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Lauren Paz ELD 308 Title: Interactive Read-Aloud Grade: 5 Standard: Comprehension Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions

(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher- led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. C. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. Time: 15 minutes Objective: Students will listen as the teacher reads aloud stopping to make predictions and wonderings. Materials: Rosas Bus The Ride to Civil Rights by Jo S. Kittinger Lesson Sequence: Before Reading Good morning/afternoon boys and girls. Today we will be reading a book called Rosas Bus by Jo S. Kittinger. By looking at the cover and hearing the name of the title can anyone tell me what they think the book might be about? Wow! Those are some great predictions. Lets begin reading and see if we can confirm the predictions we just made or if we need to make new predictions. Remember predictions are never wrong because they are only stating what we think will happen. During Reading Stop after a few pages and ask students if we confirmed any of the predictions we made. Should we make new predictions? What do they think will happen next? Stop after page 11, What do you think will happen to Rosa Parks? Is she going to get up from her seat or sit still? Those are some great predictions. As I read the next page put your hand up if your prediction has been confirmed. Stop after page 17, Do you think the bus boycott will cause the government to change the law? Those are some great predictions. As I read the next page put your hand up if your prediction has been confirmed. After Reading Ask students what they thought about the book? Were our predictions confirmed? What was your favorite part of the book?

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Title: Reading Mini-Lesson Grade: 5 Standard: Reading Literature: Craft and Structure 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. Key Ideas and Details 1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Time: 15 minutes Objective: Students will draw on their prior knowledge and use the information from the text to make inferences. Materials: Independent reading book Sticky Notes Pencil Rosas Bus by Jo S. Kittinger Lesson Sequence: Lesson Intro Boys and girls, do you remember the book we read yesterday? Yes, Rosas Bus by Jo S. Kittinger. Today were going to take another look at the book and see if we can make any inferences on how Rosa may have been feeling during the civil rights movement. Inferences are a combination of what the text tells us and what we bring to the text through our prior experiences and background knowledge. When we make an inference, we come up with a new idea. Sometimes we have to make inferences because the author doesnt say everything we need in order to understand the text so we have to figure it out ourselves! We do this when we want to understand important ideas. State objective and purpose Today Im going to show you how to make inferences using information from the text (Rosas Bus) and background knowledge. Then you will have a chance to make inferences using your own text. Teach and Model I will begin by reading an excerpt from Rosas Busy. White people climbed aboard bus #2857, pid a dime, and took a seat in the front of the bus. Black people climbed aboard the bus, paid a dime, but often had to walk back down the steps and go to the rear door- even if it was raining, even if their legs were broken, even if they were cold and the steps were hard to climb. Thats just the way things were. To help make an inference there are three things im going to look for I think about what the author says about the topic. I think about what I already know about the topic. Then I tie them together to figure out what I need to know.

The author is describing how the colored folks had to get back off of the bus after they paid to walk
around to the rear of the bus each time they got on the bus. I know that if I had to do something like that I would feel angry because after a long day of being on my feet I just want to be able to get on the bus and sit down; rather than get off the bus only to get back on. Using this information I can infer that the colored folks felt angry or upset because of this. Once I have made an inference Im going to take a sticky note and write down the clues I used to make my inference and then stick it to the page of my book. Guided Practice On a piece of chart paper/overhead I will have another excerpt from the book displayed. I will read over the text with the students and ask them if they are able to make any inferences. When the white seats filled, an entire row of black people had to stand up so one white person could sit down. Black people werent allowed to share a row with white people. Thats just the way things were. If black people didnt stand up, the bus driver could have them arrested, and theyd have to pay a fine. Those were the rules, called Jim Crow laws. Thats just the way things were. I will ask the students what clues they used in the text to help them make their inferences as well as what background knowledge they used as well. Great job everyone! Remember to write down the clues you used on a sticky note and place it in the book. Independent Practice As you begin your independent reading today I want you to use the steps we learned to make inferences in your reading. Once youve made an inference write down the clues on a sticky and place it on the page. During this time I will walk around the room and conference with students about their findings. Closure Who can tell me what an inference is? Great job! Why do we make inferences? Awesome! Who remembers the steps we took to make our inferences? Very good How will you know the lesson has been successful? Students have the knowledge and ability to make inferences when the author doesnt clearly explain something in the text.

Title: Writing Mini-Lesson Grade: 5 Standard: Text types and purposes 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. Time: 15 minutes Objective: Students will learn to write a letter to Rosa Parks about what they would have done if they had been in her shoes during the civil rights movement. Materials: Pencil Writers notebook Rosas Bus by Jo S. Kittinger

Lesson Sequence: Lesson Intro Good morning boys and girls! Do you remember the book we read the other day? Thats right; Rosas Bus. Does anyone remember what brave thing Rosa did when she was on the bus? Great job! Rosa refused to give up her seat for a white person after a long day of work. Today we are going to write our own letters to Rosa Parks. State objective and purpose Today Im going to show you how to write a letter to a friend. We will be discussing the format of a letter and how to put it together. Each student will then write their own letter to Rosa Parks Teach and Model I will begin by going over letter format Date Salutation (Greeting Dear ____) Body Closing Signature P.S. (post script)

On the board I will have a large piece of paper that maps out where the different elements of the letter will be placed

Guided Practice Now that I know the format of a letter its time to start thinking about what I want to write. Im going to start by writing todays date in the top right hand corner (October 25, 2011). Dear Rosa, (Dont forget the comma!) Now for the body portion of the paragraph. Today we are writing to Rosa explaining what we would have done in her situation. When I think back to how Rosa stood up for herself when she was asked to give up her seat I wonder what I would have done in her situation. Im not sure if I would have done the same thing because I would have been scared I would be sent to jail. In my letter to Rosa Im going to tell her that although I admire her courage I dont think I would have been able to do the same brave thing she did. Does anyone else feel differently? Why do you feel that way? Great! Lets put that in the letter. Closing (Sincerely,) Signature (Miss Pazs fifth grade class) P.S. Is there anything else youd like to add to the letter? Well done class, now I want you to take out your writers notebook and begin writing your very own letter to Rosa Parks. I will leave the letter we wrote together on the board so you can refer back to it to check for formatting and ideas. Independent Practice/Assessment Students will write their own letter to Rosa Parks During this time I will walk around the room observing students I will stop and conference will students to check their letter formatting and to discuss what they are writing in their letter Dont forget to put a comma after Rosa in the salutation part of your letter and after your name (signature)! Closure Who can tell me the correct format for a letter? Great job! What does P.S. mean? Very good!

How will you know this lesson was successful? Students will be able to write a letter using the correct format and punctuation.