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DECEMBER 14-20, 2011
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Special to The Sun
Students at the Cambridge School in Pennington received yellow belts in Taekwondo Dec. 2 after
passing their test led by Master Kim of Victory Taekwondo. Please see the story below.
Achieving yellow belt status
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Greenwood Ave. bridge
County, local officials
announce upgrades. PAGE 9
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Group wants
sewer bond put
to referendum
The 1A citizens group in the
township is trying to give taxpay-
ers a voice on a $4 million general
obligation bond approved by the
Township Committee on Nov. 28
to finance up to 267,000 gallons a
day of sewage flow to the Ewing
Lawrence Sewerage Authority.
That bond ordinance is expect-
ed to cost township taxpayers an
additional $34 a year.
The Hopewell Township Citi-
zens for Tax Choice is attempting
to get 667 signatures by Dec. 19 in
order to schedule a referendum
on the bond ordinance.
CFTC chairman Robert
Kecskes said he is not sure when
the referendum would be sched-
uled.
Township Administrator Paul
Pogorzelski said that the first $1
million payment must be made
for the contract with ELSA to be
valid.
We cannot borrow the money
if the petition is successful, he
said.
Committeewoman Vanessa
Sandom cast the lone dissenting
vote against the bond ordinance
at the Nov. 28 meeting, stating
there is not enough information
on how much additional capacity
is needed, and that the excess
would only encourage develop-
ment in the township.
Mayor James Burd said at that
meeting that the cost of the ELSA
flow would be about $15 a gallon,
compared to about $67 a gallon
were the existing sewage treat-
ment plant upgraded.
This is too important an issue
to be rushed through via a com-
mittee vote, Kecskes said. Since
each taxpayer in the valley is on
the hook now to pay for this
sewage-treatment capacity in the
southern tier, every registered
voter should have the opportuni-
ty to put it to an up-or-down vote.
Many people feel we dont need
extra capacity at this time and, in
todays economic climate, they
sure dont want to pay more taxes
for it.
Kecskes and his supporters
claim that there is only demand
for about half of the 267,000 gal-
lons from existing businesses and
residents in the area.
In fact, many of the other cur-
More than 600 signatures
needed by Dec. 19 deadline
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
please see BOND, page 2
The Cambridge School in Pen-
nington has several new yellow
belt ranked students in Taekwon-
do after students passed their test
Dec. 2.
With crisp responses of Yes,
sir, students formed lines for
Master Kim of Victory Taekwon-
do in the gymnasium of the
school before about 40 parents.
Master Kim led the students
through drills, including front
kicks, jump front kicks and turn-
ing around.
I..TaeTae KwonTaeKwon-
DoI love Taekwondo the
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
Two Cambridge students
attain yellow belt status
please see BELT, page 3
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN DECEMBER 14-20, 2011
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rent businesses and residents
around Pennington Circle have
objected to the substantial costs
($44,000) to tie into the sewer sys-
tem, or have complained that
their septic systems and private
wells are already sufficient, he
said in a statement. Further,
since the current majority on the
Hopewell Township Committee
has assured these businesses and
residents that they will not be re-
quired to tie into the system, a
large portion of the 267,000 gal-
lons reserved for ELSA is unlike-
ly to ever be used.
Township Attorney Steven
Goodell said at the Nov. 28 meet-
ing that the township must first
reserve the flow at ELSA before
determining what projects will
look like, what the sewerage costs
will be and how to assess those
costs to the various users.
He added that the additional
sewerage capacity is needed for
the township to meet its afford-
able-housing requirements, and
Burd added that the township
could be subject to a builders
remedy lawsuit if developers
wanted to build that required af-
fordable housing and there was
inadequate sewerage capacity.
CFTC also claims that those af-
fordable-housing requirements
for the township have not yet
been defined.
Much of the ELSA reserved
capacity has been directed to
support affordable housing units
in the southern tier, Kecskes
said. However, state regulations
defining our affordable-housing
obligation have yet to be issued. If
the number of affordable housing
units is less than presently
planned, some of the ELSA sur-
plus capacity could end up being
homeless.
Developers are always plan-
ning for their next large housing
subdivision project, he said, and
with the ready availability of un-
used sewer capacity in the south-
ern tier, experience has shown
the group that theyre going to
jump at the chance of exploiting
it.
Such development could well
result in hundreds of new stu-
dents in our schools, resulting in
even higher township taxes, and
straining our resources further,
he stated.
Now that the committee has
committed $4 million to ELSA for
267,000 gallons of sewer capacity,
of which only half can be depend-
ed on to be used, who will be re-
sponsible for paying for the other
half ? Kecskes asked. The tax-
payers of Hopewell Township.
The petition is now available for
registered voters, who can call
915-0037, or visit www.ELSAPeti-
tion.org to register their interest
to sign.
If you want to keep the lid on
your taxes, if you feel this kind of
municipal spending is ill-timed
and unwise, well have someone
drive the petition right over to
you for your signature, Kecskes
said. But regardless of how they
vote in the end on this issue, we
think the citizens of this valley
should have a choice.
Sewer bond ordinance
may go to referendum
BOND
Continued from page 1
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Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
DECEMBER 14-20, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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students responded in unison.
Each group of students ended
its demonstration by breaking a
board held by their parents.
We are lucky to have Master
Kim, said James Maher III, as-
sistant head of school and educa-
tional administrator.
Victory Taekwondo is right
across the street from the school,
and Kim has been running Taek-
wondo classes at the school since
last year, holding them once a
week for 45 minutes.
It builds up their confidence,
their focus and their concentra-
tion, said the instructor of more
than 30 years. It also builds re-
spect for themselves and for oth-
ers. I feel like they are my chil-
dren, too.
The Cambridge School is a day
school for children who have been
diagnosed with primary lan-
guage-based learning differences,
and Maher said the focus, concen-
tration and discipline the stu-
dents learn in taekwondo carries
over into their academic studies.
It really is a unique part of
our curriculum, he said.
The Cambridge program uti-
lizes phonetics and emphasizes
visual, auditory and kinesthetic
learning styles. Instruction be-
gins by focusing on the structure
of language and gradually moves
toward reading. Students with
language-based learning differ-
ences often exhaust their intellec-
tual resources in their attempt to
decode or identify words and thus
have difficulty in comprehending
the content or text of stories. Stu-
dents are taught first to under-
stand that spoken words are made
up of individual pieces of sound
called phonemes.
The students then are taught to
manipulate these sounds into
words.
Research shows that activities
such as taekwondo can increase
focus and discipline, Maher ex-
plained.
BELT
Continued from page 1
Yellow belts awarded
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN DECEMBER 14-20, 2011
(90B) 559-B002
1980 Route 206 Belle Mead, NJ 08502 www.MontgomeryGardens.com
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Annual Holiday Walk
was Dec. 2
Pennington welcomed the hol-
iday season Dec. 2 with its 28th-
Annual Holiday Walk down
Main Street. Several hundred
residents gathered in Hope Com-
mons for the lighting of the
Christmas tree and a visit from
Santa Claus.
The Hopewell Valley Central
High School Brass Band enter-
tained those residents with
Christmas carols as Dos Gringos
and Pennington Bagel served
free hot chocolate.
The man in the white suit ar-
rived by fire truck and made his
way through the crowd, shaking
hands with the kids of all ages.
This is your celebration
tonight, so enjoy it, he said after
lighting the borough Christmas
tree.
Making his way back through
the crowd, he boarded his sleigh
for the ride to Sun National
Bank, where he heard childrens
wish lists and posed for free pic-
tures taken by Photo Haven.
The Hopewell Valley YMCA
hosted activities in front of its
building on South Main Street,
and the Youth Activity Center
will be open.
Continuing the holiday spirit
was the traditional free holiday
dance performance by the Pen-
nington Dance Company at 6:45
at Heritage Hall in the Penning-
ton Presbyterian Church, and DJ
Mary Ann Fuscello kept the holi-
day music playing throughout
the evening.
HVEF seeks donations
in teachers, staff names
The Hopewell Valley Education
Foundation is inviting residents
to make a tax-deductible donation
to the organization in the name of
a teacher or other school employ-
ee who has made a positive im-
pact on their childs life. The per-
son recognized through the
teacher, staff and school recogni-
tion program will be notified,
along with their supervisor/prin-
cipal, that a donation has been
made. Donations can be made in
any amount, and donors may re-
main anonymous if they prefer.
The form is found on the HVEF
website at
hvef.org/Recognition_Program.pdf
Information on the HVEF can
be found at hvef.org.
DECEMBER 14-20, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
Santa greets children after arriving at Hope Commons in Pennington on Dec. 2 for the lighting of the
borough Christmas tree during the 28th-Annual Holiday Walk.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN DECEMBER 14-20, 2011
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
I
ts hard to believe, but the holiday
season is nearing an end. And that
means that a lot of holiday drives
are about to wrap up, too.
Over the past several weeks, weve
had the honor of listing a great num-
ber of your efforts to help those in
need this holiday season. In our 13
South and Central Jersey publica-
tions, weve published news about ef-
forts to collect food, clothes, blankets,
toys and items for animal shelters. We
hope that your drive, so far, has been
successful.
But now the season is coming to a
close.
If you have been able to help, we
thank you. A great number of non-
profit and charitable organizations de-
pend on the kindness of the general
public during the holiday season to
make ends meet throughout the year.
Thanks to your generosity, many peo-
ple will helped.
If you havent helped, time is run-
ning short. Lets be honest, the holiday
season is the easiest time of the year
to lend a helping hand because there
are so many groups and organizations
collecting items and donations. You
have bell ringers at numerous stores.
As we mentioned, you read about
countless opportunities in our news-
paper. It seems that just about every-
where you go, theres a way to help
someone.
You dont have to give until it hurts.
Many small donations add up quickly.
Pocket change, a spare blanket, a shirt
that youve grown weary of wearing
these are things you wont miss, but
that can truly help someone else.
So lets end this holiday season with
a bang. If everyone who reads a Sun
newspaper well into six figures
makes one small donation this holiday
season, the impact will be simply over-
whelming.
Almost over
Holidays are almost behind us, but theres still time to make a difference
Time short to help others
If everyone who reads a Sun newspa-
per will make even a small donation
this year, it will make a huge differ-
ence in many lives.
Posted on sun news
Quickie marriages, Census, stalking, World AIDS day
People fleeing New Jersey
for PA for many reasons
People from New Jersey are moving to
Philadelphia in massive numbers, a trend
noted in recent Census figures and in a
highly detailed report in the Star-Ledger.
The 2010 census said former New Jer-
seyans account for 80 percent of Pennsyl-
vanias 25,770 gain in residents from other
states that year. Pennsylvania, overall, was
the biggest destination state in the North-
east last year.
Barry Lank
Gambling and a quickie
marriage is this Nevada?
Sometimes, it is seems like New Jersey
wants to be Nevada.
First, it was the casinos, then the expan-
sion of gambling.
Now, perhaps, quickie marriages.
Lawmakers are considering a proposal
to eliminate the states three-day waiting
period for marriage licenses, according to
NJ.coms Statehouse bureau. That way,
New Jersey could become more of a desti-
nation for weddings, the bills sponsors
have said.
Barry Lank
World AIDS Day: A
personal price
Ill never forget the last time I saw my
uncle Patrick Slane.
I had just returned from a visit to Scran-
ton, Pa. He was lying on the couch, and the
moans he was emitting were chilling he
could barely breathe. After years of suffer-
ing from HIV, it was finally catching up to
him, and from all indications, the end was
near.
Days earlier, I found him aimlessly walk-
ing around the house. He was completely
demented and had no idea who he was,
who I was or where he was. When I re-
turned from Pennsylvania, things ap-
peared even worse. The television was on
loudly.
He had his favorite drink, a chocolate
milkshake, sitting on the table. But he was
struggling to take in air.
He was going to die soon.
Kevin Canessa
Dont miss a thing!
This is a sampling of what you can find
every day on The Central Jersey Sun,
online at http://cj.sunne.ws.
A Hamilton man pleaded guilty to roman-
tically stalking Councilwoman Kelly
Yaede.
DECEMBER 14-20, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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POLICE REPORTS
The following items come from
reports on file with the Penning-
ton Police Department.
A 22-year-old New Brunswick
man was charged with careless
driving after a one-car accident
along Federal City Road Nov. 26.
Police said the man swerved to
avoid a deer, hit an embankment,
went airborne and landed on the
front portion of the car, rolling
over several times, damaging a
residential lawn and a tree.
Police said the man was able to
crawl out of the vehicle, but suf-
fered injuries to his lower body.
He was transported by the Pen-
nington First Aid Squad to an
area hospital where he was treat-
ed and later released. He was is-
sued a summons for careless driv-
ing which will be heard in munic-
ipal court.
Sometime between Nov. 15 and
Nov. 17, someone forced open a
French door to the building and
took a propane-powered air con-
ditioning unit valued at $800 from
a storage closet.
A 21-year-old Rumson man was
charged with DWI, reckless driv-
ing, speeding and failure to main-
tain lane after a township police
officer observed him driving a car
63 mph in a 45 mph zone along
Route 31 Dec. 4. After performing
field sobriety tests the officer
placed the man under arrest and
transported him to police head-
quarters for processing. He was
released to an acquaintance, and
the case will be heard in munici-
pal court.
A 37-year-old Trenton man was
charged with careless driving,
leaving the scene of an accident,
failing to report an accident and
weight-limit violation after police
investigated a hit-and-run crash
along Stony Brook Road Nov. 30.
It was found that the tractor-
trailer driven by the man had
struck a guiderail along the road-
way causing significant damage
to the rail.
Police said the man left the
scene of the crash without report-
ing it and was subsequently
charged with careless driving,
leaving the scene of an accident,
failing to report an accident and a
weight-limit violation.
This case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
Sometime between 2 a.m. and 8
a.m., someone entered an un-
locked car parked in the driveway
and removed a garage door open-
er. The loss was estimated at $50.
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
WEDNESDAY
December 14
FOR ALL
BTES Winter Concert: 7 p.m. at the
Performing Arts Center at Hopewell
Valley.
THURSDAY
December 15
FOR ALL
TMS Band/Orchestra Concert: 7
p.m. at the Performing Arts Center
at Hopewell Valley.
Planning Board Meeting: 7:30 p.m.
at Municipal Building.
MONDAY
December 19
FOR ALL
Recreation Advisory Board Meet-
ing: 7 p.m. at the Municipal Building.
TUESDAY
December 20
FOR ALL
Environmental Commission Meet-
ing: 7:30 p.m. at the Municipal Build-
ing.
Historic Preservation Commission
Meeting: 7:30 p.m. at the Municipal
Building.
HPL Knitting Group: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Public Library.
calendar PAGE 8 DECEMBER 14-20, 2011
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
FIXING THE GREENWOOD AVENUE BRIDGE
C
ounty and local officials have announced that substantial work will be done on the Greenwood
Avenue bridge to make it safer. Please see the story to the right.
Want to be listed in our calendar?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings, information must be received,
in writing, two weeks prior to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J.
08540. Or by email: calendar@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our web-
site (www.hopewellsun.com).
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Eleven graduate from Mercer County Fire Academy
Eleven students enrolled in the
Mercer County Fire Academy of
Mercer County Community Col-
lege graduated Nov. 30 from the
New Jersey State Firefighter 1
Program. A graduation ceremony
was held at MCCCs Dempster
Fire Service and Training Center
in Lawrenceville.
The graduates successfully
completed the 170-hour course,
and passed the New Jersey Divi-
sion of Fire Safety written exami-
nation. The program provides
entry-level candidates with the
knowledge and skills to meet the
job performance requirements
for paid and volunteer firefight-
ers. Graduates learned how to
function safely and effectively as
integral members of a firefighter
team. They may now apply for
Firefighter 1 certification.
Marc Devita, of Groveville Fire
Co., was named class valedictori-
an for receiving the highest score
on the state exam. In addition to
Devita, certificates of completion
were awarded to Anthony Scarla-
ta, Whitehorse Fire Co.; Matthew
Rivera, Colonial Fire Co.; Scott
Diamond, Hightstown Engine Co.
#1; James Bainbridge Jr., Pen-
nington Fire Co.; Adam Ames,
Union Fire Co.; Mathew Chrusz,
Union Fire Co.; Jason Johns,
Princeton Fire Dept.; Paul LaPla-
ca, Princeton Fire Dept.; Joshua
Butler, Applegarth Fire Co.; and
Jake Williams, Applegarth Fire
Co.
The graduates learned the im-
portance of teamwork and how
integral it is to firefighting, said
James McCann, director of the
Mercer County Fire Academy of
MCCC. They did an outstanding
job learning the basics of fire-
fighting and will serve their com-
munities well. Special thanks to
the Hightstown Engine Co. #1
Color Guard and the Hamilton
Township Professional Firefight-
ers Pipe & Drum Band for their
participation in the ceremony.
The program is offered twice a
year, in the fall and spring. In ad-
dition, the Fire Academy offers 25
continuing education classes for
firefighters each semester on a
variety of topics. MCCC also of-
fers an associate degree program
in Fire Science Technology, plus
credit certificate programs in
Fire Code Enforcement and Fire
Officer/Administrator. For fur-
ther information, contact the
Academy at (609) 799-3245 or visit
the website at www.DFTC.org.
DECEMBER 14-20, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
For either offer, call or write Tim.
(856) 528-4993 tronaldson@elauwit.com
www.sunne.ws
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Cannot be combined. Expires 12/28/11.
$150 OFF
Complete
Trim Job
3 rooms or more
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Cannot be combined. Expires 12/28/11.
Greenwood Avenue
bridge getting
upgrades
The Hopewell Borough Coun-
cil will work with Mercer Coun-
ty to see how to make the Green-
wood Avenue bridge safer at the
intersection with Front Street.
Front Street residents wrote a
letter to the borough Nov. 29 with
concerns that the grade and arc
of the bridge obscure vision of
traffic as motorists are pulling
out of Front Street, that the
placement of the new guiderail
obscures vision of traffic com-
ing off the bridge, and that the
oncoming traffic rarely adheres
to the 25 mile-per-hour speed
limit.
We acknowledge that there is
nothing that can be done to rem-
edy the first problem, the resi-
dents stated in the letter. How-
ever the second and third prob-
lems are easy to address.
The design flaw in the guard
rail, they said, was pointed out
during construction, but not cor-
rected.
The impact plate on the end of
the guiderail means those
pulling out of Front Street must
pull further on to Greenwood Av-
enue, often, residents say, with
cars coming off the bridge at an
estimated 45 miles per hour.
A sign on the south end of the
bridge warns motorists that the
arc obstructs traffic view and
shows a speed limit of 25 mph.
A speed bump on the Rail-
road Avenue side of the bridge is
deemed essential, the letter
reads. The design of the bump
should be such that drivers must
slow down to 15 mph, the limit
that should be set for this bridge.
There is an issue of making
a left-hand turn there, said
Front Street resident Debbie
Toth at the borough council
meeting Dec. 6. That guiderail
makes a huge difference in the
ability to see oncoming traffic.
The state DOT doesnt want
the bridge, they want to give it to
the county, said borough engi-
neer Dennis ONeal said. But
the county wont accept it until
they are comfortable with every-
thing thats there.
ONeal said he would address
the residents concerns with the
county engineers.
Why choose P. Cooper Roofing and Siding?
30 Years Experience Family Owned and Operated High Quality Products Senior Citizen Discount
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Virtual Home
Remodeler
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 12/28/11.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
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Offer expires 12/28/11.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
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Offer expires 12/28/11.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
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Offer expires 12/28/11.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
DECEMBER 14-20, 2011 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
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Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
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NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
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Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
OLD SCHOOL
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Let us do your homework.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-200-4043
24 hour
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Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
SNOW REMOVAL
Home Improvement
Roofing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
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Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/4/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
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Uk VCLVC S60 SIGN & DkIVL
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2012 VCLVC S601S
Lease for
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72 Month
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$
489
**
Adaptive Cruise Control
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Blind Spot Information System
Rear Park Assist Camera
Safer interior materials
Fuel-saving design
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Cleaner exhaust
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*Stock #12253. All prices with tax, tags, registration, acquisition and documentation fees additional. 36 month, 10,000 mile lease. Expires 12/31/11. **MSRP
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