You are on page 1of 52

Produced in partnership by: Manchester City Council & British Cycling December 2011

D
www.manchester.gov.uk

RA FT
“Making Manchester a World Class Cycling City”

Interim Strategy for Cycling in Manchester

Foreword
TBC (Ian Drake / Richard Leese)

D

RA FT

Table of Contents
Executive Summary ................................................................................... 4 Policy Context ........................................................................................... 6 Vision, Aims & Objectives...........................................................................15 Recreation ...............................................................................................14 Commuter / Utility Cycling .........................................................................18 Sport ......................................................................................................25 Workforce & Volunteering ..........................................................................29 Marketing and Communications ..................................................................30 Implementation & Monitoring Framework.. ...................................................33 Appendices ..............................................................................................44

D

RA FT

Executive Summary
Manchester is a city which is passionate about cycling in all its forms, with a host of national and international cycling events taking place in its world-class facilities and a large number of partners and groups dedicated to the development of cycling in the city. Our vision for cycling in Manchester is to be a World-class Cycling City with More People Cycling More Often. Manchester is the home of British Cycling – cycling’s national governing body. British Cycling has a unique partnership with the city of Manchester and they have pledged their long term commitment to the city through the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding with Manchester City Council in 2010, and the completion of the UK’s first £24M indoor BMX centre in 2011. The BMX centre is an expansion of The National Cycling Centre which is located in East Manchester. The 2012 London Olympics brings with it a fantastic opportunity to inspire Mancunians to take up cycling in all its forms, building on the unprecedented success of the Great Britain Cycling Team in the 2008 Olympics and Paralympics. It was agreed in the Memorandum of Understanding between British Cycling and Manchester City Council, that a Manchester Cycling Strategy would be produced. The intention of the strategy is to bring together in one place the three main components of cycling: recreational cycling, transport cycling and sport cycling. The strategy will also detail three themes that underpin these components – facilities and infrastructure, workforce, education and training and marketing and communications. The overall aim of this strategy is to increase all forms of cycling in Manchester for all people of all ages over through the partnership between Manchester City Council, British Cycling, The National Cycling Centre and the many cycling groups and partners in the city. The strategy has been produced between Manchester City Council and British Cycling in consultation with The National Cycling Centre and many cycling organisations and groups that operate in Manchester. It will be reviewed on a regular basis.

D

Despite the current, challenging economic climate, Manchester City Council and British Cycling have continued to invest considerably in cycling to develop opportunities for Manchester residents to cycle for transport, sport and recreation. The partnership has funded a comprehensive cycling development programme and given financial support to clubs, coaches, athletes and volunteers. Furthermore, the Council has directly invested in excess of £3 million pounds in cycling infrastructure through the Local Transport Plan capital programme and with funding from the South East Manchester Multi Modal Study fund. This has enabled the city to deliver significant number of initiatives across the city such as the development of the National Cycle Network, including commuter corridors, off road and orbital routes; more cycling facilities and parking in schools, the city centre and district centres and the development of safer routes to school for Manchester school children.
<<DIAGRAM – CYCLING DELIVERY IN MANCHESTER – TO BE INSERTED >>

RA FT

Manchester City Council and British Cycling have invested significantly in cycling over the last five years. Headline figures include: • • • • • • • Over £3.2 million on infrastructure through the LTP Highways Capital Programme £518,000 on child cycle training £56,000 promoting Bike Week £24 million building the National Indoor BMX Arena Over £12,000 in small grants to community groups £2.5 million on promoting and supporting club and sport cycling Over £250,000 on promoting cycling through initiatives such as Sky Rid

D

RA FT

Looking to the future the strategy sets out our proposed programme of works across all three areas and highlights the fact that whilst funding may be constrained, there is still significant investment going in to cycling and a number of large projects are underway which could significantly drive up participation.

Policy Context
Policy Context and Relevant Strategies
This strategy has been shaped by and aims to build on a number of key documents produced at a national, regional and local level and includes strategies relating to sport, recreation, health and transport. This section provides a brief introduction to each of them and sets out their approaches as regards cycling. Manchester’s Healthy Weight Strategy (2010 -2013)
(http://www.manchester.nhs.uk/document_uploads/Public%20health/SD03640%20%20Manchester%20Healthy%20Weight%20Strategy%20(website).pdf )

Manchester: A Certain Future. Our collective approach to climate change.
(http://www.manchesterclimate.com/ )

This plan for the City of Manchester sets headline actions for just one decade – to 2020 – but its goal is to provide a strong starting point for a much longer journey, through to 2050 and a radically changed, low-carbon future where large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide (CO²) have become a thing of the past. In terms of transport Manchester aims to have a low carbon, modern and fully integrated public transport system with improved cycle routes across the city region. Workplaces will encourage cycling and have appropriate facilities that will see many more of us walking and cycling on local journeys and to work

D

Greater Manchester Local Transport Plan (LTP3)
(http://www.tfgm.com/ltp3)

This document sets out the policies of Transport for Greater Manchester to provide safe, integrated, efficient and economic transport within Greater Manchester. The plan aims in the long term to make cycling a genuine, attractive choice for journeys to work and education, for leisure and for fitness. In the short term, however, it focuses on delivering easy low-cost measures that will encourage people to use bikes to make short journeys. It aims to develop an integrated package of infrastructure and promotion to deliver a significant increase in the number of people cycling. This will focus on shorter trips both “whole journey” and from home to public transport interchange / stop. The approach of LTP3 is to “target improvements so as to: o Increase the number of people walking or cycling to work and education, especially for short trips made in the peak hours, and to reduce the number of 6 

RA FT

This strategy is Manchester’s response to tackling the far reaching problems of obesity using the life course approach. The vision of this strategy is to create an environment and culture where all adults and children in Manchester have the opportunity to maintain a healthy weight. Specifically, targeting measures that will promote healthy behaviour and face up to the growing challenge of obesity by encouraging active lives with more active travel options (walking and cycling) for the six identified age groups.

single-occupancy vehicles travelling in Greater Manchester’s most congested areas and corridors; o Make the best use of existing networks and add value to investment in public transport networks by integrating walking and cycling with other modes of transport; o Improve safety and personal security for pedestrians and cyclists, with an initial focus on routes to key transport hubs and areas of employment; o Contribute to the improved neighbourhoods and environments within Greater Manchester by facilitating low-carbon modes of travel (i.e. walking and cycling); and o Contribute to improved public health in Greater Manchester by increasing physical activity, especially in areas with the most pronounced health inequalities.”. Manchester Local Area Implementation Plan (LAIP)
(http://www.tfgm.com/ltp3/documents.cfm)

The LAIP sets out how Manchester will support the LTP3 core strategy. It notes that as a relatively compact and densely populated conurbation with favourable topography and climate, there is significant scope to increase the number of people choosing to cycle for many shorter journeys. This would support our commitments to reducing transport-related carbon whilst helping to improve the health of our residents through more active travel and cleaner air. Furthermore, it could also help to improve the vitality of our streets and local centres. Its aims are to: • • • • • • Work with neighbouring authorities and cycle groups to deliver a network of safe and clearly signed cycle routes into and within the city centre; Identify and address where significant barriers exist (such as large roundabouts and complex junctions, particularly adjacent to the IRR), which can discourage cycling, and identify solutions; Examine the feasibility and deliverability of a cycle hire scheme; Engage with Virgin Trains and Network Rail to ensure that maximum benefit is derived for the city from the proposed cycle hire scheme at Piccadilly Station; Invest in cycle training to increase the number of school children being trained to Bikeability Level 2; and Subject to satisfactory post-scheme appraisal of the pilot, seek to extend the offer of free adult cycle training.

D

Finally, it notes that maintenance of routes is a priority, and that repairing pot-holes and maintaining adequate lighting and signage are all essential to delivering safe, attractive cycle routes. Transport Strategy for Manchester City Centre (TSfMCC)
(http://www.manchester.gov.uk/info/200107/transport_policy/3800/a_transport_strateg y_for_manchester_city_centre/1)

Published in November 2010, the Strategy sets out how Manchester will support the forecast increase in employment in Manchester City Centre without an increase in the 7 

RA FT

number of people commuting to work by private car. It articulates a vision for transport that supports the maintenance and improves accessibility to the City Centre while reducing carbon emissions and improving air quality. The Strategy notes that there is significant potential drive up the number of people choosing the bike for trips into the City Centre which could also deliver substantial health benefits. It notes that there are significant gaps in infrastructure provision on key links into the centre and, increasingly, a shortage of secure cycle parking spaces in the city centre. The five “key issues” identified are: o Addressing the demand for cycle parking; o Making major junctions safer for cyclists; o Working with partners to reduce cycle theft; o Liaising with City Centre employers to improve workplace cycle parking and changing facilities; and o Improving opportunities for crossing the Inner Ring Road.

Manchester Sport and Physical Activity Strategy 2012-2020 (draft) This strategy was compiled by Manchester Sport and Physical Activity Alliance (SPAA) and describes how Sport and Physical Activity in Manchester will be developed to meet Manchester’s wider aspirations – reducing the health and economic negative impacts of inactivity; capitalising on the social and economic benefits of sport and physical activity. It also emphasises the ability of sport and physical activity to support Manchester’s agendas around education and workforce development, social inclusion, crime reduction and neighbourhoods of choice. The vision included in the Sport and Physical Activity Strategy is: “a city with a culture of sport and physical activity. Sports and leisure facilities will be high quality and easily accessible to all parts of the community. The city will be known internationally as a sporting city, with a programme of sporting events that supports the local economy and acts as an inspiration for local people to participate. People will be active at all ages and all levels, from everyday physical activity, through active recreation and organised community sports, all the way to excellence in sport. At whatever your level of participation, there will be something for you in Manchester”

D

The strategy includes a focus on Sports Clubs and Developing Talent, Improving facilities and establishing a programme of events, all linked into a neighbourhood focus. Sport England Strategy 2008-2011

(http://www.sportengland.org/about_us/what_we_do.aspx )

This strategy focuses resources on building the foundations of sporting success through the creation of a world leading community sports system. This system will ensure that a substantial – and growing – number of people from across the community play sport; talented people from all backgrounds are identified early, 8 

RA FT

nurtured and have the opportunity to progress to the elite level; and everyone who plays sport has a quality experience and is able to fulfill their potential. In terms of measurable achievements and impact this translates to delivering the following outcomes: Sustain • A reduction in post 16 drop off in at least 5 sports by 25% by 2012-13; • A quantifiable increase in satisfaction; Excel • Improved talent development systems in at least 25 sports; Grow • • One million more people doing more sport by 2012-13; and A major contribution to the delivery of the Five Hour Sport offer.

Sport England’s approach is to operate at a strategic level, working with and through national governing bodies, and drawing in other partners such as local authorities who drive local provision and are key to delivering a world-leading community sport infrastructure. British Cycling’s Whole Sport Plan 2009-2013.
(http://www.britishcycling.org.uk/zuvvi/media/bc_files/vacancies/Whole_Sport_Plan_2009-13.pdf )

This Whole Sport Plan aims to “inspire participation in cycling as a sport, recreation and sustainable transport through achieving worldwide success” through: o Inspiring Britain through success by asserting the country’s position as the leading cycling nation in the world; o Getting more people on the bike by rolling out a series of exciting mass participation cycling events with British Cycling’s Principal Partner, British Sky Broadcasting, to encourage people of all cycling abilities and interests to get on the bike and share the cycling experience;

D

o Boosting cycling as a sport by investing more and better resources towards growing competitive cycling at a grass roots level for all ages and abilities; o Improving the playing environment for competitive cycling in the UK by creating a network of nationwide traffic-free facilities which can be enjoyed for sport and recreational purposes; and

o Exercising Britain’s international influence by staging major international events in the UK in the build up to London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and beyond. National Public Health policy The White Paper “Healthy Lives, Healthy People” published November 2010 Department of Health sets a new framework for public health. It puts responsibility for public health into local government and advocates a lifecourse approach in which interventions are considered as part of a systematic approach to health at different 9 

RA FT

stages of life, rather than as responses to isolated risk factors. Increasing levels of physical activity remains a key strand of public health at all stages of the lifecourse. “Plans For The Legacy From The 2012 Olympic And Paralympic Games” (December 2010 Department of Culture Media and Sport) This document sets out the Government’s high-level vision and detailed plans for the legacy from the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. There are 4 areas of focus • Harnessing the United Kingdom’s passion for sport to increase grass roots participation, particularly by young people – and to encourage the whole population to be more physically active Exploiting to the full the opportunities for economic growth offered by hosting the Games

• •

“Start Active, Stay Active: A report on physical activity for health from the four home countries” Chief Medical Officers. Department of Health July 2011
This report sets out key recommendations for physical activity as follows: • • All children and young people should engage in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity for at least 60 minutes and up to several hours every day. Adults should aim to be active daily. Over a week, activity should add up to at least 150 minutes (2½ hours) of moderate intensity activity in bouts of 10 minutes or more – one way to approach this is to do 30 minutes on at least 5 days a week. Older adults should aim to be active daily. Over a week, activity should add up to at least 150 minutes (2½ hours) of moderate intensity activity in bouts of 10 minutes or more – one way to approach this is to do 30 minutes on at least 5 days a week.

D

Promoting cycling is an important part of meeting these objectives across the whole lifecourse. Public health strategy supports an approach that involves a range of interventions, from those that are individually focused (such as cycle training) through to social and environmental improvements aimed at making physical activity an easier option.

RA FT
10 

Promoting community engagement and achieving participation across all groups in society through the Games; and

Vision, Aims and Objectives
The Vision
The vision for the partnership is: “Making Manchester a world class cycling city with More People Cycling More Often”

MISSION STATEMENT

We want Manchester to be a city of cycling, where residents feel safe cycling on the city streets, where cycling is the transport of choice for employees to travel to work, where schools are committed to embed cycling within the curriculum and where all pupils own and use a bike. Manchester will continue to be the home of the world’s greatest track cycling team and the home of British Cycling, where world class facilities exist and are used by all sections of the community alongside the world’s best riders. We want Manchester to be the home of world leading cycling events that inspire future generations of cycling champions. Manchester will be known for its ability to produce champions and its visible athlete pathway to from playground to podium. We want more people to cycle for recreation than in any other city in England and Manchester will be the home of strong sustainable Cycling Clubs providing opportunities in every cycling discipline.
This Vision has the following core components:

D
• Transport 1 Sport • • •

Recreation

These core components are underpinned by the following key themes: Workforce and Volunteers Marketing and Communications

The following diagram summarises our vision for Cycling

                                                        
1

Which includes commuter cycling and “utility” cycling for domestic non-leisure purposes

RA FT
11 

What Does World Class Look Like?

THE VISION FOR CYCLING IN MANCHESTER

THE DRIVERS

THE CORE

THE OUTCOME

Behaviour change, being more active and achieving competitive success.

Recreation

Transport

More People Cycling More Often, leading to improved health and an improved environment

UNDERPINNING THEMES –Workforce & Volunteering, and Marketing & Communications

To achieve this vision, the partnership will deliver tangible improvements by making a commitment to: • • • • Collaboratively develop recreational, utility and sports cycling through a coordinated and sustainable cross-city programme Build on existing investment and development programmes

Seek out additional investment to meet existing and future needs and Learn from others who have set examples of good practice

D
• • •

Challenges and Objectives
The aim of this strategy is to increase cycle use in Manchester in all forms including for transport and recreation, and to ensure that Manchester retains its status as a world leader for sport cycling. The key challenges for cycling are: Improving the quality of infrastructure for cyclists and ensuring that provision is designed in from the outset and not an add-on; Improving the coherence of programmes across the city and developing better links between them; Integrating community and schools provision into club infrastructure;

RA FT
12 

Sport

• •

Improving the quality and dissemination of information that already exists regarding cycling participation; and Co-ordinating and managing the expertise and knowledge of the main “providers”.

The objectives of this strategy are as follows: • • • • To increase the number of people choosing to cycle to work; To improve the quality of cycling infrastructure and to identify locations which would benefit from better provision for cyclists; To increase the number of short journeys (under 5km) that are taken by bike; Ensure that future cycling in Manchester is safe and accompanied by a reduced rate of cycling casualties along with an increased perception that cycling is safe and attractive as a transport option; To increase the number of people taking part in cycling as a sport and to support talented riders to progress to their full potential; To continue to attract major sporting events to the city to enhance Manchester’s reputation as a world-class sporting city; ensuring its residents benefit from such events; the best cycling offer that suits their interests and needs; cycle for leisure, including people with disabilities;

• •

• To work with other cycling partners to ensure Manchester residents have access to • To increase the number of opportunities and improve the support for people to • To increase the opportunities for people to cycle to improve their health and
fitness;

D
• • • •

To increase the quantity and quality of organised non-competitive events, programmes and activities; To continue to increase the number and range of recreational cycling opportunities that are of interest to everyone, but with a stronger focus on women and people with a disability; To improve the quality and dissemination of information regarding both existing and new cycling opportunities; To support people to progress their cycling in all directions and ensure lifelong participation; To improve coordination and integration amongst the cycling community and across all cycling activity and develop better communication links; and

RA FT
13 

To help people overcome barriers to cycling and build confidence through key programmes.

D
14 

RA FT

Recreation
Overview Cycling as an informal and recreational activity can be enjoyed by everyone as part of a fun and healthy lifestyle. Cycling as an easy and low impact activity can help to reduce the risk of range of health problems, contribute to physical activity targets and has the potential to have a major impact on public health. Our ambition for recreational cycling is to provide:

Our objectives are as follows:

1. To increase the opportunities for people to cycle to improve their health and fitness;
2. To increase the quantity and quality of organised non-competitive events,

programmes and activities ;

3. To continue to increase the number and range of recreational cycling opportunities that are of interest to everyone, but with a stronger focus on women and people with a disability; 4. To improve the quality and dissemination of information regarding both existing and new cycling opportunities;

D
The Current Picture

5. To support people to progress their cycling in all directions and ensure lifelong participation; 6. To improve coordination and integration amongst the cycling community and across all cycling activity and develop better communication links; and

7. to help people overcome barriers to cycling and build confidence through key programmes.

British Cycling and Manchester City Council have worked in partnership over the last three years to delivery Sky Ride city ride and Sky Ride local rides.

RA FT
15 

The opportunity for all Manchester residents to get involved in cycling for recreation, from entry level upwards and to have a variety of attractive and sustainable options for continuing to cycle for recreation, with the support to progress to transport and/or sport cycling if desired.

Sky Ride City Events Sky Ride Manchester is a mass participation bike ride on traffic free roads in Manchester City Centre. The first event took place in 2009. The events have been a huge success with participation figures growing each year to around 20,000. All groups involved in cycling have been invited to have a presence at the event and as a result almost all those involved in cycling in the city have been a part of Sky Ride Manchester. Sky Ride City Events are a great opportunity for families, inexperienced cyclists or lapsed cyclists to have fun on a bike and start to ride regularly. Sky Ride Local – the programme Manchester City Council commission British Cycling to deliver the Sky Ride Local (SRL) programme on their behalf. It is part of a legacy programme for cycling in Manchester, running free led rides every Sunday from May to October. Rides are led by British Cycling qualified Sky Ride Leaders. We ensure there are rides for all abilities providing four ride levels;

• •

All routes are mapped and risk assessed by qualified British Cycling Route Planners. Ride Leaders and Assistant Ride Leaders are allocated to rides based on the number of people who have registered, up to a maximum of 50 people on a Ride Easy (less on rides on the roads). The programme uses the most sophisticated and holistic recreational sporting portal available in the UK: www.goskyride.com Sky Ride Participation to Date Sky Ride City Event 2009

D
Sky Ride Local Registered 2009 966 Participants 671 Utilisation rates 47.4% Breeze Network

In May this year (2011) British Cycling launched the biggest ever programme to get more women into bike riding. Breeze is a Sport England Active Women funded nationwide network of fun, social and flexible bike rides designed to close the gap between the number of men and women cycling regularly, and introduce over 80,000 new women to bike riding. 16 

RA FT
2010 2011 15,000 20,000 18,500 2010 2,849 2,153 84.8% 2011 4,175 1,542 56.9%

• •

Ride Easy – between 3 to 6 miles on traffic free routes Ride Steady – between 6 to 12 miles mainly on traffic free routes and some suburban roads Ride Well – between 12 to 20 miles including roads and at a faster pace Ride Strong – between 20 to 30 miles – targeting more experienced cyclists.

Breeze Bike Rides are fun easy bike rides for women by women. Women are trained as British Cycling ride leaders to become ‘Breeze Champions’. Breeze Champions then organise their own small easy local bike rides on mostly traffic free routes. There is a Breeze Manchester network. So far this year we have trained 27 women across Greater Manchester to become Breeze champions, with three of these women living in central Manchester. These women have run 61 Breeze bike rides with 156 participants. Active Lifestyles Manchester City Councils Active Lifestyles team launched January 2011, it is dedicated to the development and delivery of physical activity and wellness programmes across Manchester. It strives to have all Manchester residents to have the opportunity to lead an active, healthy and happy life. Part of this physical activity offer included community based cycling sessions under the following categories: Tots & Trike – 18 months – 5years

Tots and Trikes is a range of fun and play cycling activities. The sessions provide support and guidance in helping parents to teach their child how to ride a bike and understand important little rules of the road. The sessions include games and activities that support a child’s learning and ability to ride a bike. Back to Bikes – older adults

This indoor cycling session helps older residents get back on a bike or teaches them how to ride a bike Trikes and Bikes - A range of cycling programmes, providing adult only or family sessions, which provide fun activities to support cycling development and abilities. Bike Fit - An outdoor session incorporating cycling and interval based circuit stations using body weight exercises. This session gives the participant an all over cardio and strength training work out.

D

Health Rides This programme is a partnership based and is targeted at specialist groups such as the Physical Activity Referral clients. Disability Participation Manchester has a strong offer for cyclists with disabilities with All Inclusive Cycling Club Wythenshawe Wheelers driving much of this through working with the Sports Development Disability Manager and the National organization Wheels for all. X sessions run each week in Manchester to cater for riders with any disability. The National Cycling Centre also offers tandem sessions for riders with visual impairments. Many opportunities to get involved in cycling are also offered by a range of cycling groups that operate in the Manchester area. These include Love Your Bike’s ‘Bike Friday’ campaign which encourages people to come together for a cycle commute once a month and their Bike Fabulous which has used the Arndale shopping centre to promote all forms of cycling and cycle-wear. X people join Bike Fridays each month. 17 

RA FT

Pedal MCR is a community cycling project and operates out of Platt Fields Park and offer support for cycle maintenance to groups and individuals. Manchester has many partners to ensure there are accessible programmes and clubs for disabled people and that opportunities exist for disabled Manchester residents to take part in sport at any level they choose. Cycle sessions that take place are: • • Cycling Club- Based at Wythenshawe Athletics Track and leading four weekly cycling sessions. Wheels for All- Deliver cycling sessions at Boggart Hole Clough and Debdale Park each week. Partnerships with the Voluntary sector

Manchester has an established relationship with voluntary sector organisations, many of whom are members of the Manchester Cycle Forum and deliver a variety of cycling activities that help to promote greater uptake of cycling across Manchester.

I Bike MCR is a group of cyclists that organise creative and original rides, events and activities to support cyclists and increase more cycling for health and environmental benefits. Their calendar of events consists of two annual bike festivals, monthly critical mass rides to Manchester City Centre and monthly women’s rides as part of the ‘Wimmin’s Bike Mcr’ group . Sustrans- Is a leading UK charity enabling people to travel by foot, bike or public transport for more of the journeys people make every day. Working with families, communities, policy-makers and partner organisations to encourage healthier, cleaner and cheaper journeys, with better places and spaces to move through and live in. In Manchester Sustrans have an active office involved in cycling projects across Greater Manchester and are members of the Manchester Cycle Forum providing invaluable advice and assistance on all matters cycling. Team Glow- Created in September 2011 by Glynis Francis to get 100 women to take part in the 2011 100 mile charity ride in Manchester. Team Glow now organises and leads regular cycling rides for women. Sportives and Charity Bike Rides - As well as the mass participation Skyride event Manchester supports and promotes many other planned cycle rides that take place each year. For example the Stroke Association’s ‘Fly Ride, British Heart Foundation’s Manchester to Blackpool Night Ride and the Manchester 100 mile charity ride. Pedal MCR is a community cycling project and operates out of Platt Fields Park and offer support for cycle maintenance to groups and individuals.

D
• • •

RA FT
18 

Love Your Bike - Is a campaign coordinated by Manchester Friends of the Earth and organises cycling related events that include Bike Week and the successful Bike Fabulous event held in The Arndale Centre which, showcases cycling fashion and accessories (no. of visitors?). On the last Friday of each month Love Your Bike leads a number of group rides from local districts to Manchester City Centre to support people to cycle (figures?).

What we are working towards Manchester can be described as a city which is passionate about cycling in all its forms and there is a wealth of groups and organisations who work to encourage more people to cycle more often. This section focuses on cycling as a recreational activity. Recreational cycling is the usual entry point for people to access cycling and should be valued in its own right for its health and social benefits. However recreational cycling can also provide a pathway into sport and performance cycling and utility cycling. Those involved in recreational cycling promotion are many and varied and include: British Cycling; Manchester City Council; Wheels for All groups; Love Your Bike; Sustrans; the CTC; Greater Manchester Cycle Campaign; I Bike MCR; Bike Right; Team Glow and various cycle clubs. This strategy recognises however that these promoters of cycling and deliverers of cycling opportunities could work better together to develop, improve and strengthen the cycling offer available to the city’s residents. This must be a key objective of this strategy. National Cycling Targets

The National Cycling Target is 1 million more people cycling at least once per month by 2013 and 125,000 cycling once per week by 2013. Currently around 30,500 people cycle in Manchester once a month (not including utility cycling) The indicative latent demand for people wanting to cycle in Manchester is 15,509. The challenge is to convert this latent demand into participants. Manchester is currently ranked 21st in ‘once per month recreational cycling’ (as measured by the Active People Survey) Manchester Cycling Targets (tbc)

More people cycling in Manchester for ‘recreational’ cycling than in any other English City by 2017

D

‘Closing the gap’ quicker in Manchester between male and female cyclists. To have a lower than national average percentage difference in participation rates between men and women Sky Ride City Event 2012 To attract ‘x’ number of participants Deliver another exceptional mass participation event which showcases both the City Centre and the National Cycling Centre in the 2012 Olympic year Attract an increased % of new and lapsed cyclists to the event Work with a range of stakeholders and partners to demonstrate what the City has to offer to a wide range of cyclists, including participation, sport, utility cycling, spectating, volunteering, leadership etc

RA FT
19 

Sky Ride Local Increasing female participation on Ride Well and Ride Strong Improve the utilisation rates to ‘x %’ Offer a range of year round ‘trail’ rides Maximize the use of the NCC, the Velo Park and Clayton Vale for Sky Ride Local and Breeze Rides Breeze Increase the female workforce by rolling out cycle instructor training for Breeze Champions Offer cycle training to women who can’t currently cycle Launch ‘women friendly’ bike shops and bike hire schemes in Manchester Offer women only mass participation events (short and traffic free) Attract more women in Manchester to train as Breeze Champions

Work with Team Glow to provide an exit route for Breeze participants wanting to progress Social Cycling Networks

Pilot a social cycling network

Roll out social cycling networks in Manchester, targeting areas where there is limited or no existing networks. Recreational cycling infrastructure and facilities

To develop the cycling infrastructure and facilities for recreational cycling (and utility cycling)

D
• • Workplace cycling

Green Corridor:

This project aims to link Manchester’s open spaces to a regional park system and will take in areas such as Victoria Park, Wythenshawe Park and Chorlton Water Park. Signs will be in place to connect routes between three and seven miles long and will help to promote recreational cycling. The Manchester Legacy Way To improve the existing canal route from the City Centre to the National Cycling Centre via national cycling route 86 alongside the canal and use it to showcase some of the great people of Manchester. This will provide a tangible Legacy from the 2012 London Olympics Clayton Vale improvements (further detail to be included)

RA FT
20 

• • • • • •

Active Lifestyle programmes Trikes and Bikes - Targeting the Family with a key emphasis 0-5 age group. This will be an indoor based session using turbo trainers for the adults. Health Referral Rides - Specific Health referral sessions for the Physical Activity Referral Scheme. Adult Only Community Clubs – Framework for pathways into the City’s major cycling events. Family Clubs - Framework for pathways into the City’s major cycling events. Back to Bikes - Targeting older people

Proposed Sessions Year 1 • • • • • • 4 Cycling hubs across the city

20 Tots and Trikes 1 hour sessions per week, every week = 1040 sessions 3 Health Referral Rides 1hour sessions per week, every week = 156 sessions 3 Family Clubs per 1hour sessions per week, every week = 156 sessions 3 Adult only Club 1hour sessions per week, every week = 156 sessions 3 Back to Bikes 1hour sessions per week, every week = 156 sessions

D
21 

RA FT

Commuter / Utility Cycling
Overview Development of cycling, as part of the wider “active travel” family is an integral part of the Local Transport Plan (LTP). An increase in the numbers of people participating in active travel will have multiple benefits. It will help reduce congestion, increase access to public transport, contribute towards improving air quality and reducing pollution and help reduce health problems related to our sedentary lifestyles – particularly obesity and coronary heart disease. Furthermore, environments designed to encourage walking and cycling can also help to improve community cohesion through lower traffic speeds (as first identified by Prof. Donald Appleyard in 1969). Manchester provides a range of cycling infrastructure across the city to ensure cycling is considered to be a real option for shorter trips. Cycle flows in Manchester are the highest in Greater Manchester and the extensive network of signed cycle routes and storage has been continually improved in district centres, the City Centre and at local transport hubs in the periods covered by LTP1 and LTP2. The focus of this part of the cycle strategy is to ensure that key routes to the City Centre are improved in order to offer more safety and increase the attractiveness of cycling for commuters. Improvements in parking at major public transport interchanges and working with Transport for Greater Manchester on the successful Local Sustainable Transport Fund Greater Manchester Commuter Cycle Project is also a key aim of the strategy.

As a relatively compact and densely populated conurbation with favourable topography and climate, there is significant scope to increase the number of people choosing to cycle for mainly shorter journeys of five miles or less. This would support our commitments to reduce transport-related carbon emissions whilst helping to improve the health of our residents through more active travel and cleaner air. Furthermore, it will also help to improve the vitality of our streets and local centres.

D
The Current Picture

Our ambition for commuter / utility cycling is:

That initiatives are brought forward to ensure that cycling becomes a real mode of choice for commuter and other utility trips through the provision of better infrastructure, adult cycle training and a programme of promotional and marketing activity.

Manchester already benefits from a growing cycling population with journeys to Manchester City Centre increasing by 4% from 2009-2010 and more than doubling since 2002. This is alongside a considerable infrastructure to support cycling as a 22 

RA FT

realistic transport option which, links strongly with designated routes connecting to neighbouring districts and regions. Cycling continues to grow as a mode of choice for commuters into central Manchester and the Higher Education Precinct. This section sets out the latest available data on transport in Manchester which is collated and published by Transport for Greater Manchester Highways Forecasting and Analytical Services – HFAS - (formerly Greater Manchester Transportation Unit). Key facts from the report: o The road with the highest 12-hour weekday pedal cycle flow was the B5117 Oxford Road near the University of Manchester with 1602 pedal cycles between 07:00 and 19:00. o The average 12-hour weekday pedal cycle flows on A and B roads in Manchester were 211 and 298 respectively. These are much higher than the averages for all districts of 107 pedal cycles for A and 100 pedal cycles or B roads. o Traffic flows into the city centre have decreased substantially in the morning and off-peak between 1997 and 2011. The car parking strategy and the completion of the Inner Relief Route and have both contributed to the increase in non-car mode share for Manchester. o All trips in the morning peak increased by 5% between 2002 and 2011. Car trips decreased by 16% and bus trips decreased by 11% while rail trips increased by 40%. Metrolink trips increased by 8%, walking by 74% and cycle trips more than doubled. More detailed data on cycling flows in central Manchester are available in Appendix X However, it should be noted that whilst there has been strong growth in the number of people cycling, this growth has not been uniform. Growth and demand remains very high in the south of the city in wards such as Chorlton, Didsbury and Fallowfield but less strong elsewhere – particularly in the north of Manchester.

D
The Cycling Network

What We Have Achieved to Date

Manchester has an extensive network of cycle lanes and trails that include a range of signs, advanced stop lines, toucan crossings and shared paths to make cycling as simple and safe as possible. Appendix ? includes a full breakdown of our investment over the last five years.

Cyclists may use most of the bus lanes in Greater Manchester. This is shown by a cycle symbol on the blue sign at the start of, and along, the bus lane. The Greater Manchester Quality Bus Corridor schemes include advance cycle stop lines at junctions and, where possible, cycle lanes to improve safety and cycle priority. The existence of a bus lane enforcement programme aims to improve compliance with bus 23 

RA FT

lanes using civil enforcement powers. This is done through fixed CCTV cameras in Manchester City Centre, and on some radial routes, and a mobile 'CCTV smart car' on other routes.

In addition to local authority-provided cycle routes, Manchester also benefits from the The Trans Pennine Trail. This is a national coast to coast traffic free route used as much by local cyclists for shorter journeys as those cycling the whole length. The trail (National Cycle Route 62) follows the Mersey Valley between Sale Water Park and Princess Parkway, and has been designated and signed. It provides a safer route to access recreational areas and, as it passes through or near many Manchester district centres, offers a healthier travel option. Cycle Parking

BLUC is a cycle parking scheme to encourage people to use their cycles to travel to train, Metrolink and bus stations and town centre locations across Greater Manchester. Once registered with TfGM you will be provided with a key with which you can open any BLUC locker within the scheme. You can then secure the locker with your own padlock. Whilst pre-registration is required, the benefits of BLUC are that you are not restricted to one particular locker or location. The full list of BLUC locations are included in Appendix ?: Cycles on public transport

D
Cycle Training

All cycles are carried free of charge on all national rail services in Greater Manchester. All local trains run by Northern Rail can carry a minimum of two bicycles (although more can sometimes be carried at the discretion of the guard). It should be noted, however, that at peak times it may be difficult to use certain services due to the high numbers of passengers. It is not possible to make a reservation on Northern services. Inter-city and inter-regional trains run by TransPennine Express, Arriva Trains Wales and East Midlands Trains also carry bikes free-of-charge but reservations are recommended. Virgin Trains (West Coast) and Arriva CrossCountry carry bikes freeof-charge but reservations are compulsory. Non-folding bikes are not permitted on either Metrolink or buses in Greater Manchester although folding bicycles can be carried. Cycle parking is provided free of charge at most railway and Metrolink stations in Manchester.

Manchester’s adult cycle training programme - ‘Freewheeling’ – is delivered by Bike Right! It offers those that live or work in Manchester free cycle training from basic “Bikeability Level 1” up to advanced one-to-one Level 3 sessions. Uptake has been 24 

RA FT

There is an increasing number of cycle parking facilities provided around the city centre and at various district centres in Manchester. There are 760 cycle parking spaces in the city centre and 544 at the University of Manchester. A map of City Centre cycle parking can be found in Appendix 1.

successful since July 2010 with 500 places being delivered across the majority of Manchester districts. A further 180 places have been delivered in 2011-2012. Continuation of adult cycle training is a key element of the Local Sustainable Transport Fund “key component” bid which was submitted to DfT by Transport for Greater Manchester and approved in Summer 2011.

D
25 

RA FT

Cycle Promotion A number of resources are invested each year to put on events, competitions and provide information that is readily available to support cycling. Manchester City Council works with various partner organisations to help maintain and further develop cycling initiatives across the city. • • • Cycle GM – The website hosts dedicated Manchester pages that include information on events, on-line journey planning, relevant contacts and links to a range of cycling related information. Manchester City Council website – Has a number of specific cycling pages for commuting, leisure, security and allows for the on-line reporting of cycle infrastructure problems. The Cycle Forum pages also exist within this website. Manchester Cycle Map – As part of a series of free maps the Manchester map provides excellent detail of cycling infrastructure providing invaluable information for people wishing to cycle and identify an appropriate route. Over the past year over 2000 maps will have been distributed. The map is regularly updated and the next version should be available in spring 2012. Bike Week – Manchester City Council continues to be involved in the annual cycling event holding its own Bike to Work day event and supporting partner organisations with cycling resources and promotion. In 2010 Bike to Work day saw 581 participants take part. Skyride – In partnership with British Cycling, Sky and The Council the annual mass participation event raises the profile of cycling across Manchester and sees circa 20000 participants take part. Further promotion of cycling activity takes place via our partners such as the Greater Manchester Cycling Campaign and British Cycling websites.

• •

Cycle Forum

D

The Manchester Cycle Forum meets every quarter. It raises awareness and promotes the opportunities for cycling in Manchester whilst providing a useful connection between The Council, individuals and organisations interested in cycling. It allows cyclists to meet regularly with Council Officers, Councillors and other interested parties to exchange views and ideas that can help make cycling safer on our roads. It also helps The Council to develop and improve its cycling policies and has had success in influencing positive outcomes for cyclists.

What We Are Working Towards There are a number of funded developments in Manchester that will benefit cycling in the future. For example, as part of the Cross City bus package, raised cycle lanes will be constructed to provide additional routes to the City Centre through the Higher Education Corridor. Secured funding from the Congestion Performance Fund will see the Rochdale Canal Towpath have a continual cycle track linking the City Centre to Oldham. All schemes are listed in the implementation plan at the end of this section. Due to reductions to Local Transport Plan settlements in 2011-12 (and as a consequence of approvals already given to other Greater Manchester Transport Fund schemes), Manchester was not given an “Integrated Transport Block” allocation from the Greater Manchester LTP settlement. This means that there is currently no funding 26 

RA FT

available for “improvements” to the highway network including initiatives such as new cycle lanes and toucan crossings. This funding situation is likely to continue during 2012-13 as well. Indicative budgets for subsequent years show that there may be a small improvements budget but this has yet to be confirmed. Local Sustainable Transport Fund The Local Sustainable Transport Fund is a Department for Transport funding scheme for projects which stimulate economic growth whilst reducing carbon emissions. It was agreed that a single Greater Manchester-wide bid will be prepared for up to £50m which would focus around the three core themes of active travel, smarter travel information and promotion, and network efficiency. Greater Manchester Commuter Cycling Project

In Manchester City Centre this will see the delivery of three “cycle centres” at key locations within the central area. These centres will provide secure cycle parking, storage, showering and changing facilities for cyclists. They are intended to be located close to the major centres of activity in the city centre to make them an attractive option for commuters who may not be provided with such facilities at their places of work. Access will be smart-card controlled to ensure safety and security and ancillary facilities such as a café or cycle shop may be provided. Greater Manchester Major Projects Bid

D

The LSTF Major Projects proposal builds on the successful “key component” project. TfGM submitted an outline “expression of interest” in Summer 2011 and were successful in the proposal being accepted. By December 2011, a full major scheme business case needs to be produced and submitted to DfT for consideration. Should the proposal be accepted, funding will be available during 2012. The bid consists of four components and cycling features prominently in several of them including: o Component 1 – Sustainable Access to Key Destinations and Transport Hubs: This will see a number of initiatives developed across Greater Manchester with some being delivered by districts and others being delivered by Transport for Greater Manchester. As part of this component, Manchester is bringing forward a project to improve access to the Regional Centre – in particular to the new cycle centres currently under development. The focus is on linking deprived communities with the Regional Centre and improving access across the Inner Ring Road (which is frequently cited as a major barrier for cyclists). Within the city centre, a number of new cycle lanes will be created on 27 

RA FT

The 'Key Component' Greater Manchester Commuter Cycling Project was approved by Department for Transport in July 2011 and TfGM is now working with Manchester City Council and city centre businesses to deliver a programme of measures to support commuter cycling in a total package worth over £6m. A four year delivery package is now established to provide Cycle Centres to enable long term secure cycle parking, the Bike Back to Work Scheme that encourages helping to tackle worklessness, Cycle Storage Grants that will encourage employers to have appropriate facilities and a number of cycle support measures including increasing the free adult cycle training that currently exists.

principle links and consideration is being given as to how new signage legislation relating to one-way streets might be used to improve permeability of the city centre for cyclists. o Component 2: Supporting Sustainable Choices: Building upon the Key Component package, the sustainable travel development agenda requires a wider package of measures aimed at embedding smarter choices across a wider commuting market. Working with key partners, including the ten local authorities, local business groups, local cycle groups, walking groups and others, TfGM have mapped out a series of initiatives that target those communities where these initiatives can offer the greatest value, including: o kick-starting adult cycle training and local community walking campaigns to establish a longer term legacy maintained by community champions; o providing travel planning start-up support for employers at larger business sites and other key destinations; and

o Component 3: Smarter Travel: TfGM have already committed to delivering a Smartcard system for the Metrolink network and supporting vehicle location technology that will provide real-time information across the tram system. This complements the Government’s incentivising of smart-reader investment across the bus industry and commitments to smart ticketing as part of future rail franchises. If the bid is successful, TfGM will roll out a single transport smartcard across the Metrolink, bus and (eventually) heavy rail network. It will also be used to provide access to the new cycle centres thus creating a truly multi-modal product. Manchester City Council is working with TfGM to develop and finalise the bid. In particular it is developing proposals to improve access to the Regional Centre cycle centres (which are being funded as part of the key component bid). This proposal will pay close attention to the Inner Ring Road and the barrier it presents to cyclists accessing the Regional Centre. It will identify a range of interventions which will improve access to the cycling centres and make cycling a safer and more attractive option for travelling to central Manchester.

D
Maintenance Cycle Hire

Despite seeing significant cuts to the improvements budget, Manchester City Council still has a substantial budget for maintenance. We will be spending £6.5 million in 2011/12 on capital maintenance and a further £1.8 million on drainage, carriageway and footway repairs. In addition, over £3 million pounds will be spent annually in subsequent year to 2014/15. This will deliver benefits to all road users – including cyclists.

Manchester aspires to develop a cycle hire scheme within the City Centre and will continue to examine how a scheme might be delivered. One project currently underway is partnership between Virgin Trains and Network Rail to deliver a hub of 28 

RA FT

o providing travel advice to expand the journey horizons of job seekers to establish this as a longer term service delivered through the traditional employment search bodies.

Brompton folding bikes at Piccadilly Station. As a pilot project this will enable the Council and our partners to further evaluate demand for cycle hire.

Cycle Training
Manchester will continue to seek to identify funding opportunities to provide both adult cycle training and schools Bikeability training for years 5 to 7.

Cycle Parking
Manchester will continue to work with public transport operators, car park operators, businesses, the rail industry and cycle groups to deliver additional parking in key locations.

Planning

D
29 

RA FT

The council will ensure that planning guidance reflects current best practice with regards to provision for cyclists and will ensure that provision of of cycle storage and changing facilites are to an agreed standard

Sport
Ambition

As the Home of British Cycling and The National Cycling Centre Manchester will remain the UK’s leading city and one of the top international cities for cycling as a sport. It will have a comprehensive cycling development programme which encourages residents of all ages and abilities to become involved in sport cycling as participants, coaches and officials, volunteers and spectators.

Manchester is a world-leading city for sport in terms of its world class facilities and events and the sporting offer that is available to those living in the city. The sport of cycling makes a major contribution to this achievement. The ambition for sport cycling in Manchester is to remain at the forefront of the UK for the development of cycling as a sport which contributes to Manchester being a world-class sporting city. Manchester will continue to attract world class cycling events and engage residents as spectators and participants; further develop its world class cycling facilities; support Manchester cycling clubs and drive forward the cycling development programme to increase the number of Manchester residents who cycle for sport. Manchester is the home of the sport’s National Governing Body British Cycling. The relationship between British Cycling and Manchester City Council has been consolidated in the Memorandum of Understanding that was signed in 2010 and is reflected in the 2011 £24m expansion of the National Cycling Centre that now houses British Cycling’s headquarters, the UK’s first indoor BMX track and the renowned velodrome. The partnership between Manchester City Council, British Cycling and The Velodrome Trust has resulted in Manchester being a world-leading city for cycle sport and being the city that produced the 2008 unprecedented Olympic successes. These successes inspired a new generation of cyclists. This section of the strategy will ensure the growth and strengthening of these partnerships to ensure Manchester retains its reputation as a world leading city for sport. Sport England publish results from their Active People Survey on an annual basis. These results show that (data from APS5?): • • • 22.4% of adults in Manchester take part in sport and active recreation (Nat Av. 22%) 47.4% of adults do no sport or active recreation at all 62.4% of adult residents in Manchester want to start playing sport or do a bit more 30 

D

RA FT

Overview:

• • • •

4.1% of adults are regular sports volunteers (Nat Av. 4.%%) 18.1% are members of a sports club (Nat Av. 23.9%) 67.1% at satisfied with sporting provision in the area (Nat Av 69.0%) Cycling is in the top five sports/activities that Manchester residents take part in and would like to do more of, alongside swimming, football, badminton and going to the gym.

The aim of sports development is to target the 62.4% of Manchester residents who want to start playing sport or to play more sport The 2010 Active People Survey 5 (APS5) shows that in Manchester cycling is the sport/physical activity with the second highest participation rate of 30,173 people (after swimming). Moreover it is the second most popular sport/physical activity (after swimming) that Manchester residents would most like to start to participate in, or to participate in more. APS5 shows latent demand for cycling to be 49,288. The strategy will also ensure that Manchester residents are at the heart of cycling development and that they benefit from the partnerships and investment. The development of cycling will deliver increased opportunities for Manchester residents to cycle as a sport, to ensure competitive opportunities exist for them, to ensure they can access the city’s cycling excellent cycling facilities, to engage them as spectators and participants in cycling events and to ensure that they benefit from the legacy that major cycling events bring to the city. The current picture.

The Manchester Velodrome opened in 1994. Amongst many major sporting events, it hosted the 2002 Commonwealth Games and continues to deliver an event legacy through offering opportunities for riders of all ages and abilities. The facility was renamed The National Cycling Centre in 2011 as it now encompasses the indoor BMX track and British Cycling’s headquarters. Looking at the more recent history of cycling development in Manchester; great strides have been made in the last five years (2006-2011): • • • A Memorandum of Understanding has been signed between British Cycling and Manchester City Council in 2010 which was witnessed by Lord Sebastian Coe; The £24M Expansion of the National Cycling Centre has been completed in 2011 which includes the UK’s first indoor track and British Cycling’s headquarters; Platt Fields Park BMX race track was completed in 2008 which sees around 6,000 visits per year. Since the opening the track has produced a British and National Champion and several other national level riders; A comprehensive cycling development programme for all young people has been developed through Manchester City Council, British Cycling and The National Cycling Centre which delivers school coaching, competition, holiday sessions and club support; A cycling development officer and two Go-Ride cycling coaches have been employed by Manchester City Council and British Cycling to develop cycling in the city;

D
• •

RA FT
31 

• •

Two new BMX posts have been created at The National Cycling Centre – a BMX Development Manager and outreach coach; Pupils from 41 schools have been part of the cycling programme in 2010-11; through being involved in cycling at The National Cycling Centre, Platt Fields Park BMX track, the Go-Ride cycling programme and other schools development work; Cycling Development has worked with 6 cycling clubs to develop their capacity to engage with Manchester residents. This includes the formation of 2 new clubs; and Twenty three major cycling events have been hosted in the city in the last 5 years (2006-7 to 2010-11), including four UCI Track World Cup Classics, six rounds of the The BMX National Series 2009, 2010 and 2011 and four National Track Championships 2011.

More competitive opportunities have been developed including a Go-Ride Race league and Manchester’s School Track Championships, in which 14 schools took part in 2011; Ten Champions’ Charter grants have been awarded to Manchester’s talented athletes in the past three years (2009-2011) to assist them to progress to their full potential as cyclists and more have received funding through the Greater Manchester Sports fund; and The presence of the Great Britain Cycling Team in Manchester has been capitalised on to inspire Manchester’s school pupils. Pupils have had the rare opportunity to meet riders including Olympics medal winners. Pupils have met Sir Chris Hoy, Victoria Pendleton, Jason Kenny, Jamie Staff and David Daniell and BMX racers Shanaze Reade, Liam Philips and Kyle Evans.

D

What we want to achieve: Over the period of this strategy the cycling development programme will continue to increase the opportunities for Manchester residents to cycle as a sport. It will: 1. Further explore the potential for Clayton Vale to be an expansion of The National Cycling Centre to include mountain-biking, Cyclo X and recreational cycling in Clayton Vale – developing the concept of ‘The Velopark of the North’. 2. Continue to attract major cycling events to Manchester to maintain Manchester’s place as a world-leading city for sport, and to ensure Manchester residents benefit from event legacy and are involved as spectators and participants. 3. Ensure all Manchester schools and educational establishments have access to cycling as a sport through The National Cycling Centre, Platt Fields Park BMX Track or through the Manchester City Council/British Cycling Cycling 32 

RA FT

These events have generated over £90k of event legacy funding that has been spent on cycling development. Around 100,000 spectator visits have been made to these events (verify with events team), which have included a free offer to Manchester’s school children and local groups. 18,500 riders took part in the 2011 Sky Ride Manchester. Furthermore:

4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

D
33 

RA FT

Development Programme, with support for schools to sustain their own cycling development. Increase the number of Manchester residents accessing the NCC and Platt Fields Park BMX track through a variety of means including a responsive track programme and enhanced marketing. Increase the numbers and % of Manchester residents participating in and becoming members of Manchester cycling clubs through supporting clubs to recruit, retain and develop coaches and volunteers and increase their income thereby increasing their capacity to develop cycling opportunities. Increase the number of clubs registering with Clubmark and achieving Clubmark accreditation (the quality assurance mark for clubs with youth sections). Increase the number of Manchester athletes progressing to regional level racing and above and accessing funding for their development. Increase the number of opportunities for people to get involved in competitive cycling and to increase the sustainability of such opportunities. Increase the number of post 16 establishments engaging in the Cycling Development Programme with the aim of tackling ‘drop-off’ from sport.

Workforce and Volunteering
Overview: Large number of people working to promote cycling in the city – huge benefits of this, but there remains gaps in people’s awareness of the Manchester cycling offer and Manchester would benefit from partners working more closely together. The current picture: MCC and BC staff involved in cycling promotion in the city. Overview of NCC staffing. Cycling Personnel in the other organisations and the voluntary sector – lots of people!

Well informed staff at all levels with a good knowledge of the whole cycling offer in Manchester, thereby giving residents the best service to suit their cycling needs. Financial and practical support for sport cycling clubs to recruit, retain and develop coaches and non-coaching volunteers. Meetings between key cycling development staff from BC and MCC every to share information on cycling development and capitalise on opportunities. How often? Increase the numbers of people involved in volunteering in cycling, deploying them to meet their preferences.

Discuss with partners and elaborate on/add more.

D
34 

RA FT

What we want to achieve: Enthusiastic staff with a passion for cycling.

Marketing and Communications
Overview: At present the various forms of cycling are marketed in a multitude of ways to capture varying target audiences. This includes specific events that promote cycling, websites, email circulation, social media, competitions and paper based marketing. The aim of the marketing and communications part of this strategy is to highlight and capitalise on the current marketing channels for cycling in Manchester to those involved in cycling promotion, to utilise new marketing technologies and where possible reduce duplication and pool resources. The current picture. Across the city and the Greater Manchester regional there are many different ways in which the general public and specific user groups can access information about cycling in Manchester. This includes a number of websites from delivering a wide range of cycling information:Websites http://www.manchester.gov.uk (which has a number of specific cycling pages for commuting, leisure, security and allows for the on-line reporting of cycle infrastructure problems. It also includes the Cycle Forum pages. http://www.cyclegm.org/ which is managed by TfGM for the whole of Greater Manchester. From here it is possible to order hard copies of the GM Cycling Maps. http://www.goskyride.com/manchester http://www.nationalcyclingcentre.com Sport cycling clubs such as:

D
http://pedalmcr.org.uk/

http://www.manchesterbmx.co.uk/, http://www.eastlandsvelo.com/, http://www.manchestercyclesport.moonfruit.com/ and http://www.manchesterwheelers.co.uk/

A number of voluntary and community organisations also maintain cycling-related websites including: http://manchesterfoe.org.uk/campaigns/transport/bike/ http://cyclemanchester.org.uk/main/

http://www.bikeright.co.uk/ Most of Manchester’s cycle shops also have their own websites. Many of these websites already to link to each-other to promote each other’s events and share information on activities and campaigns.

RA FT
35 

Events There are several events where the Manchester cycling community promote their products, programmes and campaigns. These include Sky Ride where every group involved in Manchester has been invited to have a presence. Almost every cycling organisation in the city has had a presence at Sky Ride over the last few years by having a stand and by taking part. Manchester City Council has led Bike Week over the past X years where all cycling organisations are invited to join together to promote their services and campaigns. As part of this MCC runs its own ‘Bike to Work Day’ aimed at employees. Love Your Bike has led the way in running Bike Fabulous in for the last 2 years in the Arndale centre, giving Manchester cycling organizations the opportunity to promote cycling to the thousands of weekend shoppers who pass through the Arndale Centre. Email circulation

Paper-based marketing Manchester also produces paper-based marketing materials to promote cycling. This includes the highly popular set of free Greater Manchester cycle maps which provide excellent detail of cycling infrastructure providing invaluable information for people wishing to cycle and identify an appropriate route. The map is regularly updated and the next version should be available in spring 2012. Promotional materials are also produced by The National Cycling Centre, Bike Right! and Love Your Bike amongst others. What we want to achieve.

Develop the marketing and communications of the National Cycling Centre to better communicate to their target audeiences and increase the numbers participation and to retain participants in the sport and using the centre.

D

Develop the marketing and communications of Platt Fields Park BMX track to increase participant numbers. Support sports clubs to access funding and training to develop their marketing and communications. Continue to work with partners to run events that promote all forms of cycling in the city. Continue to work with partners to promote the cycling email circulations so that more people involved in promoting cycling subscribe and contribute content Encourage partners and organisations to promote a each other’s cycling offer on their marketing and website. Utilise new social media wherever possible to promote cycling, this may include facebook and twitter. 36 

RA FT

Information is also shared about cycling in Manchester via email circulation lists from Sky Ride, The Cycle Forum, The National Cycling Centre and Love Your Bike who circulates a monthly email to around X subscribers to which anyone can contribute content.

Develop marketing to raise the new recreational cyclists’ awareness of other cycling opportunities which may include sport and transport and to ensure there are sustainable exit routes from all cycling programmes. To encourage cycling groups to display materials at The National Cycling Centre.

Discuss with partners and elaborate on/add more.

D
37 

RA FT

Implementation and Monitoring Framework
This section sets out how Manchester City Council and British Cycling will be funding cycling projects over the next three years. Funding will come from a number of sources. Whilst there are limited opportunities to make improvements to the transport network through LTP funding, a number of other funding opportunities exist across recreation, sport and transport therefore investment will continue. The framework also sets out how we will monitor progress towards our targets.

Scheme Recreation Sky Ride City Event 2012

Description

D
Sky Ride Local 2012

RA FT
Deliver another exceptional mass participation event which showcases both the City Centre and the NCC in the 2012 Olympic year To attract ‘x’ number of participants Attract an increased % of new and lapsed cyclists to the event MCC/BC/SKY MCC/BC/SKY Work with a range of stakeholders and partners to demonstrate what the City has to offer to a wide range of cyclists, including recreation, sport and utility cycling, spectating, volunteering, leadership courses etc Increase female participation on Ride Well and Ride Strong Improve the utilisation rates to ‘x %’ Offer a range of year round ‘trail’ rides Maximize the use of the NCC, the Velo BC/MCC/NCC MCC BC

Funding Source

Delivered By

Indicator

Baseline

Target

38 

Park and Clayton Vale for Sky Ride Local and Breeze Rides Develop SRL marketing programme Breeze Increase the female workforce by rolling out cycle instructor training for Breeze Champions Promote cycle training to women who can’t currently cycle but want to take part in Breeze launch women friendly bike shops and bike hire schemes in Manchester Offer women only mass participation events (short and traffic free) Sport England

MCC/BC

BC

MCC/TfGM

BC/cycle shops & Social enterprises

Social Cycling Networks

D

RA FT
BC/other partners BC/Team Glow BC Attract more women in Manchester to train as Breeze Champions Work with Team Glow to provide an exit route for Breeze participants wanting to progress Roll out social cycling networks in Manchester, targeting areas where there is limited or no existing networks. BC TBC

39 

Recreation al Cycling infrastructu re and facilities

Green Corridor: link Manchester’s open spaces to a regional park system using signage to connect routes between three and seven miles long The Manchester 2012 Legacy Way: To improve the existing canal route from the City Centre to the NCC via national cycling route 86 alongside the canal (and showcase some of the great people of Manchester) Development of the Velopark to include Clayton Vale

MCC

TBC

TBC

Workplace

D
Barriers Instrastructure LSTF GM Cycle Commuter

RA FT
Sustrans activity? Friends of Fallowfield Loop ?
Link recreational cycling to TfGM Cycle Commuter project TBC MCC/Bikeright project?

MCC

Ensure wide range of maintenance courses by all providers are widely promoted Access to info e.g. Maps/guides/websites? Work with promote cycle recycling schemes to ensure people have access to bikes Cycle training covered elsewhere?

Delivery of three cycle centres in the City Centre plus additional secure cycle parking

TfGM/MCC

2015

40 

Project

at other locations, cycle training and cycle promotion Delivery of improved cycling

LSTF Major Project – Cycle Access to the Regional Centre Workplace Travel Plans Adult cycle training School Bikeability training Rochdale Canal Towpath

Delivering travel plans at key employment sites Programme of training for adults living or working in Manchester Up to level 2 cycle training for years 5-7

MCC/TfGM

Ongoing

MCC/TfGM

Ongoing

DfT

Cross-City Bus Package

Additional cycle parking

D
Brompton Cycle Hire Project Piccadilly Cycle Parking Green Corridor Capital Maintenance Sport Cycling

RA FT
Extending off-road shared cycle track parallel to A62 linking Oldham to central Manchester Congestion Performance Fund TBC Construction of raised cycle lanes on Oxford Road and additional through routes for cyclists in the city centre MCC will work with transport operators, businesses and cycle groups to deliver additional parking in key locations MCC/TfGM 2015 MCC Cycle hire at Piccadilly Station Delivery of improved cycle parking at Piccadilly Rail Station Signage that Links Manchester’s open spaces to a regional park system Programme of planned maintenance of the highway network 2011-2015 Network Rail / Virgin Trains Network Rail 2012 2012

External training provider

41 

Development of the Velopark

Further explore the potential for Clayton Vale to be an expansion of The National Cycling Centre to include mountain-biking, Cyclo X and recreational cycling in Clayton Vale – developing the concept of ‘The Velopark of the North’. Continue to attract major cycling events to Manchester to maintain Manchester’s place as a worldleading city for sport, and to ensure Manchester residents benefit from event legacy and are involved as spectators and where possible; participants. Ensure all schools and educational estabishments have access to cycling as a sport through The National Cycling Centre, Platt Fields Park BMX Track or through the Manchester City Council/British Cycling Cycling Development Programme, with support for schools to sustain their own cycling development. Increase the number of Manchester residents accessing the NCC and Platt Fields Park BMX track through a variety of means including a responsive track programme and enhanced marketing. Increase the numbers and % of Manchester residents participating in and becoming members of Manchester cycling

BC, to be confirmed

2013

Major cycling events

MCC, BC and sponsorship.

From 2012

Schools and educational establishmen ts.

D
Manchester residents accessing the NCC and Platt Fields Park BMX track. Development of Cycling clubs

RA FT
MCC, BC, NCC, schools, external funding. From 2012 MCC, BC, NCC, residents, external funding. From 2012 BC, NCC, clubs, external funding. From 2012

42 

clubs through supporting clubs to recruit, retain and develop coaches and volunteers and increase their income thereby increasing their capacity to develop cycling opportunities Clubmark Increase the number of clubs registering with Clubmark and achieving Clubmark accreditation (the quality assurance mark for clubs with youth sections). Increase the number of Manchester athletes progressing to regional level racing and above and accessing funding for their development. Increase the number of opportunities for people to get involved in competitive cycling and to increase the sustainability of such opportunities. Increase the number of post 16 establishments engaging in the Cycling Development Programme with the aim of tackling ‘dropoff’ from sport. N/a? From 2012

Cycling competition

Post 16 cycling (tackling drop off)

D

RA FT
MCC, BC, NCC, schools, external funding. NHS Post 16 educational establishmen ts and External funding. From 2012TBC From 2012

Support for talented athletes.

MCC and external funding

From 2012

43 

Appendices

D
44 

RA FT

APPENDIX ? – Cycle Parking in Manchester City Centre

D
45 

RA FT

Appendix ? – Cycling Trends
Cycling continues to grow as a mode of choice for commuters into central Manchester and the Higher Education Precinct. This section sets out the latest available data on transport in Manchester which is collated and published by Transport for Greater Manchester Highways Forecasting and Analytical Services – HFAS - (formerly Greater Manchester Transportation Unit). Key facts from the report: o The road with the highest 12-hour weekday pedal cycle flow was the B5117 Oxford Road near the University of Manchester with 1602 pedal cycles between 07:00 and 19:00. o The average 12-hour weekday pedal cycle flows on A and B roads in Manchester were 211 and 298 respectively. These are much higher than the averages for all districts of 107 pedal cycles for A and 100 pedal cycles or B roads. o Traffic flows into the city centre have decreased substantially in the morning and off-peak between 1997 and 2011. The car parking strategy and the completion of the Inner Relief Route and have both contributed to the increase in non-car mode share for Manchester. o All trips in the morning peak increased by 5% between 2002 and 2011. Car trips decreased by 16% and bus trips decreased by 11% while rail trips increased by 40%. Metrolink trips increased by 8%, walking by 74% and cycle trips more than doubled. Furthermore, cycles make up a significantly greater proportion of the traffic on Manchester’s roads as compared to other districts and the Greater Manchester average: Percentage composition of Traffic in Greater Manchester 2010 (0700-1900)
Cars 80.6 82.3 85.0 80.9 LGV OGV1 4.4 2.7 1.1 1.0 5.3 2.9 1.4 1.5 OGV2 3.7 1.1 0.2 0.2 5.0 1.3 0.5 0.4 Buses & Coaches 0.5 2.1 4.6 1.3 0.3 1.4 2.1 1.7 PTWs 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.4 Cycles 0.0 0.8 3.1 1.5 0.0 0.6 1.1 1.1

D
Manchester Motorways A Roads B Roads Minor Roads Greater Manchester Motorways A Roads B Roads Minor Roads

HFAS also carried out cordon counts of the Regional Centre and other key centers in Greater Manchester to monitor the modal share of traffic. These surveys were first carried out in 1997 and on a regular basis thereafter to help monitor progress towards the objectives of the Local Transport Plan (LTP1 and LTP2). The most recent survey was carried out in 2011. All vehicles crossing a cordon into Manchester Key 46 

RA FT
10.5 10.3 9.6 10.5 12.3 11.4 11.4 11.2 (55) (72) (88) (82) (51) (68) (75) (77) (45) (28) (12) (18) (49) (32) (25) (23) 76.8 81.7 82.8 89.7

Centre were counted in the two time periods 07:30-09:30 (“the peak”) and 10:0012:00 (“the inter-peak”) on a typical weekday in March of this year: Road Traffic Entering Manchester Key Centre in March 2011 (07:30-09:30) Road Number and Description
A56 Gt Ducie Street A6042 Corporation Street U Dantzic Street A664 Shudehill U Tib Street U Oldham Street U Spear Street U Little Lever Street A62 Newton Street U Dean Street C Ducie Street C Store Street

Cars
1487 666 124 688 191 29 4 1 921 499

LGV
166 66 6 56 20 7 0 1 89 32

OGV
26 14 3 21 8 0 0 0 11 5 9

Bus + Coach
22 45 0 116 0 139 0 0 5 3

PTWs
25 7 2 10 1 0 0 0 16 3

Cycles
52 39 10 32 4 27 0 0 19 5

All Vehicles
1778 837 145 923 224 202 4 2 1061 547 670 42 827 766 1649 1229 1853 1551 1662 43 73 2839 1744 1115 10 392 270 847 1765 203 112 25385

U Chapeltown Street U Baird Street U Travis Street B6469 Fairfield Street

A6 London Road

U Sackville Street A34 Oxford Road A5103 Medlock Street

C Cambridge Street

U Garwood Street

U Melbourne Street A56 Chester Road A6 Chapel Street A6041 Blackfriars Road U Blantyre Street U MEN Arena Entrance

D
9 B6182 New Bridge Street A6143 Water Street A34 New Quay Street U Gore Street Cyclists on other routes Total % Composition

RA FT
591 49 4 2 35 7 0 0 0 0 674 90 13 19 12 612 79 13 10 23 11 1389 104 65 87 79 20 998 1112 1483 39 12 23 8 11 283 39 16 26 8 9 1388 69 85 1 8 20 0 2 1 0 55 2487 3 165 1 37 0 17 0 12 1465 110 24 87 20 1001 50 0 7 15 46 107 9 12 0 3 0 12 23 0 30 0 0 0 12 2 0 6 0 3 0 5 30 2 1 0 3 379 252 756 1577 191 1 21103 83.1 1591 6.3 298 1.2 956 3.8 247 1.0

15

19

28 47

127 322 39 57

14 121

38 16

16 26 112 1190 4.7

47 

Looking at historical highways survey data it can be seen that the number of people cycling into the Regional Centre in the morning peak has increased by nearly 70% since 1997:

Year 07300930 1997 1999 2002 2005 2006 2009 2010 2011

Cars 27989 29194 25980 27139 24968 21968 21408 21103

LGV 2004 2255 2207 2079 2136 1675 1657 1591

OGV 815 730 469 561 450 510 280 298

Bus 1079 1053 985 1000 1019 997 973 956

PTW 281 276 290 277 231 274 248 247

Cycle 704 645 509 562 470 1102 1143 1190

All 32872 34153 30434 31618 29274 26526 25709 25385 0.77 18759 18697 17262 16620 16939 15988 14271 13868 0.74

10001200

D
48 

RA FT
2011/1997 0.75 0.79 0.37 973 842 615 607 500 556 346 302 0.89 973 0.88 208 1997 1999 2002 2005 2006 2009 2010 2011 14312 2008 2137 1999 2067 2085 1812 1661 1672 14242 13303 12526 13057 11978 10912 1096 1023 1101 1083 1075 1008 148 138 85 75 101 53 10500 961 65 2011/1997 0.73 0.83 0.31 0.99 0.31

1.69 285 232 184 234 139 466 321

368

1.29

The inbound modal share trends are set out below and show that cycling has more than doubled since 1997:

Time Period

Year

Car

Bus

Rail

Tram

Cycle

Walk

Total

% Car 37 37 37 30 31 30

% Non Car 63 63 63 70 69 70

2002 07300930 2005 2006 2009 2010 2011 2010/2002 10001200 2002 2005 2006 2009 2010 2011

31955 32567 32958 27021 27402 26801 0.84

25254 24696 25071 24615 23418 22438 0.89

16612 16743 17950 20753 21638 23330 1.40

6301 6556 6048 6716 6448 6832 1.08

509 562 470 1102 1143 1190 2.34

5279 5723 7485 8877 9599 9207 1.74

85910 86847 89982 89084 89648 89798 1.05

RA FT
17560 16159 18541 15452 15386 14595 0.83 11415 11655 13079 15379 13851 14809 1.30 6287 6429 6938 2408 2451 2801 3450 2947 2695 1.12 184 234 139 466 321 368 3000 3713 3528 5320 5583 5063 1.69 40854 40641 45026 50079 47431 49181 1.20 10012 9343 11651 1.09 2.00

43 40 41 31 32 30

57 60 59 69 68 70

2010/2002

D
49 

Regarding road casualties and collisions, there is a slight downward trend over the period 1994-2010 although there is significant fluctuation from year to year:

Ave 94-98
All Casualties Fatal Serious Slight All KSI Pop 000s KSI per 100000 Pop 29 266 3358 3652 294 430.4 68

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

23 236 3442 3701 259 431.1 60

18 258 3637 3913 276 439.5 63

28 255 3471 3754 283 392.7 72

15 252 3493 3760 267 422.3 63

37 244 3228 3509 281 432.5 65

20 250 3156 3426 270 432.5 62

23 261 2889 3173 284 437.0 65

24 216 2604 2844 240 441.2 54

15 192 2436 2643 207 452.0 46

11 179 2238 2428 190 458.1 41

13 174 2217 2404 187 473.2 40

11 155 1796 1962 166 483.8 35

Child Casualties Child KSI Child All Child Pop 000s KSI per 100000 Pop 71

RA FT
59 60 59 50 57 42 42 36 33 535 505 514 446 475 405 366 341 285 101.6 58 100.0 60 83.3 71 85.0 59 85.2 67 85.2 49 84.6 50 83.3 43 82.8 40 112 145 145 173 147 153 139 134 116 2451 651 226 261 2515 672 260 321 2315 726 249 319 3754 2480 674 207 226 3760 2247 662 195 258 3509 2220 591 242 220 3426 1912 618 241 263 3173 1802 509 227 169 2844 1694 432 215 186 2643 3701 3913

28 257 83.2 34

32 287 84.0 38

27 236 85.3 32

542

103.1 69

Casualty Type TWPV Car Occupant Pedestrian Pedal Cycle

108

138 1439 450 239 162 2428

106 1497 397 245 159 2404

93 1156 334 261 118 1962

2229 749 288 278

D
Other All 3652

50 

Appendix ? Participation Levels in Recreational and Sport Cycling
Active People Survey 5 Cycling in Greater Manchester Cycling in Greater Manchester by Local Authority
All cycling (inc. functional and at any intensity) Number National Greater Manchester 4,926,200 217,600 Percentage of population 11.6% 11.0% Sport England measure for cycling (does not include functional cycling) Once a week (30 mins, Once a month moderate intensity) Percentage of Percentage of Number Number population population 3,748,000 169,000 8.8% 8.1% 1,841,600 91,900 4.3% 4.5% 4.1% 2.7% 4.1% 5.8% 2.7% 5.4% 7.1% 5.8% 5.4%

Location

Bolton Bury Manchester Oldham Rochdale Salford Stockport Tameside Trafford Wigan

Source: Sport England Active People Survey 5, Quarter 2 (Apr 10 - Apr 11)

Notes: Grey cells are indicative only due to low cell counts. Blank cells indicate returns that are too low to be statistically reliable.

D
51 

RA FT
17,300 11,400 43,400 14,400 9,100 16,600 34,500 18,100 22,200 30,600 8.3% 7.8% 10.8% 8.5% 5.7% 9.0% 15.0% 10.4% 12.8% 12.3% 15,100 9,300 30,500 10,900 4,100 11,700 31,300 16,100 16,200 23,800 7.2% 6.4% 7.6% 6.4% 2.6% 6.3% 13.6% 9.3% 9.4% 9.6%

8,600 3,900 16,300 9,800 5,000 12,400 12,400 10,000 13,500

Appendix ? – BLUC Locker Locations
Rail Stations Appley Bridge Atherton Bolton Bredbury Bromley Cross Cheadle Hulme Gathurst Hazel Grove Heald Green Hindley Lostock Marple Romiley Metrolink Stops Altrincham Brooklands Bury Crumpsall Heaton Park Prestwich Radcliffe Sale Stretford St Werburghs Road Whitefield Bus Stations Stockport Bolton Leigh

Horwich Parkway

Reddish North

Rose Hill Marple Stockport Wigan Wallgate

D
52 

RA FT