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Thomas
A.
Beazley

Grace‐St.
Luke’s
Episcopal
School


Jamie
Baker

Reverb
Consulting


Many
of
these
thoughts
are
further

 developed
on
Jamie’s
blog:
 Reverb
Consulting
Blog
 Reverbconsulting.blogspot.com


We
are
no
longer
in
an
environment
where
a
school
 can
put
its
head
in
the
sand
and
imagine
that
it
only
 has
to
deal
with
change
every
5
to
10
years.

 Descriptors
common
in
the
“industrial
age”

 


(stable,
predictable,
logical,
linear,
long‐range,
 fixed,
tasks,
roles,
rules)
are
being
replaced
with
 “information
age”
descriptors
(e.g.
turbulent,
 unpredictable,
fluid,
pragmatic,
adaptable,
 emerging,
and
process.)



‐
ISM
Ideas
and
Perspectives
Vol.
29
No.
1


All
types
of
individuals
and
organizations
are
struggling
to
 respond
and
stay
in
sync,
to
remain
relevant.
Some
do
this
willy
 nilly,
and
others
are
trying
to
devise
plans
such
as
personal
 learning
plans,
organizational
learning
plans,
or
sustainability
 plans.
The
basis
for
these
plans
is
this
question:

 What
will
it
take
to
survive
in
a
new,
fast,
flat,
wiki
world?
 A
recent
article
in
ASCD,
"Rigor
Redefined"
by
Tony
Wagner,
outlines
7
critical

 survival
skills
for
the
21st
century:
 1.
Critical
Thinking
and
Problem
Solving
 2.
Collaboration
and
Leadership
 3.
Agility
and
Adaptability
 4.
Initiative
and
Entrepreneurialism
 5.
Effective
Oral
and
Written
Communication
 6.
Accessing
and
Analyzing
Information
 7.
Curiosity
and
Imagination
 How
are
we
further
evolving
these
skills
in
ourselves?
 How
are
we
explicitly
teaching
these
skills
to
our
students?





If
you
don’t
like
change,
 you’re
going
to
like
 irrelevance
even
less.




 
 
 
 

 
 
‐
General
Eric
Shinseki,
U.
S.
Army
Chief
of
Staff


Relevance
is
about
alignment
 Your
pricing
and
values
message

 

must
align
with
customer
and
consumer
 expectations,
perceptions,
understanding,
 felt
experience.
 Alignment
is
led
and
managed
by
the
school
 ‐‐
story,
visibility
in
community,
designed
 experiences


Leadership
and
learning

 are
indispensable

 to
each
other.

‐
John
F.
Kennedy


Keys
to
a
Successful
Process:


Willingness
 Reflection
 Mindset


Becoming
an
organization
that
learns
is
 dependent
upon
becoming,
individually
 and
collectively,
intentional
and
disciplined
 at
reflection
despite
the
time
pressures
 that
permeate
school
life.
Reflection
is
the
 process
of
deliberatively
deconstructing
a
 situation
or
endeavor
for
meaning,
impact,
 values,
logistics,
relevance,
and
strategic
 import.



  The
hallmark
of
successful


individuals
is
that
they
 love
learning,
they
seek
 challenges,
they
value
 effort,
and
they
persist
in
 the
face
of
obstacles… Some
display
these
 [growth
mindset]
qualities
 and
others
do
not.

Why?

 This
is
what
my
work
asks.
   


















‐
Carol
Dweck


The
Chinese
believe
that
those
 who
get
the
best
grades
are
the
 hardest
workers.
In
contrast,
 Americans
say
in
polls
that
the
 best
students
are
the
ones
who
 are
innately
the
smartest.

‐
Nicholas
D.
Kristof,
New
York
Times


Grace‐St.
Luke’s
core
 leadership
 embarked
upon
an
 intensive,
prolonged
 exploration
of
the
 themes
presented
in
 Pink’s
book
to
 generate
strategies
 for
becoming
more
 aligned
to
the
21st
 century.


The
future
belongs
to
a
very
 different
kind
of
mind
‐‐
creators
 and
empathizers,
pattern
 recognizers,
and
meaning
makers.
 These
people
‐‐
artists,
inventors,
 designers,
storytellers,
caregivers,
 consolers,
big
picture
thinkers
‐‐
will
 now
reap
society’s
richest
rewards
 and
share
its
greatest
joys.

‐
Daniel
Pink,
A
Whole
New
Mind


Hello,
I’m
a
Mac
and
I’m
a
PC….


MFA
=
the
new
MBA


Not
just
function
but
also
DESIGN
 Not
just
argument
but
also
STORY
 Not
just
focus
but
also
SYMPHONY
 Not
just
logic
but
also
EMPATHY
 Not
just
seriousness
but
also
PLAY
 Not
just
accumulation
but
also
MEANING


Pjkl

  Brad’s
driving
passion


Joe’s Wines Brad Larson Owner and Sommelier

fuels
his
learning.
He
 works
hard
at
continually
 learning
about
his
 industry
at
a
micro
and
a
 macro
level
because
he
 loves
it.
He
is
playful
and
 intensely
passionate
 about
what
he
does,
and
 that
affinity
drives
him
to
 continually
do
better.




 Play
will
be
to
the
21st
century
what
 work
was
to
the
last
300
years
of
 industrial
society
–
our
dominant
way
of
 knowing,
doing,
and
creating
value.

 
 
 
 
 


–
Pat
Kane,
The
Play
Ethic


Play
deserves
more
respect
than
it
gets.
 Playing
with
images
and
ideas
is
what
 creativity
is
all
about,
and
creativity
advances
 civilization...If
there
is
any
better
way
to
 strengthen
a
brain,
or
to
feed
the
spirit
than
 to
play,
I
do
not
know
what
it
is.

‐
Edward
Hallowell,
The
Childhood
Roots
of
Adult
Happiness


Look
for
ways
to
be
more
playful

  
café
to
harvest
information
   
field
Trips
(Get
on
the
Bus)
   
guest
speakers
   
movie
day


  Independent
Student
Projects



(no
midterms!)


8th Grade Independent Project

Spqrl

  “Story
creates
an


Independent Bank Susan Stephenson Co-Founder, Chairman of the Board

opportunity
for
our
 organization
to
powerfully
 express
its
authenticity
 through
the
stories
of
our
 customers.
Story
leads
 others
to
act
upon
their
 desire
to
be
a
part
of
this
 culture
that
happens
to
be
 a
bank.”



When
facts
become
so
widely
available
 and
instantly
accessible,
each
one
 becomes
less
valuable.
What
begins
to
 matter
more
is
the
ability
to
place
these
 facts
in
context
and
to
deliver
them
with
 emotional
impact.




 Story

=
context
enriched
by
emotion.


E.M.
Forster’s
famous
observation


Fact


 The
king
died
and
then
the
queen
 died.
 Story

 The
king
died,
and
then
queen
died
 of
a
broken
heart.


Msktutv

 

Buckman Laboratories Kathy Buckman Gibson Chairman of the Board

Upon
becoming
chairman,
 Gibson’s
immediate
 challenge
was
to
develop
an
 organizational
culture
that
 honored
Buckman
 employees’
cultural
 diversity
and
created
a
 capacity
for
collaboration
 across
divisions.
“A
written
 statement
of
how
we
 respect
one
another
and
 how
we
respectively
work
 together
infused
our
culture
 with
a
sense
of
meaning.”



Presentee‐ism
is
the
phenomenon
 of
being
there
physically
but
not
 there
emotionally,
mentally,
or
 spiritually.
Presentee‐ism
is
caused
 by
the
loss
of
one’s
sense
of
 meaning
or
one’s
understanding
or
 ownership
of
mission.


So
what's
left?
Meaning.
Purpose.
 Deep
life
experience.
Use
whatever
 word
or
phrase
you
like,
but
know
 that
consumer
desire
for
these
 qualities
is
on
the
rise.
Remember
 your
Abraham
Maslow
and
your
 Viktor
Frankl.
Bet
your
business
on
it.


- Rich Karlgaard, publisher of Forbes

MASLOW

Cqys
qz
Ep{u|}

  Standards
of
how
we,
as
professionals,
interact
with
each


other,

with
all
members
of
our
learning
community.


  Standards
that
we
develop
and
embrace
as
a
community.
   Embodies
the
values
that
we
view
as
being
essential
for


working
together
effectively.
 one
another
accountable.


  Standards
that
we
model,
reinforce,
and
to
which
we
hold


Sl~•{qtl

  Tim
also
talked
at
length


Young Avenue Sound Dr. Tim Sharp Symphony Conductor Dean of Fine Arts, Rhodes College

about
managing
talent
 and
the
difficulty
 involved
in
motivating
 and
influencing
a
player
 who
was
at
the
 recognized
top
of
their
 field.
“As
difficult
as
it
is,”
 he
says,
“Without
 collaboration,
if
each
 player
did
his
own
thing,
 the
end
result
would
not
 be
worth
anyone’s
time.”



Symphony
is
the
ability
to
put
together
 the
pieces.
It
is
the
capacity
to
synthesize
 rather
than
to
analyze;
to
see
relationships
 between
seemingly
unrelated
fields;
to
 detect
broad
patterns
rather
than
to
 deliver
specific
answers;
and
to
invent
 something
new
by
combining
elements
 nobody
else
thought
to
pair.

 
 
 
 


‐
Daniel
Pink,
A
Whole
New
Mind


Many
engineering
deadlocks
have
been
broken
by
 people
who
are
not
engineers
at
all.
This
is
because
 perspective
is
more
important
than
IQ.
The
ability
 to
make
big
leaps
of
thought
is
a
common
 denominator
among
the
originators
of
 breakthrough
ideas.
Usually
this
ability
resides
in
 people
with
very
wide
backgrounds,
 multidisciplinary
minds,
and
a
broad
spectrums
of
 experience.

‐
Nicholas
Negroponte
of
MIT




A
large
part
of
self‐understanding
is
the
 search
for
appropriate
personal
metaphors
 that
make
sense
of
out
lives.

‐
George
Lakoff,
Metaphors
We
Live
By


organizational metaphor

E~•kp{l

  “You
can
measure


St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital Pam Dotson, R.N., MBA Vice President of Patient Services

empathy
and
you
can
 develop
empathy.
A

 leader
must
manage
with
 organizational
empathy
 for
the
overall
mission
of
 the
organization
first,
with
 personal
empathy
for
the
 members
of
the
 organization.
Yet,
you
 must
focus
primarily
on
 fulfilling
the
mission.”



Empathy
is
the
ability
to
imagine
 yourself
in
someone
else’s
position
and
 to
intuit
what
that
person
is
feeling.
It
 is
the
ability
to
stand
in
someone
else’s
 shoes,
to
see
with
their
eyes,
and
to
 feel
with
their
hearts.
It
requires
 attuning
oneself
to
another.


Empathy
is
an
essential
part
of
living
a
life
of
meaning.
 Empathy
is
an
essential
part
of
Design,
because
good
 designers
put
themselves
in
the
mind
of
whoever
is
 going
to
experience
the
product
or
service
they’re
 designing.
 Empathetic
people
understand
the
importance
of
 context.
 Stories
can
be
a
pathway
to
empathy.
 Empathetic
listening,
intuition,
and
willingness
to
 deviate
from
the
rules
can
mean
the
difference
 between
life
and
death.

 Empathy
supplements
objective
knowledge
and
the
use
 of
technology.


A
hospital
is
an
empathic
business.

 This
is
what
makes
it
a
good
analogy

 for
a
school.


 patient‐centered
organizational
chart
  organizational
empathy
  Analogous
organizational
chart
for
school


‐
what
would
be
different?


Ds}uvt

 

Hnedak Bobo Group Janet Smith Founding Principal

“Everything
springs
from
your
 culture
and
it
must
be
healthy
 and
performance
oriented… Every
large
and
small
thing
 associated
with
your
 organization

is
marketing,
and
 it
communicates
about
you,
 whether
you
realize
it
and
 design
it,
or
not.
Becoming
 hyperaware
and
intentional
 about
every
detail
in
your
 environment
and
your
 interactions
is
marketing,
and
it
 pays
off.”



Design
Is:



problem‐solving
  everything
you
see,
feel,
 hear,
smell
  how
we
collaborate
  managing
experiences
  what
we
will
be
in
50
years

  


CYCLE
OF
INNOVATION

  Innovation
is
the
ongoing


Observe


Assess


Relevance


Develop

Implement


process
of
analyzing
 critical
market
factors
 and
evolving
customer
 needs
and
aligning
your
 organization,
its
 knowledge,
and
its
 people
to
meet
current
 demands.
One
innovates
 to
remain
relevant.



The
key
to
success
in
any
organization
is
 having
employees

continue
to
learn
and
 grow,
yet
too
often
this
is
not
a
priority
for
 leaders…Strangely
and
sadly,
this
lack
of
 appreciation
and
understanding
about
the
 importance
of
adult
learning
is
true
even
 in
education.
If
any
setting
should
evince
 learning
among
employees,
it
is
schools,
 yet
often
they
don’t.

‐
Thomas
Hoerr,
Leading
an
Independent
School


We
can’t
solve
problems
 by
using
the
same
kind
 of
thinking
we
used
 when
we
created
them.

‐
Albert
Einstein


Grace‐St.
Luke’s
School


©
2008
Reverb
Consulting






The
illiterate
of
the
21st
Century
 will
not
be
those
who
can
not
read
 or
write,
but
those
who
cannot
 learn,
unlearn
and
relearn.



 
‐
Alvin
Toffler,
Revolutionary
Wealth


Jamie
Baker
 Reverb
Consulting
 jamie@reverbconsulting.com
 901
337‐0525