Gifts of Almighty God (YHWH

)

The Rare Fruit Trees:

Almighty God (YHWH) has provided many fruit trees for our enjoyment and food. This digital book will contain a short description on a number of these that are quite rare in most cases and little known in a series of short articles on each : The First is the Bignay: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the BIGNAY, Antisdesma Bunius: In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) This 0 in of a from rden n of is both a very interesting and a very rare fruit with probably less than 20 the entire United States. It produces a small berry with a flavor and size small blueberry. Its growth habits vary very widely and it can be anything a small bush to a towering tree of over 40 feet. In the Mounts Botanical Ga in West Palm Beach, just off of Military Trail, there is a towering specime over 40 feet that all should go look at.

The Bignay is native to southeastern Asia, Malaya and western Australia. There i s a tremendous variety with respect quality of fruit. Some being of such poor fl avor as to be hardly fit for human consumption and others with excellent fruit t hat almost everyone would highly enjoy. The tree previously mentioned as growing in the the Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach produces some excellent f ruit. [Note: the the Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach is open to the p ublic, free of charge 6 days a week between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Eastern Stan dard Time, and I would recommend a visit there when ever you happen to be in sou th Florida]. Interestingly the fruit sets best on female trees that have not been pollinated; however, seeds from such fruit will not germinate. Propagation in the USA is do ne with air layers, cuttings, or graftings; I know of NO male trees in the USA. The fruit, although rather small, makes a good drink, excellent jellies and jams and is very rich in vitamin C. The fruit is subacid and quite flavorful and is green when not ripe and jet black when ripe, and borne is large clusters. Most B ignays are quite prolific and produce in south Florida at least two crops per ye ar. The tree, especially in bush form, is very attractive and pleasing to look a t. I even know of one person growing one in a heated sunroom in St. Paul, Minnesota , but I would NOT recommend it as a house plant for the north. Second, the Canistel: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the Canistel, Pouteria Campechiana: In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y

ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) The Canistel, Pouteria Campechiana, is a fruit native to Central America, Cuba, and south Florida. The fruit can be eaten at various stages, but is most favorab le when fully ripe tasting somewhat like an excellent mango at this stage. At ea rlier stages it is rather dry of texture and not to the likening of many individ uals. It is often called the egg fruit tree due to the shape of its fruit being that of a giant egg. The height and bushiness of the tree is highly variable. I have seen both bush a nd tree forms including trees over 20 feet. Also, the fruit and leaves are highl y variable, but there is as yet no recognized name variety, but the Hispanic com munity of south Florida is attempting to selectively breed this tree. I myself a m a part of this experiment, but I have not been having much success. When some one gets a good/better specimen as a result of a 'sport' of nature, a scion is taken from it and usually side-grafted onto a tree with less desirable fruit. Only about 1 graft in 5 actually takes so one usually side-grafts a numbe r of scions on the tree if size permits. The Rare Fruit Council International is very active in this area, and of course I am a member. This tree would NOT make a good indoor house plant for the north. Third, The Black Saporte: Here is a Commentary on the Black Saporte, Diospyros Digyna, of the family Ebena ceae: Genesis 1:29-30 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of t he earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (American Standard Version) The Black Saporte, Diospyros Digyna, is a handsome evergreen fruit tree, that pr oduces a greenish-brown thin skined fruit that can be eaten fresh, but in my opi nion is much better when used in baked goods. I know one German lady that makes the most tasteful Black Saporte brownies that taste even better than chocolate o nes. I, myself, am a great cook, but unfortunately not the best baker. The tree can grow to about 25 feet high with a width of 25 feet. Its leaves are very glossy dark green and appear as if someone polished them, leathery, alterna te, with wavy margins. Originally the tree was a native to Mexico, but has sprea d throughout the warm areas of the tropics. Its flowers are quite small and whit e, and in Florida and the Caribbean it flowers in May and June. Unfortunately, i t takes about nine months for the fruit to mature. I believe the ones on my tree will be ready in March. The tree does not like cold and freezes at about 29 degrees F. Also the tree lik es moist, well-drained soil having a pH of between 5.5 to 7.0. It likes full sun or light shade, and makes a wonderful addition to the looks of any tropical gar den. This tree can not take drought conditions. With respect propagation, seeds germinate in about 30 days, and seedling trees w ill fruit in about 5 years. The tree also does NOT have any serious pest problem s. There is only one known variety, the Bell. The tree is sometimes called the C hocolate Pudding Fruit as the inside edible part of the fruit resembles chocolat

e pudding both with respect looks and taste when fully ripe, but has jet black s eeds which chocolate pudding does not have. These seeds are very hard and one mu st be sure never to accidentally eat one. O'h the fruit is about the size of an orange. Thus as can readily be seen, our heavenly Father (YHWH) has provided wonderful t hings of creation for our physical needs and made them also beautiful to behold. Special note, Let's get a good discussion on the wonderful things of Creation Go d (YHWH) has provided for us. I have on this thread provided an excellent start. Let's get into growing wonders and not cults and negativity. I am a positive ou tgoing person and like everyone to be the same. Fourth, The Carambola: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the CARAMBOLA, Averrhoa Carambola: In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) This is an interesting fruit as its fruit is star shapped. Some Carambolas are q uite sweet and almost like candy to the taste and others are quite sour. The one s you are likely to find in the store are rather tart as the real sweet type I s o much enjoy do NOT ship well. The leaves of this tree are compound and sensitive to both light and to touch; t hey will fold-up when they are touched or shaded. The fruit is golden yellow whe n ripe, translucent, ribbed and star-shaped in cross-section. There are many named varieties, over 40, of both sweet and sour types. The only three varieties , that in my opinion are truly sweet are the Cary, the Orkin, an d the Sherimberka (probably spelt wrong). I am growing the Cary and the Sherimbe rka, but the Cary has done the best for me. It is very prolific with respect fru it production and its fruit are just wonderful in flavor. It can either be eaten fresh, made into pulp and frozen, made into jellies and j ams, and into juices. The juice is a drink very rich in vitamin C and of excelle nt flavor if made from sweet carambolas or if the sour one's juice is mixed with either orange juice or pineapple juice. Also, a candy is made from this fruit. This fruit is one of my favorites. Fifth, The Guava: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the GUAVA, Psidium Guajava: In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) One of my favorite fruits that God (YHWH) has so lovingly provided for the enjoy ment of mankind is the tropical GUAVA, (Psidium Guajava). It produces a very swe et fruit of fine flavor and full of vitamin C. In many Spanish speaking countrie

s they make a delightful paste out of it somewhat of the consistency of butter t hat can be put on sandwiches, crackers, etc. to impart a wonderful flavor. The common guave, Psidium Guajava, is a native to the American tropics, and has become widely distributed throughout all the warm areas of the world. In fact, i ts seedlings now grow wild in many areas of the tropics including south Florida and Hawaii. The common guave is often called lemon guava, pear guava, apple guav a, etc. There are a great number of varieties all with different flavors some of which are more agreeable to the taste than others. Some of the varieties have r ound fruit, and others have oblong, pear shaped, and other shapes of fruit. Their flesh which you eat varies in shade from white to red, but in my opinion t he red colored flesh taste the best and is the sweetest. Many food products are made from the common guava besides the paste previously m entioned. Some of these products are nectars, juices, pies, cakes, soda pop, pas tries, etc. All are quite tasteful and enjoyable. There are several important named varieties such as the Strawberry Guava, P. Cat teianum, or Cattley Guava which is one of my favorites. Of this species there ar e many varieties ranging in size from berry size to the size of an orange. Some Guavas are more cold hardy than others, but the berry size variety of the S trawberry Guava makes a very nice house plant in the north in a 5 to 10 gallon p ot. Of course during the cold whether it must be kept in a warm area of the hous e. It will grown well in most well-drained loams, much, or sandy soils which are supplied with enough moisture. They require more water for their growth than do citrus trees. They are quite tolerant of acidity and alkalinity, doing well in all the circumneutral soils and even tolerating a pH down to 4.5 or up to 8.2. A t either of these extremes they need more nitrogen than usual. Some of the recognized commercial cultivators in south Florida are: Red Indian, Ruby, Supreme, Miami Red, and Miami White. Much of the work on producing other d esirable clones is being conducted by members of the Cuban community in Miami, a nd in Dade County. Sixth, The Jabuticaba: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the Jabuticaba, Myrciaria cauliflora.: In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) The Jabuticaba (also called Brazilian Grape Tree, Jaboticaba, Jabotica, Guaperu, Guapuru, Hivapuru, Sabará and Ybapuru) is a fruit-bearing tree native to Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, and Bolivia. The fruit is purplish black, with a white pulp ; it can be eaten raw or be used to make jellies and drinks (plain juice or wine ). The fruit tree (named jabuticabeira in Portuguese) has salmon-colored leaves whe n they are young, turning green posteriorly. It is a very slow growing tree whic h prefers moist, lightly acidic soils for best growth. It is widely adaptable, h owever, and grows satisfactorily even on alkaline beach-sand type soils, so long as they are tended and irrigated. Its flowers are white and grow directly from its trunk in a cauliflorous habit. Naturally the tree may flower and fruit only once or twice a year, but when continuously irrigated it flowers frequently, and

fresh fruit can be available year round in tropical regions. The jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O.Berg. [Myrtaceae]) is a small tre e native to Minas Gerais in southeastern Brazil grown for the purple, grape-like fruits it produces. Traditionally, an astringent decoction of the sun-dried ski ns has been used as a treatment for hemoptysis, asthma, diarrhea, and gargled fo r chronic inflammation of the tonsils. The fruit is 3-4 cm in diameter with one to four large seeds, borne directly on the main trunks and branches of the plant , lending a distinctive appearance to the fruiting tree. It has a thick, purple, astringent skin that covers a sweet, white, or rosy pink gelatinous flesh. Comm on in Brazilian markets, jaboticabas are largely eaten fresh; their popularity h as been likened to that of grapes in the US. Fresh fruit may begin to ferment 3 to 4 days after harvest, so they are often used to make jams, tarts, strong wine s, and liqueurs. Several potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory anti-cancer compounds have been isolated from the fruit. [source of some of information - Wikipedia, the free e ncyclopedia] Seventh, The Fig Tree: Commentary on The Fig Tree, One of the Wonders of Creation: Micah 4:4 But they shall sit every man under his vine and under his fig tree; an d none shall make them afraid: for the mouth of Jehovah of hosts hath spoken it. (American Standard Version; ASV) The fig tree is one of the marvels of creation by Almighty God (YHWH). Many evol utionist claim life came about by chance reaction of elements to form low levels of life, but forget that the food for any life form must also be present for li fe to be sustained. Therefore, the fact that food sources, plants, were availabl e at the right time, when an animal or reptile life form came into existence pro ves a higher power or intelligence was behind the appearance of life on the plan et earth. Also, the right atmosphere must be present or the life form can not co ntinue to exist; many other things must be present for a life form to succeed wh ich the evolutionist conveniently forgot about or failed to take into account; t herefore, the only answer is God (YHWH) as stated at Genesis 1:20, "And God said , Let the waters swarm with swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven." (ASV). The fig tree played a major part in life at the time of Jesus (Yeshua) and he us ed it in several powerful illustrations such as at Matthew 21:19-21, "And seeing a fig tree by the way side, he came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leave s only; and he saith unto it, Let there be no fruit from thee henceforward for e ver. And immediately the fig tree withered away. 20 And when the disciples saw i t, they marveled, saying, How did the fig tree immediately wither away? 21 And J esus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, If ye have faith, and d oubt not, ye shall not only do what is done to the fig tree, but even if ye shal l say unto this mountain, Be thou taken up and cast into the sea, it shall be do ne." (ASV) The cursing of the fig tree, in Matthew 21:19, is explained by the fact that the fruit of this tree appears before the leaves, and a tree so full of leaves indi cated that ripe figs should be there even though it was not yet the regular seas on. The meaning is then, that when one has the outward show of a good character, without its fruits, he is but a hypocrite, and of no value to the kingdom of Go d. The fig tree and its fruit are well known; they were very common in Palastine, a nd there is mention often made of then in scripture. Our first parents clothed t hemselves with fig leaves, Genesis 3:7, "And the eyes of them both were opened,

and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig-leaves together, and made themselves aprons." (ASV). The prophet Isaiah gave orders to apply a clump of f igs to Hezekiah's boil: at 2 Kings 20:7, "And Isaiah said, Take a cake of figs, And they took and laid it on the boil, and he recovered." (ASV). Scientifically the fig is ficus carica. It is a somewhat strange fruit since it is actually a collection of many fruits which grow, not in a flat umbel or from a cluster of stems as many fruits do, but inside of a fleshly receptacle. The ou ter wall of the fig is actually a stem with a specialized shape. It forms a cavi ty, in some cases almost closed, in which sprout a number of tiny flowers, some male and some female. In the Smyrna fig, this cavity is almost closed at the bot tom end-the end which, in apples or pears, would correspond to the blossom end. And since Smyrnas bear only female flowers, it would seem that they would be doo med to falling, infertile, from the tree each year, for lack of pollination. Whi ch is exactly what does happen without the aid of a specialized wasp, the fig wa sp, or Blastophaga psenes, which has been busy fertilizing this type of fig for many centuries in the Old world. It was not unto this was understood and the was p was imported to this country, that Smyrna figs were successfully grown here. However the climate which favors the culture of fig trees is not always cogenial to the fig wasp. In this country the trees may be grown where the temperature d oes not go below 20 degrees for extended periods. While in its completely dorman t state, the tree will sometimes even survive temperatures as low as 10 to 15 de grees, though after the buds start to swell, they will be damaged at 28 to 30 de grees. The wasps, unfortunately cannot stand this cold. However, the common fig, in contrast to the Smyrnas fig, produces its fruit asex ually and any pollination or seed development which follows is not necessary to the production of fruit. Trees of the San Pedro group produce two crops, the fir st asexually and the second which must be fertilized by pollen from the caprifig . These two types of trees are recommended for home gardeners, even those who li ve in mild climates where the wasps can grow. Fig trees are rapid growing like many tropical plants. Under favorable condition s, cuttings of certain varieties may be raised to tree size and bear a crop in t he first year. I believe the easiest to grow for the home gardener are the Brown Turkey, Celeste, and the Green Ischia. When I lived in Charleston, South Caroli na, I had two wonderful Celeste fig trees. One grew 20 ft. high and covered one side of a not so beautiful shead. Besides producing a bountiful crop, fig trees, especially the Brown Turkey and t he Celeste make very beautiful additions to the landscape with their large green leaves giving a tropical garden effect; however they will not grow much further north than Durham, North Carolina. If you decide to grow figs, please do NOT gi ve them too much fertilizer, because if you do you will get plenty of leaves, bu t very little fruit. Also, do NOT grow on soil where cotton has ever been grown as a disease that cotton puts into the ground, cotton root rot, will kill the pl ant in time. Also supply sufficient water in hot dry weather, but not too much. In reality the tree does not require a lot of attention and few insects bother i t extensively. Once more, with the need of the Smyrnas fig for its relationship with the fig wa sp shows the marvels of creation and that evolutionist are in error. If you decide to grow figs or any of the other fruits I write about, please post your results and suggestions for all to see. Eighth, The Kukui Nut: Genesis 1:29-30 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed,

which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of t he earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (American Standard Version) The Kukui Nut or Candlenut Tree, Aleurites Moluccana, it the state tree of Hawai i, and was first brought there by Polynesian voyagers. It is a member of the Spu rge family and is the official symbol of the Aha Kupuna, the Council of Elders o f the Nation of Hawaii. In Hawaii it grows wild in the lower mountain forest are as and is used in gardens as a shade tree, although it is a bit messy due to dro pping of its leaves and edible nuts. The Kukui nut has many uses. Originally it was most valued for its light, the oi l of the white kernels being extracted for its use in stone lamps and in ti leaf sheath torches. The shelled nuts were skewered on a coconut fond mid-rib and li t one by one, from the top to bottom, as they set in a container of sand or dirt , or in the earth itself. Childern were often given the responsibility for keepi ng the "candles" lit. The tree is sometimes called the Candlenut Tree. The nuts are widely used as a traditional lei, both the hard shells of the polished black , tan or brown, and immature white, which are more rare. The white flowers and d owny, angularly pointed leaves are also strung as lei, representing Moloka`i, wh ose symbolic color is silvery green. The bark, flowers and nuts are all used for medicine. As food, a small amount of the pounded roasted nuts, plus salt and so metimes chili peppers, is used as a relish and is called `inamona. The small, five-petaled white flowers were chewed by the parents of a young chil d and given to the child to aid in healing of e`a (thrush) sores inside the mout h and upon the tongue. Also used for this problem was the juicy sap that fills u p the depression left when the stem is pulled off the green fruit. This is appli ed with the finger and rubbed inside of the child's mouth and on the tongue. The green fruit is the part of the plant that contains the nut. This sap is also a healing application for chapped lips, cold sores and mild sunburn. One mashed nut (sometimes the raw kernel, sometimes the roasted) or the sap of t he green nut was often used in combination with other traditional Hawai`i medici nal plants, particularly when a purgative for constipation was needed. The poten cy of this plant is so strong that these internal remedies are administered very carefully by those with experience in these matters. The late Uncle Harry Mitch ell of Keanae recommended the use of kukui nut for high blood pressure. He sugge sted one teaspoon a day of the ground roasted kernel. Sometimes this is mixed wi th pressed garlic juice. For bad cases of ulcers and other skin sores, the baked meat of ripe kukui nuts was pounded and mixed with other plants, such as ripe noni fruit. In the treatme nt of rheumatic joints or deep bruises and wounds, kukui and noni leaves were wr apped around the afflicted places and heat applied by hot packs of salt, sand or rocks wrapped in tapa cloth. The inner bark provided a red-brown dye for tapa cloth and `olona cordage, while the gum from the bark strengthened the tapa. The soot (pau) of burned nuts prov ided a black dye for tattooing and for painting designs on canoes and on tapa cl oth. The soft light-colored wood of the tree trunk was fashioned into canoes. Th e oil provided a varnish similar to linseed oil. Roasted kernels, pulverized by fishermen while on the reef or in canoes, were st rewn upon the ocean surface where there were small ripples and waves. The film i ncreased underwater visibility by creating a lens on the water's surface. Fishin g nets were preserved by a coating of kukui oil.

The kukui tree is a classic example of the wisdom of ancient voyaging Polynesian s. The plants that they chose to bring on their canoes had to serve many useful purposes. The kukui is such a plant. Isn't it wonderful that God (YHWH) created these wonderful nut producing trees f or mankind. Tenth, The Lychee: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the Lychee, Litchi chinensis. In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) The lychee is native to southern China and southeastern Asia. The tree originate d over 2000 years ago in the tropical forests of southern China, where it is a d ominant tree species. There are still villages in southern China today with ly chee trees that are over 1000 years old! In 1903 Reverend W.M. Brewster importe d Royal Chen Purple lychee trees to south and central Florida from China. This lychee variety was renamed Brewster. There remains part of an original 'Brewster ' grove in Davie, Florida. The flowers are small, greenish, and are borne on a l arge thyrse (a many-flowered inflorescence) which emerges at the ends of branche s anytime from late December to February and March in Florida. The fruit is a d rupe borne in loose clusters numbering from 3 to 50 fruits. The skin (pericarp) ranges from yellow to pinkish or red and is leathery, with small, short, conical or rounded protuberances. The edible portion of the fruit (pulp) is called an a ril; is succulent, whitish, translucent, with excellent subacid flavor. The fr uits contain one shiny, dark brown seed, usually relatively large, but it may be small and shriveled (called chicken tongues) in some varieties. Lychee trees typically b egin to flower in the early winter months and continue to bloom throughout the months of January, February and March. Lychee flowers appear as 12 to 30 inch cl usters containing both male and female flowers on the terminal ends of hardened off new growth. If there has been sufficient chilling and dryness during the win ter there will generally be a larger portion of bloom instead of simply new grow th. Male flowers are the first to emerge and open. The fruit forms from the female f lower that opens later than the male. When the flower is pollinated the ovary be gins to swell. This is what becomes the actual lychee fruit. As the small lyche e fruit develop many of the fruits will drop off of the tree from wind and some simply from natural attrition. A variety of insect pests can damage the stem on the new ly developing fruit leading to drop off. With the advent of the summer rainy sea son (around mid-May in Florida) the fruits will begin to swell with juice and pr oduce lots of sugars. Unlike many other tropical fruits, much of the size of a l ychee is determined in the very last stage of development, just prior to its pea k ripeness. An excellent indicator of ripeness in lychees is the flattening of the bumps on the surface of the skin, caused by the fruit swelling with juice an d fructose. The dark red color (almost purplish) is a good indicator of maturity along with fruit size. Lychee flowers are pollinated by bees and various fly species. Isolated or singl e lychee trees will usually set acceptable amounts of fruit. However, recent res earch has demonstrated that under some conditions, cross-pollination among diffe rent cultivars may increase fruit set. Therefore, in some cases there may be an advantage to planting more than one variety.

The season of bearing is Mid-May to early July in Florida, depending upon variet y. Mauritius is the major commercial cultivar and bears more regularly than Brew ster, which is the second most commonly grown cultivar. Young trees are damaged at temperatures of 28° to 32°F, while temperatures down to 2 4° to 25°F cause extensive damage or death to large trees if exposed for several hou rs. Lychee trees are moderately drought tolerant. However, newly planted lychee trees should be irrigated regularly during establishment. In the home landscape , trees will perform well without supplemental irrigation after trees are establ ished. For more consistent cropping of mature trees, withholding irrigation afte r September until bloom to enhance the amount of flowering. This encourages dorm ancy (not a true dormancy) throughout the winter months. It is important to wate r during fruit set through harvest to enhance fruit quality and yields. In my case our lychee tree gets watered by the same sprinkler that waters the grass. Young lychee trees are sometimes difficult to establish in windy sites, and expo sure to constant winds may result in tattered leaves, stunted shoot growth, and stem dieback. If possible, trees should be planted in wind-protected sites or pr otected from wind by surrounding trees or with light shade cloth which has been attached to wire fencing. Lychee trees do not come true from seed, and seedlin g trees may take 10 or more years to bear fruit. Air layering is the most commo n method of propagation in Florida. In general, the larger the limb, the easier it is to air layer. Grafting (usually cleft or veneer) and budding onto lychee s eedlings or air layers is possible but is not as common as air layering alone. Air-layered or grafted t rees begin to bear fruit in 3 to 5 years. Unreliable bearing is the major constraint to lychee production. Cultivars vary greatly in their bearing habit. Most trees bear a good crop only about 1 year ou t of 3 or 4. In contrast, well-cared-for, mature Mauritius trees may bear every year, with good yields in alternating years. The trees grow best in well-drain ed soils. Of the soils of southern Florida, lychee trees grow best in acid sands with moderate-organic-matter content. Trees grow well in the muck soils, but us ually do not fruit well because of excessive vegetative (shoot and leaf) growth. Sandy soils with low-organic-matter content are suitable if sufficient fertilizers are suppl ied. Many areas in Florida are within 7 ft or so of the water table and experience oc casional flooding after heavy rainfall events. To improve plant survival conside r planting fruit trees on a 2 to 3 ft high by 4 to 10 ft diameter mound of nativ e soil. The three most popular varieties grown in south Florida are the Brewster, Hak Ip and Mauritius, my own lychee tree is none of these, but is a Sweet Clift). The fruits are harvested by cutting the main stem bearing the fruit clusters several inches behind the fruit clusters. Fruit may or may not be detached from the fru it clusters before storage. Lychee fruit must be ripened on the tree for best f lavor. Lychee are an excellent fresh fruit and are best consumed as soon after h arvest as possible. Fresh fruit may be stored in polyethylene bags in the refrigerator for 5 to 10 days and retain reasonable color and freshness. Fruit m ay be frozen whole (in the peel), canned (without the peel), and dried (in the p eel) for later use. In the home landscape, the lychee makes a beautiful specimen tree which provides fruit, aesthetics, and shade. Eleventh, The Malabar Chestnut: Genesis 1:29-30 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of t

he earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (American Standard Version) The Malabar Chestnut, Pachira Aquatica, is native to an area from southern Mexic o to Guyana and northern Brazil, and is related to Baobob, (Adansonia digitata), Durian (Durio zibethinus), Almirajo (Patinoa almirajo), Chupa-chupa, South Amer ican Sapote (Quararibea cordata). Tropical estuaries are the native habitat of t he Malabar chestnut, so it is perhaps best suited to Hawaii and southern Florida . Even so, the plant also grows well in the milder parts of southern California. Several handsome specimens are thriving in the Quail Gardens collection near En cinitas, Calif., which has more cold and wind than many home gardens. The plant will tolerate brief exposure to temperatures as low as 28° F, but may drop some or most of its leaves. Malabar chestnuts make attractive potted plants and add an attractive tropical note to patios and sun rooms. The Malabar chestnut is a very showy evergreen tree with greenish bark that can grow to 60 ft. in the tropics. In California the growth is more like 10 to 15 ft . tall with a spread of 8 to 10 feet. Its nuts are five-valved fruit of Malabar chestnut is an ovoid, woody green pod which may reach 4 to 12 inches in length a nd 2 to 2-1/2 inches in diameter, bearing some resemblance to kapok or silk flos s seed pods. The tightly packed seeds (nuts) inside enlarge until the pod bursts and the seed fall to the ground. The rounded seeds are without floss and 1/2 in ch or larger in diameter. They are edible raw or roasted. Besides tasty nuts, it has beautiful flowers, The petals of the very large creamy white flowers of the Malabar chestnut curl back to the base of the flower, leaving only the spectacu lar clusters of 3 to 4 inch cream-white stamens. And in appearance whether as a house plant or outdoors in warm areas is very striking and outstanding. The shin y, bright green, alternate palmately compound leaves of the Malabar chestnut gro w to about 12 inches long and are quickly shed. They are larger and showier than Chorisia speciosa, the popular floss-silk tree. Young leaves and flowers are co oked and used as a vegetable. I would highly recommend this as a house plant in the north, but it must be kept in a warm location. One note on harvesting from the Malabar Chestnut, The nuts of ut are harvested when the seed pods burst. The raw nuts taste ill keep for months in a cool, dry place. Roasted or fried in flavor of chestnuts, and can be ground into a flour for bread the Malabar chestn like peanuts and w oil they have the baking.

Isn't it wonderful that God (YHWH) created these wonderful nut producing trees f or mankind. Twelfth, The Mango: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the Mango, Mangifera Indica, which originated in India and Southeast Asia, but has spread world wide in the tropics and is the largest fruit crop in the world on the basis of tons of fruit picked. In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV). And the Mango surely is a wonderful gift to mankind from our Creator, Almighty G od (YHWH), and the are many varieties of Mangoes, even more than that of Apples. The trees are Evergreen and some varieties can reach 50 feet [15 to 16 meters ] high, but there are miniature varieties such as the Fairchild that only grow t

o about 10 feet [8 meters] high. Most varieties have a very good flavor, but t here are some that are known as the turpentine Mangoes that one can hardly eat; however, goats and pigs like them. My goat, named Billy, really loved them. However, my favorite eating varieties are the Bombay, Carrie, Hayden, Julian, an d Keith. I especially like the Bombay as it is one of the very few "freestone" mangoes and yet one of the very best tasting with almost no fiber - a true deli ght. Most Mango varieties are NOT free stone and the flesh tends to stick very hard to the big seed in the center of the fruit. Mangoes vary in size, shape, and color. They can be round, oblong, or kidney s haped. The trees are quite beautiful and make nice additions to any tropical l andscape. The leaves are long, narrow, and a beautiful deep green, and new gro wth comes out in flushes. For fruit trees, the Mango is rather fast growing with respect production of fru it with the trees usually producing fruit by the third year if the trees are gra fted trees or five years if they are not. There are two principle types of Mangoes, the Indian and the Indo-Chinese. In dian mangoes usually have brightly colored fruit, but unfortunately are suscepti ble to anthracnose; whereas the Indo-Chinese usually do not produce brightly col ored fruit, but are resistant to anthracnose. One sad note, some people are very allergic to Mangoes and should not eat them o r touch the tree. Most Mangoes bear heavily in alternate years and le to cold weather, anything below 34 degrees F. the crop production. Fortunately, Mangoes for so you do not need more than one tree to obtain planted in full sun and well drained soil having the blossoms are very susceptib can kill the blossoms and ruin the most part are self-fruitful fruit. They should always be a pH between 5.5 and 7.5.

The Mango can either be eaten fresh, made into pulp and frozen, made into jellie s and jams, into pies and Mango cobbler, and into juices. The juice is a drink v ery rich in vitamin C and of excellent flavor if made from sweet Mangos. This fruit is one of my favorites. Thirteenth, Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the MULBERRY, Morus genus: In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) The Mulberry is a most interesting fruit of tremendous variable varieties. The t wo main branches are the black mulberry and the white mulberry. Varieties that b elong to the black mulberry division of this genus, regardless of actual color, have a rather bad reputation for the stains they cause on clothing, rugs, and ot her items that are difficult and/or impossible to remove; whereas, the white mul berry division of this genus regardless of the actual color does NOT make durabl e stains. The fruit looks like blackberries growing on a tree, but with more sweetness tha n the average blackberry. The fruit varies from fair to excellent in taste and i

s excellent for eating fresh, as juice, at jams and jellies, in pies and cobbler s, etc. I like the flavor of the Pakistani giant mulberry the best, it is a memb er of the white mulberry division, very large in size and a redish black when fu lly ripe and of most excellent flavor. It is great with breakfast cerials. Some mulberry varieties can only grow in warm areas such as the Pakistani, the O scar's, the Silk Hope [all are members of the Morus alba or white mulberry divis ion]; and others are better for colder areas. The varieties best for colder area s are Illinois Everbearing Mulberry - a cross between the Morus alba and the Mor us ruba, Weeping [a Morus alba], Contorted Mulberry {Morus alba], common Black M ulberry [Morus nigra], etc. [a good source for mulberry trees is Burnt Ridge Nursery in Onalaska, Washington ] Mulberry trees and bushes with their bid leaves made a very decorative addition to the landscape and if you have some spare space you should consider one. If ne ar the house make sure it belongs to the white mulberry division - Morus alba. Mulberries are very soft and perishable so they are usually picked as they are t o be used or consumed. Trees spread rapidly after one to two have been planted, because the birds love them and drop seeds far and wide. But do not worry they a re very prolific and there will usually be plenty of fruit left for you to consu me. Fourteenth, The Pomegranate: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically the Pomegranate, Punica granatum, of the family Punicac eae: This fruit bearing tree is mentioned many times and is one of the wonderful gift s of God (YHWH) for the enjoyment and nourishment of mankind. It is small shru bby tree that is quite beautiful to look upon and has pretty flowers as well as producing fine fruit. It is mentioned at the following verses in the Bible, wi th all verse quotes taken from the Rutherford Bible. Exodus 28:34 a bell of gold, and a pomegranate, a bell of gold, and a pomegrana te,--upon the skirts of the robe, round about. Exodus 39:26 a bell and a pomegranate, a bell and a pomegranate, upon the skirt s of the robe, round about,--to minister in--As Yahweh commanded Moses. 1Samuel 14:2 Now, Saul, was tarrying in the uttermost part of Gibeah, under the pomegranate tree that is in Migron,--and, the people that were with him, were a bout six hundred men; Song of Solomon 4:3 Like a cord of crimson, are thy lips, and, thy mouth, is lo vely,--Like a slice of pomegranate, are thy temples, behind thy veil: Song of Solomon 6:7 Like a slice of pomegranate, are thy temples, from behind t hy veil: Song of Solomon 8:2 I would have guided thee--brought thee into the house of my mother, Thou wouldst have instructed me,--I would have let thee drink of spiced wine, of the pressed-out juice of my pomegranate. Joel 1:12 The vine, is abashed, and, the fig-tree, languisheth,--pomegranate, p alm also, and apple--all the trees of the field, have withered, Yea abashed is g ladness, away from the sons of men.

Haggai 2:19 Is the seed yet in the store-house? Howbeit, though at present neit her, the vine nor the fig-tree nor the pomegranate nor the olive tree, hath brou ght forth, from this very day, will I bless you.Hi Everyone: The Pomegranate, Punica granatum, is a fruit that is grown in many parts of the world and varies as to size and color. The fruit should be eaten when it is full y ripe. What you eat is the small amount of pulp around each seed. The best w ay to open and use this fruit is to score the skin just down to the seeds in abo ut six places, cutting from stem to flower. This opens the fruit and exposes al l the seeds at one time. They can be pressed for juice, used in fruit salads, o r an excellent syrup can be made when cooked with sugar and a little water. Th is syrup is sold commercially as grenadine syrup/juice and is quite tasty. Also , pomegranate fruit is very good for your health as it contains many vitamins an d bioflavonids which are excellent antioxidants. The height and bushiness of the tree is highly variable. I have seen both bush a nd tree forms including trees over 15 feet. Also, the fruit and leaves are highl y variable, but there are several named varieties south Florida some of them are Wonderful, Spanish Ruby, etc. Also, there is a rare white variety which I had one of in the past, but I have been unable to find anything on it in the literat ure, may have been a sport of nature. In growing pomegranate trees one can encounter some problems such as leaf spot d isease on the fruits and leaves. Fruit often split on the tree. So it is best to pick, but not eat, the fruit before it is fully ripe. Also, some sucker oft en and these must be removed or they will weaken the tree. It can be propagated from seeds which take approximately 45 days to germinate; h owever, superior varieties are grown from air layers or cuttings. Pomegranates can withstand winter temperatures to about 10 degrees Fahrenheit, b ut ripen their best fruit in much warmer climates. They are an ideal plant for desert areas since they can withstand considerable drought. Now the fruit grows on the current year's growth, and as the fruit grows heavier , it pulls down on the slender new branches, making the tree very decorative due to the weeping effect. Although the tree will withstand drought fairly well, t he fruit will split if a tree is allowed to dry out completely and is then water ed so for a good crop maintain the moisture level even. Fifteenth, The Rose Apple: Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided f or mankind, specifically The Rose Apple, Syzygium jambos: In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed there of, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs y ielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed ther eof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening an d there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV) The rose apple is native to the East Indies and Malaya and flourishes in tropica l and sub tropical climates only. The rose apple tree may be a shrub but is gen erally a tree reaching 25 or more feet if not pruned. The glossy, leathery, shiny leaves are about six to eight inches in length and about two inches in width. New leaves are dark win e colored and gradually turn dark green as they mature. The beautiful yellowishwhite one and a half inch flowers are produced from late winter through the spri ng. The tree may have fruit

maturing while the tree is still producing additional flowers. The flowers are p roduced in short terminal racemes on new growth. The round or oval fruits are up to two inches in diameter and are pale yellow wi th sometimes a faint, pink blush. Fruits have a thin layer of pale yellowish fle sh and a hollow central cavity containing one to three large brown seeds. The fl esh is very distinctly rose scented and is generally crisp and juicy. Propagation: Most rose apple trees are grown from seeds, which are polyembryonic (producing 1 to 3 sprouts), but the seedlings are not uniform in character nor behavior and take 3 or 4 years to start flowering. Some trees are air layered wh ich will give earlier fruiting. Select strains may also be propagated by budding . The trees grow slowly, but are adaptive for a wide range of soil types and gener ally once well established require little maintenance. The tree flourishes on sa nd and limestone with very little organic matter. The rose apple tree can be gro wn as container plant and will fruit in containers. Harvest: Rose apples are mostly eaten out-of-hand. They are seldom marketed. In the home, they are stewed with some sugar and served as dessert. The fruit is ma de into jam or jelly with lemon juice added. Rose apples bruise easily and are h ighly perishable. They must be freshly picked to be crisp. [information source retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/rose_apple.html and G ene Joyner's Articles on 10/08/2010] Sixteenth, The Banana, A Wonderful Gift From God: Genesis 1:29-30 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of t he earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (American Standard Version). One of the wonderful gifts that God (YH WH) has provided for us in the Bannana. Its scientific name is Musa acuminata Co lla, M. X paradisiaca L. (hybrid), and the origin of the edible bananas is belie ved to be in the Indo-Malaysian region reaching to northern Australia. "Bananas and plantains are today grown in every humid tropical region and consti tutes the 4th largest fruit crop of the world. The plant needs 10 - 15 months of frost-free conditions to produce a flower stalk. All but the hardiest varieties stop growing when the temperature drops below 53° F. Growth of the plant begins t o slow down at about 80° F and stop entirely when the temperature reaches 100° F. Hi gh temperatures and bright sunlight will also scorch leaves and fruit, although bananas grow best in full sun. Freezing temperatures will kill the foliage. In m ost areas bananas require wind protection for best appearance and maximum yield. They are also susceptible to being blown over. Bananas, especially dwarf variet ies, make good container specimens if given careful attention. The plant will al so need periodic repotting as the old plant dies back and new plants develop." [ source - http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/banana.html,California Rare Fruit Growers, Inc]. It is quite benefical for us as it contains three natural sugars-sucrose, fructo se and glucose combined with fiber a banana gives an instant, sustained and subs tantial boost of energy. Research has proven that just two bananas provide enoug h energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number o ne fruit with the world's leading athletes. But energy Isn't the only way a bana na can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial numb er of illnesses and conditions making it a must to add to your daily diet. One o f these is depression, and this is because bananas contain trypotophan, a kind o f protein which the body converts into serotonin a known relaxant in the brain,

and because it also contains Vitamin B6. It can also reduce the risk of high blo od pressure and stroke. Also, it packs a lot of potassium which assist in making you more alert. It assist in the controlling of constipation due to its high fi ber content.[source - Rare Fruit Council International-Palm Beach Chapter] Strokes: According to research in 'The New England Joumal of Medicine' eating ba nanas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%1[source - The New England Journal of Medicine] "Propagation of bananas is done with rhizomes called suckers or pups. Very small pups are called buttons. Large suckers are the preferred planting material. The se are removed from vigorous clumps with a spade when at least three feet tall, during warm months. Pups should not be taken until a clump has at least three to four large plants to anchor it. When the pup is taken the cut must be into the mother plant enough to obtain some roots. Plant close to the surface. Large leav es are cut off of the pup leaving only the youngest leaves or no leaves at all. Some nurseries supply banana plants as container grown suckers." [source - http: //www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/banana.html,California Rare Fruit Growers, Inc]. Thus as can readily be seen, our heavenly Father (YHWH) has provided wonderful t hings of creation for our physical needs and made them also beautiful to behold. Seventeenth, Here is a Commentary on the An often admired but still very minor fruiting membe r of the Myrtaceae, the grumichama, Eugenia brasiliensis Lam. (syn. E. dombeyi S keels), is also called grumixama, grumichameira, or grumixameira in Brazil, and sometimes Brazil cherry elsewhere. The Gruminchama a pretty, shiny leaves and a dark cherry-like fruit of excellent flavor. is one of the gifts that Almighty God (YHWH) has provided for mankind a s recorded at Genesis 1:29-30, And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb producing seed that is on the whole earth, and every tree in which is the fruit of a tree producing seed: it shall be food for you; 30 and to every animal of the earth, and to every fowl of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth on the earth, in which is a living soul, every green herb for food. And it was so.A nd God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon th e face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yieldin g seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, where in there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (Darb y Bible; DB). The highly ornamental tree is slender, erect, usually to 25 or 35 ft (7.5-10.5 m) high, short-trunked and heavily foliaged with opposite, oblongoval leaves 3 1/2 to 5 in (9-16 cm) long, 2 3/8 in (5-6 cm) wide, with recurved margin; glossy, thick, leathery, and minutely pitted on both surfaces. They pers ist for 2 years. New shoots are rosy. The flowers, borne singly in the leaf axil s, are 1 in (2.5 cm) wide; have 4 green sepals and 4 white petals, and about 100 white stamens with pale-yellow anthers. The long-stalked fruit is oblate, 1/2 t o 3/4 in (1.25-2 cm) wide; turns from green to bright-red and finally dark-purpl e to nearly black as it ripens, and bears the persistent, purple- or red-tinted sepals, to 1/2 in (1.25 cm) long, at its apex. The skin is thin, firm and exudes dark-red juice. The red or white pulp is juicy and tastes much like a true suba cid or sweet cherry except for a touch of aromatic resin. There may be 1 more or less round, or 2 to 3 hemispherical, hard, light-tan or greenish-gray seeds to 1/2 in (1.25 cm) wide and half as thick. The Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia says the following of the Gruminchama, The g rumichama (Eugenia brasiliensis, syn. Eugenia dombeyi) is medium sized tree (max imum 20 meters height) endemic to Brazil which bears small fruits that are purpl e to black in color, and have a sweet cherry-like flavor. Its wood is used in ca

rpentry, woodworking and turnery. Its small size favors its use in urban landsca ping. Its slow growth and low rate of dispersion make it rare, and it's generall y considered as an endangered species[1]. ^ Paulo Backes & Bruno Irgang, Mata Atlântica: as árvores e a paisagem, Porto Alegre , Paisagem do Sul, 2004, page 316.[source retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.or g/wiki/Grumichama on 9/14/2010] Over the years there have been mild efforts to encourage interest in the virtues of the grumichama in Florida, mainly because of the beauty and hardiness of the tree and the pleasant flavor of the fruit but the sepals are a nuisance and ther e is too little flesh in proportion to seed for the fruit to be taken seriously. Varieties Variety leucocarpus Berg. in Brazil becomes a large tree to 65 ft (20 m) high an d has fruits with white flesh. It is not as common as the red-fleshed type. Climate The grumichama is subtropical, surviving temperatures of 26º F (-3.33º C) in Brazil. It is better suited to Palm Beach than to southern Florida. In Hawaii, the tree fruits best from sea-level to an altitude of no more than 300 ft (90 m). Soil The grumichama does better on acid sand in Central Florida than it does on limes tone in the south. It is reported to prefer deep, fertile, sandy loam. Sturrock says it grows well in rich clay in Cuba but is adversely affected by the long, d ry season. Propagation Wilson Popenoe stated that propagation in Brazil is entirely by seeds which rema in viable for several weeks and germinate in about a month. Fenzi says that seed s, cuttings and air-layers are employed, and Sturrock has mentioned that graftin g is easy. Culture The grumichama is of slow growth when young unless raised in a mixture of peat m oss and sand and then given a thick layer of peat moss around the roots when set ting out, and kept heavily fertilized. In Hawaii, it has taken 7 years to reach 7 ft. Fruiting begins when the plants are 4 to 5 years old. Season The tree is regarded as remarkable for the short period from flowering to fruiti ng. In Florida, it has been in full bloom in late April and loaded with fruits 3 0 days later. The crop ripens quickly over just a few days. In Hawaii, the trees bloom and fruit from July to December, with the main crop in the fall. Trees in Brazil vary considerably in time of flowering and fruiting so that the overall season extends from November to February. Pests In Hawaii, the fruits are heavily attacked by the Mediterranean fruit fly. Food Uses Fully ripe grumichamas are pleasant to nibble out-of-hand. in Hawaii, half-ripe fruits are made into pie, jam or jelly. [source - Morton, J. 1987. Grumichama. p. 390 391. In: Fruits of warm climates. Julia F. Morton, Miami, FL] Thus as can readily be seen, our heavenly Father (YHWH) has provided wonderful t hings of creation for our physical needs and made them also beautiful to behold. Special note, Let's get a good discussion on the wonderful things of Creation Go d (YHWH) has provided for us. I have on this thread provided an excellent start. Let's get into growing wonders and not cults and negativity. I am a positive ou tgoing person and like everyone to be the same. Now to know the truth, go to: 1) 2) http://religioustruths.yuku.com/ http://www.network54.com/Forum/403209/

3)

http://religioustruths.lefora.com/

If you wish more information and/or wish to ask a question or what ever, contact me by leaving a PM (personal message) at http://religioustruths.yuku.com/ Your Friend in Christ Iris89 Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of d eath will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of h is prison cell."€€ Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible t oday!

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