghanistan can also
enjoy the books. In his library in
Afghanistan is Sgt. Michael D.
Gronkowski.
Osterhout books find
new home in Afghanistan
Members from the Tri-County Council Auxiliary of the Pennsylvania American Legion recently
met at the Milesburg American Legion Post 893. The council consists of members from Centre,
Lycoming and Clinton counties. Some of the participants, from left, first row: Ruth Bauman, chap-
lain, William Marshall Crawford American Legion Auxiliary (ALA) Unit 131, Lock Haven; Barbara
Miller, president, Department of Pennsylvania American Legion Auxiliary; Dorothy Thiel, member,
Lock Haven ALA Unit 131. Second row: Carol Wert Walker, secretary, ALA Unit 131; Mary Ellen Switz-
er, ALA Unit 893, Milesburg; Bonnie Femea, ALA Unit 395, Kingston; Althea Watkins, member, ALA
Unit 131; and Ruth Bowmaster, sergeant at arms, ALA Unit 131.
American Legion Auxiliary groups meet
Marissa Metric, a senior at
Hanover Area Junior-Senior High
School, collected personal hy-
giene products and clothing
items for homeless veterans for
her senior project. She collected
over 1,600 items with the help of
the students and teachers
throughout Hanover Area School
District, the local 59 Amvets Club
and fellow workers and students
of Northeast Gymnastics. The
items will be donated to the
Homeless Veterans Program at
the Department of Veterans
Affairs Medical Center. With some
of the donations is Metric.
Senior project to help
homeless veterans
Board members and repre-
sentatives from the Lackawanna
County Medical Society (LCMS)
recently presented a $10,000
check to The Commonwealth
Medical College (TCMC) to bene-
fit the student scholarship fund.
The TCMC scholarship fund
provides monetary assistance to
qualified students who have
demonstrated financial need or
exceptional scholastic merit. At
the check presentation, from
left: Dr. Edward Zaloga; Dr. Lois
Margaret Nora, interim presi-
dent and dean, TCMC; Dr. Jack
Henzes; Dr. Lori Williams; Dr.
Christine Phillips; Dr. Ariane
Conaboy; Dr. Christopher Peters;
Dr. Wayne Weston, president,
LCMS; Kim Scandale, executive
director, LCMS; and Dr. Gerald
Tracy, associate dean for North
Regional Campus Development,
TCMC.
Medical College receives
scholarship funds
Allied Services Skilled Nurs-
ing and Rehabilitation Center
recently hosted a presentation
by Clayton Jacobs, the educa-
tion and outreach coordinator
for the Alzheimer’s Association
of Pennsylvania. The free pre-
sentation that was open to the
public was entitled, ‘Where We
Have Been and Where We Are
Going,’ and covered medical
issues, advances and the chang-
es in societal attitudes toward
the condition. Some of the
participants, from left: Kim
Yablonski, manager, Alzheimer’s
Unit; Louise Conway, recreation
aide; Laura Piazza-Smith, ad-
ministrator; Debi Monelli, nurs-
ing director; Jacobs; Joy Yunko,
Alzheimer’s program specialist;
Chris Minich, assistant adminis-
trator; and Sean McDermott,
recreation aide.
Alzheimer’s presentation
hosted by Allied Services
Paul Sromovski and David Racemus, correctional officers at
SCI-Dallas, recently received plaques for their years of participa-
tion on the Honor Guard Team. They also received framed letters
of appreciation from SCID Management. Members of the Honor
Guard Team provide funeral honors to fallen comrades. Sromo-
viski has been an active member for 22 years and Racemus for 25
years. At the awards presentation, from left: Lt. D. Mosier, team
leader; V. Mooney, deputy superintendent; Racemus; Sromovski; J.
Walsh, superintendent; and L. Mahally, deputy superintendent.
Officers receive plaques for participation
The Lupus Foundation of Pennsylvania recently held its
annual Lupus Loop 5K Walk/Run at Nay Aug Park, Scranton.
The event, which attracted hundreds of participants, featured
free food, D.J. and music, awards, children’s activities and
health information. All money raised will be used to promote
awareness, education, service and research for those affected
by lupus. Members of the ‘X-Treme Bean’ team, made up of the
family and friends of the Mishko family, walked in honor of
Jillian Mishko, from left: Amanda Kline, Landsdale; Shawn
Lamb, Philadelphia; and Jillian Mishko and Johna Bourbeau,
Clarks Green.
Lupus Loop raises funds for Lupus Foundation
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570-763-0044
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 3C
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your child’s birthday.
To ensure accurate publi-
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parents’ names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
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Don’t forget to include a day-
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photos and all publicity photos.
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GUIDELINES
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HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Curt Gronski, son of Sheri Sara-
ka and Ed Gronski, Shavertown,
is celebrating his second birth-
day today, Dec. 12. Curt is a
grandson of June Saraka and
the late Tim Saraka, Glen Lyon,
and Betty Gronski and the late
Ed Gronski, West Wyoming.
Curt Gronski
Tyler Stolpe, son of Eric and
Samantha Stolpe, White Haven,
celebrated his eighth birthday
Dec. 8. Tyler is a grandson of Ed
Stolpe and William and Susan
Ackerman, all of White Haven.
He has a sister, Megen.
Tyler Stolpe
Millie Ann Symbula, daughter of
Frank and Jill Symbula, Drums, is
celebrating her ninth birthday
today, Dec. 12. Millie is a grand-
daughter of Janice Collins and
the late Brooks Collins, Berwick,
and the late Lois and Frank
Symbula, Plains Township.
Millie A. Symbula
Tuesday
WANAMIE: Glen Lyon Hose
Company 7 p.m. at fire head-
quarters. President Ronald
Papciak will preside. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.
MEETINGS
KINGSTON: The local Girl
Scouts of Service Unit 331
are collecting toys for the
Toys for Tots campaign.
Marine Corps representatives
in dress blues will pick up
the toys 6 p.m. Dec. 21 at the
Wyoming Valley West Middle
School. For more information
contact Cindy Taylor, leader,
at 718-0396.
WILKES-BARRE: The
Christmas meeting of the St.
David’s Society of Wyoming
Valley that was scheduled for
Wednesday evening at the
Genetti Hotel and Confer-
ence Center has been can-
celed. The regular monthly
luncheon meeting will still
be held at noon on Wednes-
day at the Genetti Hotel and
Conference Center.
WILKES-BARRE: Crime
Clinic of Greater Wilkes-
Barre has changed the date
of its annual Christmas party
and officer installation pro-
gram from Tuesday to Dec.
20 at the Wyoming Valley
Country Club. Cocktail hour
will begin at 6 p.m. followed
by dinner and installation of
2012 officers. The December
event is sponsored by UGI
Penn Natural Gas Inc.
Anyone interested in mem-
bership in the organization is
invited to attend the party.
Members and guests who
have not yet made reserva-
tions may contact Mary Wal-
lace at 825-1664.
WILKES-BARRE: Salva-
tion Army Women’s Auxiliary
will meet at noon Dec. 19 at
the Wilkes-Barre Corps, 17 S.
Pennsylvania Ave. There will
be a buffet luncheon and the
cost is $10. Guests are wel-
come to attend. Reservations
are due today. Everyone
attending is asked to bring a
small, wrapped gift to be
used for prizes for the games.
Members of the auxiliary
will be distributing gifts to
the residents at Manor Care,
Second Avenue, Kingston, on
Dec. 21. Everyone is asked to
meet in the lobby of the
facility at 1 p.m.
For information and to
make reservations for the
luncheon, call Anne Gerrity,
auxiliary president, at 825-
1573.
IN BRIEF
Thomas
Joseph
Caffrey, son
of Edward
and Joan
Caffrey,
Hanover
Township,
was awarded
the rank of
Eagle Scout,
the highest rank in scouting.
Thomas joined Cub Scout Pack
43, St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-
Barre, in 2002. As a cub scout
he earned the Webelos badge
and The Light of Christ Award.
Caffrey joined Boy Scout
Troop 43 in February 2007.
While a member of the troop,
he served as an assistant patrol
leader, chaplain aide, instructor,
quartermaster and senior patrol
leader. He has earned 32 merit
badges including Disability
Awareness and Theatre.
For his Community Service
Project, Caffrey planned and
orchestrated a Fun Day for all
members of the Northeast
Pennsylvania Special Olympics.
Participants enjoyed activities
such as football toss, basketball
shooting, a bocce tournament
and kickball games. The entire
group of participants was treat-
ed to lunch and received partici-
pation certificates.
Caffrey is a sophomore at
Holy Redeemer High School,
where he earned an academic
scholarship. He is a high honors
student and served as class
president for his freshman and
sophomore class. Caffrey is a
member of the cross country,
track and field and speech and
debate teams. He is also a
member of the French and
drama clubs. He participated in
a group performance for the
National History Day Competi-
tion in May which placed first in
the region and third in the state.
Caffrey was a member and altar
server at St. Therese’s Church,
Wilkes-Barre. He was honored
by Bishop Joseph Bambera with
the Bishop’s Youth Award.
Caffrey is also active in local
theater and has performed in
productions for K.I.S.S. Theatre
Company, The Music Box Dinner
Theater and Little Theater of
Wilkes-Barre.
He is the grandson of Rita
Caffrey, Wilkes-Barre; the late
Joseph Caffrey; and Daniel and
Florence McGroarty. He has two
brothers, Patrick, 19, and Kevin,
7.
Thomas was recognized at a
Special Court of Honor ceremo-
ny at St. Therese’s Church on
April 3.
NAMES AND FACES
Caffrey
The Rotary Club of Wyoming
recently made a donation to the
West Pittston Library Flood Re-
cover Fund. At the check pre-
sentation, from left, are Anne
Bramblett Barr, director, West
Pittston Library, and John Har-
rington, president, Rotary Club.
Wyoming Rotary donates
to flood recovery fund
The Rotary Club of Plains recently donated 55 new winter coats to
needy children. The Rotarians worked with the SS Peter and Paul
Food Pantry and Temple Israel identified families with children in
need of a winter coat. The Rotarians also provided each child with a
hat, gloves and scarf. With some of the donations, from left: Frank
Dominick; Ben Berrini, SS Peter and Paul Food Pantry; Girard Meca-
don; Tom Malloy; Mitch Kornfeld; Rabbi Larry Kaplan, Temple Israel;
Paul Muczynski; and Gino Bartoli.
Plains Rotary Club collects winter coats
Employees of TMG Health recently participated in United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne Counties’ Day of
Caring event. Thirty-six employees from the Dunmore Operations Center and Scranton Data Center spent
the day at the United Neighborhood Center, Alder Street, Scranton, participating in beautification projects,
including landscaping, yard maintenance and a neighborhood cleanup. The employees also spent time with
the center’s members and served lunch to the group. TMG Health volunteers, from left, first row, are Shan-
non Chmura, Sasha Ardestani, Jennifer Zelno, Jennifer McMonigle and Donna Johnson. Second row: Bryan-
na Curtis, Christine Lang, Elisa DePolo, Peggy Hansbury and Jenn Betz. Third row: David Gambal, Steve
Krieger and Scott Hudson.
TMG Health employees participate in Day of Caring event
Bear Creek Cub Scout Pack 2000 recently conducted its first service project. A food drive was held on
Nov. 19 and yielded nearly 1,500 food items and $120 in cash donations. The Cub Scouts collected non-per-
ishable food donations from their neighbors and from customers of Schiel’s Market in Parsons. Schiel’s
Market also donated bags and boxes. The contributions were divided between the food bank of St. Vincent
de Paul Kitchen in Wilkes-Barre and Ruth’s Place. With some of the donations, from left, are Dylan Jasulev-
icz, Parker Mosley, Henry Davies, Jeffrey Kozerski, Kenny White, Edward Jasulevicz and Jason Prudente.
Bear Creek Cubs host service project for local food banks
Editor’s Note: The complete list of Volunteer Opportunities can
be viewed at www.timesleader.comby clicking Community News
under the People tab. To have your organization listed, visit the
United Way of Wyoming Valley’s volunteer page at www.united-
waywb.org. For more information, contact Kathy Sweetra at
970-7250 or ksweetra@timesleader.com.
C M Y K
PAGE 4C MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
NO PASSES
NEW YEAR’S EVE
NEWYEAR’S EVE (XD) (PG-13)
2:00PM 4:45PM 7:30PM10:15PM
ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (3D) (PG)
11:25AM, 1:55PM, 4:20PM, 7:00PM, 9:30PM
ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (DIGITAL) (PG)
12:40PM 3:15PM 5:55PM 8:20PM
DESCENDANTS, THE (Digital) (R)
11:20AM 12:45PM 2:00PM 3:30PM 4:40PM
6:10PM 7:25PM 8:55PM 10:05PM
HAPPY FEET TWO (3D) (PG)
11:35AM 2:10PM 4:35PM
HUGO (3D) (PG)
1:10PM 4:15PM 7:15PM 10:20PM
HUGO (DIGITAL) (PG)
11:40AM 2:45PM (5:45PM 8:40PM)
Except on Tuesday 12/13
IMMORTALS (3D) (R)
7:05PM 9:45PM
J. EDGAR (DIGITAL) (R)
(12:55PM 4:00PM) except on Saturday 12/10
7:20PM 10:25PM
JACK AND JILL (DIGITAL) (R)
12:35PM 3:00PM 5:20PM 7:40PM 10:00PM
MUPPETS, THE (DIGITAL) (PG)
11:15AM 12:30PM 1:50PM 3:05PM 4:25PM
5:50PM 7:10PM 8:30PM 9:50PM
NEW YEAR’S EVE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM, 1:05PM, 2:55PM, 3:50PM, 5:40PM,
6:35PM, 8:25PM, 9:20PM
PUSS IN BOOTS (3D) (PG)
12:50PM 3:10PM 5:30PM 7:55PM 10:10PM
SITTER, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
12:10PM 1:15PM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:30PM
5:35PM 6:40PM 7:45PM 8:50PM 9:55PM
TOWER HEIST (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM 2:35PM 5:05PM 7:35PM 10:30PM
TWILIGHT SAGA: THE BREAKING DAWN
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:30AM 12:25PM 2:15PM 3:35PM 5:00PM
6:25PM 7:50PM 9:15PM
Saturday, 12/10
METROPOLITAN OPERA: FAUST 12:55PM
Tuesday, 12/13
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All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
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ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
• FIRST MATINEE SHOW ALL SEATS $5.25
EXPERIENCE D/BOX MOTION ENHANCED
SEATING ON SELECT FEATURES
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Faust LIVE
Saturday, December 10th at 12:55 pm only
The NewYork City Ballet Presents
George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker
Tuesday, December 13th at 6:00 pm only
*NewYear’s Eve - PG13 - 130 min.
(12:30), (1:00), (3:10), (3:45), 7:15, 7:40, 9:55,
10:20
*The Sitter - R - 130 min.
(1:45), (4:00), 7:30, 9:35
***Hugo 3D - PG - 135 min.
(12:50), (3:40), 7:00, 9:50
***Arthur Christmas 3D - PG - 110 min.
(1:50), (4:10), 7:25, 9:45
The Muppets - PG - 120 min.
(12:50), (1:30), (3:20), (4:10), 7:10, 7:30, 9:40,
10:00
***Happy Feet Two in 3D - PG - 110 min.
(12:40), (3:00), (5:20), 7:40 (No 3:00, 5:20 or
7:40 show on Tues. Dec. 13; No 5:20 or 7:40
show on Thurs. Dec. 15)
Happy Feet Two - PG - 110 min.
(1:10), (3:30), 7:10, 9:30
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part
1 - PG13 - 130 min.
(12:40), (1:00), (3:20), (3:50), 7:00, 7:20, 9:40,
10:00
***Immortals in 3D - R - 120 min.
10:15
Immortals in 3D D-Box - R - 120 min.
10:15
J. Edgar - R - 150 min.
(12:30), (3:30), 7:00, 10:00 (No 12:30 or 3:30
show on Sat Dec. 10)
Jack and Jill - PG - 100 min.
(1:10), (3:40), 7:40, 9:50
Tower Heist - PG13 - 115 min.
(1:40), (4:30), 7:45, 10:10
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Leave-
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All in the
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<
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News at 11 Jay Leno
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Celtic Woman -- Believe Classic Irish songs
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60s Pop, Rock & Soul (My Music) Artists and
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U
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(CC) (TVPG)
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Law & Order: Special
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tine
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House “A Pox on Our
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News First
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How I Met

Dr. Dolittle 3 (PG, ‘06) ›› John Amos, Kyla
Pratt, Chelan Simmons.
Dr. Dolittle 3 (PG, ‘06) ›› John Amos, Kyla
Pratt, Chelan Simmons.
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
Criminal Minds “Re-
taliation” (TV14)
#
News Evening
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The Insid-
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King of
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How I Met How I Met Law & Order: Special
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+
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PIX News at Ten Jodi
Applegate. (N)
Seinfeld
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Seinfeld
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1
30 Rock
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Phl17
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Big Bang
Theory
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AMC
The Shadow Riders (PG, ‘82) ›› Tom Sell-
eck, Sam Elliott, Katharine Ross.
White Christmas (‘54) ›››› Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye,
Rosemary Clooney. (CC)
White Christmas (10:45) (‘54)
›››› Bing Crosby.
AP
Pit Bulls and Parolees
(CC) (TVPG)
Pit Bulls and Parolees
(CC) (TV14)
Saved A Vietnam vet.
(CC) (TVPG)
Fatal Attractions (CC)
(TV14)
I Shouldn’t Be Alive
(CC) (TVPG)
Saved A Vietnam vet.
(CC) (TVPG)
ARTS
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
Stephen King’s Bag of Bones (‘11) Pierce
Brosnan. (CC) (Part 1 of 2)
Stephen King’s Bag of Bones (‘11) Pierce
Brosnan, Melissa George. (CC)
Stephen King’s Bag
of Bones (‘11)
CNBC
Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report
(N)
60 Minutes on CNBC Supermarkets Inc: In-
side
American Greed Mad Money
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John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett OutFront
(N)
Anderson Cooper 360
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Piers Morgan Tonight
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Anderson Cooper 360
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Erin Burnett OutFront
COM
Daily
Show
Colbert
Report
(6:58) 30
Rock
(:29) 30
Rock
Worka-
holics
South
Park
Always
Sunny
Always
Sunny
Always
Sunny
Always
Sunny
Daily
Show
Colbert
Report
CS
Sport-
sNite
Eagles Ex-
tra
Orange
Line
’net IM-
PACT
Villanova
B’ball
Philly Sports Classic From June
8, 1989.
SportsNite (CC) Eagles Ex-
tra
Orange
Line
CTV
Saints
Alive
Guadalupe Daily Mass The Holy
Rosary
The Journey Home
(N) (Live) (TVG)
Signs of
Life
Solemn
Novena
World Over Live Vaticano Women of
Grace
DSC
Sons of
Guns
Sons of
Guns
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(TV14)
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American Guns (N)
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Sons of Guns (CC)
(TV14)
DSY
Kickin’ It
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(TVY7)
Wizards-
Place
Shake It
Up! (CC)
(TVG)
A.N.T.
Farm
(TVG)
Good Luck Charlie, It’s Christ-
mas! (‘11) Bridgit Mendler. (CC)
Wizards-
Place
Shake It
Up! (CC)
(TVG)
A.N.T.
Farm
(TVG)
Good Luck
Charlie
E!
Khloe &
Lamar
Khloe &
Lamar
E! News (N) Fashion
Police
Sex and
the City
Kourtney & Kim Take
New York
Scouted “Nicole &
Amber B.” (TV14)
Chelsea
Lately
E! News
ESPN
SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC) (TV14)
Monday Night Countdown (N)
(Live) (CC)
NFL Football St. Louis Rams at Seattle Seahawks. (N) (Live) Sports-
Center
ESPN2
NFL32 (N) (Live) (CC) SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC) (TV14)
Interrup-
tion
Bowl Mania Special (CC) Sports-
Center
Football
Live
FAM
A Flintstone Christ-
mas (CC) (TVG)
12 Dates of Christmas (‘11) Amy Smart,
Mark-Paul Gosselaar, Peter MacNeill.
National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation
(PG-13, ‘89) ›› Chevy Chase.
The 700 Club (N) (CC)
(TVG)
FOOD
Diners,
Drive
Diners,
Drive
Unwrapped “Holiday
Favorites”
Holidays Unwrapped Diners,
Drive
Diners,
Drive
Diners,
Drive
Diners,
Drive
Diners,
Drive
Diners,
Drive
FNC
Special Report With
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FOX Report With
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The O’Reilly Factor
(N) (CC)
Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van
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The O’Reilly Factor
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HALL
The Hollywood Christmas Parade Holiday pa-
rade features celebrities. (TVG)
Santa Jr (‘02) Lauren Holly, Judd Nelson,
Nick Stabile. (CC)
A Christmas Wedding Tail (PG, ‘11) Jennie
Garth, Brad Rowe, Tom Arnold. (CC)
HIST
American Pickers
(CC) (TVPG)
American Pickers
(CC) (TVPG)
Pawn
Stars
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Stars
American Pickers (N)
(CC) (TVPG)
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Real Deal Invention
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H&G
For Rent
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For Rent
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Hunters
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Love It or List It (N)
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House
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House
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House
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House
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House
Hunters
House
Hunters
LIF
A Holiday to Remember (‘95) Connie Sellec-
ca, Randy Travis. (CC)
Under the Mistletoe (‘06) Jaime Ray New-
man, Michael Shanks. (CC)
Recipe for a Perfect Christmas (‘05) Chris-
tine Baranski, Carly Pope. (CC)
MTV
Teen Mom 2 “Best
Laid Plans” (TVPG)
Made (N) (TVPG) Ridicu-
lousness
Ridicu-
lousness
Ridicu-
lousness
Ridicu-
lousness
Ridicu-
lousness
Beavis Ridicu-
lousness
Ridicu-
lousness
NICK
iCarly
(TVG)
Odd Par-
ents
Sponge-
Bob
Sponge-
Bob
My Wife
and Kids
My Wife
and Kids
That ’70s
Show
That ’70s
Show
George
Lopez
George
Lopez
Friends
(TV14)
Friends
(TV14)
OVAT
William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer
Night’s Dream (5:15) (PG-13, ‘99) ››
Mariinsky Theatre’s Nutcracker From Saint
Petersburg, Russia. (N) (TVPG)
(:15) Mariinsky Theatre’s Nutcracker From
Saint Petersburg, Russia. (TVPG)
SPD
Pimp My
Ride
Pimp My
Ride
Pass Time Pass Time Monster Jam Pass Time Pass Time Pimp My
Ride
Pimp My
Ride
Monster Jam
SPIKE
(:12) 1,000 Ways to
Die (TV14)
Ways to
Die
Ways to
Die
(:12) 1,000 Ways to
Die (TV14)
Ways to
Die
Ways to
Die
Ways to
Die
Ways to
Die
Ways to
Die
Ways to
Die
SYFY
Pirates-
Worlds
Red Planet (PG-13, ‘00) › Val Kilmer. Marooned astro-
nauts struggle to survive on Mars.
Underworld: Evolution (R, ‘06) ›› Kate
Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. (CC)
The Amityville Hor-
ror (R, ‘05) ››
TBS
King of
Queens
King of
Queens
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Conan (N) (CC)
TCM
A Bullet for Joey (6:15) (‘55) ›› Edward G.
Robinson, George Raft. (CC)
A Christmas Carol (‘51) ›››
Alastair Sim. Premiere.
Oliver Twist (9:45) (‘48) ›››› Robert Newton, Alec
Guinness, John Howard Davies.
TLC
Toddlers & Tiaras
(CC) (TVPG)
Little People Big
World: Holiday
Cake Boss: Next Great
Baker (CC)
Cake Boss: Next Great
Baker (N)
Candy
Queen
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Queen
Cake Boss: Next Great
Baker (CC)
TNT
Law & Order “Burn
Card” (TV14)
Law & Order “Grief”
(TV14)
The Closer (CC)
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The Closer “Relative
Matters” (TV14)
Rizzoli & Isles (N)
(CC) (TV14)
The Closer “Relative
Matters” (TV14)
TOON
Grandma Got Run
Over by a Reindeer
Johnny
Test (N)
Advent.
Time
Advent.
Time
MAD (N)
(TVPG)
King of
the Hill
King of
the Hill
American
Dad
American
Dad
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
TRVL
Anthony Bourdain: No
Reservations
Anthony Bourdain: No
Reservations
Anthony Bourdain: No
Reservations
The Layover “Miami”
(N) (CC)
Anthony Bourdain: No
Reservations
Anthony Bourdain: No
Reservations
TVLD
(:12) M*A*S*H (CC)
(TVPG)
(6:52)
M*A*S*H
(:24)
M*A*S*H
Home Im-
prove.
Home Im-
prove.
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
The Exes King of
Queens
USA
NCIS “Terminal
Leave” (TVPG)
NCIS “Call of Silence”
(CC) (TVPG)
WWE Monday Night RAW The annual WWE Slammy Awards. Who is
the WWE Superstar of the Year? (N) (Live) (CC)
Elf (11:05) (PG, ‘03)
››› Will Ferrell.
VH-1
40 Most Shocking Hip
Hop Moments
T.I. and
Tiny
T.I. and
Tiny
Love & Hip Hop
(TV14)
T.I. and
Tiny
Behind the Music
“T.I.” T.I. (TV14)
T.I. and
Tiny
Love & Hip Hop
(TV14)
WE
Charmed “Oh My
Goddess” (TVPG)
Charmed (Part 1 of 2)
(CC) (TVPG)
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
WGN-A
30 Rock
(TVPG)
30 Rock
(TVPG)
America’s Funniest
Home Videos (CC)
America’s Funniest
Home Videos (CC)
America’s Funniest
Home Videos (CC)
WGN News at Nine
(N) (CC)
30 Rock
(TV14)
Scrubs
(TV14)
WYLN
Expanding
the
Holiday
Profiles
WYLN Re-
port
Topic A Beaten
Path
Storm Pol-
itics
WYLN
Kitchen
Tarone
Show
Late Edition Classified Beaten
Path
YOUTO
(5:45) The X-Files
“The Walk” (TV14)
Adrenali-
na
PJTV Kipkay TV The X-Files “The
Walk” (CC) (TV14)
(:15)
Adrenalina
Diggna-
tion on
(:15) Kipkay TV
PREMIUM CHANNELS
HBO
The Chronicles of Narnia: The
Voyage of the Dawn Treader
(5:30) (PG, ‘10) ››
Dinner for Schmucks (PG-13, ‘10) ›› Steve
Carell. Comic misadventures follow a man’s
encounter with a buffoon.
Enlight-
ened (N)
(TVMA)
Boardwalk Empire “To
the Lost” (CC)
(TVMA)
Enlight-
ened
(TVMA)
Boxing
HBO2
Citizen U.S.A.: A 50-
State Road Trip (CC)
(TVPG)
Ocean’s Eleven (PG-13, ‘01) ››› George
Clooney. A suave ex-con assembles a team
to rob a casino vault. (CC)
Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The
Lightning Thief (PG, ‘10) ›› Logan Lerman,
Brandon T. Jackson. (CC)
The Ring (PG-13, ‘02)
›› Naomi Watts.
(CC)
MAX
Get Him to the Greek (‘10) ››› Jonah Hill.
An executive must drag a boozy rock star to
Hollywood. (CC)
Splash (PG, ‘84) ››› Tom Hanks. A disen-
chanted businessman struggles to protect a
mermaid. (CC)
Little Fockers (PG-13, ‘10) ›
Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller, Owen
Wilson. (CC)
Sexual
Witch-
craft
MMAX
One Eight Seven (5:20) (R, ‘97)
› Samuel L. Jackson, John
Heard. (CC)
I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (R,
‘88) ›› Keenen Ivory Wayans,
Bernie Casey. (CC)
Life as We Know It (PG-13, ‘10) ›› Kather-
ine Heigl. Antagonists must work together to
raise their goddaughter. (CC)
Life on
Top (CC)
(TVMA)
Jonah
Hex ›
(CC)
SHO
Talihina Sky: The
Story of Kings of
Leon (5:30) (CC)
Fair Game (PG-13, ‘10) ››› Naomi Watts,
Sean Penn. iTV. Valerie Plame is revealed as
a CIA agent.
Dexter Debra’s battle
with LaGuerta. (CC)
(TVMA)
Homeland “The Vest”
Carrie is hospitalized.
(TVMA)
Dexter Debra’s battle
with LaGuerta. (CC)
(TVMA)
STARZ
Can’t Hardly Wait
(5:15) ›› (CC)
Boss “Listen” (CC)
(TVMA)
Boss “Reflex” (CC)
(TVMA)
Eat Pray Love (PG-13, ‘10) ›› Julia Roberts, James
Franco, Javier Bardem. (CC)
Other
Guys
TMC
All Good Things (6:05) (R, ‘10) Ryan Gosling.
The wife of a New York real estate scion sud-
denly goes missing. (CC)
Twelve (R, ‘10) › Chace Craw-
ford, Curtis Jackson, Emma
Roberts. (CC)
The Burning Plain (9:35) (R, ‘08) ›› Charl-
ize Theron. Flashbacks reveal a fatal affair
and its effect on family. (CC)
Day Night
• 2 p.m. 3, 22 The Talk Actress Kim
Cattrall; actor Dylan Walsh; Sheryl
gets people’s take on news topics.
(N) (TV14)
• 3 p.m. 28 The Dr. Oz Show Ra-
chael Ray shares her simple, healthy
secrets to save dinner. (N) (TVPG)
• 4 p.m. CNN The Situation Room
With Wolf Blitzer (N)
• 5 p.m. FNC The Five A rotating
ensemble of five FOX personalities
will discuss the current news stories
of the day. (N)
• 7 p.m. 3 Entertainment Tonight
(N) (TVPG)
• 8 p.m. CNN Anderson Cooper 360
(N)
• 8 p.m. CNBC 60 Minutes on
CNBC
• 9 p.m. CNN Piers Morgan Tonight
(N)
•11 p.m. 22 Access Hollywood
Sandra Bullock; Matt Damon; Scar-
lett Johansson. (N) (TVPG)
TV TALK
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 5C
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I am
a gay woman. My
partner, “Jenny,” and
I have been friends
with another couple
for 15 years. Over the
last year I have come
to realize that I no
longer want to be friends with them.
One of them has been particularly un-
kind to me, and frankly, we don’t have
a lot in common.
Jenny is uncomfortable with my de-
cision and wants me to talk to them
to discuss my feelings. If I talk to
them, I’m sure they will be offended
by what I have to say because I didn’t
say anything when the issues first
arose. I’m not good at confrontation,
and it’s hard for me to tell someone
my feelings are hurt.
The bottom line is, I want out of
this couple’s friendship. But I need to
do it in a way that’s OK with Jen. She
wants to continue her friendship with
them. Please help.
— Moving On in Georgia
Dear Moving On: It would not be
confrontational to tell them that
while you have known each other for
a long time, you feel you have grown
apart. You should also mention that
your feelings were hurt when one of
them said “( ).” At least that way
they will understand why you have
disappeared, and Jenny won’t be left
with the responsibility of explaining
it to them.
Dear Abby: My fiance and I recently
received a wedding invitation from
a friend of his from high school. Our
wedding is not far away, and I have an
etiquette question.
A Facebook message was sent after
our invitation arrived in the mail.
It said, “In lieu of gifts, people can
donate monetarily to the couple” by
check or cash the day of the wedding,
or via a paypal account.
I’m confused. I grew up the South,
and this doesn’t seem like a tradi-
tional approach to gift-giving. Isn’t it
inappropriate to ask for money?
— Mystified Bride in Alabama
Dear Mystified: Yes, it is. To solicit
money the way that couple did is
crude. An acceptable way to get
the word out about the type of gifts
couples prefer is by word of mouth.
Guests usually ask if a couple is
registered and where, and when the
question is raised, it’s all right to tell
them. If you have created a wedding
website, the information can be in-
cluded on it.
When couples prefer a gift of
money, the proper way the informa-
tion should be conveyed is verbally by
your family or friends, but not by you.
Dear Abby: I love the holiday season,
but I often get a little depressed. I
lost my father on Christmas Day sev-
eral years ago and have since lost a
brother to cancer. I’m tired of feeling
this way when this is the season to be
merry. What can I do?
— Another Blue Christmas in South
Carolina
Dear Blue: I am sorry for your losses.
Because of your father’s death on
Christmas Day, it may always bring
some sense of loss. However, an ef-
fective way to distract yourself would
be to spend time in the company of
friends who understand your feelings.
Another would be to volunteer at a
senior center, shelter or food distribu-
tion program.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Woman is ready to put an end to a friendship that is past its prime
To receive a collection of Abby’s most
memorable — and most frequently re-
quested — poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). There
is a down side to trying to get
along with everyone all the time.
It could cause you to be incon-
sistent. Better to be yourself —
trustworthy and steadfast.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You
think you know what you want
until you have to articulate it
verbally or write it down. That
process will inform you in sur-
prising ways and bring you good
fortune, as well.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You
will be ultra-aware of the way
people experience you. You’ll
make slight adjustments. You’ll
tuck your ego away in favor of
successfully creating a desired
result.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). You
will be particularly vulnerable
to visual stimulation. You’ll see
the pretty, shiny, slick object of
your desire, and it will make an
impression you just can’t
shake.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Don’t under-
estimate your charm. You’re
probably not even aware of your
peculiar sense of timing, but it’s
most effective. In fact, you’ll hyp-
notize others with your special
rhythm.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). The one
who has an idea and takes action
to share that idea will be remem-
bered. You want to be such a
person. That’s why you’ll initiate
celebrations and rituals.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You know
how to be you. There’s no way in
this lifetime to know how to be
anyone else. So try not to blame
your parents for teaching you to
be like them. That was the only
thing they could teach you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Don’t
let yourself become too seri-
ous, and don’t get caught up in
details that no one can relate
to, and you’ll spin an enthralling
tale.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Thank goodness you will display
some imperfections. Mistakes
bring you together with loved
ones, interesting strangers and
new friends. P.S.: If you were per-
fect, no one could tolerate your
presence.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Do
not mistake the “filler” for the
irrelevant. Small talk and pleas-
antries will make all the differ-
ence. Acknowledging the right
people and paying respects also
will be important.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You
like to be in control, but you’re
not a “control freak.” Your fun
doesn’t depend on being in
charge. You’ll gladly surrender
the steering wheel to one who
seems to need it more than
you do.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). What
you do, you do with love in your
heart. It doesn’t have to be
much. In fact, the most meaning-
ful gesture you make today will
be quite small. But it’s perfect.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Dec. 12).
You’ll have a new perception of
a painful period in your past — a
healing that will favorably affect
your relationships. You’ll speak
for those who can’t and will
help the needy in the new year.
Healthy activities anchor you in
January. Cancer and Aquarius
people adore you. Your lucky
numbers are: 5, 9, 19, 24 and 18.
F U N N I E S MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 1D
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
W YOM IN G A V E . E
X
P
W
A
Y
8
1
From Cla rks S um m it/S c ra n ton
E xpre s s wa y - L e fton W yom in g A ve .
From W ilke s -Ba rre to S c ra n ton
E xpre s s wa y8 Bloc ks on
W yom in g A ve n ue
R.J. BURN E
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570)342-0107 •1-888-880-6537
www.rjb urn e .c om •Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Sat 9-4
SEASON ’S BEST EVEN T
FROM CA DIL L A C
OF S CRA N TON -N E P A
2012 S RXBy C a dilla c
FW D L uxury Colle c tion
M S RP $40,940
$
299
L e a s e It!
P E R M ON TH
P lus Tax
N o S ecurity
D eposit R equired
CA DIL L A C P RE M IUM CA RE
M A IN TE N A N CE IN CL UDE D
ON A L L 2012 CA DIL L A CS
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX Fwd Luxury Edition
$40,940 M SRP.$299 permonth plus9% salestaxtotal
$326 permonth.24 M onth lease 12,000 milesperyear.24
M onthly paymentstotal$7,176 $.30/mile penalty over
24,000 miles.$2000 down paymentplus$299 first
paymentplus$200 Acquisition Fee,taxand tagsdue at
delivery.Totaldue atdelivery $2499 plustax& tag fees.
LESSEE M UST Q UALIFY FOR G M TAR G ETED PR IV ATE
OFFER OR M UST B E A CUR R EN T LESSEE OFA 19 9 9
OR N EW ER N ON -G M LEASE. Leasee responsible for
excessive wearand tear.M usttake delivery by 1/3/2012.
RequiresGM FinancialTier1 or2 creditapproval.Please
see salesperson forcomplete details.
2012 CTS By C a dilla c
M S RP $39,990
$
249
L e a s e It!
P E R M ON TH
P lus Tax
N o S ecurity
D eposit R equired
Lease price based on a 2012 CTS Sdn with AllW heel
Drive $39,990 M SRP.$249 permonth plus9% salestax
total$271 permonth.24 M onth lease 12,000 milesper
year.24 M onthly paymentstotal$5,976 $.30/mile penalty
over24,000 miles.$2000 down paymentplus$249 first
paymentplustaxand tagsdue atdelivery.Totaldue at
delivery $2249 plus$200 Acquistion Fee,tax& tag fees.
LESSEE M UST Q UALIFY FOR G M TAR G ETED PR IV ATE
OFFER OR M UST B E A CUR R EN T LESSEE OFA 19 9 9
OR N EW ER N ON -G M LEASE. Leasee responsible for
excessive wearand tear.M usttake delivery by 1/3/2012.
RequiresGM FinancialTier1 or2 creditapproval.Please
see salesperson forcomplete details.
A ll W he e l Drive
7
2
5
9
2
4
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
30th Anniversary Sale
08 Dodge Caliber 50K.........
$
11,900
08 Chevy Aveo 38K....................
$
8,900
07 Saturn Ion.................................
$
5,995
05 Ford Focus...............................
$
5,995
02 Pontiac Grand Am GT 77K..
$
4,995
05 Chrysler PT Cruiser......
$
4,950
04 Chevy Cavalier ...................
$
4,450
01 Nissan Sentra......................
$
3,995
00 Plymouth Breeze..............
$
3,450
Cars
07 Ford Escape...........................
$
8,750
05 Hyundai Santa Fe..............
$
7,995
01 Ford Ranger Edge 87K, Ext Cab
$
7,895
03 Subaru Baja............................
$
6,750
04 Chrysler Pacifica.............
$
6,595
03 Chevy Tracker.....................
$
5,850
00 Olds Bravada 82K................
$
4,995
99 Ford Explorer XLS..........
$
4,495
4x4’s & Vans
7
2
5
0
6
5
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
FREE INSPECTION &
OIL CHANGE FOR A YEAR
**
$
6,990
*
2002 Hyundai
Elantra
$
5,590
*
4 Cyl., 88K, Loaded
2000 Ford
Ranger 4x4
$
7,990
*
73K, Great Condition
2000 Ford Taurus
$
2,990
*
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
2003 Kia Spectra
$
5,990
*
2000 GMC
Jimmy 4x4
2003 Ford
Taurus
$
4,990
*
6 Cyl., Station Wagon,
151K, Runs Great
4 Cyl., 73K, Extra Clean! 6 Cyl., 98K
88K, Like New
PAGE 2D MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
BEFORE THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE
ZONING HEARING BOARD
A public hearing will be held in City Council
Chambers, Fourth Floor, City Hall, 40 East
Market Street, Wilkes-Barre,
Pennsylvania, on Wednesday, December
21, 2011, at 4:30 p.m., Eastern Standard
Time, relative to the following zoning
appeal application:
a) Ronald Jackson for the property
located at 171 South Sherman Street
for a variance to waive both side yard set-
backs from the required 5 feet down to 0
feet in order to construct an 18’ x 20’ car-
port as an accessory use within an R-2
zone.
b) Lori Bachman for the property locat-
ed at 62 Willow Street for a special
exception to establish a home occupation
beauty salon within an R-1 zone.
c) Joel Alberty Diaz & Bermidia
Rodriguez for the property located at
123 Lehigh Street for a variance to
establish a business for check cashing,
money orders, income tax preparation and
notary services within an R-1 zone. A vari-
ance to waive one required parking space
and a handicap parking space for the pro-
posed use.
d) Rosa & Philip Bellia for the property
located at 198-200 South Main Street
for a special exception to permit parking
at another location at 202-206 South Main
Street for a proposed 84 seat restaurant
within a C-2 zone.
e) Theresa Tyler-Smith for the property
located at 780 South Main Street for a
special exception to operate a daycare
center for 24 children and 4 employees in
the lower section of a church within an R-
1 zone.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY
APPEAR AT SUCH HEARING. CASES
WILL NOT NECESSARILY BE CALLED
IN THE ORDER LISTED ABOVE. DIS-
ABILITIES NOTICE: This Hearing is being
held at a facility which is accessible to per-
sons with disabilities. Please notify Mr.
Jack McCutcheon, if special accommoda-
tions are required. Such notification
should be made within one (1) week prior
to the date of this hearing. Mr.
McCutcheon can be reached at (570)
208-4112 or by FAX at (570) 208-4124 or
by e-mail at
jmccutcheon@wilkes-barre.pa.us
By Order of the Zoning Hearing
Board of the City of Wilkes-Barre
William C. Harris, Director of
Planning & Zoning/Zoning Officer
THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE IS AN
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION EMPLOYER
THOMAS M. LEIGHTON, MAYOR
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Wednesday Dec. 14 Special
.35 cent Wings
Wednesday-Sunday Open at 4 pm
In House Only
Home of the Original
‘O-Bar’ Pizza
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
MULTIPLE ESTATES AUCTION
ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES
TRAVER’S AUCTIONS
56 Dorchester Dr., Dallas, PA
Tuesday, December 13th, 2011
Inspection: 3:30 PM Start Time: 5:00 PM
ANTIQUES (including furniture) –
COLLECTIBLES – CONTEMPORARY
FURNISHINGS – JEWELRY – NICE
BOX LOTS + MUCH MORE!!!
**NEXT AUCTION IS OUR
15TH ANNUAL
NEW YEARS DAY
AUCTION**
SUNDAY, JANUARY 1ST, 2012
START TIME 11:00AM
Visit us at: www.auctionzip.com
(ID# 2280) or www.traversauctions.com
or call 570.674.2631
Travers Auction Barn: RH926
Auctioneer: Steve Traver AU3367L
10% Buyers Premium
AUTOSERVICE
DIRECTORY
462 Auto
Accessories
TONNEAU COVER
new, Extang Tri-
fecta fits ‘00-10 Toy-
ota Tacoma $250.
Weather Tech, new,
vent- visors slid in
door window, fits
‘00 to 10 Toyota
Tacoma $40.
570-829-1048
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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It’s a showroom in print!
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the directions!
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
468 Auto Parts
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
ŠCA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
LOST. Bischon,
small white. Max.
Has orange marking
on back. Lost in
vicinity of W. Pittston
Municipal Building
near Foundry St.
Reward
570-262-7505
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
FOUND Coonhound.
Male, about 4 miles
outside of Shick-
shinny
570-706-6887
FOUND, Dog, adult
Spaniel/Retriever/La
brador mix, black,
male, blue collar.
Found near Empire
St, Wilkes-Barre,
1pm on 12/9. Con-
tact SPCA, Plains.
FOUND. Boxer-Lab
Mix. Female, sable,
very friendly, about
5 months old. Free
to good home.
570-288-5291 or
570-406-2770
FOUND. Cat, large
black male on West
6th St., West Wyo-
ming 570-885-0743
FOUND. Fishing rod,
reel, and lures on
Dec. 5th, at parking
area on Fedor Road,
Ceasetown Dam.
570-675-8615
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that on
December 5, 2011,
the Board of Com-
missioners of
Luzerne County
adopted a Resolu-
tion authorizing the
formation of the
Luzerne/Lackawan-
na Airport Authority
pursuant to 53 Pa.
C.S. 5603. Pursuant
to the Resolution,
the December 21,
2011 Articles of
Incorporation of the
proposed Authority
shall be filed with
the secretary of the
Commonwealth.
LEGAL NOTICE
The proposed
budget for fiscal
year 2012 for the
Borough of
Luzerne, Luzerne
County, PA, has
been prepared and
is available for pub-
lic inspection at the
Luzerne Borough
Building, 144 Acad-
emy St., Luzerne.
The final budget is
scheduled to be
adopted at a spe-
cial meeting on
Thursday, Decem-
ber 22, 2011 at 5PM
at the Luzerne
Borough Building.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
PUBLIC NOTICE
In accordance with
the Pennsylvania
Liquor Code, the
City Council of
Wilkes-Barre will
hold a Public Hear-
ing on Thursday,
December 15, 2011
at 5:30 p.m., in City
Council Chambers,
Fourth Floor, City
Hall to discuss the
transfer of a Liquor
License for the
premises located at
302 North Empire
Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
Wilkes-Barre City
Hall is a facility
which is accessible
to persons with dis-
abilities. Please
contact Jack
McCutcheon at
(570)-208-4112 or
jmccutcheon@wilke
s-barre.pa.us in
advance if special
accommodations
are required.
Jim Ryan, City Clerk
LEGAL NOTICE
ESTATE OF FRANK
T. GIRVAN
late of Kingston,
Pennsylvania. Died
November 17, 2011.
Letters Testamen-
tary having been
granted to Jane A.
Girvan. All persons
having claims again-
st the Estate or
indebted to the
Estate shall make
payment or present
claims to:
Douglas P.Thomas,
Attorney for
the Estate, at
415 Wyoming Ave.,
Scranton, PA 18503
150 Special Notices
I’ll be there!
Chippendales at
Genettis –
Jan 13th!
bridezella.net
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly, at
814-237-6278
ext. 226
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HONDA`09 REKON
TRX 250CC/Electric
shift. Like New.
REDUCED
$3,650.
(570) 814-2554
TOMAHAWK`10
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
409 Autos under
$5000
DODGE `00 STRATUS
Running condition.
Inspected. $1,000.
(570) 706-1186
FORD `05 TAURUS
V6. 4 door. Front
wheel drive. Excel-
lent shape. 93k
miles. $4,700
570-709-5677
570-819-3140
FORD `95 F150
4x4. 6 cylinder.
Automatic. 8 ft.
modified flat bed.
90k miles. Runs
great. $4,900
(570) 675-5046
Call after 6:00 p.m.
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI ‘00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LEO’S AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
GMC ’00 JIMMY
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, 4x4.
$2,150.
CHEVY ’97 BLAZER
4 door, 6 cylinder
auto. 4x4.
$1,850
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO
CONVERTIBLE Sprint
blue/black, tan
leather, auto, 7
speed, turbo, 330
HP, Navigation,
AWD
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
08 PONTIAC GRAND
PRIX SE
blue, auto V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL silver, grey
leather
07 Hyundai Sonata
GLS navy blue,
auto, alloys
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD AWD silver,
grey leather
06 DODGE STRATUS SXT
RED.
05 DODGE NEON SXT
Red, 4 cyl. auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Burgundy tan
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
Maxx White, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 VW JETTA GLS
Black. Auto. Sun-
roof.
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO
Mid blue/light grey
leather, Naviga-
tion, (AWD)
01 PONTIAC AZTEK
4 door. Auto. Grey
01 VW JETTA GLS
green, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
98 MAZDA MILLENIA
green
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS black
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, white,
5.7 Hemi, 4 door,
4x4.
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 DODGE DURANGO
SLT blue, 3rd seat
4x4
07 CHEVY UPLANDER
silver, 7 passen-
ger mini van
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT Blue
grey leather, 7
pax mini van
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
Blue auto, V6, AWD
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT, black,
sunroof, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT, blue, grey
leather, 4x4
05 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT blue 4x4
05 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Blue, auto, 4x4
05 FORD F150 XLT
SUPER CREW TRUCK
Blue & tan, 4 dr.
4x4
05 BUICK RANIER CXL
gold, tan, leather,
sunroof (AWD)
04 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB cab, black,
auto, V-8, 4x4
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, sil-
ver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, 4x4
black, black
leather, 3rd seat,
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
Graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
04 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 CHEVY TRACKER
ZR2, blue, auto,
4x4
03 DODGE DURANGO
SLT, white, gray
leather, 3rd seat,
4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
pax mini van
02 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY 7 pas-
senger, mini van,
gold AWD
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
Reg. Cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
01 NISSIAN XTERRA,
black, 5 speed,
4x4
01 F150 SUPERCREW
XLT, green, 4 door,
V8, 4x4 truck
00 FORD EXPLORER
LTD, white, grey
leather, 4x4
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
Black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
96 CVEVY BLAZER
black 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500
4X4 TRUCK
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
ACURA `06 TL
4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6
Cylinder engine
Auto with slapstick.
Navigation system.
57k miles. Black
with Camel Leather
interior. Heated
Seats. Sun Roof,
Excellent condition.
Satellite Radio, Fully
loaded. $18,000.
570-814-2501
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
White Diamond
80K original miles,1
owner, garage kept,
camel leather interi-
or, 3.2L / 6 cylinder,
5-speed automatic,
front/rear & side
airbags, ABS
Navigation System,
8-speaker surround
system DVD/CD/AM
/FM/cassette,XM
Satellite Radio,
power & heated
front seats,power-
door locks & win-
dows, power moon-
roof, 4 snow tires
included!....and
much, much
more! Car runs and
looks beautiful
$17,500 Firm
See it at
Orloski’s Car Wash
& Lube
295 Mundy Street
(behind Wyoming
Valley Mall)
or Call 239-8461
AUDI `05 A4 1.8T
Cabriolet Convert-
ible S-Line. 52K
miles. Auto. All
options. Silver.
Leather interior.
New tires. Must
sell. $17,500 or best
offer 570-954-6060
AUDI `05 A6
3.2 Quattro AT6.
Auto tiptronic 6
speed. Black with
black leather. Garage
kept. Fully loaded,
gps, cold weather
package. 78K miles.
Carfax report
included. $15,900.
570-814-6714
BMW ‘04 325 XI
White. Fully
loaded. 120k
miles. $10,500
or best offer.
570-454-3287
BMW ‘98 740 IL
White with beige
leather interior.
New tires, sunroof,
heated seats. 5 cd
player 106,000
miles. Excellent
condition.
$5,500. OBO
570-451-3259
570-604-0053
BUICK `05 LACROSSE
Metallic Gray. Heat-
ed leather seats.
Traction control, 6
way power front
seats, remote start.
Rear park assist.
New tires. 41,400
miles. $11,000
570-696-2148
CADILLAC `05 SRX
All wheel drive,
traction control,
3.6 L V-6, power
sunroof, auto-
stick, leather inte-
rior, auto car
starter, factory
installed 6 CD disc
changer, all
power, memory
seat. 39,000
miles.
$21,000
570-453-2771
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHEVROLET `08
IMPALA
Excellent condition,
new tires, 4 door,
all power, 34,000
miles. $13,995.
570-836-1673
CHEVROLET `98
BLAZER
5 speed standard,
6 cylinder, 4x4,
power steering and
brakes, Air, 90,000
miles, inspected.
$3,000.
570-477-5146
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
CHEVY `07 AVEO LT
Power window/door
locks. Keyless
entry. Sunroof. A/C.
Black with tan
leather interior.
22,000 original
miles. AM/FM/CD.
New tires.
$12,000
(570) 287-0815
CHEVY `97 ASTROVAN
Beautiful, 4 door.
Power steering &
brakes. 8 cylinder.
Excellent condition.
$3,000. Negotiable.
570-762-3504
CHEVY 08 IMPALA LTZ
Metallic gray, sun-
roof, leather, Bose
Satellite with CD
radio, heated seats,
traction control, fully
loaded. Remote
Start. 50k miles.
$16,995 or trade.
(570) 639-5329
CHEVY ‘11 MALIBU LT
Moonroof.
7K miles.
$16,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY ‘95 ASTRO
MARK III CONVERSION
VAN. Hightop. 93K.
7 passenger.
TV/VCP/Stereo.
Loaded. Great con-
dition. $4,995
(570) 574-2199
CHRYSLER `04
SEBRING
LXI CONVERTIBLE
Low miles - 54,000.
V6. FWD. Leather
interior. Great
shape. A/C. CD.
All power.
$7,200. Negotiable
(570) 760-1005
CHRYSLER ‘04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $4900.
570-991-5558
CHRYSLER ‘08 SEBRING
Leather. Heated
seats. DVD Player.
$12,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
412 Autos for Sale
‘10 Dodge Cara-
van SXT 32K. Sil-
ver-Black. Power
slides. Factory war-
ranty. $17,699
‘09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$12,299
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. $14,499
‘08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42k, 5 speed, AWD.
Factory warranty.
$13,499
‘08 CHEVY
SILVERADO 1500
4x4, Regular Cab,
63K, Factory War-
ranty $13,499
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$11,899
‘08 CHRYSLER
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
4 cylinder, 40k
$11,599
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 60k. Factory
warranty. $9,899
‘05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner, just
traded, 65k
$13,099
‘05 Suzuki
Verona LX Auto.
64K. Factory war-
ranty. $5,499
‘03 DODGE CARAVAN
R-A/C. 69k. $6,699
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,899
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
DODGE `02
STRATUS SE PLUS
100,000 miles, auto-
matic, front wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
locks, power win-
dows, power mir-
rors, power seats,
all power, cruise
control, CD player,
keyless entry, rear
defroster, new 2.7
engine.timing set,
water pump, oil
pump, $2,999.
(570) 604-5277
EAGLE `95 TALON
Only 97,000 Miles.
Full custom body kit,
dark green metallic
with gray interior.
Dual exhaust, 4 coil
over adjustable
struts. All new
brakes, air intake
kit, strut brakes,
custom seats, cus-
tom white gauges, 2
pillar gauges, new
stereo, alarm, cus-
tom side view mir-
rors. 4 cylinder
automatic, runs
excellent. $8,500.
Call 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
(evenings)
FORD `07 MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE
34K. V6. 17”
wheels. Shaker. 6
disc. Satellite.
Mileage computer.
New winter tires.
Power seat/leather.
$16,750.
(570) 474-0943
FORD `95
CROWN VICTORIA
V-8, power windows
& seats, cruise con-
trol. Recent inspec-
tion. Asking $1,000.
Call 570-604-9325
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Auto. Alloys. CD
Player. $11,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
GMC `94 VANDURA
Burgundy, V-8,
queen bed,
4 captains chairs,
TV, 2 stereos, VCR,
window blinds,
4 light settings, AC,
all power,
only 45,000 miles.
$5,000
570-675-8627
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S
Excellent condition
inside & out. Garage
kept. Regularly
serviced by dealer,
records available.
Option include alloy
wheels, decklid
spoiler, sport seats,
interior accent light-
ing (blue), Nose
mask and custom
cut floor mats. Dark
grey with black inte-
rior. 56K highway
miles. REDUCED!
$13,300. Call
570-709-4695
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
JAGUAR ‘94
XJS CONVERTIBLE
Mint Condition
Magnolia red,
with palomino
beige leather
interior. This car
rates a 10 in &
out. 4 new tires
and services.
Florida car.
$13,300.
570-885-1512
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
412 Autos for Sale
MARZAK MOTORS
601 Green Ridge St, Scranton
9 9 9 9 9 9 9
FORD `97 CROWN
VICTORIA, green, 4
door, V8, loaded,
71K $4,200
CHEVY ’99 MAL-
IBU, tan, 4 door, V6,
29K original miles
$4,695
LINCOLN ‘00
TOWNCAR, tan,
leather, loaded,
116K $5,395
Ford ‘04 Taurus,
4 door, grey,
loaded, 140K
$3,995
FORD ‘03 WIND-
STAR LX, green,
loaded 129K
$4,900
570-955-5792
MERCEDES `92 500 SEL
White with gray
leather interior, 17”
custom chrome
wheels, 4 new tires,
new breaks front &
rear. Full tune-up, oil
change & filters
done. Body and
interior are perfect.
Car has all the
options. 133,850
miles. Original price:
$140,000 new. This
is the diplomat ver-
sion. No rust or
dings on this car -
Garage kept. Sell for
$9,500.
Call: 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
Evenings
PONTIAC ‘02 SUNFIRE
2 door. Very
clean! Warrantied.
75K. $5,695.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
PONTIAC 01 GRAND AM
4 cylinder. Auto.
Sharp Sharp Car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
SCION `06 XA
67,000 miles,
power windows &
locks, great gas
mileage.
$9,000/OBO
570-606-5634
SUBURU ‘06 LEGACY
GT LIMITED SEDAN
4 door, black,
approximately
76,000 miles. 2.5
liter engine, auto.
asking $12,000.
570-510-3077
TOYOTA `10
Camry SE. 56,000
miles. Red, alloy
wheels, black cloth
interior. Will consid-
er trade. $14,200
(570) 793-9157
TOYOTA 07 CAMRY LE
Low miles. One
owner. $13,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 3D
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit Waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at
delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000
financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
Steve Mizenko
Service Manager
15 Yrs. at Coccia
Rudy Podest
Parts & Service
Director
27 Yrs. at Coccia
Pat McGinty
Parts Manager
20 Yrs. at Coccia
Barry Williams
Finance Manager
24 Yrs. at Coccia
, Safety Canopy, Air, Side Impact
Safety Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Fog Lamps, Rear
Cargo Convenience Pkg., Privacy Glass,16” Alum.
Wheels, Roof Rack, Auto., Sirius Satellite
Radio, CD, PW, PDL, Keyless Entry,
George Geiges
Service Manager
24 Yrs. with Ford
Lenny Santarsiero
Body Shop Manager
Rob Kosco
Salesperson
24 Yrs. with Ford
Jim Bufalino
Salesperson
18 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Toni Grasso
Salesperson
8 Yrs. at Coccia
Joe Skrutski
Salesperson
11 Yrs. at Coccia
US MARINES
Marcus Ossowski
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Frank Vieira
Director of
Internet Services
1 Yr. at Coccia
Victor DeAnthony
Salesperson
4 Yrs. at Coccia
Kevin Uren
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Greg Martin
General Manager
21 Yrs. at Coccia
US MARINES
Joe “Bobo” Nocera
Used Car Manager
25 Yrs. at Coccia
US NAVY
Ginny Kutzer
Salesperson
20 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Jason Kilduff
Salesperson
Mike Hallock
Salesperson
Abdul Alsaigh
Sales Manager
4 Yrs. at Coccia
Terry Joyce
Sales Manager
34 Yrs. at Coccia
Tom Washington
Sales Manager
14 Yrs. with Ford
Remote Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD, Pwr. Door
Locks, Anti-Theft
Sys., Side Curtain Air
Bags, Side Impact
Air Bags, Message
Center, Air, MyKey
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
Auto., AC, Pwr. Mirrors, Advanced Trac with
Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains,
AM/FM/CD, Pwr. Door Locks, Tilt Wheel,
,
Cruise Control, 15” Alum.
Wheels,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad
27
Mos.
Len Gierszal
Finance Manager
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
Pwr. Windows, Pwr.
Door Locks, Air, Advance Trac with Roll
Stability Control, Remote
Keyless Entry,
CD, MyFord
MPG
27
Mos.
STX, 3.7L V6, Auto., Air,
17” Alum. Wheels, Cloth
Seat, 40/20/40 Split
Seat, Decor Pkg.,
Cruise, ABS, Pwr.
Equipment Group
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
27
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
27
Mos.
Auto., CD, 16” Alum. Wheels, Tilt
Wheel, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Cruise
Control, Side Impact Air Bags,1st
& 2nd Air Curtains, PL, PW,
Anti-Theft Sys., Keyless
Entry, Message Center,
MPG
Auto., CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel, Pwr. Seat,
Safety Pkg., 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Side Impact
Air Bags, Anti-Theft Sys., PL, PW, Siruis
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry,
Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
27
Mos.
Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety
Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains,
Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry,
Message Center,
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
Patrick Plastow
Internet Specialist
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
27
Mos.
MPG
MPG
MPG
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
27
Mos.
MPG
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
27
Mos.
3.5L Engine, MyFord Display,
Auto. Climate Control, Pwr. Mirrors,
17” Steel Wheels, CD, Keyless
Entry, MyKey, Cruise
Control, PL, PW
MPG
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/11.
27
Mos.
Auto., 3.5L V6, Reverse Sensing Sys., CD, Keyless
Entry w/Keypad, PW, SYNC,18” Alum. Wheels,
Anti-Theft Perimeter Alarm,
Sirius Satellite Radio, PDL
3.7L V6 Engine, XL Plus Pkg.,
Cruise Control, AM/FM/CD,
MyKey System, Pwr.
Equipment Group,
40/20/40 Cloth Seat,
Pwr. Mirrors, XL
Decor Group
72
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PAGE 4D MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
545 Marketing/
Product
548 Medical/Health
545 Marketing/
Product
548 Medical/Health
545 Marketing/
Product
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Our shelves are restocked! We have the cars and we have the deals! COME IN TODAY!
WyomingValley Motors
560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA 18704
www.wyomingvalleymotorskia.com
GET UP TO$5,000 OFF ANEWKIA!
InterMetro Industries, a division of Emerson, has an immediate opening for
a Commodity Manager, located in Wilkes-Barre.
This key position is critical to our expanding business. The Commodity Manager
will report directly to the Director of Strategic Sourcing. Responsibilities include
strategically implementing the use of suppliers to maximize savings, negotiating
agreements with suppliers, maintaining metrics to measure supplier performance,
and facilitating reverse auctions.
The successful candidates should possess the following qualifcations:
• Bachelors degree
• 5+ years relevant experience
• Exceptional negotiating skills
• Experience sourcing electronic components for manufacturing
facilities strongly preferred
• Experience with Oracle and reverse auctions a plus.
Travel 10-15% expected. InterMetro Industries offers a competitive total
compensation and beneft package.
For immediate consideration, please visit the Emerson careers page at:
http://www.emerson.com and search for InterMetro Industries (Metro) in the
Company search engine.
InterMetro Industries is an equal opportunity employer and
strongly promotes diversity in the workplace.
Commodity
Manager
Part Time 11-7
At least 1 year nursing experience
In SNF/LTC facility preferred
Full Time 7-3, 3-11 & 11-7
Part Time 3-11 & 11-7
At least 1 year experience
In SNF/LTC facility preferred
Join Our Dedicated Team of
Professionals!
Call 877-339-6999 x1 or 570-735-29773
Email Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Don’t forget to ask about our amazing
pay rates and benefits package!
Complete application in person
395 Middle Road, Nanticoke
LPNS
CNAS
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
Pre-employment drug screening and background check required.
Interested candidates should send letter of interest, resume and salary history to:
The Times Leader
Human Resources Department
15 N. Main Street • Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
hiring@timesleader.com
No Telephone Calls Please!
We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in the workplace.
Inserter/Packager
Immediate Need
The Times Leader has immediate openings for Day & Night Shifts, part time
Inserter/Packager for our Packaging Department.
Experience preferred, but will train the right candidate.
This position reports directly to the Packaging Supervisor.
Duties include but are not limited to:
• Opening of insert skids
• Feeding of circulars into assigned hoppers
• Stackdown of ROP
• Clean up of Packaging Department at the end of assigned shift
Employees must be able to work fexible hours,
be able to lift at least 25 lbs. and have own vehicle.
JJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJooooobbbbbsssssssssssss ooooob JJJJJJJJJJ Autos
THE TIMES LEADER
timesleaderautos.com
Pre-employment drug screening and background check required.
Interested candidates should send letter of interest, resume and salary history to:
The Times Leader
Human Resources Department
15 N. Main Street • Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
ldaris@timesleader.com
No Telephone Calls Please!
We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in the workplace.
JJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJooooobbbbbsssssssssssss ooooob JJJJJJJJJJ Autos
THE TIMES LEADER
timesleaderautos.com
PACKAGING SHIFT
SUPERVISOR
The Times Leader has an opening in the Packaging Department for a Full Time Shift
Supervisor. The Packaging Department is responsible for insertion and packaging of
our printed products with a primary goal of servicing our distribution operation. In
this fast-paced environment, we strive to achieve superior deadline performance, high
effciency and good customer service through planning, organization, and staff devel-
opment. The ideal candidate will have a high level of energy and enthusiasm. Some
mechanical aptitude along with manufacturing process or inventory management expe-
rience is desirable. Good communication, problem solving, and computer skills are re-
quired. Must also have a sense of urgency and the ability to work in a fast-paced, team
oriented manufacturing environment. This is a night shift position that offers plenty of
opportunity for career development and advancement. We offer a salary commensurate
with experience and an excellent benefts package, medical, dental and more.
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder.
$16,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN `09
BEETLE
Excellent condition,
20,000 miles, all
power, sun roof,
kayak and bike rack
included. $14,900.
570-864-2300
VOLKSWAGEN `09
Beetle. Excellent
condition. $16,500.
CHEVY EQUINOX
‘05. Very good
shape, new brakes.
$13,000
(570) 262-8863
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
Chrysler ‘68 New Yorker
Sedan. 440 Engine.
Power Steering &
brakes. 34,500
original miles.
Always garaged.
$6,800
(570) 883-4443
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
OLDSMOBILE ‘53
98 SEDAN
72K original miles.
Rocket V8 motor.
Hydromatic trans-
mission. Mechani-
cally sound. Antique
tags. Excellent Dri-
ver. Must see to
appreciate! Asking
$7,200
Or best offer.
(570) 855-3040
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY `04 DUMP TRUCK
36k miles. 9’6” Boss
power angle plow.
Hydraulic over elec-
tric dump box with
sides. Rubber coated
box & frame. Very
good condition.
$22,500 firm. Call
570-840-1838
FORD `90 TRUCK
17’ box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
439 Motorcycles
‘96 HONDA
American Classic
Edition. 1100 cc. 1
owner, under
20,000 miles. Yel-
low and white,
extra chrome, VNH
exhaust, bags,
lights, MC jack, bat-
tery tender, hel-
mets. Asking $3500
570-288-7618
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY ‘73
Sportser 1000cc
"Bobber" Must see!
3,000 obo. Call
(570) 510-7231
for pics!
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
NIGHTTRAIN
New rear tire. Very
good condition. 23K
miles. $8,500. Call
570-510-1429
HARLEY
DAVIDSON ‘01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
KAWASAKI ‘03
KLR 650. Green.
Excellent condition.
6K Miles. $3,000
(570) 287-0563
KAWASAKI ‘05
NINJA 500R. 3300
miles. Orange.
Garage kept. His &
hers helmets. Must
sell. $2400
570-760-3599
570-825-3711
Kawasaki` 93
ZX11D NINJA
LIKE NEW
8900 Original
miles. Original
owner. V@H
Exhaust and Com-
puter. New tires.
$3,800.
570-574-3584
MOTO GUZZI `03
1,100 cc. 1,900
miles. Full dress.
Shaft driven. Garage
kept. Excellent condi-
tion. $6000. Health
Problems. Call
570-654-7863
UNITED MOTORS
‘08 MATRIX 2 SCOOTER
150cc. Purple &
grey in color. 900
miles. Bought brand
new. Paid $2,000.
Asking $1,600 or
best offer.
(570) 814-3328 or
(570) 825-5133
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
442 RVs & Campers
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New inspection.
Like new, inside
& out. $13,000.
(570) 540-0975
CADILLAC `07
ESCALADE ESV
Black with extended
cab. Fully loaded.
Low miles. Extra set
of tires & rims.
Leather interior.
$32,000.
(570) 357-1383
CADILLAC `99
ESCALADE
97k miles. Black
with beige leather
interior. 22” rims.
Runs great. $8,500
Call 570-861-0202
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 05
SILVERADO
2WD. Extra cab.
Highway miles.
Like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVY ‘10
EQUINOX LT
Moonroof. Alloys.
1 Owner. $22,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 99
SILVERADO 4X4
Auto. V8. Bargain
price! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE `00
CARGO VAN 1500
88,500 miles. V6.
Automatic. Good
Condition. $2,300
(570) 793-6955
DODGE ‘97 2500
4X4, CUMMI NS
Extended Cab.
Good Shape.
$9,500 negotiable.
(570) 954-7461
FORD `00 WINDSTAR
Excellent condition,
8 passenger, new
starter. $2,900.
570-655-2443
FORD `00 WINDSTAR
SE. 7 passenger, 4
door, V6, all power,
inspected, well
maintained, excel-
lent family van,
reduced to $2,495.
570-287-3951
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD `01 ESCAPE
SUV. V6. 4x4. New
tires. CD. Factory
wheels. Good con-
dition. $2,450. Call
570-299-0772
FORD ‘05 ESCAPE XLS
4 Cylinder. 5
speed. Front
wheel drive. air.
Warranted.
$7,895.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘97 F150 4X4
Auto. V6. New
inspection! $4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘00 EXPLORER
XLT. CD. Power
seats. Extra
Clean! $3,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD 08 EDGE SEL
Leather. Auto.
$17,940
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
GMC '02 SAFARI
CARGO VAN
AWD. Auto. War-
rantied. $5,195
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Very clean.
$10,750. Call
570-474-6028
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
HONDA 06 CRV SE
Leather &
Moonroof.
$15,872
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HONDA ‘09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner.
$17,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HYUNDAI '04 SANTA FE
4 Cylinder. Auto.
Front wheel drive.
78K. Very clean!.
Warrantied.
$7,795.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HYUNDAI ‘06
SANTE FE LTD
Leather. Moon-
roof. One owner.
$14,580
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP ‘04
GRAND CHEROKEE
4.0 - 6 cylinder.
Auto. 4x4. Air.
Many options -
very clean! 1
owner. War-
rantied. $9,295.
BUY * SELL * TRADE
D.P. MOTORS
1451 SHOEMAKER
AVE, W. WYOMING
570-714-4146
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
JEEP `04
CHEROKEE
135,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, $6,500.
(570) 237-6979
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 03 LIBERTY
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4x4. Leather.
Sunroof. Extra
Sharp! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 LIBERTY
Auto. V6.
Black Beauty!
$6,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP ‘06 WRANGLER
Only 29K miles!
$17,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP ‘07 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4WD & Alloys.
$15,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
JEEP 08 COMPASS
4 WD. Auto. CD.
$13,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 98 CHEROKEE
SPORT
2 door. 4x4. 6
cylinder. Auto.
Like new! $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP ‘98 WRANGLER
6 Cylinder. 4WD.
$9,250
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LEXUS `06 GX 470
Cypress Pearl with
ivory leather
interior. Like new
condition, garage
kept. All service
records. All options
including premium
audio package, rear
climate control,
adjustable suspen-
sion, towing pack-
age, rear spoiler,
Lexus bug guard.
48,500 miles.
$26,950
(570) 237-1082
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA 03 MPV VAN
V6. CD Player.
1 owner vehicle!!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `07
MARINER
One owner. Luxury
4x4. garage kept.
Showroom condi-
tion, fully loaded,
every option
34,000 miles.
GREAT DEAL
$14,500
(570)825-5847
NISSAN `10 ROGUE SL
AWD. Gray. Sun-
roof. Bose stereo
system. Black,
heated leather
seats. Sunroof
6,800 miles.
$24,000
(570) 696-2777
NISSAN ‘08 ROGUE S
AWD. Auto
$16,620
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
RANGE ROVER
‘07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 5D
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD DECEMBER 31
Harry’s U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
Sapa Extruder, Inc., the world’s leading manufacturer in extruded
aluminum is looking for a third shift Fabrication coordinator. This
supervisory position entails direction of machine operators and
related production operations, along with driving continuous
improvement initiatives within the Fabrication Division. A thorough
knowledge of Fabrication equipment and operations, precision
measuring instruments, drawings, and specifications are required.
Applicants must have five years experience in Fabrication or related
supervisory position. Qualified applicants should submit resume
with salary requirements to:
Teresa.mandzak@sapagroup.com
or complete application at
Sapa Extruder, Inc.
330 Elmwood Avenue
Mountain Top, PA 18707
Attn: Human Resources
E.O.E. NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE.
FABRICATION COORDINATOR
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
Service Advisor/Service Manager
High-end car dealership has opening for experienced
service advisor/service manager.
Applicants should have at least 2 years of previous
experience. Individual must be a self-starter and be
able to work in a fast-paced environment.
We offer an excellent working environment and an
aggressive compensation package.
Please forward your resume in confidence to
eebartoli@comcast.net or apply in person
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Santo Volvo
3512 Birney Ave., Moosic, PA 18507
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
TOYOTA 02 TACOMA
4WD. SR5. TRD.
V-6. $11,425
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 09 RAV 4
Only 13K miles!
Remote Starter.
$21,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
503 Accounting/
Finance
BUSINESS
OFFICE CLERK
Needed part time.
Fortis Institute in
Forty Fort is looking
for a part-time busi-
ness office person
to work with
accounts payable
and receivables.
Accounting back-
ground a plus. Must
be detail-oriented.
Primarily daytime
hours & Saturdays.
Fax resume to
Human Resources
at 570-287-7936 or
mail to 166 Slocum
Street, Forty Fort,
PA 18704.
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
COLLECTIONS
SPECIALIST
Local company
located in Hazleton
is seeking a full-time
Collections Special-
ist in their expand-
ing Credit Depart-
ment. The ideal
candidate will have
to work 9:30 to
6pm, have experi-
ence making collec-
tion calls, resolving
A/R disputes, and
investigating deduc-
tions and charge-
backs. This is a high
visibility position that
requires excellent
analytical, commu-
nication, and organi-
zational skills. Pro-
fessionalism and
assertiveness are
an absolute must.
SAP experience a
definite plus. We
offer a competitive
salary and excellent
benefit package.
Qualified applicants
should submit their
resume and salary
requirements by
fax to HR Dept.
570-450-0231 or
e-mail to
donna.reimold@
forbo.com or mail
To D. Reimold, Box
667 Hazleton, PA
18201.
506 Administrative/
Clerical
LEASING CONSULTANT/
RESIDENT COORDINATOR
Local apartment
community is look-
ing for a friendly and
energetic person to
join our team. Appli-
cants must be
dependable, well
organized & capa-
ble of working inde-
pendently. The right
candidate must be
creative, have pre-
vious sales experi-
ence, computer
experience and
exceptional cus-
tomer service/peo-
ple skills. Position
may require working
occasional evenings
& weekends. Great
salary and vacation
offered. Bilingual a
plus. Please send
resume to:
Property Manager
9 Beverly Drive,
Edwardsville, PA
18704. EOE
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
NEEDED
Call 570-654-5775
Electrical contractor
seeking qualified
Electrical Project
Manager for com-
mercial/industrial
projects. Must have
proven Project Man-
agement electrical
experience and be
able to:
• Handle change
orders and
related paperwork;
• Establish project
schedules;
• Create strong
customer relations;
and
• Supervise and
evaluate a crew of
professionals.
Computer knowl-
edge (Microsoft
Project, Word,
Excel) required.
Knowledge of cur-
rent NEC, College
Degree preferred.
Competitive salary
and benefit package
available.
Mail cover letter and
resume to: c/o
The Times Leader
BOX 2860
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
ELECTRICAL PROJECT
MANAGER
Immediate opportu-
nity for an Electrical
Construction Ser-
vice Manager. Must
have strong resi-
dential and com-
mercial back-
ground; ability to
estimate and man-
age projects up to
$75,000; Strong
computer skills;
experienced with
Estimation software
a plus.
Send resume to: c/o
The Times Leader
BOX 2855
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
ELECTRICAL SERVICE
MANAGER
Stone Quarry Labor-
ers; Temporary
4/1/12-11/30/12; 25
Openings; Hand
sort, tag, stack,
move, pack, load &
unload stone in sup-
port of quarry oper-
ations. Monday-Fri-
day, 7a-4p; 13.30
per hour No Over-
time; Location:
Meshoppen, PA
(Wyoming County).
Send resume to
cherylo@meshop-
penstone.com or
mail to Meshoppen
Stone Inc., PO Box
127, Meshoppen, PA
18630
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
OFFICE MANAGER
A local non-profit
Association seeks
candidate with
building industry and
office management
experience. Must
be proficient with
Quickbooks, MS
Office and Publisher.
Will plan events and
serve the Board of
Directors. Full time
salary position.
Call Harvis HR
Services with ques-
tions 542-5330
or forward resume
to apply:
BIANEPA.JOBS@
GMAIL.COM
Please, no calls to
BIA office.
522 Education/
Training
SUPPORT COACH
Full Time position
supporting academ-
ic success for chil-
dren and families.
BA/BS required
educational, bilin-
gual background
preferred. Excellent
compensation, ben-
efits, salary. Fax
resume to: 570-
825-4746 or e-mail
thogan@voapa.org
EOE
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN NEEDED
Motivated, ASE pre-
ferred. Experienced
or recent grads pre-
ferred. Competitive
salary and benefits.
Rymer Automotive
Specialists
Call 570-970-8840
T TOW OW TRUCK TRUCK
DRIVERS DRIVERS
PART & FULL TIME
Wilkes-Barre &
Mountain Top area.
570-760-6218
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
HOUSEKEEPING
Part time 4pm -
8pm, Monday -Fri-
day. Full Time 2pm-
10pm, Monday-Fri-
day. Apply in per-
son: Wilkes-Barre
Family YMCA, 40 W.
Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA.
PART TIME CUSTODIAL
Wilkes-Barre
Office cleaner.
Monday-Friday
5pm-9:30pm
$9.00 to start.
Cleaning offices,
restrooms and
mopping floors.
Apply online at
Sovereigncs.com.
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
TRUCK DRIVER
Needed. Full Time
Requirements: able
to drive 20’ truck , 7
year clean driving
record, PA medical
card, motor vehicle
report, must be able
to work flexible
hours, able to do
physical work and
lift over 60lbs.,
$10.00 per hour plus
bonus. Apply at:
U’SAgain Recycling
486 S. Empire St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-270-2670
548 Medical/Health
CAREGIVERS/
HOMEMAKERS/HHA/CNA
Homecare shifts
available in
Lackawanna and
Luzerne County.
Experience pre-
ferred - Will train.
Apply: comfort
keepers.com or
224 Wilkes-Barre
Twp. Blvd. W-B
Call: 570-970-7800
Community Home
Workers
Full Time jobs are
available to work
with individuals with
intellectual disabili-
ties in a community
home in the Ashley
and Nuangola
areas. Experience
is helpful, paid train-
ing is provided. Valid
drivers license is
required. For infor-
mation or applica-
tion, call IMPACT
SYSTEMS, Inc. at
(570) 829-3671.
Starting Salary is
$8.85 + benefits
Drug free work-
place EOE
DIETARY AIDE, PCA’S, &
PER DIEM LPN
Competitive
starting rates.
No phone calls.
Apply in person
TIFFANY COURT
700 Northampton St
Kingston, PA
548 Medical/Health
MASTER LEVEL
THERAPIST
Part Time position.
Master’s Degree in
Psychology, Social
Work or closely
related clinical field
+ 2 years clinical
experience with
children who have
emotional & behav-
ioral disorders. Pro-
gram serves female
youth in 24 hour/7
day a week residen-
tial treatment facili-
ty. Excellent com-
pensation, salary.
Fax resume to:
570-825-4746
or e-mail
thogan@voapa.org
EOE
Village at
Greenbriar
Assisted
Living
PERSONAL CARE
AIDES - PART TIME
All Shifts
APPLY WITHIN:
4252 Memorial
Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
HELPMATES, INC.
Now hiring part-time
PERSONAL CARE
AIDES for Luzerne/
Wyoming Counties.
The successful can-
didates will be
responsible for trav-
eling home to home
providing personal
care. Are you willing
to assist with
bathing, light house-
keeping and meal
preparation? We
provide travel time
& a voluntary benefit
package. Immediate
need in Nanticoke,
Berwick, Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre. Lead-
ing home care
provider in PA since
1987. Interested
candidates should
call 1-855-444-2037
to set up an inter-
view. EOE.
551 Other
HOT JOBS
Call Center/
Telemarketing,
Forklift, Ware-
house, Welder,
CNC Operators,
Carpenters, Sales
& Marketing Reps,
IT Help Desk,
Desktop Manager,
Senior Manager
Deployment
Service.
www.express
pros.com
570.208.7000
STREET DEPARTMENT
Swoyersville Bor-
ough Council is now
accepting applica-
tions for 1 (one) full
time street depart-
ment worker. The
work week is 40
hours, 5 days a
week. Starting
salary is $9 to $9.50
per hour depending
on qualifications.
Benefits include
health insurance for
employee only after
90 days, sick time,
paid holidays and
personal days after
90 days, optional
pension plan partici-
pation after 6
months, vacation
period and clothing
allowance after 1
year. Successful
passing of drug and
alcohol testing
required upon hir-
ing. Applications
can be picked up at
the Swoyersville
Borough Building,
675 Main St., Swoy-
ersville, PA, Mon-
day-Friday 9AM-
4PM. Deadline for
application is
December 29,
2011. EOE
Gene Breznay
Borough Secretary
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
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INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
554 Production/
Operations
MANUFACTURING
MATERIAL
HANDLER
• Day shift
• Night shift
$9.50/hr to to start.
($.50/hr Diff/nights)
General laboring
assisting production
line with material
handling and sup-
plies. Must have
experience driving
forklift and ability to
multi task and work
in fast paced envi-
ronment. 60-90 day
evaluation with $
increase $ based on
YOUR performance,
attendance etc.
Benefit Package:
includes: Medical,
Dental, Vision, Life
Insurance, Vacation,
Holiday pay PLUS
Full-time 12 hour
shifts on alternating
3 & 4 day work
weeks. Every other
weekend a must.
Previous manufac-
turing experience
preferred. Some
heavy lifting.
Accepting
applications at
AEP INDUSTRIES,
INC.
20 Elmwood Ave
Crestwood
Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA
18707
EOE
We are a drug free
workplace.
573 Warehouse
DISTRIBUTION
CLERKS
WILKES-BARRE
Are you an
Early Bird or a
Night Owl?
Adecco has
Various Shifts
with Pay Rates up
to $9.75/hour
TEMP TO HIRE
REQUIREMENTS
FOR CONSIDER-
ATION:
PROFESSIONAL
RESUME
with Solid Work
History
Submit to a
Background and
Drug Screen
HS Diploma/GED
Stand on Feet
All Day
Basic Computer
Skills
Apply
Today At www.
adeccousa.com
Or Call
570.451.3726
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BEER & LIQUOR
LICENSE FOR SALE
LUZERNE COUNTY
$22,000
For More Info
Call 570-332-1637
or 570-332-4686
TAX REFUND COMING?
INVEST IN
YOURSELF WITH
JAN – PRO
Quote from current
Franchisee,
“I started with a
small investment &
I have grown my
business over
600%. It definitely
changed my life and
I would recommend
Jan-Pro.”
* Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
* Insurance &
Bonding
* Training &
Ongoing Support
* Low Start Up Costs
* Accounts available
throughout Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
DALE EARNHARD
#3 SR. JACKET,
black, size XXL,
made in USA, Front
has “Dale Earnhard
#3 Heartbeat of
American” (with
Chevy symbol)
embroidered, also
some embroidery
on back. New con-
dition, $45. DOLLS.
(3) Porcelain. Her-
itage collectibles.
Still in original pack-
age. $20 for all.
570-235-5216
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
CHEST FREEZER
7 cu ft Frigidaire.
Like New!! $95.
570-237-2464
FOOD PROCESSOR
Bullet Express with
juice, never used.
paid $120 sell for
$60. 570-288-8274
MICROWAVE, coun-
tertop Kenmore.
white 1.2 cu ft 1200
watt, digital, good
condition $30.
570-855-9221
MICROWAVE, good
working condition,
$15. (570) 825-9744
710 Appliances
MIXER Kenmore
stand mixer 400
watt with paddle,
dough hook &
whisk, red $150.
570-474-0863 or
570-309-5490
REFRIGERATOR
Whirlpool, side by
side, white, ice &
water measures
70”Hx35.5”Wx33.
75”d. $575.
570-824-6233
SLICER
Univex model 7512
12” knife, built in
sharpener, very
good condition.
New $1,800. asking
$600.
570-833-4495
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
BABY SWING, Rain-
forest by F. P. music,
lights, mobile, like
new $40. 855-9221
CRIB, white, practi-
cally new $45
crib mattress
excellent condition:
$20. 570-301-8495
714 Bridal Items
LACE BOWS wed-
ding white 24 for
$12. 570-654-4440
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
MEMORIAL SHRINE
LOTS FOR SALE
6 lots available at
Memorial Shrine
Cemetery. $2,400.
Call 717-774-1520
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
722 Christmas
Trees
CHRISTMAS TREES
(2) ceramic 18” H $5
each.570-288-8274
HELEN &
ED’S
CHRISTMAS
TREE FARM
Fresh Cut Trees
or
Cut Your Own
* Spruce * Fir *
* Live Trees *
* Wreaths *
OPEN DAILY
8 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Ample Parking
Holiday Music
helenandedstree
farm.com
570-868-6252
Nuangola Exit 159
off I-81
(Follow Signs)
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
jACKET Aeropostale
girls medium $25.
484-239-8507
JACKETS, leather,
one small, one
large, $50/each.
Dolce Gabbana
handbag $200.
570-654-4440
TOTE, pink/khaki,
Andy Warhall Camp-
bells soup, canvas,
$10. WRISTLET,
Vera Bradley,
pink/aqua, $10.
CAP, Ed Hardy, gold
skull/dragon, $30.
TOTE, grey quilted,
Hollister, $7. PURSE,
Ed Hardy, yellow
canvas, large, rose
& Ed Hardy print
design, some stain.
$10. PURSE, Ed
Hardy, gold/bronze,
leather rose & gold
studded spider
design, studs on
strap, dust bag,
great condition.
$50. Items in like
new condition
unless otherwise
noted.
570-696-3528
732 Exercise
Equipment
AB LOUNGER Ultra,
never used $50.
570-288-8274
EXERCISE EQUIP-
MENT 4 pieces, as
seen on TV all for
$40. 570-824-0248
TREADMILL
$150.
570-212-2902
736 Firewood
FIREWOOD FREE
cut to length, pick
up only, wood is
hardwood only. Call
Dave 10am - 9pm
any day. 570-574-
7123 ask for Dave.
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER: Edenpure
Infrared $200.
484-239-8507
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ANTIQUE CEDAR
CHEST. Made in PA.
Good condition.
$55. 570-417-1646
BED FRAME, queen,
tubular steel head &
foot board, $200.
SHELVING, Medal, 3
shelves, $5.
(570) 654-4440
COUCH and CHAIR,
Victorian, beige
with floral design.
$2,200. COUCH,
sectional, choco-
late. $1,800. OBO.
Both like new.
570-822-7884
Entertainment Cen-
ter, FREE, real wood
walnut finish, 79”W,
61”H, 24”D.
570-735-6542
ESTATE SALE
LEFT OVER ITEMS
Living room, formal
dining room, mis-
cellaneous, etc.
570-690-0221 (C)
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
SOFA Berkline, dou-
ble reclining, excel-
lent condition $400.
570-655-1508
754 Machinery &
Equipment
CONCRETE MIXER
$150. Chipper $200.
Lawn Boy LM $100.
Wagner Paint
Sprayer $100. Side-
walk Edger (Gas)
$50. 570-822-4751
SNOW BLOWER
Toro, electric start,
runs great, used
very little $125.
570-825-3371
756 Medical
Equipment
TENS UNIT: (DYNEX
II) Neurostimulator;
all necessary equip-
ment included.
$100. 570-829-1611
WHEELCHAIR, folds
for travel, $160. 2
potty chairs, bed-
side/commode, $60
each. Walker with
two wheels $35.
Tub chair $20, OBO.
All excellent condi-
tion.
Call for details
570-825-7156
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
CHINA CABINET
$50.
570-288-8274
COFFEE URN, 55
cups, Farberware,
needs stem, $25.
DINNERWARE, 64
piece set, $35.
RUGS, braided,
reversible, 3 sizes,
$35. 570-654-4440
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GUITAR, electric
Oscar Schmidt, red,
includes gig bag,
amp & cord, like
new, 125 for all.
570-823-3835
SNOW TIRES (4)
185/65/r15 with
studs excellent con-
dition $280.
570-696-1450
TUB: cast iron claw
foot, white, cast
iron, 60+ years old
old. 5’Lx16” deep
$300. Men’s black
leather ice skates
size 10, ladies white
leather size 8. $10.
each. Christmas
tree Pink for Breast
Cancer 6’. white
LED lights used 1
holiday sell $45.
Seat covers gen-
uine Sheepskin for
bucket seats, both
$45. 570-779-9464
758 Miscellaneous
WREATH large 32”
Christmas wreath
has 200 colored
lights $25. 16 piece
new santa dinner-
ware set, dishwash-
er & microwave
save still in box, set
includes 4 dinner
plates , 4 soup
bowls, 4 salad
plates, 4 mugs $10.
Portable kerosene
fired heater oper-
ates for 27 to 37
hours on 1.92 gal-
lons of kerosene
$60. Jacobsen
homelite 320 gas
snow blower runs
well, manual $100.
Graco baby swing,
4 position reclining
seat, wide one-hand
operation play tray
for baby’s toys $25.
570-288-8689
YEARBOOKS Old
Forge H.S. 1975,
1977-1983; 1987-
1994; 1996-1997;
2005-2006; 2010.
$20 each. Only 1
available per year.
570-457-9389
762 Musical
Instruments
ALTO SAXOPHONE:
Selmer AS500 with
case. Like new.
$475.00.
570-574-2853
DRUM SET Sonor
Force 1003 5 piece
bass drum & pedal,
2 Tom Toms with
double tom holder,
snare, floor tom, all
stands, drummer
seat also includes
zildjian high hat,
crash & ride cym-
bals, all high end
stands, have hard-
ware, muffle pads &
some cymbal
cases, silver. $375.
obo. 570-479-2322
PA Speakers, pair,
Kustom KPC 10’s,
mint condition. $90.
firm. 570-574-8254
PIANO
Upright, Whitman.
Free. Good condi-
tion, needs tuning.
Must pickup.
570-288-4242
766 Office
Equipment
TYPEWRITER $80. 5
drawer file cabinet,
side to side draw-
ers, new $950 sell
$450. 280-2472
776 Sporting Goods
ANTIQUE POOL
TABLE: $700.00
or best offer.
Call 570-208-3888
BINOCULARS.
Lafayette, zoom,
field, 5.5 degrees at
12x with case. Good
condition. Bausch
and Lomb, works,
but in rough condi-
tion. $20 for both.
570-235-5216
SNOWBOARD, Bur-
ton, Dominate 151
with Burton step in
bindings, size 10
Burton boots, excel-
lent condition, $280.
570-883-2785
780 Televisions/
Accessories
BLU-RAY
DISC PLAYER:
Sharp BD-HP35U
blu-ray disc player
with WiFi Internet.
3D ready. Like new
in box with all
accessories. $45.
Sony BDP-S570 blu-
ray disc player with
WiFi Internet. 3D
ready. Like new in
box with all acces-
sories. $45.
570-833-2598
TV Phillips 32” HD
wide screen, flat
front, tube $50.
570-696-0187
TV Sony Trinitron
36” HD ready, flat
front, tube. Very
good condition.
$50. 570-855-9221
TV, 30” Quasar Con-
sole with convertor
box, 14” Orion TV,
both work fine, $50.
Must take all 3
items. 570-718-0187
782 Tickets
BUS TRIPS
RADIO CITY MUSIC
HALL CHRISTMAS
SPECTACULAR
12/16,1:00 pm Show
2nd Mezz. $91
12/17 11:30am Show
Orch. $156
2nd Mezz. $121
COOKIE’S
TRAVELERS
570-815-8330
570-558-6889
cookiestravelers.com
“Hugh Jackman
Back on Broad-
way”
Dec. 28th, 2pm
Orchestra Seats
2 at $400.
570-417-5438
JERSEY BOYS
Wed. March 14th
$175. Orch. seats
570-655-4247
784 Tools
TOOLS. Craftsman,
10 in Radial Arm
saw, 16” Scroll saw,
1.5” Circular saw
blades, 4’ Level, 3+
inch Snips, 9 large
metal files, large
square, wire cutters
and more. Moving,
must sell. $140 for
all. 570-235-5216
786 Toys & Games
AIR HOCKEY TABLE
Starcraft turbo like
new $80. obo
570-287-2433
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
SLIM PLAY STATION
3, 2 wireless con-
trollers, 2 games, 1
bluray movie, $250.
570-288-3352
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S &
S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVD’s, VHS & CDs
& Pre 90’s toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Dec. 9: $1,709.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
KITTEN needs good
home, orange tiger
striped sweet,
friendly, young,
wags tail like a dog,
pleasant, independ-
ent, Scranton.
570 851-0436
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
PAGE 6D MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St • Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 11pm
WVON¡MO VALLEV
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
*For qualified Buyers. Bi-weekly payments greater than 17
1/2% of monthly net income, additional
down-payment may be required. Costs to be paid by Buyer at delivery: registration, taxes, title, doc fee.
0
$
DOWN*
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
BUFFALO CREEK
LABRADOR’S
Pups. Males. Train-
ing started. Champi-
on blood line. Excel-
lent hunters & great
pets!
(570) 490-1464
CHOW PUPPIES
Sweet, affectionate,
loving puppies.
Second shots &
papers. $500/each.
570-466-2252
CHRISTMAS SHI-TZUS!
Adorable puppies!
Will be ready for
Christmas! $550
570-401-3004
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LAB MIX PUPPIES &
COCKAPOO PUPPIES
Well socialized.
Shots & dewormed.
$125 each
570-259-8146
Poms, Yorkies, Mal-
tese, Husky, Rot-
ties, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
Chihuahua, Labs &
Shitzus.
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
YORKIES
Registered. Vet
checked, home
raised, sweet dis-
positions. Will hold
until Christmas.
Small,
$750 to $850.
570-436-5083
570-788-2963
PUPPY FOR
CHRISTMAS
7 months old, male,
white with brown
ears & eyes, all
shoots, cage includ-
ed, $100.
(570) 357-9513
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
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ALDEN
1100 Walnut Street
Great starter or
investment home.
Nice neighborhood.
Property sold in as
is condition.
MLS#11-215
$23,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
ASHLEY
3 bedroom, 1 bath 2
story in good loca-
tion. Fenced yard
with 2 car detached
garage. Large attic
for storage. Gas
heat. $79,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
ASHLEY
Delightfully pleas-
ant. This home has
been totally remod-
eled, a great buy
for your money.
New modern
kitchen with all
appliances, living
room and dining
room have new
hardwood floors.
Nice size 3 bed-
rooms. 1 car
garage. Be sure to
see these values.
MLS 11-2890
$68,000
Call Theresa
Eileen R. Melone
Real estate
570-821-7022
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
Remodeled 2 or 3
bedroom home.
Large yard. Nice
porch. Low traffic.
Not in flood area.
Asking $82,000.
Deremer Realty
570-477-1149
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
AVOCA
Renovated 3 bed-
room, 2 story on
corner lot. New roof
& windows. New
kitchen, carpeting &
paint. Hardwood
floors, gas fireplace
& garage. All appli-
ances included. A
MUST SEE. $119,000.
570-457-1538
Leave Message
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
BACK MOUNTAIN
133 Frangorma Dr
Bright & open floor
plan. 5 year old 2
story. 9' ceiling 1st
floor. Custom
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Family room
with 14' ceiling &
fireplace. Conve-
nient location.
MLS# 11-2572
$349,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search featured
homes in Tunkhan-
nock. $275,000. For
appointment, call:
570-333-4024
906 Homes for Sale
BACK MOUNTAIN
Enjoy this gracious
4 bedroom Tudor
home on 5+ acre lot
with mature land-
scaping. Hardwood
floors throughout, 4
fireplaces, built in
bookcases & Ameri-
can Chestnut doors
enhance this archi-
tecturally designed
home. The master
bedroom and bath
located on the first
floor with 3 addition-
al bedrooms, a sun-
room and 2 baths
on the second floor.
Lovely views over
look stone patio and
yard. MLS#10-3053
$549,000
Call Rhea
570-696-6677
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
BEAR CREEK
475 East Ave.
Top to bottom re-do
for this beautiful 3
bedroom, 1.75 bath,
2 story home locat-
ed in the Meadow
Run Lake communi-
ty of Bear Creek.
Tranquil setting,
modern interior all
re-done, granite
countertops in the
kitchen, exterior
with new landscap-
ing and stone patio
with lake frontage
to name a few!
MLS 11-1643
$329,900
Call Jay A.
Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear Creek Blvd
Well maintained
custom built 2 story
nestled on 2 private
acres with circular
driveway - Large
kitchen with center
island, master
bedroom with 2
walk-in closets,
family room with
fireplace, custom
built wine cellar - A
Must See property!
$299,900
MLS# 10-4312
Call Geri
570-696-0888
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
Enjoy the exclusive
privacy of this 61
acre, 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with
vaulted ceilings and
open floor plan. Ele-
gant formal living
room, large airy
family room and
dining room and
gorgeous 3 season
room opening to
large deck with hot
tub. Modern eat in
kitchen with island,
gas fireplace,
upstairs and wood
burning stove
downstairs. This
stunning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back
and savor
the view
MLS 11-3462
$443,900
Sandy Rovinski
Ext. 26
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
BEAR CREEK
VILLAGE
333 Beaupland
10-1770
Living room has
awesome woodland
views and you will
enjoy the steam/
sauna. Lake and
tennis rights avail-
able with Associa-
tion membership.
(membership
optional). Minutes
from the Pocono's
and 2 hours to
Philadelphia or New
York. $259,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
Buying?
Go to the top...
call Jane Kopp
288-7481
Selling?
Call Jane Kopp
Real Estate
288-7481
FREE MARKET
ANALYSIS
DALLAS
20 Fox Hollow Drive
Well maintained
two story with
fully finished lower
level awaits its
new family. 4-6
bedroom, 3.5 bath,
2 fireplaces. One
year home warranty
included. Wonderful
neighborhood.
$270,000
MLS #11-3504
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DALLAS
210 42nd St. E
Beautiful 3300 sq.ft.
custom built Tudor
home on 3.7 +/-
acres with stream,
pond & gorgeous
landscaping in a
great country like
setting. A home
you'll be proud to
own. MLS#10-4516
$ 399,900
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
248 Overbrook Rd.
Lovely 4 bedroom
cape cod situated
in a private setting
on a large lot.
Vaulted ceiling in
dining room, large
walk in closet in 1
bedroom on 2nd
floor. Some
replacement win-
dows. Call Today!
MLS 11-2733
$125,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
3 Crestview Dr.
Well-constructed
and maintained
sprawling multi-
level with 5,428
square feet of living
space. Living room
& dining room with
hardwood floors
& gas fireplace;
eat-in kitchen with
island; florida room.
5 bedrooms, 4
baths; 2 half-baths.
Lower level rec
room with wet bar
& fireplace. leads
to heated in-ground
pool. Beautifully
landscaped 2
acre lot.
$575,000
MLS# 11-1798
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
DALLAS
NEW PRICE!
56 Wyoming Ave
Well maintained 4
bed, 2 bath home
located on large .85
acre lot. Features
open floor plan,
heated 3 season
room with hot tub,
1st floor laundry, 2
car garage and
much more. 11-3641
$179,500
Call Jim Banos
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-991-1883
DALLAS
** OPEN HOUSE **
SUNDAY, NOV-13
12NOON-2PM
148 E Center Hill Rd.
Conveniently locat-
ed, roomy & com-
fortable 2 story
awaits your family.
3 bedrooms 1.5
bath, hardwood
floors, new deck,
pool & new win-
dows MLS#11-3815
$149,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
** OPEN HOUSE **
SUNDAY, NOV-6
12NOON-2PM
DALLAS
* NEW LISTING! *
Ruckno built home
in Shrine Acres.
Double lot, 20x40
in-ground pool in
rear with great pri-
vacy. Cedar sided,
updated roof and
heating system. 4
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, lots of clos-
ets, hardwood
floors, 1-car garage.
MLS#11-4134
$279,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 7D
PAGE 8D MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
DRUMS
Sand Springs
12 Sand Hollow Rd.
Nearly new 3 bed-
room, 2.5 bath
town home. Huge
Master with 2 clos-
ets full bath. 1 car
attached garage,
wooded lot, end
unit. Cul-de-sac.
Great golf
community.
MLS 11-2411
$172,000
Call Connie
Eileen R. Melone
Real Estate
570-821-7022
DUPONT
167 Center St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath 2 story
home with
garage and
driveway.
Newer kitchen
and bath. For
more info and
phot os visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3561
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DUPONT
Main Street
Commercial
Excellent corner
location. Approxi-
mate 200’ road
frontage. 1st floor
offices. Large 2nd
floor apartment.
Detached 3 bay
garage. $225,000
Call Kathie
570-288-6654
DURYEA
314 Bennett Street
NOT IN FLOOD ZONE
Refashioned 3 or 4
bedroom, two full
modern baths. Two
story, 2300sf, level
yard with new land-
scaping and 1 car
garage. New every-
thing in this charm-
ing must see prop-
erty. Custom blinds
throughout. Great
neighborhood. Park
beyond the back-
yard. MLS# 11-3776
$164,900
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
DURYEA
314 Edward St
Wonderful neigh-
borhood, this 4
bedroom, 10 year
old home has it all!.
Extra room on first
floor, great for
mother in law suite
or Rec Room. Mod
oak kit, Living
Room, central air,in
ground pool, fenced
yard, and attached
2 car garage. Great
family home! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www. atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3732
$239,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
DURYEA
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level. If
you’re looking for a
Ranch, don’t miss
this one. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
805-807 Main
St.
Multi-Family.
Large side by
side double with
separate utili-
ties. 3 bed-
rooms each side
with newer car-
pet, replace-
ment windows
and newer roof.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3054
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DURYEA
BLUEBERRY HILLS
108 Blackberry Ln.
Newer construc-
tion, 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family
room with gas fire-
place. Formal dining
room. 2 car garage,
gas heat, large
deck, above ground
pool. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3858
$289,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
DURYEA REDUCED
1140 SPRING ST.
Large 3 bedroom
home with new
roof, replacement
windows, hardwood
floors. Great loca-
tion! For more infor-
mation and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2636
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
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the directions!
DURYEA
REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry
Lane
Blueberry Hills
4 BEDROOMS, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$319,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
DURYEA
Single Family Dwelling
Kitchen, Living
room, dining area, 2
bedroom, full bath
& pantry. Was in
Flood - took up to
3” on first level.
$15,000 firm.
Call (570) 780-0324
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
192 Hillside Ave
Nice income prop-
erty conveniently
located. Property
has many upgrades
including all new
replacement win-
dows, very well
maintained. All units
occupied, separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit:www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3283
$89,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
EDWARDSVILLE
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen and
replacement win-
dows installed.
MLS 11-560
$52,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
32 Atlantic Ave
3 bedroom. Great
starter home.
Almost completely
remodeled. 11-2108
$87,000
Darcy J. Gollhardt,
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
EXETER
1021 Wyoming Ave
2 unit duplex, 2nd
floor tenant-occu-
pied, 1st floor unoc-
cupied, great rental
potential. Separate
entrances to units,
one gas furnace,
new electrical with
separate meters for
each unit. The 1st
floor apartment
when rented out
generated $550 per
month. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4247
$52,000
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
EXETER
44 Orchard St.
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
single, modern
kitchen with appli-
ances, sunroom,
hardwood floors on
1st and 2nd floor.
Gas heat, large
yard, OSP. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1866
$137,999
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
EXETER
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$123,000
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms and 1.5
baths, new rear
deck, full front
porch, tiled baths
and kitchen, granite
countertops, all
Cherry hardwood
floors throughout,
all new stainless
steel appliances
and lighting, new oil
furnace, washer
dryer in first floor
bath. Great neigh-
borhood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
FALLS/MILL CITY
10 acres with gas
lease. Out of flood
zone. 3 bedrooms.
2 baths. Living
room. Dining room.
Family room.
Kitchen. $130,000.
570-333-1456
Leave a Message
FORTY FORT
65 W Pettebone St.
Beautiful remod-
eled home in desir-
able neighborhood.
4 bed, 3 bath,
stainless steel
appliances, granite
countertops, deck,
private driveway
with 2 car garage
A must see.
$163,000
RENT TO OWN
OPTION AVAILABLE
570-881-8493
HANOVER TWP.
10 Lyndwood Ave
3 Bedroom 1.5 bath
ranch with new win-
dows hardwood
floors finished base-
ment 2 car garage
and a finished base-
ment. MLS 11-3610
$154,900
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
HANOVER TWP.
20 Dexter St. ,
Nice starter home
with shed - MOVE-IN
READY! Fenced yard.
Security system.
Roof 2006. Hanover
Area School
District. This home
would be eligible for
the Luzerne County
Growing Home-
owners Initiative.
MLS #11-3023
$ 39,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
HANOVER TWP.
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$179,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
HANOVER TWP.
8 Diamond Ave.
Don’t worry
about winter in
this fully insulat-
ed home with
new windows. 3
floors of living
space lets you
spread out and
enjoy this
house. Large
family room
addition plus 4
bedrooms, 1 1/2
baths, 1st floor
laundry, large
corner lot. Mod-
ern kitchen with
granite coun-
ters. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-622
$119,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
HANOVER TWP.
94 Ferry Road
Nice vinyl sided 2
story situated on a
great corner fenced
lot in Hanover Twp.
2 bedrooms, 2
modern baths,
additional finished
space in basement
for 2 more bed-
rooms or office/
playrooms.Attached
2 car garage con-
nected by a 9x20
breezeway which
could be a great
entertaining area!
Above ground pool,
gas fireplace, gas
heat, newer roof
and “All Dri” system
installed in base-
ment. MLS #11-626
$119,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good con-
dition with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath,
eat-in kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced yard
& new gas heat.
REDUCED TO
$39,000
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
HARDING
310 Lockville Rd
Enjoy the serenity
of country living in
this beautiful two
story home on 2.23
acres. Great for
entertaining inside
and out. Three car
attached garage
with full walkup attic
PLUS another 2 car
detached garage.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-831
$267,000
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
HUGHESTOWN
Now available. Both
sides of duplex for
sale. Each unit
being sold individu-
ally. Well main-
tained and in nice
neighborhood, has
new roof and large
yard. 19 is $35,000,
21 is $37,000. Call
Holly Kozlowski
Gilroy
Real Estate
570-288-1444
906 Homes for Sale
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$99,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HUNLOCK CREEK
12 Oakdale Drive
Completely remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home with
detached garage &
carport on approx
1.5 acres in a nice
private setting.
MLS# 11-1776
$129,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
JENKINS TWP
2 Owen Street
This 2 story, 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath
home is in the
desired location of
Jenkins Township.
Sellers were in
process of updating
the home so a little
TLC can go a long
way. Nice yard.
Motivated sellers.
MLS 11-2191
$89,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
JENKINS TWP.
297 Susquehannock
Drive
A HOME FOR A HOME FOR
THE HOLIDA THE HOLIDAYS! YS!
Classic 2 story
home with 4 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths, 2
car garage. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet, private
yard with above
ground pool,
kitchen overlooks
large family room.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2432
$259,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP.
475 S. Main St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2 story home with
vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl sid-
ing, large yard and
off street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3545
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
KINGSTON
Awesome Kingston
Cape on a great
street! Close to
schools, library,
shopping, etc.
Newer gas furnace
and water heater.
Replacement win-
dows, hardwood
flooring, recently
remodeled kitchen
with subway tiled
backsplash. Alarm
system for your
protection and
much more. MLS
#11-1577
$154,900.
Call Pat Busch
(570) 885-4165
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
111 Church St.
Large 3 bedroom
completely updated.
Big family room.
Detached garage.
Home warranty
included. Walk-up
attic. Replacement
windows. $149,900
MLS #11-3598
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
KINGSTON
129 S. Dawes
Ave.
4 bdoo 1 bath,
large enclosed
porch with brick
fireplace. Full con-
crete basement
with 9ft ceiling.
Lots of storage, 2
car garage on
double lot in a
very desirable
neighborhood.
Close to schools
and park and
recreation. Walk-
ing distance to
downtown Wilkes-
Barre. Great fami-
ly neighborhood.
Carpet allowance
will be consid-
ered. For mor info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realty.inc.com
$129,900
MLS #11-1434
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space
throughout, enjoy
the privacy of deck
& patio with fenced
yard. MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
KINGSTON
29 Landon Ave N
Striking curb appeal
with charm to
spare! Hardwood
floors throughout
the first floor, beau-
tiful arched door-
ways, gas fireplace,
lots of closet
space, modern
kitchen and a large
updated main bath.
MLS#11-3075
$144,900
Call Mary Price
570-696-5418
570-472-1395
KINGSTON
549 Charles Ave.
A quality home in a
superior location!
Features: large
living room; formal
dining room with
parquet flooring;
oak kitchen with
breakfast area; 1st
floor master
bedroom & bath
suite; bedroom/
sitting room; knotty
pine den; half-bath.
2nd floor: 2
bedrooms & bath.
Finished room in
lower level with
new carpeting &
wetbar. Central air.
2-car garage. In-
ground concrete
pool with jacuzzi.
$324,900
MLS# 10-1633
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
58 S. Welles Ave
Large charmer had
been extensively
renovated in the last
few years. Tons of
closets, walk-up
attic and a lower
level bonus recre-
ation room. Great
location, just a short
walk to Kirby Park.
MLS 11-3386
$129,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
KINGSTON
68 Bennett St
Great duplex on
nice street. Many
upgrades including
modern kitchens
and baths, plus ceil-
ing fans. Both units
occupied,separate
utilities. For more
info and phtos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3284
$74,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
KINGSTON
806 Nandy Drive
Unique 3 bedroom
home perfect for
entertaining! Living
room with fireplace
and skylights. Din-
ing room with built-
in china cabinets.
Lower level family
room with fireplace
and wetbar. Private
rear yard within-
ground pool and
multiple decks.
MLS#11-3064
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
Completely remod-
eled, mint, turn key
condition, 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
large closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,900, seller will
pay closing costs,
$5000 down and
monthly payments
are $995/month.
Financing available.
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
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the directions!
KINGSTON
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
46 Zerby Ave
Lease with option
to buy, completely
remodeled, mint,
turn key condition,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large
closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with
5% down; $6,750
down, $684/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
REDUCED
76 N. Dawes Ave.
DO THE MATH!
Qualified FHA buy-
ers could possibly
be paying less than
$900 per month for
mortgage, taxes
and insurance.
NOW is the time to
buy. Stop throwing
your money away
renting. Well cared
for 2 bedroom
home with private
yard, garage and
driveway. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2278
$124,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON
SALE BY OWNER!
Charming, well
maintained. Front
porch, foyer,
hardwood floors,
granite kitchen, 4
bedrooms, living
room/large dining
room, 2 fire-
places, 2.5 baths,
sun room, base-
ment with plenty
of storage. Pri-
vate English style
back yard.
$195,000
570-472-1110
KINGSTON
290 REYNOLDS ST.
KINGSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Brick front 2-story in
a desirable Kingston
neighborhood. 4
bedrooms, 3 baths
will give you all the
room you need for
family, guests or just
room to spread out!
The living room has
a fireplace to enjoy
a cozy evening, for-
mal dining room &
large eat-in kitchen
for family dinners or
a quiet morning
breakfast. Many
upgrades were
done by the owner
prior to listing and
the house is freshly
painted inside and
the carpets were
cleaned. All you
need to do is move
in and enjoy the
upcoming holidays
and many more
years. Call today for
an appointment. For
more information
and photos, go to
prudentialreal
estate.com and
enter PRU2A8T2 in
the “Home Search”.
Price Reduced to
$148,900. The seller
is motivated and
says “Make me an
offer”. MLS#11-364
Reduced to
$148,900
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
LAFLIN
24 Fordham Road
Lovely cedar shingle
sided home on large
corner lot in a great
development. 4 bed-
room, 2 1/2 baths, 1st
floor family room, fin-
ished lower level.
Hardwood floors
throughout, huge liv-
ing room & family
room. 1st floor laun-
dry room & office,
gas heat, nice deck,
above ground pool, 2
car garage. 11-3497
$295,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LAFLIN
22 Dogwood Drive
Beautifully kept
home on a quiet
dead-end street.
Handicap accessi-
ble. Convenient
Laflin location, close
to interstate and
turnpike. Last home
on street makes it
very private and
quiet! Home fea-
tures large base-
ment with extra ceil-
ing height, living
room opens to mod-
ern, eat-in kitchen,
4 bedrooms, 2 full
baths. Beautifully
landscaped yard
with large deck and
pond. MLS#11-3432
$218,900
Chris Jones
570-696-6558
906 Homes for Sale
LAKE HARMONY
3A Ridgewood
Neat, clean and
updated! Spacious
rooms throughout.
Sunken living area
with accent wall for
fireplace. Large loft
with entertainment
area. Jacuzzi in
master bath/show-
er. New carpet.
Freshly painted. No
outside mainte-
nance. MLS 10-7583
$144,900
570-643-2100
C21poconos.com
LAKE NUANGOLA
Lance Street
Very comfortable
2 bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $119,000
Call Kathie
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
LILY LAKE
Year-round beauty
featuring cedar and
stone siding, central
aid conditioning,
hardwood floors.
Modern kitchen with
granite island, 4
bedrooms, fireplace
in master, 2 baths.
Sunroom with glass
walls for great lake
views. Low taxes.
MLS#11-1753
$299,000 or
rent for $1,250/mos
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in move
in condition with
updated kitchen
and baths. Nice
yard with shed and
potential off street
parking. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LUZERNE
459 Bennett St.
Very nice 5 bed-
room, 2 story home
in nice area of
Luzerne. Off street
parking for 4 cars.
1st floor master
bedroom and laun-
dry. Replacement
windows on 2nd
floor. 5 year young
full bath. Modern
kitchen w/breakfast
bar and oak cabi-
nets. Basement
always DRY! All
measurements
approximate
MLS11-3745
$122,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LUZERNE
807 North Street
NEW LISTING
Lovely modern
large ranch with 4
or 5 bedrooms
including a master
suite with walk in
closet.Full finished
basement with a
separate room
presently used as a
functioning beauty
shop and 1/2 bath.
Beautiful back yard
with 2 covered
patios, one with hot
tub. Gas heat, all
hardwood floors on
first level, profes-
sional landscaping,
neutral decor, over-
sized 1 car garage,
lots of closets and
storage & much
more. MLS#11-3139
$172,000
(570) 237-1032
(570) 288-1444
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
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on an automobile?
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It’s a showroom in print!
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Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 9D
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
906 Homes for Sale
LUZERNE
REDUCED!
262 WALNUT ST.
Nicely redone 2
story on large
fenced corner lot.
Updates include,
vinyl siding, win-
dows, electric serv-
ice & wiring, newer
carpeting, 2 zoned
gas heat and all
new 2nd floor (gut-
ted and reinsulated.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
large eat in kitchen,
1st floor laundry and
attached shed that
could be a nice 2nd
bath. Shed and off
street parking
for 6 cars.
MLS 11-2564
$104,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
MOSCOW
331 Gudz Road
Private country liv-
ing, with easy
access to inter-
state. Relax and
enjoy this comfort-
able A-Frame
home. Jacuzzi,
large deck and gor-
geous pond. Great
for entertaining
inside and out. For
more photos and
info visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3285
$249,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
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It’s a showroom in print!
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the directions!
MOUNTAIN TOP
21 Forest Road
Fairview Heights
ranch featuring 3
spacious bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths, fire-
place, 1st floor laun-
dry, floored attic
with walk-in cedar
closet, 2 car
attached garage.
Newer roof, fur-
nace, water heater
and more! Sellers
are licensed real
estate agents.
MLS 11-3419
$172,500
Tony Desiderio
570-715-7734
Century 21 Smith
Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 story, 5 bedroom
home completely
remodeled in & out.
$245k with owner
financing with
20% down or will
lease with option
to purchase.
tj2isok@gmail.com
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
$199,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
NEW LISTING –
Nestled on just
under an acre just
minutes from 81S
this colonial offers
2194 sq. ft. of living
area plus a finished
basement. Enjoy
your summer
evenings on the
wrap around porch
or take a quick dip in
the above ground
pool with tier deck.
The covered pavil-
ion is ideal for pic-
nics or gatherings
And when the winter
winds blow cuddle
in front of the gas
fireplace and enjoy
a quiet night. Price
to sell, $185,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
MOUNTAINTOP
NewListing
For Sale By Owner
2+ acre lot. 4 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath, 2
story home. Hard-
wood floors. New
roof. Large detached
garage. Crestwood
area school district.
$69,000. Needs
some TLC. Call
570-868-8223
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#11-2600
PRICE REDUCED
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
NANTICOKE
182 Robert Street
Nice single or
duplex. Gas heat.
Detached garage.
This home is “high
and dry”, and avail-
able for immediate
occupancy. Call
Jim for details.
Affordable @
$104,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
NANTICOKE
414 E. Grove Street
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2 story with off
street parking,
backyard, new oil
furnace, windows,
wiring, kitchen,
bath, flooring &
paint. Excellent
condition. $89,500.
Seller Assist of $5,000
Call Bill Remey @
570-714-6123
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
East Noble Street
Nice two family on
the east side. Gas
heat. Detached 2
car garage. Afford-
able @ $69,500.
Call Jim for details
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E. CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch???
Check out this
double wide
with attached 2
car garage on a
permanent foun-
dation. Large
master bedroom
suite with large
living room, fam-
ily room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal
dining room,
vaulted ceilings
throughout and
MORE!
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
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without hassle
or worry!
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PITTSTON
168 Elizabeth Street
Sturdy ranch in Ore-
gon Section. 3/4
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Price $92,500.
Call Stephen
570-814-4183
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$89,900
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
44 Lambert Street
For Sal e or Rent!
Beautiful cozy
home! Upstairs
laundry, lots of clos-
et space. Tastefully
renovated. Extra
large driveway. Low
maintenance. Ther-
mostats in each
room. MLS#11-2210
$89,900
or $800/month
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON TWP.
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$62,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON TWP.
754 Laurel St.
Absolutely beau-
tiful move in
condition. This 2
bedroom Ranch
home with fully
finished base-
ment is in excel-
lent condition.
Come and see
for yourself. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3796
$129,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
993 Sunrise Dr.
Horizon Estates
Fabulous end unit
townhome provides
luxurious, carefree
living. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 1st
floor master suite.
Ultra kitchen with
granite and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room with
built in cabinet. 2
story living room
with gas fireplace
and hardwood. 2
car garage, mainte-
nance free deck,
nice yard that can
be fenced. Low
HOA fee for snow
removal and grass
cutting. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3488
$289,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$169,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own “cabin
in the woods.”
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
3 bedroom, 2 bath
bi-level in good con-
dition with 2 car
garage, eat-in
kitchen and living
room/dining room
combo. Lower level
has framed out fam-
ily room with brick
fireplace. Very nice
lot. Electric base
board heat.
$139,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
PLAINS
74 W. Carey St.
Affordable home
with 1 bedroom,
large living room,
stackable washer
& dryer, eat in
kitchen. Yard
with shed.
Low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4068
$37,500
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
KEYSTONE SECTION
9 Ridgewood Road
TOTAL BEAUTY
1 ACRE- PRIVACY
Beautiful ranch 2
bedrooms, huge
modern kitchen, big
TV room and living
room, 1 bath, attic
for storage, wash-
er, dryer & 2 air
conditioners includ-
ed. New Roof &
Furnace Furnished
or unfurnished.
Low Taxes!
Reduced
$115,900
570-885-1512
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
74 Mack Street
Modern 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 baths with a 1
car garage and
fenced yard. Combi-
nation living room/
dinning room with
hardwood floors.
Modern kitchen with
Corian counter tops
and tiled back-
splash. Modern tiled
bath. First floor
bonus family rooms.
New carpeting
throughout. Finished
lower level with 1/2
bath. Shed included.
MLS 11-4241
$119,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
OUT OF FLOOD
ZONE
46-48 Helen Street
Well Maintained
Double Block on
Quiet Street, Great
Neighborhood. Per-
fect Home For You
With One Side
Paying Most of Your
Mortgage, Or
Would Make A
Good Investment,
WIth Separate
Utilities And Great
Rents. Newer Roof,
Vinyl Replacement
Windows,Vinyl
Aluminum Siding,
Walk-Up Large Attic
From One Side,
Lower Front And
Rear Porches, With
Two Rear Upper
Closed In Porches.
$124,900
Call Ronnie
570-262-4838
PLAINS
48 Woodcrest Drive
Great end unit
townhouse in
Woodcrest Estates!
Located within
walking distance to
Mohegan Sun and a
few minutes drive to
the Wyoming Valley
Mall and I-81. Low
HOA fees. New roof!
Don’t miss an
opportunity to live
carefree & have
someone else shov-
el your snow & mow
your lawn! A great
price! MLS#10-4416
$119,900
Karen Bernardi
570-371-8347
Ray Bernardi
570-283-9100 x34
PLYMOUTH
1 Willow St.
Attractive bi-level
on corner lot with
private fenced in
yard. 3-4 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths. Fin-
ished lower level,
office and
laundry room
MLS 11-2674
$104,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
PLYMOUTH
401 W. Shawnee Ave
OUT OF FLOOD AREA
Beautifully redone
3-4 bedroom, 2
bath bi-level with
garage on cozy cor-
ner lot near Valley
West High School.
New Paint, Carpet-
ing, Appliances &
more. $125,000.
570-706-5496
PRINGLE
372 Hoyt Street
This two story home
has 4 bedrooms
with space to grow.
First floor has gas
heat and second
floor has electric
heat. Off street
parking for one in
back of home.
MLS 11-640
$59,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
PRINGLE
SUNDAY, DEC-11
12 NOON – 2 PM
50 Broad Street,
Nicely appointed, all
brick Ranch with
brand new kitchen
features wood cabi-
netry, granite coun-
tertop, new stove
and dishwasher,
microwave. Totally
renovated bath with
beautiful decorative
tile & double vanity.
Refinished original
hardwood floors.
This home has a
phenomenal view
from the kitchen,
living room & dining
room. Lower level
has kitchenette, full
bath & plenty of dry
walled area.
MLS#11-1844
Directions: Rte 11
turn on Northamp-
ton St., straight on
Main, follow to right
on Williams, left on
Hurbane, right on
Conner, right on
Broad St.
Hostess: Margaret
Reasonably priced
at $174,900.
613-9080
SCRANTON
RUNDLE STREET
Nice ranch in very
well maintained,
quiet neighborhood
with finished base-
ment, hardwood
floors, and big,
fenced back yard
with deck. $109,900
MLS# 11-4025
Joseph P Gilroy
Real Estate
(570) 288-1444
Ask for
Holly Kozlowski
(570) 814-6763
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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It’s a showroom in print!
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SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
$449,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
12 Windy Drive
New construction in
the exclusive
Slocum Estates.
Stone & Stucco
exterior. All the
finest appoint-
ments: office or 5th
bedroom, hard-
wood floors, crown
moldings, 9' ceil-
ings 1st & 2nd floor.
Buy now select
cabinetry & flooring.
MLS #11-1987
$499,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
SHAVERTOWN
4 Genoa Lane
There is much
attention to detail in
this magnificent 2
story, 4 bedroom, 2
full bath all brick
home on double
corner lot. Large
family room with
brick fireplace, all
oak kitchen with
breakfast area,
master suite, solid
oak staircase to
name a few.
MLS #11-3268
$525,000
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-07770
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
Lovely 3 bedroom
2400 sf Cape Cod
with modern eat-in
kitchen, large sun-
room & family room.
Master bedroom
with master bath.
Central air, gas heat
& 2 car garage.
Very well land-
scaped with beauti-
ful paver sidewalks.
Quiet neighborhood.
Possible 6 month
rental for the right
tenant. $229,000
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
SHICKSHINNY
17 Main Road
REDUCED
Lovely Country set-
ting for the cute Bi-
Level on 5.34 acres.
Property features 4
bedrooms, 1.75
baths, living room,
kitchen, family room
& laundry room.
Plus 2 car attached
garage, 30' X 35'
detached garage
and 14' X 28' shed.
MLS 11-1335
REDUCED
$199,900
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SHICKSHINNY
178 SWEET VALLEY RD
NEW Brick Ranch
on 1 acre. (11-4576)
$274,000
O’BOYLE
REAL ESTATE LLC
570-586-2911
SHICKSHINNY
408 Cragle Hill Rd.
This is a very well
kept Ranch home
on 6 acres, central
air, rear patio and 1
car garage. This is
a 3 parcel listing.
MLS 11-4273
$157,900
Jackie Roman
570-288-0770
Ext. 39
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SHICKSHINNY
Completely remod-
eled 3 bedroom,
1.75 bath brick &
aluminum ranch on
over 4 acres with
Pond. New stainless
steel appliances, 2
car attached and 1
car built-in garage,
paved driveway,
open front porch, 3
season room, rear
patio, brick fireplace
& property goes to
a stream in the
back.
PRICE REDUCED
$179,900
MLS# 10-4716
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SWEET VALLEY
570 Grassy Pond Rd
Nice Country Bi-
Level on 40 acres
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, kitchen,
living room, family
room, office & laun-
dry room. Plus
attached oversized
2 car garage with
workshop, rear
deck & 3 sheds.
Borders state game
lands. MLS 11-1094
$319,900
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber St.
Nice Ranch home,
great neighbor-
hood.
MLS 11-3365
$109,000
Call David
Krolikowski
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber Street
Nice ranch home!
Great neighbor-
hood. MLS#11-3365
$109,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
SWOYERSVILLE
610 Church St.
Attractive cape cod
on a large, open lot
in a great neighbor-
hood. Bright, eat-in
kitchen, finished
lower level rec
room, updated gas
furnace and electri-
cal. MLS# 11-3562
PRICE REDUCED
$139,900.
Call Steve Shemo
(570) 288-1401
(570) 793-9449
SWOYERSVILLE
Beautiful 2 story, 3
bedroom home.
Modern kitchen &
bath. Nice yard. Gas
heat. $69,900. Call
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WANAMIE
950 Center St.
Unique property.
Well maintained - 2
story 10 year old set
on 3.56 acres. Pri-
vacy galore, pole
barn 30x56 heated
for storage of
equipment, cars or
boats. A must see
property. GEO Ther-
mal Heating Sys-
tem.Only 10 minutes
from interstate 81 &
15 minutes to turn-
pike. MLS#10-3802
$249,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldn’t
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$64,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WAPWALLOPEN
604 Lily Lake Road
3 bedroom home in
beautiful country
setting. Large 3
stall detached
garage. Priced to
sell. MLS#11-1046
$104,900
Owner willing to sell
separate detached
garage parcel for
$39,900
Aggressive Realty
570-233-0340 or
570-788-8500
WEST PITTSTON
16 Miller St.
4 bedroom Cape
Cod, one with hard-
wood floors. Cen-
tral air, nice yard in
Garden Village.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3645
$129,900
Call Tom
Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
WHITE HAVEN
123 Fern Ridge Rd.
PRICE REDUCED!
In Community of
White-Haven
Pocono's Nice bed-
room, 2 bath ranch.
Great vacation
home or year round
home. Community
Lake & other ameni-
ties. Close to hunt-
ing, fishing, golf &
skiing. close to Rte.
80. All offers contin-
gent to bank short
sale approval.
$67,900
MLS# 11-765
Call Tony Wasco
570-855-2424
Trademark
Realtor Group
570-613-9090
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WHITE HAVEN
1303 Promontory Dr
Furnishings includ-
ed, ready to move
in. 3 bedroom, 2
bath ranch a block &
a half from the lake.
Well equipped
kitchen. Full base-
ment, extra large
family room with
storage room.
MLS 10-9719
$149,900
570-643-2100
C21poconos.com
WHITE HAVEN
135 Game Drive
Charming Pocono
style log home.
$5,000 acres of PA
Gamelands in your
backyard. 2,000 sq.
ft. decorated with
the latest Pocono
Mountain Themes
and is loaded with
extra features.
MLS 11-1539
$229,900
570-643-2100
C21poconos.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PAGE 10D MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment
Homes
Ask About Our
Fall Specials!
$250 Off 1st Months Rent,
& $250 Off Security
Deposit With Good Credit.
1 bedroom starting @ $690
F e a t u r i n g :
‹ Washer & Dryer
‹ Central Air
‹ Fitness Center
‹ Swimming Pool
‹ Easy Access to
I-81
Mon – Fri. 9 –5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706 (Off Route 309)
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
M ond a y - Frid a y 9 -5
Sa tu rd a y 1 0-2
W IL KE SW OOD
822-27 1 1
w w w .liv ea tw ilk esw ood .com
1 Bedroom Sta rting
a t$675.00
• Includes gas heat,
w ater,sew er & trash
• C onvenient to allm ajor
highw ays & public
transportation
• Fitness center & pool
• P atio/B alconies
• P et friendly*
• O nline rentalpaym ents
• Flexible lease term s
APARTM E NTS
*RestrictionsAp p ly
906 Homes for Sale
WHITE HAVEN
412 Indian Lake
Lakefront. Enclosed
porch and lower
patio looking out
over the lake. 4
bedrooms, hard-
wood floors, master
bedroom with view.
Screen porch.
Basement that can
be finished.
MLS 10-9989
$225,000
570-643-2100
C21poconos.com
WHITE HAVEN
4628 State St
Colonial on double
lot. Desirable East
Side community in
carbon county.
Flawless rooms,
basement& garage.
Stone fireplace. Oil
heat. Central air.
Water filtration &
conditioner. Public
sewer. Rear deck.
Shed with power.
MLS 11-3156
$179,900
570-643-2100
C21poconos.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WHITE HAVEN
66 Sunshine Drive
Subject to bank
short sale approval.
Cathedral ceilings. 2
sided L/P Gas Fire-
place, washer/dryer
bathroom combo.
Cozy well used
square footage.
Wrap deck. 2 utility
sheds for storage.
MLS 11-2528
$79,900
570-643-2100
C21poconos.com
WHITE HAVEN
28 S. Woodhaven Dr
Beautiful 4 bedroom
home. Peaceful sur-
roundings. Lake
view. 11-1253.
$179,000
Darcy J. Gollhardt,
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
WILKES-BARRE
711 N. Washington St.
Recently remodeled
3 bedroom, hard-
wood floors, gas
heat, 1st floor laun-
dry room. MLS# 11-
2981. $69,000.
Call Geri
570-696-0888
WILKES-BARRE
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with newer
laminate floors,
vaulted ceiling, 2
large bedrooms.
Finished lower level
with 1/2 bath and
laundry room. Large
family room built in
garage, and wood
pellet stove. No
sign, alarm system.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3290
$89,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
123 Dagobert St.
Immaculately kept 2
story, 3 bedroom
home in beautiful
neighborhood.
Home features
newer doors, dou-
ble hung E glass
windows through-
out. A/c & ceiling
fans in all rooms
except bathroom.
Beautiful year round
sunroom in rear.
Property includes
50x100 buildable
lot, 3 parcels on
one deed.
A must see!
MLS 11-2452
$119,500
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
185 West River St
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, DEC 18
2 to 4
Spacious, quality
home, brick - two
story with 6 bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 bath,
two fireplaces, den,
heated sunroom off
living room,
screened porch off
formal dining room,
modern eat-in
kitchen, garage.
Many extras... Sac-
rifice,
Owner relocating
out of state.
$114,900.
MLS 11-2474
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
WILKES-BARRE
221 Brown Street
Great first home or
down size. Nice
clean move in ready
no lawn work here.
2 car detached
garage and best of
all the Mortgage is
probably lower than
your rent payment.
$52,500 MLS#11-
871
Call Tony Wasco
570-855-2424
Trademark
Realtor Group
570-613-9090
WILKES-BARRE
260 Brown Street
Move right into this
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath in very good
condition with mod-
ern kitchen and
bathrooms and a 3
season sunroom off
of the kitchen.
MLS 11-4244
$64,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
74 Frederick St
This very nice 2
story, 3 bedroom, 1
bath home has a
large eat in kitchen
for family gather-
ings. A great walk
up attic for storage
and the home is in
move-in condition.
MLS 11-1612
$63,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING!
86 HICKORY ST.,
Cozy 2-unit apart-
ment with parking
for 3 vehicles, nice
enclosed rear yard,
rear shed, washer,
dryer, refrigerators
included. Can be
converted back to
single family
dwelling.
MLS#11-4047
$49,900
Louise Laine
570-283-9100 x20
WILKES-BARRE
Great 3 bedroom
home in mint condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors, fenced lot,
garage. MLS#11-2834
$83,900.
(570) 237-1032
(570) 288-1444
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Lot 39 Mayock St.
9' ceilings through-
out 1st floor, granite
countertops in
kitchen. Very bright.
1st floor master
bedroom & bath.
Not yet assessed.
End unit. Modular
construction.
MLS #10-3180
$179,500
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
32 Wilson St
No need for flood or
mine subsidence
insurance. 2 story, 3
bedroom, 1 bath
home in a safe,
quiet neighborhood.
Aluminum siding.
Corner, 105’x50’ lot.
Fenced in yard.
Appraised at
$57,000. Serious
inquiries only. Call
570-826-1458
for appointment
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
3 bedroom, 2 story,
with brick & stucco
siding. Beautiful
hardwood floors.
Semi-modern
kitchen. Finished
basement with fire-
place. Covered
back porch. Priced
to sell. $79,900.
MLS 11-2987
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
1007 Morgan Drive
Beautiful two-story
traditional home
located high & dry in
Pine Ridge Estates,
one of Wilkes-
Barre’s newest
developments. Fea-
tures 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, master
suite with walk-in
closet, 9’ ceilings
and hardwoods on
1st floor, family room
with gas fireplace,
two-car garage and
deck. MLS#11-3479
$229,900
Karen Ryan
570-283-9100 x14
WYOMING
1702 W. Eighth St.
1 story Ranch with
100x200 lot, paved
driveway, new
energy star
replacement win-
dows. Excellent
starter home. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2912
$89,500
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WYOMING
40 Fifth st
Very nice 2-
family,one side
move in the other
rented separate
utilities, 6 rooms
each side plus 1/2
bath upstairs each
side. Wonderful
neighborhood plus
short walking dis-
tance to Wyoming
Avenue. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4027
$124,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
608 Wyoming Ave
Location, Location,
location! Either you
are looking to raise
your family or just
work from home this
amazing brick ranch
style property has it
all. Zoned commer-
cial, 3 very large
bedrooms and 3 1/2
baths, full finished
basement, library
room, oversized liv-
ing room, formal
dining room and so
much more. You
have to see it to
appreciate. Call
today for a private
tour of the property.
1 year Home War-
ranty. MLS 11-1870
PRICE
REDUCTION!!!
OWNER WANTS
OFFERS
$275,000
Call Tony Wasco
570-855-2424
Trademark
Realtor Group
570-613-9090
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WYOMING
MOTIVATED SELLER!!
Nicely maintained
2-story traditional in
great neighbor-
hood. Modern oak
kitchen, open layout
in family room/den
with new floors,
above ground pool
in fenced rear yard.
1-car detached
garage with work-
shop area, all on a
nice wide lot.
MLS#11-2428
REDUCED TO
$139,900
Call Steve Shemo
(570) 288-1401
(570) 793-9449
WYOMING
Very nice ranch on
corner lot in great
neighborhood & out
of flood zone! Sharp
hardwood floors in 2
bedrooms & dining
room. Finished
basement with 3rd
bedroom. Relaxing
flagstone screened
porch. 1 car garage.
One block from ele-
mentary school plus
high school bus
stops at property
corner! MLS#11-3831
$139,500
Call Steve Shemo
(570) 288-1401
(570) 793-9449
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
YATESVILLE
Willow View Dev.
7 Osborne Drive
This home features
a great layout with
3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace in a
beautiful develop-
ment. Just add your
own touches and
you’ll have a won-
derful home. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4320
$229,000
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Mary’s St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
EDWARDSVILLE
89-91 Hillside Ave.
Out of the flood
plain this double
has potential.
Newer roof and
some windows
have been
replaced. Property
includes a large
extra lot. Square ft.
approximate.
MLS 11-3463
$67,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
89-91 Hillside St.
Out of the flood
plain, this double
has potential.
Newer roof and
some windows
have been
replaced. Property
includes a large
extra lot.
MLS 11-3463
$87,000
Call Roger Nenni
Ext. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
5770-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
FORTY FORT
1012 Wyoming Ave.
SUPER LOCATION
Needs work. Priced
to sell. Great for
your small business
or offices. Very high
traffic count. Prop-
erty is being sold IN
AS IS CONDITION.
Inspections for buy-
ers information only.
Property needs
rehab.
MLS 11-4267
$84,900
Roger Nenni
570-288-0770
Ext. 32
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
HUGHESTOWN
165 Searle St.
Double block
home, great
investment
propPerty or live
in one side and
rent the other.
Two 3 bedroom,
6 room 1/2 dou-
bles . Great
walk up attic on
both sides.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3915
$49,900
S
O
L
D
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
JENKINS TWP.
1334 Main St.
1 story, 2,600 sq. ft.
commercial build-
ing, masonry con-
struction with
offices and ware-
housing. Central air,
alarm system and
parking. Great for
contractors or
anyone with
office/storage
needs. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3156
$84,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
KINGSTON
366 Pierce St.
Commercial build-
ing for sale.Highly
desirable corner
location with park-
ing for approxi-
mately 25 vehicles.
Would be attractive
for any retail or
commercial
operation.
MLS 11-2763
$300,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
KINGSTON
64-66 Dorrance St.
3 units, off street
parking with some
updated Carpets
and paint.
$1500/month
income from long
time tenants. W/d
hookups on site.
MLS 11-3517
$109,900
Call Jay A.
Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
NANTICOKE
406-408 Front St.
4,400 SF commer-
cial building with
storefront and living
space on the 2nd
floor. This building
can be used for
commercial appli-
cations or convert it
into a double block.
Property being sold
“AS IS”.
MLS 11-4271
$40,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
423 E. Church
St.
Great 2 family in
move in condi-
tion on both
sides, Separate
utilities, 6
rooms each. 3
car detached
garage in super
neighborhood.
Walking dis-
tance to col-
lege. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1608
$123,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
94 Church St.
Spacious double
block, one with one
side owner occu-
pied, 2nd side
needs cosmetic
care. Off street
parking for 2 vehi-
cles, walking dis-
tance to the down-
town. Pool and
patio deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3292
$76,500
Call Bill Williams
570-362-4158
PITTSTON
SALE OR LEASE
PRICE REDUCED
Modern office build-
ing, parking for 12
cars. Will remodel
to suit tenant.
$1800/mo or pur-
chase for
$449,000
MLS 11-751
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
Township Blvd.
MAKE AN OFFER!
Ideal location
between Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton.
Ample parking with
room for additional
spaces. Perfect for
medical or profes-
sional offices. Con-
tact agent to show.
Asking $945,000
Contact Judy Rice
570-714-9230
MLS# 10-1110
WEST WYOMING
331 Holden St
10-847
Many possibilities
for this building. 40 +
parking spaces, 5
offices, 3 baths and
warehouse.
$425,000
Maria Huggler
Classic Properties
570-587-7000
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
WEST WYOMING
379-381 Sixth St.
Perfect first home
for you with one
side paying most of
your mortgage.
Would also make a
nice investment
with all separate
utilities and nice
rents. Large fenced
yard, priced to sell.
Don’t wait too long.
Call today to
schedule a tour.
MLS 11-1453
REDUCED!!
$84,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSS REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
Stately brick building
in Historic district.
Wonderful 1st block
S Franklin. Formerly
Lane's. 5700sq ft +
full basement for
storage. Great pro-
fessional space.
Well maintained. Pri-
vate parking & gar-
den. MLS#11-345
$495,000
570-696-3801
Call Margy
570-696-0891
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
Centrally located,
this triplex is fully
occupied and has 2
bedrooms in each
unit. Nicely main-
tained with one long
term tenant on 3rd
floor and off street
parking. An annual
income of $17,520
makes it an attrac-
tive buy. $79,000
MLS 11-825
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654
570-760-6769
WYOMING
14 West Sixth St.
Former upholestry
shop. 1st floor in
need of a lot of
TLC. 2nd floor
apartment in good
condition & rented
with no lease. Stor-
age area. Off street
parking available.
PRICE REDUCED!
$65,000
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-572
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$169,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
BACK MOUNTAIN
3.37 acre wooded
lot. Public sewer.
Underground utili-
ties. Close to 309.
Asking $59,900
Call 570-885-1119
DALLAS
New Goss Manor
lots. Prices ranging
from $59,900 to
$69,900. Public
water, sewer, gas &
electric available.
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5420
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
EXETER
Ida Acres, Wyoming
Area School District.
6 lots remain, start-
ing at $38,000. Pri-
vate setting. Under-
ground utilities.
570-947-4819
EXETER
Out of flood area.
100x125ft. All utili-
ties in place. Build-
ing moratorium
does not apply to
this lot. $45,000
reduced to $42,000
Call 570-655-0530
HARDING
Mt. Zion Road
One acre lot just
before Oberdorfer
Road. Great place
to build your
dream home
MLS 11-3521
$29,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
912 Lots & Acreage
LAFLIN
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
BUILD YOUR
DREAM HOME
on one of the last
available lots in
desirable Laflin.
Convenient location
near highways, air-
port, casino &
shopping.
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 11-3411
$34,900
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood Schools!
126 Acres for Sale!
Mostly wooded with
approx. 970 ft on
Rt. 437 in
Dennison Twp.
$459,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Several building lots
ready to build on!
ALL public utilities!
Priced from
$32,000 to
$48,000! Use your
own Builder! Call
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
SHAVERTOWN
LAND
Harford Ave.
4 buildable residen-
tial lots for sale indi-
vidually or take all
4! Buyer to confirm
water and sewer
with zoning officer.
Directions: R. on
E. Franklin, R. on
Lawn to L. on
Harford.
$22,500 per lot
Mark Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WYOMING COUNTY
14+ acres, Rt. 29
Noxen, bordering
StateGame Lands.
Great for hunting
or private home
site. Low taxes.
$105,000. Please
call
570-690-5951
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
MobileOneSales.net
Call (570)250-2890
930 Wanted to Buy
Real Estate
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
WE BUY HOUSES
570-472-3472
938 Apartments/
Furnished
PITTSTON TWP.
Attractive weekly &
monthly rates for
single & double
rooms and suites.
Water, heat, cable
& maid service
included.
AMERICA’S BEST
VALUE INN
Call 570-655-1234
PLAI NS
1 bedroom, refriger-
ator, stove and
washer provided, no
pets, $375./per
month, Call
(570) 239-6586
PLAINS
Furnished 1 bed-
room, luxury apart-
ment. EVERYTHING
INCLUDED. Heat,
hot water, A/C,
electric, phone,
cable. Private, no
smoking, no pets.
570-954-0869
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WEST PITTSTON
Attractive 1 room
furnished efficiency.
Cherry kitchen cabi-
nets, granite bath,
built-ins, washer/
dryer. Security &
references. Non
smokers, no pets.
$625. Includes heat
& water.
570-655-4311
WILKES-BARRE
2 apartments. 3
bedroom, 1 bath.
appliances incl. W/d
in both. $650/mo
plus utilities. Securi-
ty deposit of $650.
Call (717) 713-3902
before 9:00 p.m. to
set an appointment
or email:
tarinhoupt
@hotmail.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
TWO APARTMENTS
Brand new 2 bed-
room, washer/dryer
hookup, $550
month + utilities
4 bedroom, full
basement, washer /
dryer hookup,
$500 month +.
570-868-6020
ASHLEY
We Care about the
place you call home,
& we want you to
care about it too!!
2 & 3 bedrooms,
reserved parking.
Short block to bus
stop. $675 & 725
rent includes
heat/water/sewer &
trash. Application,
references, back-
ground check,
smoke free, pet
free, lease + securi-
ty. Call Terry
570-824-1022
BACK MOUNTAIN
Cozy 1 bedroom.
Heat & Appliances.
$550/ month.
570-574-2588
DALLAS
$600/mos + utilities.
A 1 bedroom Studio,
near Misericordia
University. Security
due at signing of
lease. Private drive-
way. Call Bill
Call (570) 690-2170
DALLAS
2396 Lower
Demunds Road
2nd floor. 2 bed-
room+ spare room,
large living room
and kitchen. Laun-
dry room, upper
back deck with
yard. Off street
parking. Tenant
pays utilities and
garbage. First, last,
security. $550/mo
570-956-7571
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 11D
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PAGE 12D MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
962 Rooms 962 Rooms
Rooms starting at
Daily $39.99 + tax
Weekly $179.99 + tax
WiFi
HBO
Available Upon Request:
Microwave & Refrigerator
(570) 823-8027
www.casinocountrysideinn.com
info@casinocountrysideinn.com
Bear Creek Township
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
s
i
d
e
I
n
n
C
a
s
i
n
o
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS TWP
CONDO FOR LEASE:
$1,800. 2 bedroom/
2 Bath. Call Us to
discuss our great
Amenity & Mainte-
nance program!
Call 570-674-5278
DALLAS
Š Large 3 bedroom
2nd floor. No pets.
Off street parking.
Call Joe570-881-2517
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DUMORE
Two bedroom 1
bathroom apart-
ment on Apple St.
$600/month + utili-
ties. Available 1/15.
(570) 815-5334
EXETER
2 bedroom, modern
kitchen and bath,
Includes OSP
stove, fridge, heat,
water, sewer.
No Pets. $650.
570-693-1294
EXETER
Senior Apartments
222 SCHOOLEY AVE.
EXETER, PA
Accepting appli-
cations for 1 bed-
room apartments.
Quality apart-
ments for ages
62 and older.
Income limits
apply. Rent only
$450 month.
*Utilities Included
*Laundry Facilities
*On Site
Management
*Private parking
Call for appointment
570-654-5733
Monday - Friday
8am-12pm. Equal
Housing Opportunity
FALLS
1 bedroom, bath.
Basement apt. Pri-
vate entrance, off-
street parking. Utili-
ties & appliances
included. No smok-
ing or pets
$500/mo + security
570-388-6603
FORTY FORT
1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS
Very nice, clean,
great neighbor-
hood, hardwood
floors, a/c, wash-
er/dryer with newer
appliances, stor-
age, 1st/last/securi-
ty with one year
lease. References
required. $650-
$695 + utilities.
Water/sewer by
owner, no pets,
non-smoking.
Call 202-997-9185
for appointment
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, excel-
lent location,
newly remodeled.
Sunken living
room. Oak floors
kitchen and bath
and w/w. Incl.
fridge, stove,
dishwasher. Coin-
op laundry in
building. Off street
parking. $750
includes all utili-
ties. No smoking
570-779-4609 or
570-407-3991
HANOVER TWP.
1 bedroom, 1 bath-
room, all appliances
provided, off-street
parking, no pets, no
smoking. Heat,
sewer, hot water
included, $550 per
month + 1st & last
month & $400 secu-
rity de-posit. Call:
570-852-0252
after 8:00 a.m.
HANOVER TWP.
Beautiful 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor
apartment with
modern kitchen, re-
finished hardwood
floors throughout,
gas heat, $550/
month + security. All
utilities by tenant.
Call Lynda
570-262-1196
HANOVER TWP.
Lyndwood Ave.
3 bedrooms, 1st
floor, in nice
neighborhood. Dish-
washer,
washer/dryer hook
up. Parking, porch
storage. $600/per
month + utilities &
security deposit.
Call 904-382-4509
HANOVER TWP.
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, refrig-
erator, stove &
dishwasher, Euro-
pean tile kitchen &
bath. Parking, A/C,
cathedral ceilings,
fireplace, deck.
$725/month.
Call 570-650-0278
HANOVER TWP.
Newly remodeled
large 2nd floor 1
bedroom apartment
with hardwood
floors. $750/month
+ utilities.
Call John Thomas
570-287-1196 or
570-714-6124
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
HARVEYS LAKE
1 bedroom, LAKE
FRONT apartments.
Wall to wall, appli-
ances, lake rights,
off street parking.
No Pets. Lease,
security &
references.
570-639-5920
HUDSON
2 bedrooms,
1 bath, refrigerator
& stove, washer
/dryer hookup, full
basement, no pets,
$625/month, water
& sewer paid,
security.
570-829-5378
HAPPY HOLIDAYS!
Apartments Available
KINGSTON, 1 &
2 bedroom units
PLAINS, large 2
bedroom with
bonus room
PLAINS, efficien-
cy 1 bedroom
WILKES-BARRE,
1/2 double with 4
bedrooms
WILKES-BARRE,
2 bedroom
duplex building
All Include:
Appliances,
Carpeting,
Maintenance.
Lease, Credit
Check & Refer-
ences Required.
570-899-3407
Tina Randazzo
Property Mgr
KINGSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor, living room &
modern eat in
kitchen. Electric
heat. $400 + securi-
ty. All utilities by
tenant. Ready now.
Call Lynda
(570) 262-1196
KINGSTON
1 bedroom. Avail-
able now. $425 +
security & electric.
Call 570-829-0847
KINGSTON
131 S. Maple Ave.
3 room apartment -
2nd floor. Heat &
hot water included.
Coin Laundry. Off
street parking. No
pets/smoking. $600
570-288-5600
or 570-479-0486
KINGSTON
1st floor, 2 bed-
rooms, private park-
ing, quiet neighbor-
hood, near colleges.
$600/month + utili-
ties, 1 month rent &
security.
AVAILABLE NOW!
570-656-7125
KINGSTON
595 MARKET ST
BRAND NEW
2 bedroom
apartment. $650 +
utilities. No pets
/ No smoking. Off
street parking, air,
new appliances &
microwave, laundry.
Security, references
& Background
check required.
570-288-4508
KINGSTON
Attractive / quiet
neighborhood near
Kingston Pool.
Charming 2 bed-
rooms + sunroom,
oak kitchen, dish-
washer, fridge, dis-
posal, washer/ dryer,
a/c, basement,
garage. Water &
Sewer included. No
pets. $575 +
gas/electric, security,
references & lease.
570-466-8041
KINGSTON
PECKS COURT
New Construction.
2 bedroom luxury
apartment. Appli-
ances, heat, sewer
& garbage included.
$800/month.
Call 570-441-4101
KINGSTON
Recently renovat-
ed 2 bedroom. Liv-
ing room & dining
room. Convenient
off street parking.
All new appli-
ances. Water &
sewer included.
$570 + utilities,
security & refer-
ences. No pets.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
for Move In
Specials.
570-288-9019
KINGSTON
Spacious 2nd floor,
2 bedroom. 1 bath.
Newly remodeled
building, Living
room, Dining room,
eat-in Kitchen, pri-
vate front balcony,
off street parking, all
appliances, includ-
ing washer/dryer.
Available 1/1/12.
$650 + utilities. No
pets, no smoking.
570-814-3281
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Wyoming Avenue
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, appliances,
laundry room. $490
+ electric. Security
& references.
570-696-1600
LUZERNE
41 Mill Street.
Convenient to
Cross Valley, large
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor, large living
room with ceiling
fan, large bath with
shower, utility room
with washer &
dryer, large closets
professionally
organized,
off street parking,
no smoking
$595 + utilities.
570-288-3438
LUZERNE
Efficiency. 2 rooms
plus bath. Some
utilities included.
$415/month
Lease & security.
Call after 6 p.m.
570-220-6533
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 bedroom, 2 bath
apartment. Off
street parking. Big
yard. Nice neighbor-
hood. Crestwood
school district.
$1,000 + utilities,
security & lease.
Call 570-678-7801
MOUNTAIN TOP
Centrally located 1
bedroom,
washer/dryer
hookup in base-
ment, off-street
parking, no pets,
yard. $500/month,
+ security deposit.
Tenant pays electric
& water.
570-474-0388
MOUNTAINTOP
1 bedroom, 1 bath,
all appliances pro-
vided, washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets.
$700/month, utilities
included. Security
deposit and lease.
570-678-7801
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, 1st
floor. Large eat in
kitchen, fridge,
electric stove,
large living room,
w/w carpeting,
master bedroom
with custom built
in furniture. Ample
closet space.
Front/back porch-
es, off street
parking, laundry
room available.
No dogs, smok-
ing, water, sewer,
garbage paid.
$525/mo + gas,
electric, security,
lease, credit,
background
check.
(570) 696-3596
NANTICOKE
2nd Floor apart-
ment for a tenant
who wants the
best. Bedroom, liv-
ing room, kitchen &
bath. Brand new.
Washer/dryer hook-
up, air conditioned.
No smoking or
pets. 2 year lease,
all utilities by ten-
ant. Sewer &
garbage included.
Security, first & last
month’s rent
required. $440.00
570-735-5064
NANTICOKE
3 BEDROOM 1/2 DOUBLE
Washer/dryer hook-
up. Off street park-
ing: Garage & yard
$640.+ utilities. Now
accepting section 8.
570-237-5823 for
appointment
NANTICOKE NANTICOKE
347 Hanover St.
Large 1 bedroom,
1st floor, wall to
wall carpet, eat-in
kitchen with appli-
ances, washer &
dryer hookup,
porch & shared
yard. Sewer &
garbage included.
$395/mo + utili-
ties & security.
New energy effi-
cient gas furnace.
Pet Friendly.
Call 570-814-1356
NANTICOKE
Nice clean 1
bedroom. Heat, hot
water, garbage fee
included. Stove,
fridge, air-condition-
ing, washer/dryer
availability. Security.
$525 per month
Call (570) 736-3125
NANTICOKE
Very clean, nice, 2
bedroom. Water,
sewer, stove, fridge,
Garbage collection
fee included. W/d
availability. Large
rooms. Security,
$535/mo.
570-736-3125
PITTSTON
1 bedroom,
includes, fridge,
stove, heat,
garbage stickers.
Off street parking
avail. $400/month
plus security
570-388-2271
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
2nd floor,
1 bedroom, 1 bath,
with office.
Not in flood zone!
Garbage, sewer
& appliances includ-
ed. Pets negotiable.
$505/month,
+ security & lease.
570-574-8179
PITTSTON
AVAILABLE DEC. 1
2 bedroom, modern
and clean. Includes
stove and fridge.
W/d hookup. Land-
lord pays sewer
and garbage, ten-
ant pays heat,
water & electric.
NO PETS
Lease & security
required. $550/mo
570-829-1578
PLAINS
1st floor. Modern 2
bedroom. Kitchen
with appliances. All
new carpet. Conve-
nient location. No
smoking. No pets.
$550 + utilities.
570-714-9234
PLAINS
2 bedroom, heat,
hot water, water &
sewer included.
$625/month.
Call (570) 905-0186
PLAINS
Large 2 bedroom,
eat-in kitchen, off
street parking for 4
cars, small pets ok,
large fenced in
yard. $600/month
includes water &
sewer. Security
required. Call Tom
at 570-574-6261
SHAVERTOWN
One or 2 bedroom
apartment for rent.
Heat included.
Laundry facilities,
Off-street parking,
No Pets. Call
570-675-3904
SWOYERSVILLE
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, car-
peting, all appli-
ances, washer/dry-
er, off-street park-
ing, no pets. Water
& hot water includ-
ed. Gas heat paid by
tenant. $475/month
+ security & lease.
Call 570-675-7836
SWOYERSVILLE
Modern 1 bedroom,
1st floor. Quiet area.
All appliances
included, coin-op
laundry. Off street
parking. No pets.
$430. Water/sewer
included. Security &
references. Call
570-239-7770
SWOYERSVILLE
Roomy 1 bedroom.
Extra large walk in
closet. Equipped
with range, refriger-
ator, washer &
dryer. New tile bath.
Security, references
& lease. No pets.
$575/month.
Utilities by tenant.
570-287-5775
570-332-1048
W. WYOMING
2nd floor. 2 bed-
room. Appliances.
Enclosed porch. 2
car garage. $600/
month + security
and utilities. No
pets. No smoking.
Call (570) 333-4363
WEST PITTSTON
203 Delaware Ave.
Out of flood zone. 4
rooms, no pets, no
smoking, off street
parking. Includes
heat, water, sewer,
fridge, stove, w/d.
High security bldg.
1st floor or 2nd floor
570-655-9711
WEST PITTSTON
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
Clean 1 bedroom,
2nd floor. Washer/
dryer hookup.
Water & sewer
included. $550/mo.
+ utilities, security &
references. Call
(570) 947-8073
WEST PITTSTON
Newly remodeled
1st Floor, 2 bed-
room, stove refrig-
erator, & dish-
washer, washer/
dryer hook up, wall
to wall carpeting.
Off Street Parking.
$600/month +
utilities, security &
references. No
Smoking. No Pets.
570-574-1143
WEST PITTSTON
Spacious 2nd floor,
2 bedroom 1 bath
apartment. Large
eat-in kitchen. Off
street parking. Utili-
ties included except
electricity. NO pets.
$750/month.
Call Judy Rice
570-714-9230
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
135 Westminster
St., 2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, living room.
Laundry hookup.
Recently renovated.
Pet friendly. Section
8 Welcome. $495 +
utilities.
Call 570-814-9700
WILKES-BARRE
151 W. River St.
NEAR WILKES
1st floor. 2 bed-
rooms, carpet.
Appliances includ-
ed. Sewer & trash
paid. Tenant pays
gas, water & elec-
tric. Pet friendly.
Security deposit &
1st months rent
required. $600.
570-969-9268
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove
& dishwasher,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, pets ok
with fee, $650/
month, plus security
and utilities.
Call 570-650-1575
WILKES-BARRE
83 W. Chestnut St
Freshly painted 3
bedroom. Clean and
neat. Pets OK. $500
+ first, security, utili-
ties & references.
570-223-6252
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
9 Sycamore St. (off
W. Chestnut near
General Hospital)
Clean 1st floor, 1
bedroom, bath.
Appliances with
range, fridge,
microwave,
includes water and
sewage. Section 8
welcome. No smok-
ing or pets. Security
$475 + utilities.
570-829-1253
570-817-5345 (c)
WILKES-BARRE
For lease, available
December 5th.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
room, refrigerator
and stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, no pets,
$400/per month,
plus utilities,
$200/security
deposit. Call
(570) 688-4925
WILKES-BARRE
“GENERAL
HOSPITAL”
VICINITY
Super Clean,
remodeled
compact 3
rooms, laundry,
appliances, off
street parking 1
car. $470 +
utilities.
EMPLOYMENT,
CREDIT, LEASE
REQUIRED. NO
PETS/SMOKING.
Managed
Building!
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
WILKES-BARRE
HEIGHTS
57 Carbon Lane
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor. Wall to wall
carpet. eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances, off street
parking, rear
porch. $395 + utili-
ties & security.
570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 +
tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower Section
1 bedroom apart-
ment available. Nice
Area. Duplex (1 unit
ready now). Heat
and hot water. Rent
with option to buy. No
pets. Call
570-823-7587
WILKES-BARRE
Meyers Court. 3
bedroom end unit
townhouse. $690 +
utilities. For more
info visit:
DreamRentals.net
or call 570-288-3375
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
2 bedroom. Includes
heat, hot and cold
running water. Off
street parking.
Security required.
Background check.
$545 For appoint-
ment call:
570-814-3138
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
723 N. Main St.
1st floor, Very large
1 bedroom, 1.5
bath, eat-in kitchen
with appliances,
$420 + security,
no pets. Water
included. Tenant
pays gas & electric.
Call 570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
WILKES-BARRE
Spacious 3 bed-
room. Newly reno-
vated, freshly paint-
ed, nice neighbor-
hood. Appliances.
New washer/dryer
and new floor cov-
ering. $700 plus util-
ities, references,
credit and back-
ground check.
Smoke Free.
Call 570-881-0320
WILKES-BARRE
Spacious, newly
renovated 2 bed-
room. Nice neigh-
borhood. Freshly
painted. With appli-
ances & new wash-
er / dryer. New floor
coverings. $650 +
utilities, references,
credit and back-
ground check.
Smoke Free.
570-881-0320
WILKES-BARRE
Three room, one
bedroom, all freshly
painted with new
flooring throughout.
Includes stove,
washer & dryer in
laundry area and off
street parking in pri-
vate, well-lit lot.
Water and sewer
included, electricity
by tenant. $460/
month. Security,
application, refer-
ences and lease
required. No smok-
ers, No pets. Call
570-814-9574
WILKES-BARRE
Š1 bedroom
water included
Š2 bedroom
water included
Š1 bedroom
efficiency water
included
Š2 bedroom
single family
Š3 bedroom
single family
HANOVER
Š4 bedroom
large affordable
Š2 bedroom
NANTICOKE
Š2 bedroom
large, water
included
PITTSTON
ŠLarge 1
bedroom water
included
PLAINS
Š1 bedroom
water included
KINGSTON
Š3 Bedroom Half
Double
KINGSTON
Š2 bedroom
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
2 BEDROOM
AVAILABLE NOW!!
Recently renovated,
spacious, wood
floors, all kitchen
appliances included,
parking available.
$500 + utilities
Call Agnes
347-495-4566
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WYOMING
BLANDINA
APARTMENTS
Deluxe 1 & 2 bed-
room. Wall to wall
carpet. Some utili-
ties by tenant. No
pets. Non-smoking.
Elderly community.
Quiet, safe. Off
street parking. Call
570-693-2850
WYOMING
Updated 1 bedroom.
New Wall to wall
carpet. Appliances
furnished. Coin op
laundry. $550. Heat,
water & sewer
included. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
FREE HIGH SPEED FREE HIGH SPEED
INTERNET! INTERNET!
Why pay extra for
internet? Our new
leases include a
FREE FREE high speed
connection!
Affordable mod-
ern office space
at the Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include
internet, heat,
central air, utili-
ties, trash
removal, and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Parking
available at the
intermodal garage
via our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
1,200 - 2,000 SF
Office / Retail
Call 570-829-1206
FORTY FORT
Free standing build-
ing. Would be great
for any commercial
use. 1900 sq. ft. on
the ground floor
with an additional
800 sq. ft in finished
lower level. Excel-
lent location, only 1
block from North
Cross Valley
Expressway and
one block from
Wyoming Ave (route
11) Take advantage
of this prime loca-
tion for just $850
per month!
570-262-1131
HANOVER TWP
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space
For Lease 1,200 sq.
ft. starting at $700/
month. Off street
parking. Central
heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
OFFICE OR STORE
NANTICOKE
1280 sq ft. 3 phase
power, central air
conditioning. Handi-
cap accessible rest
room. All utilities by
tenant. Garbage
included. $900 per
month for a 5 year
lease.
570-735-5064.
OFFICE SPACE
MAIN ST., LUZERNE
2nd floor, approx.
2,300 SF, Private
restroom & break-
room, off street
parking.
570-288-1004
OFFICE SPACE
PLAINS
Total space 30,000
sf. Build to suit. Per-
fect for Doctors
suite, day care, etc.
High visibility. Lots of
parking. Rent starting
$10/sf. MLS 11-4200
Call Nancy or Holly
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
OFFICE SPACE
HANOVER TWP.
End unit. Former
beauty salon would
also be suitable for
retail store. High
traffic area. $800
per month. (11-4214)
Call John Thomas
570-287-1196 or
570-714-6124
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
944 Commercial
Properties
RETAIL/OFFICE
2,000 sq building for
rent on busy Rt. 309
in Mountain Top,
across from Sub-
way. Lots of park-
ing, great visibility,
Available immedi-
ately. $2,000/month
+ utilities.
570-430-0852
315 PLAZA
750 & 1750
square feet and
NEW SPACE
3,500 square feet
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WILKES-BARRE
Great Business
Opportunity
1,500 square feet,
available immedi-
ately. High traffic
area, excellent
street visibility on
the Sans Souci Hwy.
Call 570-760-5215
WYOMING
72’ x 200’ VACANT
COMMERCIAL LOT
233 Wyoming Ave,
Rt. 11 (1.25 miles
from proposed Wal-
mart) For Sale or
lease. $96,000.
570-388-6669
FORTY FORT
1188 Wyoming Ave
Built in 1879 this
prestigious 2,800
square foot space
features high ceil-
ings, ten-foot door-
ways, three large
distinctive chande-
liers, hardwood
floors and three fire-
places. Other fea-
tures: french doors,
large well lit parking
lot, handicap acces-
sibility. Signage
positioned on 179 ft
frontage. Over
15,000 vehicles
pass daily.
570-706-5308
Elegant Space Available
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
NICE NEIGHBORHOOD
564 Garfield St.
For lease, available
12/1/11, 3 bedrooms,
1 bath room, refrig-
erator & stove pro-
vided, washer/dryer
hookup, no pets,
fenced yard on cor-
ner lot. $575./per
month, plus utilities,
$575./security
deposit. Call
(570) 542-4904
before 7:00 p.m. to
set an appointment
or email
obuhosky@epix.net.
FORTY FORT
1/2 double.
3 bedrooms. Stove,
refrigerator,
dishwasher. Washer
/dryer hookup.
Newly painted.
Off street parking.
$675 + utilities.
570-814-0843
570-696-3090
GLEN LYON
3 bedrooms, wall to
wall carpeting,
laundry room, yard.
$500 + utilities,
security & refer-
ences. No Pets.
Call 570-592-3100
HANOVER TWP.
Completely remod-
eled 2 bedroom, 1
bath, wall to wall
carpet. Stove,
washer/dryer hook
up. Off street park-
ing. $750/month +
first, last & security.
Includes water,
sewer & trash. No
pets. No smoking.
References & credit
check.
570-824-3223
269-519-2634
Leave Message
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, new wall to
wall carpeting,
freshly painted, par-
tial A/C, gas heat,
large fenced in
yard, walking dis-
tance to Kingston
Corners. All appli-
ances, off-street
parking, no pets.
$725/month, plus
utilities, & 2 months
security.
Application &
references.
Call 570-639-4907
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
Charming, Spacious
6 room, 2 bedroom
duplex, includes 2nd
and 3rd floor. Con-
venient to Wyoming
Ave. Washer/dryer
hook-up, basement
storage, $550 /
month + utilities,
security & lease. NO
PETS.570-793-6294
950 Half Doubles
LARKSVILLE
2.5 bedroom, fresh-
ly painted, stove,
off street parking,
washer/dryer
hookup, dry base-
ment. $525/month,
+ utilities & security.
(570) 239-5760
LARKSVILLE
231 Nesbitt Street
3 bedrooms with
stove & refrigera-
tor, washer/dryer
hook up, nice yard,
off street parking.
No pets. $525/
month + security.
(570) 779-5910
MOCANAQUA
3 bedroom, modern
kitchen & bath,
large yard and deck,
off-street parking,
water and sewer
paid. $600/month,
+ security & lease.
Call 570-542-4411
PLAINS
3 bedroom, fresh
paint, new hard-
wood/tile/carpet,
gas heat, new bath.
Includes stove and
fridge. $695/month
plus utilities, secu-
rity deposit and
references
Call Scott
570-714-2431
Ext. 137
WEST PITTSTON
4 bedroom, off
street parking,
yard, garage,
totally remodeled.
$850/month
plus security
570-299-7103
WEST PITTSTON
MAINTENANCE FREE!
2 bedroom.
Off street parking.
No smoking. $600
+utilities, security
& last month.
570-885-4206
WILKES-BARRE
176 Charles St
TOWNHOUSE STYLE, 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
Not Section 8
approved. $550/
month + utilities. Ref-
erences & security
required. Available
now! 570-301-2785
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator &
stove, washer/dryer
hookup,
$450/month,plus
utilities.
Call 570-313-7701
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, newly
remodeled bath,
large eat in kitchen,
washer/dryer hook-
up, fenced in yard.
$750/per month,
plus utilities, securi-
ty deposit & lease.
570-820-7049
WILKES-BARRE
32 Riverside Drive
Luxurious 1/2 double
in landmark man-
sion. 5 bedrooms.
Living room with fire
place. Dining room.
Kitchen with appli-
ances. Large base-
ment. 2.5 baths.
Central Air.
$975/month. Secu-
rity & references
required. Water and
sewer included.
Available now.
570-905-7334
570-825-0000
WYOMING
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
gas heat, new car-
peting, range & laun-
dry hook ups. Credit
check required.
$675/month + utilities
& security.
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Private, 3 bedroom
ranch, patio, porch,
appliances, work
shop. $830 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-522-0084
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR
Well maintained
ranch style condo
features living room
with cathedral ceil-
ing, oak kitchen,
dining room with
vaulted ceiling, 2
bedrooms and 2 3/4
baths, master bed-
room with walk in
closet. HOA fees
included. $1,200 per
month + utilities.
MLS#11-4063.
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
953Houses for Rent
DURYEA
Blueberry Hill
Large 3 bedroom
ranch with over-
sized garage. Large
lot with pool. No
Realtors. For more
details. Available for
lease or purchase
for $339,000. Call
570-406-1128
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove &
dishwasher provid-
ed, washer/dryer on
premises, front and
rear porches, full
basement and attic.
Off-street parking,
no pets, totally
remodeled. $1,000/
month, plus utilities,
security & lease.
Call 570-824-7598
KINGSTON
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, diswash-
er & disposal. Gas
heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995. month.
570-479-6722
KINGSTON
Single family, two
bedroom. $675 per
month, plus utilities
& snow removal.
First floor is handi-
cap accessible. No
pets; No Smoking.
Washer / Dryer on
premises. Fenced
yard. On Street
Parking. One year
lease, 1st & last
month's rent, &
security. Credit &
Background check.
Darcy J Gollhardt
570-262-0226 or
Paul Donahue
570-510-1399.
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
ext 1352
LAKE SILKWORTH
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
single home. Lake
view with dock& lake
rights. Remodeled
with hardwood & tile
floors. Lake Lehman
Schools. No pets No
Smoking. $725 +
utilities, security &
lease. Call
570-696-3289
MOUNTAIN TOP AREA
NEAR LILY LAKE
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
3 bedrooms, 1.5
bath, Farm house.
Modern kitchen,
hardwood floors.
$950/month +
security & 1
year lease
Call 570-379-2258
MOUNTAIN TOP
Rent to Own - Lease
Option Purchase 5
bedroom 2 bath 3
story older home.
Completely remod-
eled in + out! $1500
month with $500
month applied
toward purchase.
$245K up to 5 yrs.
tj2isok@gmail.com
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom Ranch,
double lot, off
street parking,
fridge & stove
included. Trash &
sewer included.
$550/month +
security. No pets.
570-735-2207
muenchclifford@
yahoo.com
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
SHAVERTOWN
2 bedroom, private
setting with pond.
1.5 baths. Large
kitchen with appli-
ances, dishwasher
& microwave
included. Plenty of
closet & storage.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Private drive.
$1,200/month
+ utilities. Security
deposit required.
Call (570) 760-2362
SWOYERSVILLE
Rent to Own
Nice 3 bedroom
ranch. Modern
kitchen & bath, new
flooring, finished
basement, fenced
yard, shed, off street
parking & more. Pets
OK! Small down pay-
ment. $975.
Call 570-956-2385
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 PAGE 13D
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Masonry, stucco,
& concrete
Call the
Building
Industry
Association of
NEPA to find a
qualified mem-
ber for your
next project.
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates
570-899-4713
1024 Building &
Remodeling
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
STORM OR FLOOD
DAMAGE??
HUGHES
Construction
ROOFING, Home
Renovating.
Garages,
Kitchens, Baths,
Siding and More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-388-0149
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
1039 Chimney
Service
CAVUTO
CHIMNEY
SERVICE
& Gutter Cleaning
Free Estimates
Insured
570-709-2479
1039 Chimney
Service
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1057Construction &
Building
PRICE CONSTRUCTION
Full Service
General Contractor
BASEMENT > ROOFING
> KITCHENS > REMOD-
ELING > BATHROOMS
LJPconstructioninc.com
570-840-3349
1078 Dry Wall
DAUGHERTY’S
DRYWALL INC.
Remodeling, New
Construction, Water
& Flood Repairs
570-579-3755
PA043609
Looking for more
business?
Find it with a
Classified ad!
570-829-7130
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings and
painting. Free esti-
mates. Licensed &
Insured. 328-1230
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
MODULAR HOMES/EXCAVATING
570-332-0077
Custom excavating,
foundations, land
clearing, driveways,
storm drainage, etc.
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
Professional
Window & Gutter
Cleaning
Gutters, carpet,
pressure washing.
Residential/com-
mercial. Ins./bond-
ed. Free est.
570-283-9840
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
1132 Handyman
Services
Electrical, Plumbing,
Carpentry, Painting
Attic & Basement
Cleanup. Call Rick
570-287-0919
FLOOD VICTIMS
FOR
CONSTRUCTION
& DEMOLITION
CALL
LICENSED GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Plumbing, heating
electrical, painting,
roofs, siding, rough
& finished carpen-
try. Call anytime.
570-852-9281
Mark’s
Handyman
Service
Give us a call
We do it all!
Licensed & Insured
570-578-8599
RUSSELL’S
Property & Lawn Main-
tenance
LICENSED & INSURED
Carpentry, paint-
ing & general
home repairs.
Now save for
Spring Lawncare!
570-406-3339
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
AAA Bob & Ray’s
Hauling: Friendly &
Courteous. We take
anything & every-
thing. Attic to base-
ment. Garage, yard,
free estimates. Call
570-655-7458 or
570-905-4820
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
1156 Insurance
NEPA LONG TERM
CARE AGENCY
Long Term Care
Insurance sales.
Reputable
Companies.
570-580-0797
Free Consult
www.nepa
longtermcare
.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BRUSH UP TO 4’ HIGH,
MOWING, EDGING,
MULCHING, TRIMMING
SHRUBS, HEDGES,
TREES, LAWN CARE,
LEAF REMOVAL, FALL
CLEAN UP. FULLY
INSURED. FREE ESTI-
MATES 829-3261
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
JASON SIMMS PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Free Estimates
21 Yrs. Experience
Insured
(570) 947-2777
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1225 Plumbing
BERNIE THE PLUMBER
& HOME BUILDER
“SAME DAY SERVICE”
Why Pay more?
Interior & exterior.
We do hardwood
floors, furnaces,
water heaters - all
your home remodel-
ing needs.
Pay when you’re
pleased. All work
guaranteed.
Free Estimates.
570-899-3123
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
NEED FLOOD REPAIRS?
Boilers, Furnaces,
Air. 0% Interest 6
months.
570-736-HVAC
(4822)
1252 Roofing &
Siding
FALL
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW
PLOWING
ŠCommercial
ŠIndustrial
ŠResidential
ŠDRIVEWAYS
ŠSIDEWALKS
ŠSALTING
VITO & GINO’S
570-574-1275
PLOWING SHOVEL-
ING BLOWING SALT-
ING CINDERING
CONTRACT PLOW-
ING. EMERGENCY
SAME DAY SNOW
REMOVAL.
570-823-6000
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1327 Waterproofing
BASEMENT
WATERPROOFING
Foundation
Repairs
Free Estimates
CALL GRI
570-466-4695
It’s there when you wake up.
Get convenient home delivery. Call 829-5000.
PAGE 14D MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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FOR YOUR SMALL BUSINESS!
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• MONITOR YOUR
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$
30
00
JUST A MONTH!
953Houses for Rent
WEST PITTSTON
SINGLE HOME
FOR RENT
622 Foundry St.
For lease, available
immediately, 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
room, refrigerator
and stove provid-
ed, washer/dryer
hookup, no pets,
Modern single
family home in nice
neighborhood.
Serious inquiries
only., $725.00/per
month, plus utili-
ties, $725.00/
security deposit.
Call 570-239-4102
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms with
lots of storage.
Hardwood floors. 5
minute walk to Gen-
eral Hospital. $670.
+ utilities.
570-814-3838
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled 2 bed-
room, 1 bath house.
Hardwood floors.
$575 + utilities. Call
215-932-5690
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $315.
Efficiency at $435
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FLORIDA
Boca Raton
Beautiful 5 room
home with Pool.
Fully furnished. On
canal lot. $600
weekly. If interest-
ed, write to:
120 Wagner St.
Moosic, PA 18507
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