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Direct Instruction Lesson Plan Model Lesson Title: Diversity and the other side of the story Unit:

Exploring Diversity through Wicked Lesson Author: Brittany Gonzalez Grade Level: Grade 12 Subject Area: English Time allotted for the Lesson: 1 class. [time will vary] Curriculum Standards met in this lesson: NYS Standards Analyze and synthesize information from different sources by making connections and showing relationships to other texts, ideas, subjects, and the world at large. Compare a film, video, or stage version of a literary work with the written version. Engage in a variety of prewriting experiences, such as using a variety of visual representations, to express interpretation, feelings and new insights. Use resources such as personal experiences, knowledge from other content areas, and independent reading to create literary, interpretive, and responsive text. ISTE Engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources

Instructional Objectives: Students will: Analyze and connect to a chart from an assigned reading Apply a critical lenses to a film clip Engage in discussion via responses to questions Make predictions and connections between the novel and the unit theme Materials, Resources and Technology: Novel, Journals, Wizard of Oz clip, The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by A. Wolf book. Anticipatory Set: In Journals, consider the chart from Kirk and Okazawa-Reys article. How do you fit into some of these categories? What are your feelings behind this? Have class share.

Teacher Modeling: Present the childrens story The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by A. Wolf as an example of considering the other side of the story. Recapitulation or Checking for Understanding: What are some examples of stories whose other side might change what know or how you feel about the story or characters within it? Was there ever a time when you did not get the opportunity to tell your side of the story and got in trouble or was viewed unfavourably? Application: Show clip of Wizard of Oz. Engage students in discussion with questions: Who has seen the Wizard of Oz? (have a student briefly outline the movies plot) Who was being targeted in this clip? How did the Wicked Witch take advantage of the characters disabilities? Have you (student) ever felt as if you were or know someone whose been taken advantage because of their race, socio-economic status, ability or religion? How would you describe the Wicked Witch of the West? Mean Angry Evil How do people become this way? Lesson Closure: Introduce Wicked, the story of how the Wicked Witch of the West became wicked. Journal Entry: Predict some possibilities as to what you may discover about the Wicked Witchs story and what elements of diversity do you expect to explore while reading Wicked?

Kirk, Gwyn. Okazawa-Rey, Margo. Identities and Social Locations: Who Am I? Who Are My People?. Readings For Diversity And Social Justice. 2nd ed. New York: Routledge,2010. Print.

Brittany Gonzalez Inquiry Based Model Lesson Plan


Standards Addressed:
(list National, State and Technology if applicable)

NCTE Read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in patterns NYS Standards Use resources such as personal experience, knowledge from other content areas, and independent reading to create literary, interpretive, and responsive text Analyze and synthesize information from different sources by making connections and showing relationships to other texts, ideas, subjects, and the world at large. Use a variety of visual representations, to express interpretation, feelings and new insights. Compare a film, video, or stage version of a literary work with the written version. Evaluate the impact of the medium on the message Present reasons, examples and details form sources to defend opinions or judgments Speak informally with familiar people, in a group setting ISTE Engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources

Lesson Title: Time Frame: Objectives:

Archetypes and Heroes 1 2 classes Students will: Use prior knowledge to describe a hero Engage in group work Display comprehension of reading by displaying images related to the text and present the main points of their assigned section to their peers Compare and contrast what a hero and anti-hero are Apply frameworks of heroes or anti-heroes to Wickeds antagonist, Elphaba Search for evidence supporting their assigned framework Analyze film clips and song lyrics that support

Elphabas heroism Connect the theme of Diversity to Elphabas presumed heroism Key Vocabulary: Archetype Archetypal Approach Archetypal Characters Hero Anti-hero Archetypal images Archetypal situations Tragic Flaw

Materials:

Novel, Journals, Archetypal Approach handouts, Chart Paper, magazines, markers, tape, hero/ anti-hero prompt cards, video clips and lyric handouts

Engage: The activities in this section capture the students attention, stimulate their thinking and help them access prior knowledge. Explore: Students are given time to think, plan, investigate, and organize collected information. Explain: Students are now involved in an analysis of their exploration. Their understanding is clarified and modified because of a reflective activity.

Journal Prompt: Who were your favorite superheroes growing up? What makes them heroes?

Separate students in four groups. Students read Archetypal Approach handout. Each group is assigned a section (Archetypal Approach, Character, Images, or Situations) to present on. Students should clip images from magazines or draw representation of their section and paste them along with main point of their section onto chart paper. Each group will briefly present/teach their section to the class and share their finding, marking their understanding of archetypes. How do archetypes defy the frameworks of diversity?

Elaborate/Extend: Students are given the opportunity to expand and solidify their understanding of the concept and apply it to a real world situation.

Focus on archetypal character Hero. What are some examples? Anti-hero Now that we know that an archetypal hero is, what can we infer an anti-hero is? Each group will receive one of the following prompt cards

Students will come up with arguments for their card and will be given an opportunity to briefly pose their arguments and findings to the class. Elphaba as Hero: Show clips of Wicked Broadway show: The Wizard and I and/or Defying Gravity and No Good Deed Goes Unpunished. Lyric handouts. What is Elphabas tragic Flaw? How are these songs reflective of Elphabas Quest and her Fall? How have the different elements of Diversity that are prominent in Elphabas life thus far added to her being viewed as an archetypal hero?

DAILY LESSON PLAN - COLLABORATIVE LEARNING MODEL Teacher: Brittany Gonzalez Unit: Exploring Diversity through Wicked Standards: NYS Standards Analyze and synthesize information from different sources by making connections and showing relationships to other texts, ideas, subjects, and the world at large. Prepare and give presentation as a group Present reasons, examples and details form sources to defend opinions or judgments Speak informally with familiar people, in a group setting NCTE Use Spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (exchange of information) Lesson Title and #: Diversity Introduction Objectives: Students will: Observe images and engage in reflective writing Analyze an article Synthesize the main points of the article Work as a group to prepare a short presentation to teach their article/topic to the class Delivery Strategies (mark with X; lesson specifics on next page): Lecture Role Play Socratic Lesson X Reading Analysis Power Point Audio-Video Analysis Group Discussion Writing Activity X Group Activity Debate Jigsaw Teacher-generated questions Worksheet Game Assessment and/or Evaluation Strategies (mark with X): Observation Learning Log/Journal Presentation/Performance Anecdotal Notes x Work Samples Interview/Conference Checklist Oral Questioning Score Card Self assessment Peer assessment Assessment Rubric AV Presentation Written Submission X Oral Report Evaluation Rubric Test/Quiz

Resources/Materials: Images power point, Journals, Diversity Articles, Chart paper, Markers Motivator: Images will be put on loop for students to view and consider. Students will be asked to take 3-5 minutes to respond to the images in anyway in their journals. Students will be given the opportunity to share their responses. Images:

(Caption: Dont Laugh (Special Olympics) theres a black guy around)

(Rich)

(Poor)

(Recipe For Disaster: Religion, Politics)

Student Application: Students will break up into four groups. Each group will receive an article on one of the four faces of diversity we will cover during the unit: Race, Ability, Socio-economic Status, and Religion. As a group, students will read their article and create a mini presentation on their article and how it pertains to diversity. Students will then present their topic/article to the class. Lesson Closure and Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their understanding of their topic, their teamwork, their offering of information for the class and their overall presentation (clear, loud voices, organized and structured). Students who are not presenting should be taking notes and remain respectful to their classmates.