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Urban Design Manual
PART C – DESIGN STANDARDS
These Design Standards have been prepared in order to assist developers and their agents in preparing development application submissions to the City of Kitchener. These standards assume ideal conditions. There will be sites where due to competing objectives or the inherent limitations of the specific site, it will not be possible to meet the standards. In such cases, the reader/designer should consult with staff to discuss the best method of achieving the optimum design for the respective site.

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INFRASTRUCTURE, STREETS AND SITE DESIGN 1.0 PARKING STRUCTURES
Definitions
Footcandles – The standard used to specify the measured intensity of lighting. Illumination Level – The minimum level of illumination for the specified area measured on a horizontal plane. Distance from signalized intersection - minimum 65 metres Distance from unsignalized intersection - minimum 33 metres One-way lane width - minimum 3.66 metres, maximum 4.57 metres Two-way lane width - minimum 6.1 metres, maximum 9.1 metres Turning radius at street - 7.6 to 9.1 metres Angle of intersection at street and driveway – 70 to o 110 Driveway entrance/exit shall be at grade with existing or future sidewalk. Grade of entrance/exit shall not be greater than 4% for a distance of 7.62m from the nearest edge of the street. The grade of the aisle ramp or driveway adjacent to a parking control device (gate, cashier booth, ticket dispenser) shall not exceed 4% for a minimum distance of 9.1m on the approach to such devices. Where a driveway entrance/exit intersects a street, an unobstructed daylight triangle of 4.57m x 4.57m shall be maintained behind the property line on both sides of the driveway. No visual obstruction is allowed greater than 1 m over the traveled portion of the adjacent roads. Pedestrian entrances/exits and elevators must be barrier free accessible.
o

Standards Design Criteria - Ramps:
Grade - maximum 12% Transition Grade – applicable to all ramps regardless of grade and must be ½ of the ramp grade for a minimum distance of 3.66m centred on the transition point, to a maximum of 6% One-way Ramp Width - 3.04 metre minimum Two-way Ramp Width - 6.10 metre minimum One-way Curved Ramp Width - 4.57 metre minimum Two-way Curved Ramp Width - 9.10 metre minimum One-way Curved Ramp Radius - 5.5 metre minimum (inside radius) - Two-way Curved Ramps shall include a 0.50 metre centre median. Curved Ramp Super Elevation - 0.10 metres/metre maximum (at the point of sharpest turning).

Design Criteria - Traffic Circulation:
In areas where traffic circulation may require guidance for directional movement and where painted arrows are not adequate to direct traffic safely or in an organized manner for optimum site circulation, traffic signs, delineators, markings or other traffic control measures or devices will be required.

Design Criteria - Parking Areas:
Slope of parking area and aisles - 0.5% minimum, 5% maximum – Refer to Section 3.0 for Surface Parking design standards.

Design Criteria - Street Entrance/Exits:

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Design Criteria - Lighting: Horizontal Illumination Levels (Footcandles) 5 General Parking Areas 2 Roof and Surface * (see also Outdoor Lighting Standards) 10 Ramps and Corners 20 Stairwell and Exit Lobbies Uniformity Ratio 4:1 Average/Minimum

Large safe-exit arrows shall be displayed on safeexit doors 1.5 meters above the floor, measured from the centre of the arrow to the floor, with the arrow pointing down. Designated safe-exit routes. Small safe-exit arrows prominently displayed on columns or walls 1.5 meters above the floor, measured from the centre of the arrow to the floor, and located:

• •

• • • •

At least every ten metres along the safe-exit route. At all safe-exit route decision points along the safe-exit route. Wherever a safe-exit route crosses a traffic aisle.

Lighting of parking structures shall:

• • • • • • • • •

Clearly illuminate the interior of the structure and allow the visual inspection of the interiors of cars. Provide uniform distribution to avoid dark areas and shadows. Provide closer spacing of lower wattage fixtures rather than fewer fixtures of higher wattage. Protect lighting fixtures from damage by using wired glass or other suitable means of protection. Maximize natural light penetration. Provide vandal-resistant fixtures, easily maintained, and repaired on a regular basis. Locate fixtures in order to minimize glare. Highlight pedestrian entrances with additional secondary lighting fixtures. Paint all walls and ceilings white for greater and more even illumination.

Alert signs are to be prominently displayed on columns or walls 2.1 meters above the floor, measured from the top of the sign to the floor, located every 25 parking stalls in the garage, evenly distributed in the structure. The following shall be coloured green:

• •

The safe-exit door. The frame of the safe-exit door and wall adjacent to the safe-exit door to a distance of one metre on either side of the frame, and to a height of 3 meters above the floor or to the soffit above the bulk head over the door.

Signs shall be used to notify users of the security measures in place (monitoring by security patrols, closed circuit TV, intercom systems) or to highlight locations of emergency telephones, intercoms or panic buttons. All required traffic control signing (stop, yield, crosswalks, etc.) shall be provided in accordance with typical traffic engineering practice. The sizes, shapes and colours of these signs shall conform to standards specified in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (Ontario Ministry of Transportation).


Design Criteria - Signage:

Signs within the parking structure shall be well illuminated, easy to read, and have a uniform graphic design and include the following:

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Urban Design Manual Figure 1.1: Signage for Parking Structures C-4 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .

• • Design Criteria . Section 5. elevator lobbies and open ramps shall be used to enhance visibility and minimize entrapment areas. Parking regulation and fee structure signs shall be placed near entrances and/or at cashier booths. Colour-coding and unique graphics can help orient users to locate parked vehicles quickly.0.555551 Urban Design Manual • Information signs (entrance. Barrier Free Parking.Paint/Stain: • All new or redeveloped parking structures shall have the ceilings and walls painted or stained white to enhance light reflection and brightness. exit.Sight Lines: • The garage shall be designed to minimize obstructions to view. Design Criteria . 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-5 . Fire Route) shall be clearly posted in welllit areas to enhance pedestrian and driver safety and minimize confusion. directional) and regulatory signs (No Parking. Glassed stairwells. Design Criteria .Barrier Free Parking: • Barrier free parking is to be supplied in all parking garages as per the standards contained in Barrier Free Accessibility.

including field accesses. i. Commercial access – Provided access to a property being used other than for a residential use of six units or less or farm or field uses.Urban Design Manual 2. Low Speed Roadway – One with a posted speed limit of less than 70 km/h.0 ACCESS TO ROADS Definitions Access – The means by which vehicles are provided with ingress from a public or private property to the roadway.e. High Speed Roadway – One with a posted speed limit of equal to or greater than 70 km/h. A high volume commercial access provides access to facilities which generate higher volumes of automobile traffic and/or heavy truck traffic. Radius – The curved outer edge of an access connecting the throat to the curb line. shopping centre. Standards The following chart indicates the number and location of permitted accesses for City and Regional roads. C-6 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . Non-commercial Access – A non-commercial access is one providing access to a residential use of six units or less or to agricultural land. Throat Width – Is identified by the minimum width dimension at the intersection of the radius with the parallel portion of the access.

0 m 8.0 m 55.0 m 9.0 m 150.0 m 300.6 m One One 33.0 m 13.0 m 4.0 m N/A 37.0 m 33.0 m 13.0 m 69.0 m N/A 7. Minimum dimension shall be measured from centreline of access to centreline of adjacent access Minimum dimension shall be measured from centreline of access to property line abutting railway right-of-way .0 m 300. 3.0 m Varies Varies Variable Variable Notes: 1.0 m 8.0 m 304.0 m 115.1: Number and Location of Access Points Number and Location of Access for City and Regional Roads Number of Access Allowed Minimum Dimension from NonSignalized Intersecting Highway Minimum Dimension from Signalized Intersecting Highway Minimum Dimension from Pedestrian Signals Minimum Dimension from Adjacent NonCommercial Access Minimum Dimension from Adjacent Commercial Access Minimum Dimension from Adjacent High Volume Commercial Access Minimum Dimension from At Grade Railway Crossing Minimum Dimension from Abutment or Structure on a Highway Throat Width (note 1) (note 2) (note 2) (note 3) (note 4) (note 4) (note 4) (note 5) One One 16.0 m One One 15.0 m 304.6 m – 9.0 m 59.0 m 65.0 m Varies Varies 7.0 m 20.0 m 115. 5.0 m N/A 13.0 m 69.0 m 16.0 m 110. 4.Urban Design Manual 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-7 777771 Figure 2.0 m 150.0 m Varies Varies 3.0 m 33. 2. Need must be demonstrated and approved where multiple accesses are requested Minimum dimension shall be measured from centreline of access to property line abutting an intersecting highway Minimum dimension shall be measured from centreline of access to centre of crosswalk.0 m 16.0 m 150.0 m 37.0 m 8.0 m 300.6 m – 7.7 m – 6.0 m 13.0 m 65.0 m 59.0 m 55.0 m 28.0 m 24.

2. the minimum aisle width for angle parking shall apply. Section 5. lane or driveway.7 metres minimum.5% minimum. Design Criteria . The length and standard dimensions shall comply with the minimum standards shown in the chart below. Design Criteria . All angle parking spaces shall be plainly marked in accordance with the approved site plan. One-way Aisle Width .6. traffic signs. In commercial areas. Driveways – maximum gradient of 10%. • Design Criteria .5 metres from any intersecting road. lane or obstruction.Traffic Circulation: In areas where traffic circulation may require guidance for directional movement and where painted arrows are not adequate to direct traffic safely or in an organized manner for optimum site circulation.Urban Design Manual 3. delineators. right-of-ways connecting adjacent properties will be encouraged.4 metres minimum Length .1: Parallel Parking Dimensions Design Criteria .Street Entrances/Exits: • • Distance from signalized intersections – minimum 65 metres. Angle parking includes 90 degree parking layouts. • C-8 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . Angle Parking – The arrangement of parking spaces in such a manner that the side of the vehicle when parked is at an angle to the travelled portion of the aisle. • • Standards Parking Areas: • • • Slope of parking area and aisles – 0.0 SURFACE PARKING FACILITIES Definitions Parallel Parking – The arrangement of parking spaces in such a manner that the side of each vehicle is parallel to the travelled portion of the aisle or driveway. which may have a minimum length of 5.Barrier Free Parking: • Barrier free parking is to be supplied for all parking facilities as per the standards provided in the Barrier Free Accessibility section. Distance from unsignalized intersection – minimum of 33 metres. except the first and last space in any row. Figure 3. markings or other traffic control measures or devices will be required.6 metres. 5% maximum.Angle Parking: • The width of angle parking spaces shall not be less than 2. All aisles serving angle parking shall be restricted to one way traffic with the exception of 90 degree angle parking layouts.3.0.1 metres minimum. Two-way Aisle Width . Design Criteria .5 metres provided it is located a minimum of 1. Where both parallel and angle parking are served by one aisle.7 metres minimum.Parallel Parking: • • Width . except where such aisle is designated as a fire route in which case the Emergency Services Policy shall govern.6.

6m 2.7 m for Single Parking Row 0 • Portions of industrial sites which are behind the front facade and are not used for passenger vehicle parking or circulation.Angle of Parking W .6m 17. only when the street is curbed.6m 2.6m 15. 2: Angle Parking Dimensions Angle Parking Dimensions: AN0 90 85 80 75 70 65 60 55 50 45 40 In industrial areas.2m 3.6m 4.Stall Width Parallel to Aisle * . Curbing will also be required to maintain the integrity of the pavement due to drainage or grading concerns and along all passenger vehicle parking and circulation routes.4m 3. poured concrete curbing is required to define entrances and where required by the Storm Water Management Scheme.7m 17.3m 18.Width of Parking Module C . In all other types of development continuous poured concrete curbing (15 cm high) is required in the following locations: W 2.6m 2.6m L 5.5m 5.6m 2.6m 2.0m 3.5m 5. concrete or equivalent is required for all areas on site except: Legend: AN .Length of Stall A .7m 4.4m 3.7m 2. Fire access routes as per the Ontario Building Code.0m 6.0m 6. Driveways for truck traffic will have poured concrete curbing to a minimum of 3 metres behind the property line and/or at the start of the turning radii behind the property line. • • • • Barrier free drop-off zones and parking spaces are to be flush with the adjacent sidewalk.Width of Stall L .9m 3.6m 2.5m A 7.1m 6.6m 16.6m 5. • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-9 .6m 2.9m 5.6m 2.7m 5. Defining vehicular ingress and egress.Surface Treatments: Hot-mixed asphalt.6m 2.8m 2.999991 Urban Design Manual Design Criteria – Curbing: • Figure 3.6.Width of Aisle M .8m 14.4m C 2.4m M 18. whichever is greater.7m 5.6 metres wide (measured from back face of curb to back face of curb).0m 5.0m 6.6m 2.5m 4.7m 17.6m 2.8m 14.9m 6. Parking lots for City parks use. Design Criteria .6m 2. Sidewalks adjacent to vehicular parking stalls and internal traffic routes.7m 6.1m 17. Adjacent to vehicular parking stalls and landscaped areas.6m 2.8m 5.3m* 6.1m 5.0m 3.8m 17.0m • • Around traffic islands minimum of 2.

vehicle fuels or spilt chemical products for all vehicle servicing/repair and storage associated with vehicles undergoing repair. • C-10 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . The design and grading of all loading docks should accommodate the anticipated size of truck and required turning movements.Urban Design Manual Loading Docks and Vehicle Repair in the Huron Business Park: • Loading/unloading areas and transfer areas shall have asphalt or concrete surfacing together with a collection system to collect all oils.

provides security and enhances the City’s night-time environment. (This quantity was formerly known as the “illumination value” or “illumination level”.: lamps which are inadequately shielded. Reflected Glare .e.The minimum level of illumination for the specified area measured on a horizontal plane. shields and the appropriate application of the fixture mounting height.5 metres above ground level.Glare caused when excessive bright light sources in the visual field are seen directly. e. designed. The City of Kitchener requires that 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-11 . wattage. located. such as reduction of contrast. Lighting sources are not to be visible from adjacent properties or on-site residential units.) Standards Effective outdoor lighting improves visibility.The discomfort or impairment of vision experienced when parts of the visual field are excessively bright in relation to general surroundings. Design Criteria . The City of Kitchener requires the use of full cutoff luminaries that direct no light above the horizontal plane.Glare Control: Glare is excessive brightness that causes discomfort or impairment of vision. One footcandle = 10. For all area lighting. Glare . Glare control must be achieved through the use of cutoff fixtures.(Unit: Lux) The luminous flux density at a surface i. The SI unit is the candela per square metre (cd/sq. It is measured by the luminous intensity of the light emitted or reflected in a given direction from a surface element divided by the area of the element in the same direction. light trespass.) One Lux is equal to one lumen per square metre.m. the luminous flux incident per unit area. Illuminance .76 Lux. Outdoor lighting must be aimed. Vertical illuminance is measured at 1. This lighting standard recognizes the benefits of outdoor lighting and provides clear guidelines to help maintain and compliment the City of Kitchener’s character and contribute to the safety and security of its citizens and visitors. increases safety. Improperly installed lighting can be extraordinarily powerful and create problems of excessive glare. It is intended to reduce the problems associated with improperly designed and installed outdoor lighting.g. One footcandle is equal to one lumen per square foot. luminaries should be used and equipped with devices for redirecting light such as shields.Light Trespass: Light trespass is the unnecessary illumination of adjacent property. Lumination Level . Discomfort Glare .Glare which impairs the ability to see detail without necessarily causing visual discomfort.0 OUTDOOR LIGHTING Definitions Footcandle -The standard used to specify the measured intensity of lighting. pedestrians or adjacent users by impairing their visibility or create a nuisance by projecting or reflecting objectionable light onto neighbouring properties.Light Pollution.Glare which causes visual discomfort without necessarily impairing the ability to see detail. Direct Glare . All outdoor lighting equipment and fixtures shall be properly shielded and directed downward. Luminance . produced by reflection of light sources or other bright areas in glossy or semi-matt surfaces. fitted and maintained so as not to present a hazard to drivers. Effective lighting systems must be designed to eliminate direct and indirect skyward lighting. Design Criteria . discomfort or distraction..A term used to describe various visual effects.The physical measure of stimulus which produces the sensation of luminosity (brightness) in terms of the intensity of the light emitted in a given direction (usually towards the observer) by unit area of a self-luminous or transmitting or reflecting surface. aiming angle and fixture placement. visors or hoods. Disability Glare .11111111111 Urban Design Manual 4. high energy use and skyward light pollution. Design Criteria . Night Sky Controls: Light pollution is considered undesirable and many people feel that it reduces the enjoyment of the night sky.

2 0.5 Horizontal 15:1 4:1 Vertical Illumination (footcandles) 0.Urban Design Manual the illumination levels at all property lines not exceed 0. Area Around the Pump and Under the Canopy: Measurement Minimum Average Maximum Uniformity Maximum:Minimum Average:Minimum 5:1 4:1 Horizontal Illumination (footcandles) 5 20 25 Design Criteria .5 – min.5 10 Vertical 20:1 5:1 Car Dealership Lighting: Automobiles are typically placed on display adjacent to the roadway.5 – min. The following charts indicate the required illuminance levels and uniformity ratios for various types of use. “light is shining in my window.” Such concerns can be addressed by containing light within the design area and carefully selecting.0 7. brightness. The lighting of this area should meet the needs of the business without producing excessive brightness. Gas Stations: Light levels for gas stations should be adequate to facilitate on-site activities without producing excessive C-12 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .5 2. Commercial and Institutional: Horizontal Measurement Illumination (footcandles) Minimum Average Maximum Uniformity Maximum:Minimum Average:Minimum 0. locating and mounting well-shielded luminaires. 0. measured in lux or footcandles. Illuminance uniformity is measured by the ratios Maximum to Minimum and Average to Minimum. Driveway and Laneways: Measurement Average Horizontal Average Vertical Illumination (footcandles) 0. 0. These ratios provide a measure of the consistency of lighting across a site and provide assurance that the illuminance is within a range that the human eye can properly discern all objects in its field of view. Illuminance levels provide an effective method of measuring the performance of a lighting design. The fixtures should be placed between the roadway and the merchandise area such that cut-off and low-glare luminaries are aimed directly at the front row.5 2. Every effort should be made to minimize reflected glare off of the windshields.5 footcandles. there is the complaint that. Areas away from the pumps used for parking or vehicle storage should be designed in accordance with the Outdoor Parking Area Lighting Requirements. The lighting should not compromise motorists' visibility on the roadway or that of the customer viewing the merchandise. Lighting complaints are frequently due to nuisance glare or excessive brightness in the normal field of vision even though there may be no measurable light at ground level.Illuminance: Illuminance determines the amount of light incident on a surface. All light fixtures mounted on canopies must be recessed or flush with the bottom surface of the canopy.2 Uniformity Maximum:Minimum 10:1 Outdoor Parking Area Lighting Requirements for Industrial.

poles and transformer units. structures. Aiming direction and angle of light source. Full cutoff details. Location of all lights. Façade and Sign Lighting: Vertical surface illumination and accent lighting can provide a sense of security and mitigate shadows and provide important aesthetic benefits. Mounting height. loading and amenity areas. Type of light source. The following chart indicating illumination levels and uniformity ratios as shown below: Illumination Level Measurement Maximum Horizontal Illumination (fc) • Uniformity Maximum:Minimum 5:1 10:1 Measurement Minimum Average Maximum Horizontal Illumination (footcandles) Vertical Illumination (footcandles) Landscape.13131313131 Urban Design Manual Car Dealership Display Areas: Display Areas Adjacent to Public Rightof-Way 20 All Other Internal Display Areas 10 • • • Shielding methods (where applicable). property lines. all of the following must be included to be accepted for review: Maximum: Minimum Average: Minimum • • • Location of all buildings.50 footcandles. Uniformity Ratios Measurement Horizontal Vertical Submission Requirements for Outdoor Lighting Plans: For each site plan requiring the submission of an Outdoor Lighting Plan. Manufacturer’s catalogue information and detail of the fixture. All building facades. Pole foundation details. The identification of any light sources which would be visible from 1. • The following statement must be included on the Outdoor Lighting Plan and signed by the design professional responsible for the plan: • • • • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-13 . Power (in watts). landscaping and sign lighting should be designed to eliminate direct up lighting and prevent glare onto neighbouring properties and roadways. parking. Illumination levels for all proposed fixtures illustrating ISO footcandle curves at a maximum interval of 0.5 m elevation (above ground level) at the property line.

Visibility of the proposed light sources from any nearby residential sites has been minimized so as not to create a nuisance.Urban Design Manual This drawing indicates all existing and proposed outdoor lighting fixtures for this development. folded to legal size or smaller are required. The outdoor lighting design professionals are responsible for ensuring no additional outdoor lights are planned for the project or are illustrated on other drawings (such as electrical drawings showing wall pack lighting attached to the building).5 footcandles or greater) or objectionable glare upon any adjacent property. • Design Criteria . C-14 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . provided that it can be demonstrated through the preparation of a comprehensive lighting design strategy having clear objectives and a demonstration of how the proposed design meets the intent of these design guidelines and the goals and objectives found in Part A of the Urban Design Manual. five copies of the Outdoor Lighting Plan. The proposed lighting distribution pattern will not cause veiling luminance (disability glare) and there will be no significant encroachment of light (0.Design and Maintenance: All approved outdoor lighting is to be maintained for the life of the proposed development. Signature of Design Professional • For a final submission. • NOTE: Variations from the standards shown may be appropriate in some situations.

large complexes or where multiple buildings exist on a site.7 m and minimum width of 3. commercial. The Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo are committed to promoting and encouraging developments that are designed for all users. Commercial or Institutional . industrial and institutional developments.2 m. • Adjacent to the barrier free entrance(s) of each building and connecting with the barrier free path of travel.9 m when adjacent to a flush curb/sidewalk (adjacent sidewalk is to be a minimum width of 1. Exterior accessible routes may include parking access aisles. • Design Criteria: Designated barrier free parking spaces for persons with disabilities shall be provided at the following rates: • • • • • • Industrial – 1 space per 100 total parking spaces.0 BARRIER FREE ACCESSIBILITY Definitions Barrier Free Access refers to the continuous unobstructed access. the required number of designated spaces should be evenly distributed to ensure available parking at all public entrances. ramps. Right Angle and Parallel Parking Space Size: Right-angle parking spaces – minimum width: 5. who has provided preferred dimensions based on their personal working experiences. Provide sufficient clearance around vehicles.minimum length of 6. Parallel parking spaces . • • • • Designated Parking Requirements: Designated surface parking spaces shall be provided for use by persons with disabilities in parking lots associated with all public facilities and in parking areas serving residential. The entrance nearest the designated parking spaces must be equipped with a power door operator.1 per 50. Residential.3). the designated parking space may be reduced to 3.1 per 20. connecting all elements and spaces of a building or facility. Located such that persons do not need to travel behind parked vehicles. Hospital and Medical Centre .1). Located as close as possible to a required passenger elevator.75 m (see Figure 5. intersections or commercial loading zones.5 m. Asphalt within designated parking spaces should be benched / ramped flush with the adjacent curb or sidewalk. crosswalks at vehicular ways and barrier free accessible doorways at all entrances and exits. These guidelines were originally developed by the K-W Barrier Free Advisory Committee. Provide a minimum vertical clearance of 2.8 m). Hospitals and medical centres will be required to have additional designated parking facilities.15151515151 Urban Design Manual 5. Designated barrier free parking must be designed to achieve the following criteria: Standards These standards have been developed to ensure that barrier free access is provided for all new developments and redeveloped sites. light standards and site furnishings. minimum length: 5.9 m in width (see Figure 5. Located away from designated fire routes. Where right angle parking is proposed in multiples of two. For shopping malls. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-15 .

0. Ensure that signage does not obstruct pedestrian flow to adjacent areas. non-slip.5 m x 1.2: Sign pointing to designated parking spaces for persons with disabilities • • • • • C-16 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .5 m blue solvent-based traffic paint background. Designated parking space(s) are to be painted with the international symbol of accessibility. Figure 5.6 – 2. Signs mounted on moveable bases are unacceptable (see Figure 5. Signage may be obtained through the City of Kitchener Transportation Division (519) 741-2371. hard surface.0 m from curb edge.2 m above grade. non-glare.2).4).3: Sign Location for Multiple Parking Bays • • Figure 5.Urban Design Manual Figure 5.0 m of curb. The symbol shall be painted with yellow solvent-based traffic paint on a minimum 1. Provide directional signage in large parking areas or for hidden parking spaces (see Figure 5. textured. Landscaping and other design features shall be used to prevent vehicles from protruding over barrier free paths of travel Incorporate required designated parking signage 1.1: Vertical clearance at passenger loading zone Provide a level. or on a building face within 2.

Pedestrian loading areas or drop-off zones must be designed to achieve the following: Design Criteria: • Minimum dimensions of 5. non-glare.75 m to allow for specialized transit use. Provide directional signage in large parking areas or for hidden passenger loading areas (see Figures 5. • Note: Also see the Ontario Building Code for fire access route design requirements. Provide a level. overhead protection such as canopies or other structures shall be provided where possible and have a vertical clearance of 2. • • Figure 5.4: Sign Indicating Parking Spaces for Persons with Disabilities • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-17 . Where the passenger loading area is adjacent to a flush grade sidewalk.5.75m for use with personal modified vans (see Figure 5.5). See Figures 5. intersections or commercial loading zones.9 m (see Figure 5. Identify passenger loading areas with proper signage so that motorists are not confused with parallel parking spaces. At building entrances. hard surface having a slope of between 1% and 3%.4 and 5. A minimum vertical clearance of 2.2 m width and 7. Located so that persons do not need to travel behind parked cars and/or across a traffic lane. non-slip.17171717171 Urban Design Manual Designated Interior Parking Space Requirements: • • • Where indoor parking facilities are provided. The designated spaces should be located as close as possible to the barrier-free accessible elevator and have a vertical clearance of 2. designated parking spaces for persons with disabilities must be provided on at least one parking level with barrier free access to the passenger elevator lobby through a door equipped with a power door operator. Passenger loading areas must be visible from the main barrier-free entrances and provide benches or seating to the side of pedestrian routes so that persons can see and be seen while waiting to be picked up or dropped off.0 m length.1). Located away from designated fire routes.2).75 m (see Figure 5.1). the width of the loading space may be decreased to 3. textured. Passenger Loading Areas: Pedestrian loading areas or drop-off zones should be provided at all main barrier-free entrances and connect with the barrier-free path of travel.

6: Building Entrance.Urban Design Manual Figure 5.5: Passenger Drop-off and Entrances – Minimum Standards Figure 5. Parking and Drop-off Standards C-18 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .

Eliminate or minimize cross-slope on walkways where the grade is greater than 3%. • • • • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-19 .2 m long.19191919191 Urban Design Manual • Sidewalks: Sidewalks also refer to walkways and pathways for this document. Asphalt within parking areas must be benched / ramped flush with the adjacent curb or sidewalk Where barrier free parking spaces or loading zones are provided not immediately adjacent to a main entrance. they shall meet at the same grade (i. telephone seating areas. parking. provide level resting areas every 30 m. Provide non-slip. poured in place concrete with a broom finish perpendicular to the path of travel (preferred) or asphalt.e. municipal sidewalks and outdoor amenities i. flush curbs must be provided along the barrier free path of travel.9). parks. Continuous slope shall be between 0% and <5% with a cross-slope between 1% and 2%. Rest areas are to be a minimum of 1. Provide textured surface at key locations (sidewalk edges.5m in width and provide sufficient additional space to accommodate expected site furnishings. Do not include exposed aggregates or ridges which allow water or ice accumulation. Sidewalks must be designed to achieve the following: Slopes greater than 5% must be designed as a ramp with handrails on both side (see Figure 5. Flush curbs are required at all intersecting roadways. passenger loading areas. non-glare surfaces for sidewalks. equipment and signage so as not to restrict the required clear path of travel.5 m. no steps). Where two sidewalks meet. Ensure that all grading of the barrier-free path of travel is less than 5% and that the landing areas adjacent to curbs do not exceed 2% in any direction.8 m wide and 2. Sidewalks. Where sidewalks have a slope of between 2% and 5%. The minimum width for a sidewalk is 1. playgrounds.7). curbs and grading are to be designed in a manner that provides maximum assistance for persons with mobility disabilities without creating hazards for persons who are visually impaired. All transitional grade changes on sidewalk areas shall be less than 3% wherever possible (see Figure 5. • • • • • Design Criteria: • Provide barrier-free walkways between all barrierfree entrances. Be a minimum of 1.e. This allows enough width for two people in wheelchairs to pass and also for the piling of snow along the edges without obstructing pedestrian traffic flows during the winter months. road intersections) to indicate changes in the path of travel.

Urban Design Manual Figure 5.7: Sidewalk Grades and Flush Curbs C-20 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .

Avoid obstacles intruding into ramps (i. non-glare surfaces. Preferred maximum slope of 6%. the landing shall be extended at least 0. • • Design Criteria: • • • Ramps shall have a maximum internal clear width of 1. sandwich board signs. Provide a level area at the top and bottom of a ramp of at least 1.67 m.8: Grate Openings • • • • • • • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-21 . continuous and even surface. Provide colour and texture contrast at the top and bottom of ramps. Figure 5. Poured in place concrete ramps should have a broom finish which is perpendicular to the path of travel. possibly combined with the railing design. Provide a minimum vertical clearance of 2. Provide poured in place concrete (preferred). overhanging shrubs/trees. Provide landings where there is an abrupt change in direction and at intervals not more than 9 m along the horizontal length of the ramp (see Figure 5.6 m. ramps with handrails are necessary to ensure a barrier-free path of travel. asphalt or wood.e.). Do not include aggregate or ridges which allow water or ice accumulation. Provide handrails on both sides of ramps. Ramps must be located as close as possible to the most direct barrierfree path of travel and designed in a manner which compliments the overall design of the building and site. A handrail is always required at an elevation change of 0.9).8) and shall have a slip-resistant.21212121211 Urban Design Manual • Ramps: In circumstances where there is a grade change of 5% or greater.1 m.6 m beyond the latch of the door opening. If a door is provided. Ramps must be designed to achieve the following: Surfaces of ramps that form a barrier-free path of travel shall have no opening that will permit the passage of a sphere more than 13 mm in diameter (see Figure 5. Ramps and landings which are not at grade or adjacent to a wall shall have protected edges.67m x 1. etc.1 m. Provide non-slip.

Urban Design Manual Figure 5.9: Ramp Design C-22 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .

10: Stair Design Nosing should not project.12). Where handrails are used extensively by both young users and adults.5 m in height between changes in level without a landing. steps are often necessary. In such instances the steps should be located as close as possible and perpendicular to the most direct barrier-free path of travel. The stairs should be designed in a manner which compliments the overall design of the building and its site. Run shall be a minimum of 255 mm and a maximum of 355 mm. If a ‘shadow line’ is proposed for decorative purposes. • • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-23 . non-glare textured. preferred 60 mm (see Figure 5.700 mm should be provided. A cross-slope of 1% is recommended to ensure that steps are well drained and do not allow ice formation.11). a maximum of 50 mm deep on the leading edge on the tread and vertical face of the nosing. Treads and risers shall have a uniform rise and run throughout a flight of steps. Provide a level non-slip. Provide a minimum vertical clearance of 2.1 m. wood or concrete pavers. a lower set of handrails with a recommended height of 600 . (See Figure 5. Flights of steps should not exceed 1.8 m. hard surface. Handrails should be a minimum 30 mm in diameter and a maximum of 40 mm. Rise shall be a minimum of 125 mm and a maximum of 200 mm. Provide poured in place concrete (preferred). Figure 5.23232323231 Urban Design Manual Steps: In circumstances where there is a change in grade. • • • • Handrails: Handrails are common site elements and should be provided on both sides of ramps and stairways and must be designed to achieve the following: • Design Criteria: • • Handrails should be provided at a height between 865 mm and 965 mm as measured vertically from a line drawn through the surface of the ramp.10) Use a colour/lightness contrasted strip. Minimum clearance is 40 mm. Provide a clearance between every handrail and any wall to which it is fastened. At facilities used by children. Steps must be illuminated to a minimum level of 10 foot candles. Do not include exposed aggregate or ridges which allow water or ice accumulation. Provide colour and texture contrast at the top and bottom of flights of stairs and on stair nosings. Poured in place concrete steps should have a broom finish which is perpendicular to the path of travel. Design Criteria: • • Provide a minimum clear width of 1. it should not have a height exceeding 12 mm or a radius exceeding 13 mm (See Figure 5. a double set of handrails is suggested.

A minimum clearance of 1 m is required between handrails. • • Figure 5. Handrails must terminate in a manner which will not obstruct pedestrian travel or create a hazard (see Figure 5.11: Stair Tread and Nosing Design C-24 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .13).12: Handrail Design • Extend horizontally not less than 300 mm beyond the top and bottom of the ramp or stairway and curve to the wall or post (see Figure 5.13).Urban Design Manual Figure 5.13: Handrail Extensions Figure 5.

ice and rain off the front entranceway platform. All automatic doors should be integrated into an emergency backup system.25252525251 Urban Design Manual Entrances and Automated Door Activators: All main barrier-free entrances must be located prominently and designed to achieve the following: Design Criteria: • A textured floor surface should be provided on both sides of doorways to alert those with visual impairment.14: Motion Sensor Detector Zones • • • Transitional illumination between exterior and interior lighting conditions must be provided for both day and night use. parents with children. Door edges and jambs should not be excessively sharp. with the door in the open position (door handles. at least 100 mm in diameter. Push buttons to activate doors should be placed 750 mm above grade on a wall.14). Pressure plates should extend beyond the full swing of swinging doors in a manner which does not require persons using wheelchairs or scooters to back up. Automatic door activators must be provided to allow persons with a disability. If required. which does not create pedestrian/door conflicts. shoppers with full hands and people with strength limitations easy access and exit. Where possible. Barrier-free entrances should be sheltered from the elements and located adjacent to designated parking and passenger loading areas. Guardrails should have a second rail not more than 680 mm above grade and a rail or kick plate not more than • • • • • • • • • • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-25 . Automatic doors should be of lightweight construction and easy to open in the event of a power failure. Doors and door frames should be colour/brightness contrasted from surroundings. • Figure 5. Push buttons should be large square or round plates. must not intrude into the clearance). with maximum colour contrast for good visibility. Automatic doors may be activated with either a motion sensor. Thresholds are strongly discouraged. Large expanses of clear glass near entrances must be marked with a colour/brightness contrasted. etc. entranceways should be covered to keep snow. Motion sensors are the preferred automatic door activators. Push buttons should be able to be located by vision or touch and be a minimum of 900 mm in front of the door(s). They should allow a minimum of 15 seconds before closing from a fully open position (see Figure 5. continuous strip 100 mm wide. Grade level fire doors and exits must be accessible and connect directly with accessible exterior. as well as interior circulation routes. Door openings should have a minimum clearance width of 915 mm. pressure plate or push button. push bars. 1350 mm from the finished floor. post or handrail in a manner. Automatic swing doors require guardrails on both sides if opening towards the operator. a threshold should be colour/brightness contrasted and be a maximum of 13 mm in height.

preferably on both sides of the door(s). All playground equipment must be approved by the latest edition of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA). Gates and doorways are to be a minimum of 920 mm in width and should not occur at corners.15: Required Guards at Out-swing • Automatic swing doors must have sensing devices to stop and/or slow door movements when an obstruction is encountered in the path of the swing door.16). C-26 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . international symbol of accessibility for persons with disabilities) must identify all public use accessible doors. as well as at drop off areas. Similarly.5 m and be a minimum of 125 mm in diameter.2 m to 1. It should be placed in a prominent location indoors and outdoors.e. Signage (i. Refuse and recycling receptacles should be provided at appropriate waiting/rest areas. Whereas it may not be possible to have complete accessibility to every item and piece of play equipment in the play area. turns or congested areas. • • Figure 5.Urban Design Manual 75 mm above grade (see Figure 5. picnic areas. the play needs of all children must be considered and design of play areas must ensure access for both adults and children in the play area. paths and trails are to be constructed so that all users can equally utilize facilities and be designed to achieve the following: • Design Criteria: • • Waiting and rest areas should be provided at regular intervals of 90 metres along barrier free paths of travel.15) Guardrails are to be colour contrasted to surrounding area. • Figure 5. bus stops and telephone booths. • Amenities: Amenities such as waiting and rest areas. Play areas for children in public spaces must be accessible to all children and their parents or care givers. at a height of 1. playgrounds. • Benches should be a minimum length of 1200 mm and provide a space 1000 mm wide and 1200 mm deep beside each bench for wheelchair or scooter users (see Figure 5.16: Waiting and Rest Area Playground equipment should be designed to provide barrier-free opportunities that encourage use by all children. surfacing materials should provide adequate cushioning abilities and allow barrier-free travel.

stable.I. water-flow control devices must be designed to be controlled. Provide colour and texture contrast or a hand rail to define path/trail edges and intersections. Resting areas are to be designed according to Figure 5. In water play areas. provide level resting areas every 30 metres.27272727271 Urban Design Manual • When designing inclusive play areas. manipulated and easily reached by preschool children and children with disabilities. Appropriate signage must be provided. level. The bottom edge of the Acknowledgements/Resources: • • • • • • • • • Queen’s University at Kingston City of North York City of Peterborough Alberta Transportation and Utilities C.16. Slopes greater than 5% should be designed as a ramp. An accessible approach to the picnic area must be provided from an accessible parking space. non-slip. Joints should be flush. A hard surfaced path connecting the parking space to the picnic areas and to other facilities (i.B. It is recognized that in natural areas. (Canadian National Institute for the Blind) Ontario Building Code Canadian Standards Association City of Mississauga K-W Barrier-Free Advisory Committee • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-27 . • • • • • • • • • • • • • HL3 asphalt Concrete Well-compacted stone dust • Consideration should be given to adult care givers who may also be persons with disabilities. careful consideration is to be given to barrier-free access from the street into the play area and the availability of rest stations and seating opportunities.) should be provided.e. • • • • Trails should be a minimum of 3000 mm wide. Where paths and trails are sloped 3% to 5%. well-drained surfaces. Other acceptable materials include asphalt. changes in direction. Pathways should be free of joints that may cause tripping or the “washboard” effect on mobility devices such as manual and electric wheelchairs or scooters. Accessible picnic tables should be on hard. road intersections and curb ramps . Provide a continuous. Picnic sites should be within 30 metres of accessible washroom facilities. softer surface materials such as limestone screenings are acceptable. avoid tripping edges and raised curbs to allow access by people using mobility devices and use by children and adults with visual impairments. building entrances. washrooms. In water play areas. A minimum of 2 or at least 10% of picnic areas within a site must be accessible. Slopes are to be between 0% to 4% wherever possible with a cross-slope between 1% and 2%.N. hard. light and as short as possible. Utilize colour/brightness contrast. concrete and wood decking (boards to be perpendicular to the direction of travel with spacing not exceeding 13 mm). Acceptable pathway surfaces that do not soften with heat or moisture include: table top must be no lower than 680 mm above ground level. water etc. nonglare surface.

17: International Symbols of Accessibility C-28 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .Urban Design Manual International Symbol of Accessibility for Disabled International Symbol of Accessibility for Visually Impaired International Symbol of Accessibility for Hearing Impaired International Symbol of Accessibility combined with Service Identification Signs indicate those facilities which are accessible Figure 5.

• • • Designing barrier free intersections and barrier free transit stops. Locating buildings as close to the street as possible. A maximum of 800 metres apart Accommodate transit vehicles. Spacing bus stops 200 – 250 metres apart. Ensuring that intersections of local roads are spaced no more than 200 – 250 metres apart. including: Supportive of the efficient design of transit routes by: • • • • • • Avoiding one way street systems. i. Avoiding bus bays. Providing sidewalks in accordance with City policy.0 PEDESTRIAN AND TRANSIT SUPPORTIVE DEVELOPMENT It is important for all forms of urban development and redevelopment to be made more accessible by public transit. protected barrier free pedestrian crossing points (signalized intersections and crosswalks) where warrant criteria have been met. • • • • A minimum turning curve radius for a bus of 15 metres. Both the City of Kitchener and the Regional Municipality of Waterloo have sidewalk policies which may require either the installation of or the contribution of funds towards the construction of public sidewalks across the frontage of property subject to a development proposal. Having sufficient. (this standard may not be achievable in all locations). there needs to be transit and pedestrian orientations on the streets which feed those transit services. A minimum paved road surface of 9 metres. As straight and direct as possible. Ensuring a maximum distance of 200m to 250M between intersections. While the development of high intensity. mixed use development at nodes and along corridors makes transit use more attractive. Constructing collector and arterial roads with standards for surface and subsurface materials and depths that meet the needs for bus traffic. Eliminating reverse-lotted development. Orienting buildings to the street and to pedestrian traffic. Grand River Transit staff should be contacted in the early stages of development to discuss what potential routings would be considered appropriate. Please see current City and Regional policies for criteria and Engineering staff for current rates.e. • • • • • • Standards • Arterial and Collector Roads are to be designed to be: • • • • • Continuous across neighbourhoods. Accommodate all pedestrians by: 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-29 . Locating parking lots in the rear or side yards of development sites. The design of our urban areas has a significant impact on people’s ability/willingness to use public transit. Improving access between arterial roads and internal subdivisions by providing more local road access and midblock pedestrian walkways. Providing higher density and mixed uses along arterial roads.29292929291 Urban Design Manual 6. grid pattern. A maximum road grade of 5%. Providing a temporary bus turnaround at the end of partially constructed roads.

arcades and landscaping. Provide pedestrian connections between buildings. • Development should be oriented toward the street and include: • • • • • Location of buildings as close to the street as possible. Designing arterial and collector roads to travel directly into the interior of the nodes. Have at least one building face or the main entrance adjacent to an arterial road. • • • • • • C-30 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . Subdivisions are to be designed to: • • • Facilitate barrier free pedestrian access to transit stops. Have 95% of the residences. Have on-site lighting to maximize pedestrian safety. Location of parking lots in the rear or side yards of development sites. jobs and other activities / uses within 450 m walking distance of a transit stop.Urban Design Manual Nodes and Corridors are to be designed in the following manner: Shopping Centres with transit facilities are to be designed to: • Develop compact pedestrian oriented nodes that allow for the ease of use and access to transit by: • • • • • Facilitate barrier free pedestrian access and future intensification. • • Designing building entrances to be oriented towards transit stops. street tree planters. Sidewalk ramps and curb ramps are to be constructed as outlined in Section 5. Provide sidewalks along both sides of transit routes and according to the City Sidewalk Policy. Minimizing the number of mid-block vehicular access points that cross sidewalks. Provide amenities to improve the microclimate along streets with features such as: canopies. allowing transfers between transit routes where appropriate. and an area adjacent to buildings to allow for “window shopping”. Have barrier free pedestrian access from the public sidewalk to the main building entrance. berms or solid fences along public roadways. service shops and restaurants at ground floor level. Develop barrier free. Minimizing long stretches of walls. Provide curb cuts at all intersections and walkways including mid-block crosswalks and trail crossings (where safe and appropriate). through pedestrian traffic. Provide for pedestrian safety and natural surveillance of pedestrian links to transit stops ensuring adequate lighting and year round maintenance. Have all multiple dwelling units (housing at a triplex level and up) be within 300 metres walking distance of a transit stop. pedestrian-supportive amenities along streets as follows: • • • • Locate retail stores. Provide sidewalks sufficiently wide to accommodate bus shelters and waiting areas. Have the local road pattern provide direct pedestrian access to transit stops and transfer points.0. Have barrier free pedestrian links to transit stops provided in either concrete or asphalt. Integrate neighbourhood features and public spaces with bus stop locations.

Provide sufficient lighting to allow for pedestrian safety. surveillance and adequate site lines. • • Figure 6. Maintain adequate distance to adjacent streets and driveways.31313131311 Urban Design Manual Transit Stop Waiting Areas and Shelters are to be designed to: • Provide direct.1: Typical Nearside Transit Stop 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-31 . convenient and barrier free connection from the sidewalk to the shelter/waiting area and to the bus loading and unloading doors.

Urban Design Manual Figure 6.2: Typical Farside Transit Stop C-32 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .

ventilation. vents.7 m height at the curb of the opposite side of the road from the property. at the termination of view axes. compressors. Design Criteria: • Buildings abutting residential properties or located on corner lots. pumps. satellite dishes. Additionally.0 SCREEING OF MECHANICAL AND ROOFTOP EQUIPMENT This section outlines the requirements for the screening of ground-based and rooftop equipment. and other similar non-powered equipment. Roof well – An open pit sunk below a building’s roof surface. from the front or rear face of any surrounding residential properties should be provided.2: Rooftop equipment on this building is clustered near the centre of the roof. and other similar powered mechanical equipment. access ladders. Non-mechanical equipment – Includes flues. material and construction details should be provided.1: Locating this building’s rooftop equipment away from the street and incorporating a continuous parapet helps block the equipment from public view. The primary goals of the guidelines are to provide for the full screening of equipment from public view and to ensure that screening methods contribute to the building design and streetscape. hoods. screening options integrated into the roof design may be necessary. For properties in low lying areas. Screening wall – An independent screen. Views approaching the property along all public roads should be illustrated and take into account grade changes. Definitions Mechanical equipment – Includes heating. elevator and stair penthouses. sight lines Figure 7. • Standards Site Plan Requirements: • The locations and dimensions of all rooftop equipment must be shown on building elevation drawings. Sight line diagrams are required with building elevations. If independent or integrated screens are proposed. Parapet – The portion of an exterior building wall extended above the roofline. Figure 7. and air-conditioning units. separate from a building wall. or at other prominent locations will be subject to higher rooftop equipment screening standards. away from the street and other public spaces • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-33 .33333333331 Urban Design Manual 7. Buildings shall have all rooftop mechanical equipment screened from the view of vehicular traffic. communications equipment. Diagrams should show multiple views to proposed rooftop mechanical equipment from a 1. Proposed methods of screening should be provided.

other methods. Figure 7. Design Criteria for Various Building Types: • For low-rise buildings (3 storeys or less).5: The peaked roof of this low-rise building screens all rooftop equipment and helps define the intersection where the building is situated. institutional and recreational buildings should be incorporated into the building design or. screening walls. • • • • • Figure 7. or dedicated rooftop equipment rooms. alternatively. • Rooftop equipment and equipment screening should be integrated with the building form and shall complement the building’s design. screened with the appropriate materials.Urban Design Manual • Rooftop equipment should be clustered and located near the centre of the roof to minimize visual exposure. • For all mid-rise (4-8 storeys) and high-rise (above 8 storeys) buildings. Large mechanical equipment. and raised rooflines should be coloured the same as the front side when visible from public view. rooftop mechanical equipment shall be fully screened. colours. C-34 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . continuous parapets. materials. The preferred rooftop equipment screening methods are roof wells.and high-rise buildings must be considered. Civic buildings shall have all rooftop mechanical equipment fully integrated into building design. Significant heritage buildings shall have all rooftop equipment fully screened and/or integrated into the building in a way that respects and complements the building’s heritage and architectural features.3: Rooftop equipment screening methods used on this building include parapets. The screening also articulates the roof elevation. If these methods are not possible or appropriate. The back sides of parapets.4: Rooftop mechanical equipment for this building is hidden by a screening wall that is integrated with the building design. or articulated rooflines. • Figure 7. and architectural style. including refrigeration units for commercial. an articulated roofline. rooftop mechanical equipment shall be fully screened from the public view at street level. such as partial parapets. may be used. Rooftop equipment screening for mid-rise and high-rise buildings shall contribute to an attractive skyline and the view from surrounding mid. screening walls. and centralized location of equipment.

detailed cornices. • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-35 . the enclosure is not well-integrated with the building form.35353535351 Urban Design Manual Figure 7. screening communal ground-based air conditioner units from private amenity spaces. Parapets. • Figure 7.g.6: The sloped roof of this civic building fully screens rooftop mechanical equipment and creates an attractive roofline. Figure 7.8: Although the rooftop equipment on this gas station is fully screened with materials matching the building. Many types of ground based equipment will require appropriate screening not only to address views into the site from the public realm but also to provide a buffer between uses within the site e.7: The rooftop equipment on this corner gas station is not screened and is visible from public view. Commercial buildings including gas stations shall have all rooftop mechanical equipment fully screened.9: The articulated roofline on this gas station and car wash fully screens rooftop mechanical equipment and helps create an attractive building design. and/or articulated rooflines that enhance the building design should be incorporated. Solar panels and similar equipment are not subject to screening requirements. if fencing is required. also on the site plan. The location of all ground-based mechanical and non-mechanical equipment must be illustrated on the landscape plan and. particularly for gas stations located at major intersections. Design Criteria for Screening Ground-based Mechanical and Non-mechanical Equipment: • Figure 7.

0 PRIVATE STREET NAMING AND ADDRESSING Naming of roadways within. for example. A reference plan illustrating the extents of the proposed private roads and a by-law authorizing the road naming will be required. The design and location of all signage for any proposed private roadway will be to the satisfaction of the City’s Director of Transportation and the City’s Supervisor of Site Plan Development and at the sole expense of the developer. Private roadway naming requests may be permitted and will be evaluated on a case by case basis at the discretion of the City’s General Manager of Development and Technical Services.Urban Design Manual 8. Multiple Unit Identification Signs. private residential or commercial developments may be in the in the interest of providing clear locational information to emergency service providers and the general public. C-36 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 . Design Criteria for the Naming of Private Streets: The policies which apply to the naming and addressing of City streets will be used as a guideline for naming and addressing of private roadways – see Council Policy I-1147 Street Naming. Address / Street Name Change. Addressing.

criteria for determining sufficient water supply and specifications for multiple unit identification signage. MULTIPLE UNIT IDENTIFICATION The City of Kitchener has a Council approved Emergency Services Policy in place which addresses such issues related to site development as standards for fire access routes.0 EMERGENCY SERVICE POLICY – FIRE FLOW ANALYSIS REPORT.37373737371 Urban Design Manual 9. This policy is available on the City of Kitchener website or through the Department of Development and Technical Services 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-37 . FIRE ROUTE PLAN.

(B) Front yard depth . C-38 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards 2010 .0 metres.minimum 3.5 metres where there is no opening or window to habitable room.minimum 11. (F) Separation distance between buildings . This shall not include a street townhouse. Standards • Separation distance between end of building and rear wall of closest adjacent building . (C) Driveway length .0 metres.Urban Design Manual 10. and 1.minimum 4.0m is required to accommodate emergency vehicles (J) Setback to rear property line for each unit having a deck height 0.6 m and greater .6m . (L) Side yard setback between end of building and curb or walkway .1 metres two way traffic.1): • • Rear yard depth . (E) • • • • • • • • Refer to the following diagram illustrating the specifications for designing cluster townhouse developments. Multiple Residential – a building containing three or more dwelling units.1.0 metres.minimum 6. (K) Setback to rear property line for each unit having a deck height less than 0.minimum 7.minimum 5.minimum width of 1. (N) Increase rear yard set-back to 10 metres for 3 storey units backing onto single detached properties. Additional units to a maximum of 8 units per block may be considered subject to providing appropriate enhanced design details.5 metres.minimum 6.minimum 3. Sidewalks shall be required along at least one side and possibly both sides of the internal road pattern and be fully accessible with flush curbs provided at all corners and crossing points throughout the development and leading to the municipal sidewalk.0 square metres.minimum 1. (M) The preferred number of dwelling units should range between 4-6 units within a block.66 meters one way traffic. • • • • Lot and Building Dimensions: Design Criteria: The following dimensions are standards for cluster townhouse and multiple residential developments (letters refer to corresponding dimensions on Figure 10. including patios and decks but not including stairs.0 MULTIPLE RESIDENTIAL Definitions Cluster Townhouse – means a multiple dwelling divided vertically into three or more townhouses by common walls which prevent internal access between units.5 metres (between garage and curb or walkway edge). (A) Exclusive use of patio area .8 metres.0 m for more than 2 storeys exposed. (I) Roadway width for multiple residential and cluster townhouse projects .8 metres where parking is adjacent.minimum 4. (G) Separation distance between the end of buildings where walkways are located between . minimum 3.minimum 4.0 metres.5 metres 1 and 2 storey 10. For these roadways a minimum centerline radius of 12.minimum 10. (D) Sidewalk .5 metres .5 metres (from curb or walkway edge). (H) Separation distance between end of building block having windows to habitable rooms and parking areas .0 metres.

39393939391 Urban Design Manual Figure 10. Urban Design Standards and Policies C-39 .1: Required Dimensions for Cluster Townhouse Development 2009 City of Kitchener.

Provide a defined pedestrian access to the amenity area to ensure safety from vehicular traffic. safety and security. • • Provide a usable configuration for the amenity area. Provide amenity areas adjacent to a street where appropriate and within reasonable noise levels to allow for viewing of street activities and natural surveillance.Urban Design Manual 11. and have visual and barrier free access to an interior common room(s) and barrier free washroom(s) for easy access.0 square metres of outdoor amenity area.0 square metres of common outdoor amenity space at ground level for either each resident or each dwelling unit. • • • • • • C-40 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . Locate away from loading or service areas of the building. • Amenity Areas: Design Criteria: • Outdoor amenity areas are to be in close proximity. Provide a balance of sun. Provide a variety of seating arrangements and activities. shade and shelter from the wind. Provide adequate site lighting. Provide barrier free parking for residents and visitors adjacent to an accessible entrance.0 OUTDOOR AMENITY AREAS . Notwithstanding the above. each residential or institutional development having a residential component shall have a minimum of 40. Provide a barrier-free walkway connection to all ground level entrances including fire exits.MULTIPLE RESIDENTIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENTS Standards An outdoor amenity area shall be provided for all residential and institutional developments having a residential component that contains more than either 20 residents or 20 dwelling units and provide a minimum of 2.

Barrier free play spaces should be onsite.S. Play Space Requirements: Design Criteria: Where outdoor play space is proposed for a multiple residential development containing more than 20 dwelling units. easily accessible to user groups and be separate from City parks and sports facilities.0 metres each (must be separated from designated vehicular parking/driving areas by a raised 15. The required play space will form a component of the overall required landscaped open space. Seating and. Insure all related equipment and installation are in accordance with the Canadian Standards Association (C. A minimum of 2. shade adjacent to all play spaces.A.0 metres each.0 metres x 5. • • • • • Total Play Space Requirements: Total Play Space Required 150 m2 or less 151 to 400m2 More than 400m2 Facilities Required Tot Lot(s) Tot Lot(s) Play Area(s) Tot Lot(s) Play Area(s) Hard Surface Court • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-41 .0 metres x 5. the area and the play space must be barrier free accessible. Locate tot lots and play areas contiguous to the building.0 OUTDOOR PLAY AREAS FOR CHILDREN Definitions Dimensions: • • • A Tot Lot . so as not to separate the play space from the building with roadways or parking areas. Barrier-free walkway connections into the play space from all building entrances. and have visual and barrier free access to the majority of dwelling units or an interior common area for safety and security.minimum 5.minimum 10. Barrier free accessible play equipment which is appropriate to the identified user group.4141414141411 Urban Design Manual 12. A Hard Surface Court . A Play Area .5 square metres of outdoor play space shall be provided for each bedroom which exceeds the total number of dwelling units within the development. Optimum sun/shade exposure and adequate site lighting to all play spaces. Play Space – An area at ground level which must be set aside and developed within a site as a coherent part of the multiple residential development. A play space is used by toddlers and preschoolers (tot lot) and school-age children (play area).minimum 5. and shall be provided as follows: • Play areas shall provide: • Adequate visibility into play spaces by reducing landscape screening and locating play spaces where acoustic barriers are not required.” An adequate buffer between play areas and vehicular traffic areas including loading and service areas.) “A Guideline on Children’s Play Spaces and Equipment. where possible.0 metres each.0 metres x 10. Standards Design Requirements: • Outdoor play spaces are to be in close proximity.0 cm poured concrete curb). and teens (hard surface court).

Equipment should allow creative play. C-42 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . Sufficient pieces of play equipment for the expected demand.Urban Design Manual • • • Usable play space configuration must be conducive to the element of play.

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13.0 LANDSCAPE AND NATURAL FEATURES
TREE MANAGEMENT POLICY
The complete City of Kitchener Tree Management Policy may be obtained from the Development and Technical Services Department. The following is a brief of the policy.

Biological characteristics for each vegetation community indicating: • • • • • • • • Species association or plant community Dominant species Significant species Number of trees (relative abundance) Canopy closure (%) Community and tree health Community age DBH and height (averages or categorized) Location number on map or air photo

Definitions
General Vegetation Overview (GVO) – A complete inventory, together with suitable mapping, of the biological and physical characteristics of each Vegetation Community submitted in support of the draft plan of subdivision. This overview will identify features which may require further analysis and will establish the criteria used to evaluate a development proposal. Detailed Vegetation Plan – A detailed plan submitted at the time of grading plan submission and prior to registration. It is to be completed where the GVO has determined that there are trees worth retaining and development impacts are anticipated. A detailed inventory of all trees greater than 10 cm DBH in potentially affected residual areas must be carried out. Tree Preservation Enhancement Plan – A detailed plan used to identify all vegetation to remain on a site after development and establish methods whereby this vegetation can be protected and enhanced.

Biological characteristics for isolated trees greater than 10 cm in caliper indicating: • • • • Species Condition rating DBH Location number on map or air photo

Air Photo:
The scale should be one that clearly shows relevant features of the subject property. Site boundaries to be delineated on air photo shall encompass features intercepting or outside the development area that may affect the site vegetation or the adjoining site(s) vegetation. Air photos shall show existing land use and shall be dated.

Maps:
The scale should be appropriate to the subject property and development application. Site boundaries to be delineated on maps and maps shall include features intercepting or outside the development area that may affect the site vegetation or the adjoining site(s) vegetation. Maps 1 & 2 are to include the proposed Draft Plan of Subdivision

Standards General Vegetation Overview:
A General Vegetation Overview will typically be included as part of the formal submission of a Draft Plan of Subdivision to the City of Kitchener. Data Collection Form #1 - this form shall include the date(s) when the Inventory was conducted and the following:

2010

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Urban Design Manual

Map 1 - Physical Features • Topography and slope (locate accurately relative to the property boundaries) Drainage Surface water Ground water Soils • • Community trail location(s) guided by the Urban Design Manual Opportunities Objectives Recommendations that will shape plan of subdivision. The rationale for the following decisions: vegetation communities not requiring further data and analysis in the Detailed Vegetation Plan and vegetation communities requiring further data and analysis in the Detailed Vegetation Plan.

• • •

• • • •

Map 2 - Vegetation Communities • Showing the vegetation communities defined through resolution and analysis of functional associations in the subject environment Vegetation communities (woodlands, hedgerows, isolated clusters, single species) to be accurately located relative to property boundaries indicating driplines and trunk locations and elevations Example: maple-beech woods, ash-maple woods on irregular topography, red pine woods having near-surface ground water, isolated rare species tree, hedgerow, Norway Maple cluster, marsh, old field.

Note: The above recommendations should also be symbolically shown on Map #2 Vegetation Communities. If there is an approved Subwatershed Master Plan for lands contained within the proposed subdivision, the required Environmental Implementation Report (and Environmental Impact Statement if required) is to be coordinated with the analysis and recommendations of that required by the General Vegetation Overview. This will permit the integration of the findings of the General Vegetation Overview with the pertinent hydrological/hydrogeological information. Where a Subwatershed Master Plan provides no such direction the analysis must address the impact of changed hydraulics, hydrology, and/or hydrogeology on specific vegetation communities.

Analysis:
To include: • Conclusions of Inventory and Analysis, this report will identify and locate on Maps 1 and 2: • • • • Problems Priorities Needs of vegetation communities Where vegetation communities or isolated trees are identified as being worthy of preservation because of their significance, and existing stable condition, but do not have the ability to tolerate major changes to their surrounding environment a buffer zone is to be identified and a recommended width provided Forestry maintenance access location(s) and widths where required

Name, address, telephone number of Subdivider, and Consultant(s) who completed the submission.

A complete description and explanation of the criteria used to complete Data Collection Form #1 is included in the City of Kitchener’s Tree Management Policy and may be obtained from the Department of Development & Technical Services. Please see form on next page.

C-44

City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual

2010

Urban Design Manual

2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-45

4545454545451

DATA COLLECTION FORM # 1

VEGETATION COMMUNITY NO.

GENERAL VEGETATION OVERVIEW – DATA SHEET BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS VEGETATION TYPE PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS TOPOGRAPHY

NUMBER OF SPECIES Tree – Shrub – Herb –

SLOPE

SPECIES COMPOSITION SPECIES 1. 2. 3. 4. % ABUNDANCE

SURFACE WATER TYPE – NAME – (SKETCH SHOWING SIZE, DIRECTION OF FLOW, ENTRY AND EXIT POINTS)

SIGNIFICANT SPECIES

EXISTING LAND USE

NUMBER OF TREES CANOPY CLOSURE COMMUNITY AND TREE HEALTH COMMUNITY AGE GROUND WATER

SOILS: TYPE – TEXTURE – MOISTURE –

HEIGHT and DIAMETER ASSOCIATED VEGETATION COMMUNITIES

Grading information: • Original grades (surveyed) and proposed grades Cut and fill areas Potential disruption to ground water and surface drainage • • The submission of the Detailed Vegetation Plan to the City will occur in concert with the submission of the Lot Grading Control Plan. Location(s) of Community Trail(s) consistent with all guiding documents (Community Plans. Leisure Facilities Strategic Plan and Urban Design Manual). Location and nature of recommended protection measures (see Figures 13. • C-46 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . address.1 – 13. Environmental Implementation Reports.Urban Design Manual Detailed Vegetation Plan: This plan should be derived concurrently with the Lot Grading Control Plan (and all other servicing etc. Data Collection Form #2 shall be completed and include the date(s) when the inventory was conducted and the following: • • • • • • • • • • Tree tag number Location. ‘remove’.4 of this document and the City of Kitchener Tree Management Policy). • • • Symbolized recommendations showing the accurate location of the dripline for each isolated tree or single species cluster identifying them as ‘save’. building envelopes and building type (see Building Clearance Area below and Appendix D. lot or block number Species Diameter at breast height (DBH in cm) Crown class Tree condition Tree value and physical constraints Impacts of proposed development Recommendation Name. street pattern. ‘transplant’. Functional buffer zones around vegetation communities and/or isolated trees. • • Accurate location of all trees (10 cm DBH or greater to be retained) and their driplines (truthed in field). The following information is required: • Accurate location of new woodland edges (truthed in field) and location and species of recommended plantings (if required) or transplantings. General Vegetation Overviews. Location of services (type. Subwatershed Master Plans (Greenspace Management Plans). plans) and the scale should be approximately 1:500. telephone number of consultant who undertook inventory • • • • Please see form on next page. width and depth of trench). Proposed lotting. Locations of Forestry Maintenance Accesses (if required). Symbolized recommendations showing the accurate location of the dripline for treed areas to be selectively thinned or transplanted. City of Kitchener Tree Management Policy).

. Good – (G). Remove – (R).Urban Design Manual 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-47 4747474747471 DATA COLLECTION FORM #2 DETAILED VEGETATION PLAN LOT/ BLK NO. or Dead (D) (4) Comments based on tree value and existing physical (5) From submission requirements and analysis of the DVP (6) Recommendation: Save – (S). Very Poor – (V). Poor – (P). Fair – (F). SPECIES (1) DBH (cm) CROWN CLASS (2) TREE CONDITION (3) TREE VALUE & PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS (4) IMPACTS OF DEVELOPMENT (5) RECOMMENDATION (6) (1) Trees recommended for saving shown in BOLD type (2) Dominant – (D) – Emergent canopy (receives full sunlight) Co-dominant – (C) – Not fully emergent (top of canopy receives sunlight) Intermediate – (I) – Sub-canopy tree (receives partial sunlight) Suppressed – (S) Completely overtopped (receives very limited sunlight) Transplant – (T) (3) Excellent – (E).

barbed wire. • • • Certification of Plans: For Draft Plans of Subdivision. pruning. The following information is required: • Ongoing conservation of vegetation communities. dump sites. plans) and the scale should be approximately 1:500. Where applicable. irrigation program. tree forts and any unnatural material/disturbances that are considered dangerous to the public or would be an inherited liability. Compatible recreational uses including trail locations (where appropriate). Location of ecologically appropriate public access points. All lands to be conveyed to the City as Open Space or Hazard Lands are to be free of any dead or hazardous • Management strategy • Prepare a Management Strategy in consultation with the City for all natural areas within the Draft Plan of Subdivision. Erosion control. Treatment of Lands to be Conveyed: All lands to be conveyed to the City as Park are to be free of any dead or hazardous trees (in locations where there is a safety issue). Examples of the types of information to be provided are found in the complete Tree Management Policy available from Development & Technical Services. Construction details: fence erection.e. maintenance program. signage. wells. moving procedure. Such lands will continue to be free of construction debris for a period of two years from the date of registration of the subdivision. fertilizer program. locations. hoarding. Ongoing conservation of watercourses/ wetlands. The above noted items are to be removed or properly treated to the satisfaction of the Department of Community Services in consultation with the Director of Planning prior to final approval of the Plan to be registered. crown thinning. • • • • • Certification of Protection Measures: Written certification is required from a qualified professional that protection measures have been installed as approved by the Development & Technical Services Department.e. the grading consultant will certify that the Detailed Vegetation Plan conforms to the Lot Grading Plan. The environmental consultant will certify that the Lot Grading Control Plan conforms to the Detailed Vegetation Plan prior to approval of said plans by the Development & Technical Services Department. such strategy will include recommendations for: C-48 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . timing. • • • • Conclusion of inventory and analysis. Pre-stressing treatments – i.Urban Design Manual This plan should be derived concurrently with the Lot Grading Control Plan (and all other servicing etc. • Tree stewardship • Written instructions in a standard format to be developed by the Development & Technical Services Department on site-specification stewardship are to be prepared by the Environmental Consultant and made available to the first time home or building owner/occupant of a treed property.e. Post construction – i. including summary of impacts Impact analysis for Community Trail(s) and Forestry Maintenance Access(es) Description of mitigation and protection measures: • Discussion of functional buffer zone(s) where required to ensure ecological stability of woodland edge or isolated tree(s). Tree transplants – i. litter. Ongoing conservation of wildlife habitat. debris. Actions taken should be documented in the Tree Maintenance report. remnant fences.

• Using this value of trees destroyed or damaged. sources of information should be identified and measurements should be in metric units. who has been contracted by the Subdivider to provide direction and supervision during grading and construction on the subject lands. Such removals are to be to the satisfaction of the Department of Community Services in consultation with the Director of Planning prior to final approval of the Plan to be registered. Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers. All needs of trees to be maintained shall be assessed immediately and a Tree Maintenance Report detailing all recommended tree maintenance measures shall be submitted to. The following information is generally required in the Tree Maintenance Report (some items may not be pertinent to a particular project. propose a plan indicating replacement trees of equal or greater value ($) and proposed tree planting locations (native species) for rehabilitation of the disturbed area(s). Confirmation of Receipt of Site Grading Plan Detailed Vegetation Plans and Tree Stewardship: The Subdivider must confirm in writing that the firsttime home or building owner has received a copy of the approved Site Grading and Detailed Vegetation Plans along with written instructions on proper stewardship for tree(s) on their Lot/Block or that the Subdivider has provided the builder with the approved grading and tree management plans along with written instructions on proper tree stewardship for tree(s) regarding the Lot/Block noted above. Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan but have been removed or damaged. Latest Edition) that were to be saved according to the Detailed Vegetation Plan and/or 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-49 . The above noted items are to be removed or properly treated for a distance of 30 metres from any lot/block line and 10 metres on either side of a proposed or existing community trail. Signage is to be installed by the Subdivider prior to final approval of the Plan to be registered in which the conveyed lands are located. • • Tree Maintenance Report: The purpose of this report is to ensure initial and continued compliance with the tree protection measures as described in the approved Detailed Vegetation Plan. Certification of Completed Site Work: Prior to the City issuing the Final Grading Certificate certification by both the grading consultant and the environmental consultant must be received by the City certifying that the Site Grading Plan and Detailed Vegetation Plan have been implemented in accordance with the approved plans. wells. Timing of remedial measures: • Before / during / after further construction. Such signage is to be supplied by the Department of Community Services (741-2557) at no cost to the Subdivider. However. debris. Recommendation of further trees to be removed or transplanted. The timing of the Tree Maintenance Report is to coincide with the implementation of all tree protection measures. environmental consultant. • • Assessment of damage to trees to be retained during initial site grading and clearing. tree forts and any unnatural material/disturbances that are considered dangerous to the public or would be an inherited liability. temporary signage installed on protective fencing must remain in good order until replaced by permanent markers and signage. barbed wire. Provide remedial recommendations for any damaged trees that are to be retained using current and accepted arboricultural practices. and approved by. and the completion of initial site grading.4949494949491 Urban Design Manual trees (in locations were there is a safety issue). This report is to be prepared by a qualified professional (arborist. Identify planned tree removal not conducted. the Development and Technical Services Department. other projects may require additional information): Note: In general. litter. Permanent Signage: Install signage in accordance with the “BOUNDARY MARKER” and “CITY BOUNDARY MARKER LOCATIONS” drawings found in Appendix F of the City of Kitchener Tree Management Policy. prior to registration. and advised the • • Identify and provide value ($) of trees (Guide for Plant Appraisal. forester. or landscape architect). remnant fences. dump sites.

The City encourages personal delivery to.S. Lots on which the Subdivider/Builder requests to build a structure that is to be located deeper on the lot than that approved on the Detailed Vegetation Plan and/or the revised grading will have an adverse effect on the Detailed Vegetation Plan. C-50 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . size.). fair. In the case of lots or blocks which contain only trees to be removed. Lots Containing Trees Created by Consent Under Section 52 of the Planning Act: Monitoring and Maintenance Period: For all wooded wetlands which are to be conveyed to the City. The I. poor. good. any such ecological restoration activities will be the responsibility of the Subdivider to the satisfaction of the City. and/or the Detailed Vegetation Plan. Site Plan Approval / Plan Approval: • Any site development under Section 41 of the Planning Act. timing (hydroperiod). dead). or direction of flow of surface or groundwater within or contiguous to the wooded wetlands results in an adverse environmental impact requiring any ecological restoration.A. Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan: The Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan will be required for: Subdivisions: • • Where the Detailed Vegetation Plan has identified that there are trees to be retained. As an alternative to the above noted generic examples. very poor. • • • Corner lots (where site service locations and building type has not been pre-determined). quality. Submission Requirements: The following information is required to be shown: • • The true dimensions and bearings of the property.22 of the Standard Residential Subdivision Agreement prior to occupancy.A. An example of written instructions on proper tree stewardship is given in the City of Kitchener’s Tree Management Policy.Urban Design Manual builder that the builder is obligated to provide this material to the first-time home or building owner in accordance with Clause 1. provides a series of published brochures as part of its consumers’ information program. the Environmental Consultant will monitor the wooded wetlands as required by the City to ensure compliance with the approved Subwatershed Master Plan. condition (excellent. The location of isolated trees or single species clusters showing driplines and the species. The location of woodland areas and showing: • Location of tree(s) to be removed for selective thinning (marked in field). and sensitivity of tree to development is to be noted. the General Vegetation Overview. This is the type of information that is to be provided to the new home/building owner of a treed property. If alteration of the quantity. Environmental Implementation Report. the Environmental Consultant can also obtain brochures on many areas of tree stewardship from the International Society of Arboriculture (I. Interior lots greater than 13.7 m (45 feet) of street frontage. and discussion of such written instructions with the first time home owner/occupant as a means of educating them on proper tree stewardship. all such trees shall be removed prior to the issuance of a building permit for these lots or blocks.S. • No building permit will be issued for such lot or block until applicants for such a building permit have submitted a Tree Preservation/ Enhancement Plan for the approval of the Development and Technical Services Department.

edge driplines (ground truthed) and new plantings if required. An outline of tree protection measures including: • • Recommended buffers. Consultant who provided tree data and recommendations. The location of paving and driveway areas. Builder. Walkway locations. and permit the Subdivider another occasion to monitor the builders. address and telephone number of: o o o Subdivider. An example of written instructions on proper tree stewardship is provided in the City of Kitchener’s Tree Management Policy. The location of proposed stockpiles of topsoil and backfill.5151515151511 Urban Design Manual • Location of new woods’ edges (marked in the field). Where a Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan is required the grading consultant will certify that such plan conforms to the Grading Plan. Location and type of services and utilities (provide required width and depth of trench including offsets dependent on soil conditions or nature of installation/equipment). Existing and proposed grades (contours and spot elevations). Work zone requirements (area around the proposed buildings required for excavation of foundations and access during construction). This is the type of information that is to be provided to the new home or building owner of a treed property. Certification of Completed Site Work: Prior to the City issuing the Final Grading Certificate certification by both the Grading Consultant and the Environmental Consultant must be received by the City certifying that the Site Grading and Tree Preservation / Enhancement Plans have been implemented in accordance with the approved plans. dimensions and setbacks of all proposed buildings and structures. Construction details and location of fencing and/or hoarding. Services Department. Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan and Tree Stewardship The Subdivider must confirm in writing that the firsttime home or building owner has received a copy of the approved Site Grading and Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plans along with written instructions on proper stewardship for tree(s) on their Lot/Block or that the Subdivider has provided the builder with the approved grading and tree management plans along with written instructions on proper tree stewardship for tree(s) regarding the Lot/Block noted above. The above noted certification is to be completed in accordance with the form provided below and also in Appendix H of the City of Kitchener Tree Management Policy. This confirmation is to be completed using the form provided below and also in Appendix I of the Tree Management Policy.22 of the Standard Subdivision Agreement prior to occupancy. • • • • • • • The locations. Indication of ground-water and surface drainage. Such a process will maximize the opportunity for the proper implementation of all prior tree management recommendations. Erosion control measures. • • Confirmation of Receipt of Site Grading Plan. • • • • Name. Cut and fill areas. Pre-stressing of trees. This plan review and coordination will ensure that both tree management and site engineering issues are addressed before building commences. The environmental consultant will certify the Grading Plan conforms to the Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan prior to approval of said plans by the Development and Technical 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-51 . and advised the builder that the builder is obligated to provide this material to the first-time home or building owner in accordance with Clause 1.

provides a series of published brochures as part of its consumers’ information program. The I. The City encourages personal delivery to.A.).S. and discussion of such written instructions with the new property owner as a means of educating them on proper tree stewardship. the environmental consultant can also obtain brochures on many areas of tree stewardship from the International Society of Arboriculture (I.Urban Design Manual As an alternative to the above noted generic examples.S. C-52 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .A.

Only if the tree(s) in the opinion of the Arborist etc. isolated trees. in coordination with the Grading and Servicing Engineer. and edge trees of a woodland have some chance of survival in a front yard. the allowable area to clear of trees within this lot will be: From Property Line to Building Line plus the depth of the building type plus 3 metres (construction work zone). Blocks – No trees that are worthy of further study are to be removed from blocks. is worthy of saving should any attempt be made in preserving front yard trees otherwise. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-53 . This requirement is based on the assumption that there are many possibilities for location of services within a corner lot.5353535353531 Urban Design Manual BUILDING CLEARANCE AREA (from Tree Management Policy Appendix D) Interior Lots – Due to the number of site services entering a residential lot.7 (45) 15. the following will apply regarding the removal of trees on an interior building lot: For all lots 13. Corner lots may qualify for exemption to this requirement from the City if the site services location and building type are determined at the time of submission of the Detailed Vegetation Plan. and the different types of buildings that can be built on a corner lot.7 metres in width or less of frontage.24 (50) 9.75 (32) 13. It is especially unlikely that any tree(s) found within the interior of a woodland could be singled out and saved on a narrow width lot of 13. the preservation of trees within the front yard may be extremely difficult. DEPTH OF BUILDING TYPE Building Type Bungalow (Back or Raised) Back Split Two Storey Free Hold Town House Depth Metres (Feet) 13. Tree removal from blocks will not occur until a Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan and a Tree Maintenance Report is approved by the Development and Technical Services Department as part of a Section 41 Development Agreement.7 metres (45 feet) or less. However.7 (45) Corner Lots – No trees that are worthy of further study are to be removed from corner lots.

1: Signage and Erosion Control C-54 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .Urban Design Manual Figure 13.

2: Temporary Tree Protection Fencing 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-55 .5555555555551 Urban Design Manual Figure 13.

3: Temporary Tree Protection Fencing and Erosion Control C-56 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .Urban Design Manual Figure 13.

4: Required Tree Protection Signage 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-57 .5757575757571 Urban Design Manual Figure 13.

Urban Design Manual LOT/BLOCK GRADING AND TREE MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION Date: _________________________________ Lot #: _________________________________ Block #:________________________________ 58M-__________________________________ I. being the Environmental Consultant for the above noted subdivision certify to the City of Kitchener that the approved Site Grading Plan and the Detailed Vegetation Plan and/or the Tree Preservation/Enhancement Plan have been implemented in accordance with the City-approved plans. _____________________________ of _______________________________. Additional details may be required prior to the City accepting the certification. or any other item that has not been implemented in accordance with the City-approved plans. tree replacements. _____________________________ of _______________________________. Grading Consultant Environmental Consultant ____________________________________ ______________________________________ Signature Affix Seal (if applicable) Signature Affix Seal (if applicable) Date ________________________________ Date __________________________________ cc. Please note all deviations from the approved drawings below (additional tree removal. being the Grading Consultant for the above noted Subdivision and I. Lot/Block Owner Subdivider C-58 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . grading changes.

22 of the Standard Subdivision Agreement prior to occupancy. being the Subdivider for the above noted Subdivision confirm to the City of Kitchener that I have provided the builder with the approved grading and tree management plans along with written instructions on proper tree stewardship for tree(s) regarding the Lot/Block noted above. and advised the builder that the builder is obligated to provide this material to the first time home or building owner in accordance with Clause 1. being the Subdivider for the above noted Subdivision confirm to the City of Kitchener that the first time home or building owner has received a copy of the approved grading and tree management plans along with written instructions on proper tree stewardship for tree(s) on their Lot/Block.5959595959591 Urban Design Manual CONFIRMATION OF RECEIPT Date: __________________________________ Lot #: __________________________________ Block #: ________________________________ 58M-__________________________________ I. _____________________________ of _______________________________. OR I. Subdivider ________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________ Date cc. _____________________________ of _______________________________. Lot/Block Owner Builder 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-59 .

A maximum 5:1 slope shall extend from the bottom of the pond to the limit of maximum extended detention.0m above the lowest point of the pond (see Figure 14. environmental benefits and ease of maintenance for stormwater management facilities in our community. Shallow permanent pool allows for diversity of plant material which aids in pollutant removal (nutrient uptake) and entrapment of suspended solids simulating the natural processes. 1996. Stormwater management areas.More effective than Dry Ponds but less effective than Wetlands Ponds due to the depth of the permanent pool and the lack of aquatic plantings.Storage area provided at the inlet for the primary removal of suspended solids.0%. Treated volumes are less than the volumes required in a Dry Pond. will be on lands retained by the owner. Dry Ponds. aesthetics. These principles were originally adopted by Kitchener City Council for use within the City of Kitchener on September 30.3m freeboard is required above the maximum peak flow flood level. • Stormwater management areas for subdivisions will be on lands conveyed at no cost to the City in addition to any lands required to be dedicated for park purposes under the Planning Act.Most effective type of water quality facility. Wetlands.” These principles have been prepared by a joint committee of representatives from all municipalities within the Region of Waterloo. City of Guelph and the Grand River Conservation Authority in consultation with the local development industry. subject to site plan approval.2).3m freeboard is required above the maximum peak flow flood level. Stormwater management Wetlands shall be designed to limit the maximum depth of water to 2.0% and the maximum gradient shall be 5.8m above the lowest point of the stormwater basin. Requires the smallest treatment volume. The maximum depth of the • • Standards for Plans of Subdivision and Site Plans The purpose of this section is to provide principles to augment the MOEE “Stormwater Management Practices Planning and Design Manual and to achieve the highest level of utilization. Wet Ponds. No permanent pool required for the treatment of runoff. Blends in well with the surrounding natural areas making the facility more aesthetically pleasing. Micropool.Urban Design Manual 14. The maximum depth of the extended detention zone shall not exceed 1.Least effective of the three pond types for water quality treatment. • • C-60 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . An additional 0.Storage area provided at the outlet as a tertiary treatment before discharging to the receiving water body. The minimum allowable gradient on the bottom of the basin shall be 1. with a minimum horizontal length of 3.1m above the lowest point of the stormwater basin excluding micropools. Construction costs will be borne by the owner while long term maintenance of the storm water management facility will be borne by the City. An additional 0. In recognition of diverse development conditions.0 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Definitions Forebay . Stormwater management Dry Ponds shall be designed to limit the maximum depth of water to 1. All costs associated with the construction and continuing maintenance of stormwater management facilities shall be borne by the owner.0m. consideration by the City of Kitchener will be given to all innovative approaches and/or techniques that can be demonstrated to meet its storm water management objectives. Requires the largest treatment volume due to the lack of a permanent pool.

For Wet Ponds and Wetlands. The permanent pool depth shall range between a minimum depth of 0. to the limit of maximum extended detention.3m freeboard is required above the maximum peak flow flood level. • A maximum 5:1 slope below the permanent pool level shall be permitted around the entire stormwater management pond.5m (see Figure 14.3m below the permanent pool level.3m above the lowest point of the stormwater basin.0m to a maximum depth of 1. all slopes 5:1 and steeper ranging from a minimum horizontal distance of 3.8m above the permanent pool elevation. to the lower limits of the “safety separation” area or property line where it abuts private property. shrubs.0m. The slope shall extend from the permanent pool level. All other aspects regarding the design of forebays shall conform to the above Wet Pond standards.15m to a maximum depth of 0. See plant lists at end of chapter. Consideration should be given to provide a liner and a means to draw the forebay via gravity to facilitate maintenance.0m. Native and non-invasive trees.0m from the permanent pool level to the property line (not including walkways and trails) shall be planted. The horizontal distance of this slope shall be a minimum of 3. A slope commencing from this point to the lowest point of the stormwater basin shall be a maximum of 3:1. ground covers and aquatic plants are required in a low maintenance landscape design.0m above the permanent pool elevation.3). A maximum 5:1 slope above the permanent pool level shall be permitted around the entire stormwater management pond. Maximum peak flow attenuation zone shall not exceed 1.5m in which a maximum depth of 0. Micropools shall not exceed 5% of the total wetland permanent pool surface area (see Figures 14. Maximum peak flow attenuation zone shall not exceed 1. not including the maximum 10:1 maintenance access slope.8m above the permanent pool elevation.3m.0m to a maximum depth of 1. Micropools shall not exceed an additional maximum depth of 0. From the point of maximum extended detention. An additional 0. The horizontal distance of this slope must be a minimum of 3. • A maximum 5:1 slope above the permanent pool level shall be permitted around the entire stormwater management pond. The slope shall extend from the permanent pool level. to the limit of maximum extended detention.0m above the permanent pool elevation.2 and 14. all slopes 5:1 and steeper ranging from a minimum horizontal distance of 3. The permanent pool depth shall range between a minimum depth of 1. • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-61 . • • • Forebays are required for all of the above described stormwater management facilities.4). which has regard for the ecology of the site and the eco-region. For Dry Ponds. The horizontal distance of this slope must be a minimum of 3.6161616161611 Urban Design Manual extended detention zone shall not exceed 1. Excluding maintenance access routes.0m from the pond bottom level to the property line (not including walkways • Stormwater management Wet Ponds shall be designed to limit the maximum depth of water to 3.0m. • A maximum 5:1 slope below the permanent pool level shall be permitted around the entire stormwater management pond. Forebays shall not exceed 33% of the total wet pond surface area and 20% of the wetland permanent pool surface area.5m shall be used for sediment accumulation. The permanent pool depth shall range between a minimum depth of 1. The maximum depth of the extended detention zone shall not exceed 1. all access to forebays shall be discouraged through shrub plantings (see Figures 14.2).2 and 14. slopes shall vary between 2:1 to 6:1 and have a maximum average slope of 4:1.

The subdivider shall maintain the planting for a period of one year from the completion of final planting. Landscape plans are to be prepared by an Environmental Professional acceptable to the Municipality.1: Required Density of Shrub Plantings Designed pedestrian access areas shall not exceed a maximum slope of 6:1. which ever is greater. See plant lists at end of chapter.5). 25% density equals 1 shrub per 4 square metres. Notwithstanding the above criteria in the case of headwall designs.) per 50 square metres. they shall be implemented above the maximum extended detention level or 5 year storm level. The density of shrub plantings. In the event that a community trail has been identified and/or required by the City in the vicinity or adjacent to a stormwater management pond.0m (see Figure 14. in order to prevent frequent flooding. • That in all cases. The purpose of the bar scale is not to encourage repetitive landscape design but to act as a relative guide to associate shrub plant densities with the appropriate slope. Trails shall have a minimum width of 3. Incorporating a wide range of slopes and ponding depths into facility design that conform to the design principles is strongly encouraged and desirable in order to facilitate a wide range of flora and fauna habitat conditions. Shrub plantings shall prevent public access on all 2:1 slopes and discourage access on all 3:1 slopes. shall vary depending on the degree of slope. they must be planted at a minimum rate of 1 tree (40mm cal. • • • • C-62 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . however it may be required as determined by the City.Urban Design Manual and trails) shall also be planted.5:1 2:1 Slope Range Figure 14. • Coverage Intensity of Shrub Plantings Percentage of Density 100 75 50 25 6:1 5:1 4:1 3:1 2. For subdivisions only: In addition to above requirements the following principles shall apply to subdivisions only: That a Landscape Plan of the storm water management facilities be approved by the Supervisor of Site Plan Development in Development and Technical Services and the Supervisor of Design and Development in Community Services prior to the registration of the Plan of Subdivision. Areas subject to the collection of contaminants or spills shall be fitted with adequate oil/grit separators. implementation of these principles shall have regard for approved Watershed. All landscaping of areas above the 5 year storm level shall be installed at the subdivider’s cost. Sub-Watershed and Master Drainage Plans. in accordance with the approved plan. during the first planting season after occupancy of the first unit. for safety purposes. The remainder of the planting shall commence at such time as required by the Supervisor of Site Plan Development in Development and Technical Services and the Supervisor of Design and Development in Community Services. Fencing of stormwater management facilities shall be discouraged. • • Where trees are to be planted. 100% density equals 1 shrub per square metre. the depth of water related to adjoining side slopes may vary and fencing may be required for safety purposes.

0m separation shall have a maximum slope of 6:1. the 3. The planting of coniferous trees within this zone is not permitted.3m in depth. Below the trail. Minimize the number of inlets / forebays to one (1) where possible. Maintenance access requirements are to be determined on a site-by-site basis. phone number for further information and any other relevant information. Deciduous trees should be planted at a minimum distance of 1.5m from the edge of the trail. Stormwater QUALITY management strategies may be accommodated within parking areas using. In situations where a community trail is designed within the maximum peak flow depth zone. • • • • • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-63 . If barriers are required. Rooftop runoff shall be considered as clean stormwater and shall be infiltrated as appropriate. A geotechnical report with infiltration assessment should accompany site application. all at the cost of the Subdivider.0m wide surface to accommodate maintenance vehicles with a minimum 10m turning radius (inside radius) and a flat 10m loading area is required.6).5). The design of maintenance routes and loading areas shall be to the approval of the Engineering Division. fore example oil grit for water quality management. the 3. Stormwater QUANTITY management strategies can be accommodated within parking areas to a limit of 0.2m and shrubs must be regularly prevented from naturalizing this zone. Controlled maintenance access routes shall be provided to both inlet and outlet structures and forebays. the Subdivider agrees to erect one or more information signs at (a) public access point(s) detailing the purpose of the pond. This zone shall be planted with low ground covers (see Figure 14. • For Site Plans Only: In addition to initial clauses applying to both subdivisions and site plans the following principles shall apply to site plans only: • Children’s play equipment shall not be permitted within stormwater management facilities. Prior to the City accepting the stormwater management pond as shown on the approved landscape plan. In cases where stormwater management facilities can not be aesthetically accommodated at grade. pond inlet inverts shall not be lower than the maximum extended detention level (see Figure 14. they must not interfere with visibility or create entrapment areas.6363636363631 Urban Design Manual • To enhance user comfort and safety. the following general criteria are recommended. Maintenance access routes shall not exceed a maximum slope of 10:1. • In order to prevent surcharging of storm sewers upstream. underground and roof top storage shall be considered as alternatives. to be approved by the Supervisor of Site Plan Development in Development and Technical Services and the Supervisor of Design and Development in Community Services. A minimum 3. a 3. Maintenance is required to ensure that tree canopies are raised to a minimum of 2. however.0m separation above the trail shall have a maximum slope of 3:1.0m zone on each side of the community trail shall be designed in such a way that sightlines are preserved.

Urban Design Manual Figure 14.2: Stormwater Management Pond Configuration C-64 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .

3 Micropool Detail 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-65 .6565656565651 Urban Design Manual Figure 14.

4 Forebay Detail C-66 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .Urban Design Manual Figure 14.

6767676767671 Urban Design Manual Figure 14.5 Community Trails at Storm Water Management Ponds 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-67 .

6 Preferred Pond Inlet Detail C-68 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .Urban Design Manual Figure 14.

7: Example of Storm Water Pond Signage 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-69 .6969696969691 Urban Design Manual Figure 14.

In doing this. wildlife food and cover and aesthetics be included in the overall strategy. Key to Numbers: 1-Regionally Significant to Waterloo 2-Mainly restricted to Carolinian Forest Zone 3-Use only in North Dumfries Township (removed from following list for Kitchener) 4-Use local genotypes only Native Shrubs and Trees of Waterloo Region: The committee established for the Stormwater Management Facilities Design Principles supported the general concept of creating a policy to encourage the planting of native shrubs and trees surrounding SWM ponds of Waterloo Region. New Hamburg. SWM wetlands should resemble those in the Borden-Laurentian complex. For example. and the tri-city area of Kitchener-Waterloo and Cambridge are all located in different “ecoregions”. The desired/required performance of each plant species to be planted or allowed to invade the facility must be considered. and. For species where the local genotypes are considered relatively pure. A number of large caliper shade trees could be planted in the appropriate locations. in Kitchener. the integrity of Regional populations will be preserved. where erosion control is required. Ontario Land Inventory Units). The species making up the preferred list are all indigenous to the Waterloo Region and some are Regionally Significant. a native fast growing species is preferable. and maintenance requirements of species must be compared with desired functions and effects. the desired functions must be prioritized. for design and construction in Guelph. and should only be used in North Dumfries Township. The closest genotype available should be used for all species unless otherwise indicated. 1992. But. For example. In some situations.Urban Design Manual Stormwater Management (SWM) Facilities: SWM facility design should match ecosystems and “ecoregions” (ecosections. the area’s natural integrity will be preserved and SWM areas will be protected from the general encroachment of alien species. it is preferable to use these local genotypes only to avoid importing genetic material from other areas. Waterloo Region. In fact. Although most Carolinian species are only found in North Dumfries Township some do occur north of this area. and blossom would be secondary functions and would be provided by other species possibly planted farther away from the water. the right species for that job should be planted. The plant species listed should be considered as to the performance and functionality of those chosen for a specific site. erosion control. where shading is required as soon as possible to keep water temperatures low. This list can also be used as a guide for plantings in and around SWM ponds. Species restricted to the Carolinian Forest Zone have been noted. Similarly. but higher in terms of biodiversity. prepared a list of native trees and shrubs which could be used as a guide for planting in and around ESPAs. Sizes of planting stock. On April 1. By using stock which originated in C-70 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . leaf colour. Biodiversity. The amount of planting stock of species we depend upon for shade. Guelph. growth rates. seed and plant materials could be selectively taken from those wetlands and used locally. Elmira. and filtering should always be greater than that providing colour and food for wildlife. wetlands in that area would be used. Regional staff in association with Larry Lamb of the University of Waterloo. planting of non-native plants may be necessary to establish cover and native plants with lower performance ratings in erosion control. (A list of Invasive Alien species is also provided which should not be planted). Also noted are those species which are found.

green ash Honeysuckle Family Nannyberry COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME COMMON NAME 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-71 . serviceberry Crataegus chrysocarpa Golden-fruited hawthorn Crataegus holmesiana Holmes’ hawthorn Crataegus pruinosa Frosty hawthorn Crataegus punctata Dotted hawthorn Prunus nigra Canada plum Prunus pensylvanica Pin cherry Prunus serotina Black cherry Prunus virginiana Chokecherry Anacardiaceae Rhus typhina Aceraceae Acer negundo Acer rubrum Acer saccharinum Acer saccharum ssp. nigrum Acer saccharum ssp. saccharum Acer spicatum Tiliaceae Tilia americana Cornaceae Cornus alternifolia Oleaceae Fraxinus americana Fraxinus nigra Fraxinus pennsylvanica Caprifoliaceae Vibumum lentago Cashew Family Staghorn sumac Maple Family Box-Elder or Manitoba maple Red maple Silver maple Black maple 4 Sugar maple Mountain maple Linden Family Basswood Dogwood Family Alternate-leaved dogwood Olive Family White ash Black ash Red ash.2.4 White elm Red or Slippery elm Rock elm Witch-hazel Family Witch hazel Rosaceae Amelanchier laevis Abies balsamea Larix laricina Pinus strobus Picea mariana Tsuga canadensis Cupressaceae Juniperus virginiana Thuja occidentalis Salicaceae Populus balsamifera Populus grandidentata Populus tremuloides Salix amygdaloides Salix bebbiana Salix discolor Salix lucida Salix nigra Juglandaceae Carya cordiformis Juglans cinerea Betulaceae Betula lutea Betula papyrifera Carpinus caroliniana Ostrya virginiana Fagaceae Fagus grandifolia Quercus alba Quercus macrocarpa Quercus rubra Ulmaceae Celtis occidentalis Ulmus americana Ulmus rubra Ulmus thomasii Hamamelidaceae Hamamelis virginiana Rose Family Smooth juneberry or serviceberry Amelanchier arborea Juneberry.4 Eastern white cedar Willow Family Balsam poplar Largetooth aspen Trembling aspen Peach-leaved willow Bebbs’ willow Pussy willow Shining willow Black willow Walnut Family Bitternut hickory Butternut Birch Family Yellow birch White birch Blue-beech Hop-hornbeam Beech Family American Beech White oak Bur oak Red oak Elm Family Hackberry 1.7171717171711 Urban Design Manual SCIENTIFIC NAME Trees Pinaceae Pine Family Balsam fir 4 Tamarack Eastern white pine Black spruce 1 Eastern hemlock Cypress Family Eastern red cedar 1.

racemosa Cornus rugosa Cornus stolonifera COMMON NAME Rue Family Prickly ash 1 Holly Family Winterberry Mountain holly 1 Bittersweet Family Climbing Bittersweet Burning bush 1. obliqua Cornus canadensis Cornus foemina ssp.4 Greenbrier Family Bristly greenbrier Willow Family Sandbar willow Blue-leaf willow 1 Willow Bog willow Slender willow Autumn willow Birch Family Hazelnut.2.Urban Design Manual SCIENTIFIC NAME Shrubs Taxaceae Taxus canadensis Cupressaceae Juniperus communis Smilacaceae Smilax hispida Salicaceae Salix exigua Salix myricoides Salix rigida Salix pedicellaris Salix petiolaris Salix serissima Betulaceae Corylus americana Corylus cornuta Ranunculaceae Clematis virginiana Rosaceae Aronia melanocarpa Physocarpus opulifolius Potentilla fruticosa Rosa blanda Rosa carolina Rosa palustris Rubus allegheniensis Rubus canadensis Rubus idaeus Rubus occidentalis Rubus pubescens Rubus setosus Spiraea alba Yew Family American yew Cypress Family Common juniper 1.4 Running strawberry-bush 2 Bladdernut Family Bladdernut 1 Buckthorn Family New Jersey tea Alder-leaved buckthorn Grape Family Riverbank grape Mezereum Family Leatherwood Dogwood Family Silky dogwood Bunchberry Grey dogwood Round-leaved dogwood Red-osier dogwood Ericaceae Heath Family Vaccinium angustifolium Lowbush blueberry Vaccinium myrtilloides Velvet-leaved blueberry C-72 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . American hazel Beaked hazel 1 Buttercup Family Virgin’s-bower Rose Family Chokeberry Ninebark Shrubby cinquefoil Smooth wild rose Pasture rose Swamp rose Common blackberry Smooth blackberry Red raspberry Black raspberry Dwarf raspberry Bristly blackberry Narrow-leaved meadowsweet COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME Rutaceae Zanthoxylum americanum Aquifoliaceae Ilex verticillata Nemopanthus mucronatus Celastraceae Celastrus scandens Euonymus atropurpurea Euonymus obovata Staphyleaceae Staphylea trifolia Rhamnaceae Ceanothus americanus Rhamnus alnifolia Vitaceae Vitis riparia Thymelaeaceae Dirca palustris Cornaceae Cornus amomum ssp.

pubens Symphoricarpos albus Viburnum acerifolium Viburnum cassinoides Viburnum lentago Viburnum rafinesquianum Viburnum trilobum COMMON NAME Madder Family Buttonbush Partridgeberry Honeysuckle Family Bush-honeysuckle Twinflower Fly-honeysuckle Smooth honeysuckle Elderberry. Witherod1 Nannyberry Downy arrow-wood Highbush cranberry SCIENTIFIC NAME COMMON NAME Potamogeton pectinatus Sago Pondweed Others: Ceratophyllum demersum Elodea canadensis Heteranthera dubia Lemna minor Lemna trisulca Nuphar variegatum Nymphaea odorata Coontail Canada Waterweed Water Stargrass Lesser Duckweed Star Duckweed Yellow or Bullhead Lily Fragrant White Waterlily Emergent Species: Typha latifolia Scirpus pungens Sagittaria latifolia Pontederia cordata Scirpus validus Sparganuim eurycarpum Common Cattail American Bulrush Common Arrowhead Pickerelweed Softstem Bulrush Giant Burreed Aquatic Plant Species List The following plant species are recommended by MOE for use in stormwater management ponds.5m) Pond Weeds: Potamogeton natans Floating-leaved pondweed 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-73 . Common elder Red-berried elder Snowberry Maple-leaved viburnum Wild raisin.7373737373731 Urban Design Manual SCIENTIFIC NAME Rubiaceae Cephalanthus occidentalis Mitchella repens Caprifoliaceae Diervilla lonicera Linnaea borealis Lonicera canadensis Lonicera dioica Sambucus canadensis Sambucus racemosa ssp. not all species are native to Waterloo Region. Sedges: Carex pseudocyperus Carex retrorsa Carex utriculata Cyperus-like Sedge Retrorse Sedge Beaked Sedge Deep Water Areas (1m < depth < 3m) Pond Weeds: Potamogeton pectinatus Sago pondweed Potamogeton natans Floating-leaved pondweed Potamogeton amplifolius Large-leaved pondweed Shoreline Fringe (near permanent pool) Hydric Grasses: Calamagrostis canadensis Leersia oryzoides Festuca rubra Canada Bluejoint Rice-cut Grass Red Fescue (non-native) Others: Heteranthera dubia Elodea canadensis Ceratophyllum demersum Vallisneria americana Water Stargrass Canada Waterweed Coontail Tapegrass Others: Chelone glabra Asclepias incarnata Verbena hastata Bidens cernua Bidens frondosa Alisma plantagoaquatica Turtlehead Swamp Milkweed Blue Vervain Nodding Beggarticks Devil’s Beggarticks Water-plantain SHALLOW WATER AREAS (< 0.

C.wood Sugar Maple Silver Maple Peach-leaved Willow Red Maple Bebb’s Willow Chokecherry Bur Oak Nannyberry Smooth Serviceberry Shrubs and Vines: Slender Willow Common Elder Red-osier Dogwood Ninebark Winterberry Grey Dogwood Virginia Creeper Riverbank Grape Narrow-leaved Meadowsweet Aquatic Plants: Common Cattail Softstem Bulrush Sago Pondweed Common Arrowhead Water-plantain Canada Bluejoint Sedges (Carex stipata. woodlands and natural areas because they are alien and highly invasive. Filter Strips: Festuca rubra Agrostis alba Aster novae-angliae Aster lanceolatus ssp. Rosaceae Rosa multiflora Leguminosae Pueraria lobata Celastraceae Celastrus orbiculata Aceraceae Acer platanoides Acer pseudoplatanus Rhamnaceae Rhamnus cathartica Rhamnus frangula Vitaceae Ampelopsis brevipedunculata Elaeagnaceae Elaeagnus angustifolia COMMON NAME Willow Family White Poplar Birch Family European birch Barberry Family Barberry species Rose Family Multiflora rose Pea Family Kudzu Bittersweet Family Oriental Bittersweet Maple Family Norway Maple Sycamore maple Buckthorn Family Common Buckthorn Glossy Buckthorn Grape or Vine Family Porcelainberry The following dependable species should usually be planted in larger quantities: Trees: Eastern White Cedar Red Ash Eastern White Pine White Ash Trembling Aspen Balsam Poplar Alternate-leaved Dog.Urban Design Manual SCIENTIFIC NAME COMMON NAME Pond Berming Areas: Nymphaea odorata Scirpus pungens Scirpus validus Fragrant White Waterlily American Bulrush Softstem INVASIVE SPECIES The following species are not suitable for restoration and landscaping within and adjacent to Stormwater Management Areas. lanceolatus Aster puniceus Solidago canadensis Solidago rugosa Solidago altissima Red Fescue Redtop New England Aster Tall White Aster Purple-stemmed Aster Canada Goldenrod Rough Goldenrod Tall Goldenrod SCIENTIFIC NAME Woody Species: Salicaceae Populus alba Betulaceae Betula pendula Berberidaceae Berberis spp. Other species may be added to this list as their existence as an invasive problem becomes known.pensylvanica) Oleaster Family Russian-olive C-74 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .

Iridaceae Iris pseudacorus Polygonaceae Polygonum cuspidatum Papaveraceae Chelidonium majus Cruciferae Alliaria petiolata Cheiranthus cheiri Hesperis matronalis Leguminosae Coronilla varia Lotus corniculatus Lathyrus latifolius Melilotus alba Melilotus officinalis Trifolium hybridum Trifolium pratense Trifolium repens Vicia cracca Grass Family Feather grass Common Reed Lily Family Lily-of-the-valley Daylily Iris Family Yellow Flag Buckwheat Family Japanese Knotweed Poppy Family Greater Celandine Mustard Family Garlic mustard Wallflower Dame’s rocket Pea Family Crownvetch Birdsfoot-trefoil Everlasting or perennial pea White sweet clover Yellow sweet clover Alsike clover Red clover White clover Tufted-vetch Umbelliferae Carrot or Parsley Family Aegopodium podagraria Goutweed Pastinaca sativa Wild parsnip Primulaceae Primrose Family Lysimachia nummularia Moneywort Apocynaceae Vinca minor Boraginaceae Myosotis scorpioides Labiatae Ajuga reptans Glechoma hederacea Rubiaceae Galium mollugo Campanulaceae Campanula rapunculoides Compositae Achillea millefolium Centaurea maculosa Dogbane Family Periwinkle Borage Family True Forget-me-not Mint Family Bugleweed Ground-ivy Madder Family Wild madder Bluebell Family Creeping bellflower Aster Family Common yarrow Spotted Knapweed 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-75 .7575757575751 Urban Design Manual SCIENTIFIC NAME Elaeagnus umbellata Caprifoliaceae Lonicera japonica Lonicera tatarica Viburnum opulus COMMON NAME Autumn-olive Honeysuckle Family Japanese honeysuckle Tartarian honeysuckle Guelder-rose (or European Highbush cranberry) SCIENTIFIC NAME Euphorbiaceae Euphorbia cyparissias Euphorbia esula Balsaminaceae Impatiens glandulifera Malvaceae Malva moschata Violaceae Viola odorata Lythraceae Lythrum salicaria COMMON NAME Spurge Family Cypress spurge Leafy spurge Touch-me-not Family Pink Touch-me-not Mallow Family Musk mallow Violet Family Sweet violet Loosestrife Family Purple Loosestrife Herbaceous Species: Gramineae Miscanthus sinensis Phragmites australis Liliaceae Convallaria majallis Hemerocallis spp.

4 Hobble-bush 1.4 Anacardiaceae Rhus aromatica Elaeagnaceae Shepherdia canadensis Araliaceae Aralia hispida Pyrolaceae Chimaphila umbellata Ericaceae Andromeda polifolia ssp.4 Rose Family Mountain-ash Shrubs: Myricaceae Comptonia peregrina Myrica gale Betulaceae Bayberry Family Sweet-fern 1 Sweet gale 1 Birch Family C-76 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .4 Creeping snowberry 1. stolonifera Rubus flagellaris Rubus hispidus Rubus odoratus Swamp birch 1 Rose Family Service-.Urban Design Manual SCIENTIFIC NAME Chrysanthemum leucanthemum Senecio jacobaea Tanacetum vulgare Tussilago farfara COMMON NAME Ox-eye daisy Stinking willie Tansy Coltsfoot Native Trees and Shrubs of the Waterloo Region NOT Suitable for General Use in Natural Areas: The following native species are not recommended for general use as they are highly restricted to specific habitats in the Waterloo Region.4 Dryland blueberry 4 Honeysuckle Family Hairy honeysuckle 1.4 High-bush blueberry 1. This list has been adapted from lists authored by the Region of Waterloo and the Federation of Ontario Naturalists. rugosa Betula populifolia Fagaceae Quercus ellipsoidalis Rosaceae Sorbus americana COMMON NAME Pine Family White spruce 1 Birch Family Speckled Alder 4 Grey birch1 Beech Family Hill’s oak 1.4 Bearberry 4 Leatherleaf 4 Trailing arbutus 1.4 Large cranberry 1.4 Swamp fly-honeysuckle 1. Juneberry Dwarf Juneberry Serviceberry 1 Northern dewberry Swamp dewberry Purple-flowering raspberry 1 Cashew Family Fragrant sumac 1 Oleaster Family Soapberry 1 Ginseng Family Bristly sarsaparilla 1 Wintergreen Family Pipsissewa 1.4 Wintergreen 4 Black huckleberry 4 Bog-laurel Labrador-tea 1. Key to Numbers: 1-Regionally Significant to Waterloo 2-Mainly restricted to Carolinian Forest Zone 3-Use only in North Dumfries Township (removed from following list for Kitchener) 4-Use local genotypes only Betula pumila Rosaceae Amelanchier humilis Amelanchier sanguinea Amelanchier spicata var. glaucophylla Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Chamaedaphne calyculata Epigaea repens Gaultheria hispidula Gaultheria procumbens Gaylussacia baccata Kalmia polifolia Ledum groenlandicum Vaccinium corymbosum Vaccinium macrocarpon Vaccinium oxycoccos Vaccinium pallidum Caprifoliaceae Lonicera hirsuta Lonicera oblongifolia Viburnum alnifolium SCIENTIFIC NAME Trees: Pinaceae Picea glauca Betulaceae Alnus incana ssp.3 Heath Family Bog-rosemary 1.4 Small cranberry 1. They should be planted only in the immediate vicinity of areas where they now exist or have been reliably documented in the past.

minimum soil depth/volume requirements and a minimum bed-width to property line are required based on proposed and adjacent land uses. sun. . environmental and social functions and in order for these plantings to thrive. Create safe urban environments. These trees should have a mature height that is expected to exceed eleven (11) metres and have an expected crown spread of nine (9) metres or greater. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-77 . etc.7777777777771 Urban Design Manual 15. open areas and private spaces. Adequate soil volume should be provided to allow for the expected mature size of a tree. Areas accommodating trees are required to have a minimum of 1. • • • • • • • • • • Planting Standards for all Land Uses: Planting Material Specifications Figure 15. Sod / seed planting areas shall have a minimum topsoil depth of 150mm. These perimeter planting requirements are in addition to other landscape planting requirements that may be necessary for a particular development. rehabilitation. These features should be incorporated into the site plan and later detailed on the landscape plan. Provide a consistent visual image between adjacent properties and streetscape. • • • • Provide seasonal colour. Stabilize steep embankments. naturalizing. Landscape plantings along property lines serve numerous aesthetic. Provide definition of public walkways. Achieve energy conservation and water efficiency. screening. For final acceptance of a project and release of the Letter of Credit. Mitigate or minimize the visual impact of parking and service facilities from adjacent properties and streets.8 m high Shrubs: 35-50 cm high minimum depending on species.g. Implement design practices which contribute to successful long-term maintenance. and. Shrub planting areas shall have a minimum topsoil depth of 300mm. Protect natural features and promote tree conservation. Screen unsightly areas and provide protection from excessive wind. blank facades and enhance the appearance of building setbacks and yard areas. Tree Spacing High branching deciduous trees (shade trees) are required along property lines according to Figure 15. texture and variety. Seeded areas should be well germinated with a minimum of 70% coverage.0m continuous soil depth or a minimum of 20m3 of soil volume per tree (all depth measurements are taken from base of root ball or container). rain and snow. where necessary this should go beyond the specified minimum of 20 cubic meters of soil. Soften dominant building mass and provide human scale for the pedestrian. Add visual interest to open spaces. Project Landscape Architect to provide written confirmation to City of Kitchener staff that soil volumes noted have been achieved prior to commencement of final planting.2. all required plant material must be in good health and actively growing.0 Minimum acceptable sizes for plant material: LANDSCAPE DESIGN Landscape Standards: Appropriate landscaping is required to achieve the following: • Deciduous Trees: 50 mm caliper for all land uses except for Residential High Rise where 70 mm caliper will be required Coniferous Trees: 1. The spacing of plant material should account for the ultimate size and form of the selected species as well as intention e.1 indicates the minimum landscape standards for various types of development. aesthetics. shade.

street noise. establish focal points or areas of greater interest. the following depths of materials are required: • 15 cm of drainage gravel plus 40 cm topsoil for sod • 15 cm of drainage gravel plus 60 cm topsoil for shrubs • 15 cm of drainage gravel plus 90 cm topsoil for trees Indus x x x x x x Com x x x x x x High Rise Res’al x x x x x x x Low Rise Res’al x x x x x x x Instit x x x x x x x x x x x Landscape screening of privacy areas required from adjacent pedestrian walkways.0m high require a guard rail at top of the wall x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x C-78 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . flush curb & ramps to be provided and designed for people with disabilities Landscaping screening required for parking storage and service areas Air vents and underground storage tanks are not to be located in the landscaped area Children’s recreation facilities c/w walkway connections from the building to the recreational facilities Where landscaping will be placed on a roof structure. recreational amenities & service areas Landscape screening and/or fencing required for all exposed parking. Emergency fire routes. etc. sun. Construction of berms or grade changes is encouraged to provide topographical relief Bicycle racks Intensive landscape treatment required at intersection of municipal roadways Pedestrian walkways to be minimum of 1. etc. internal roadways. service & garbage areas adjacent to other uses Streetscape along internal roads Landscape screening of rear yard setbacks between privacy areas of townhouse blocks Patios which may include wood decks required to be a minimum of 11m2 (not including steps) Privacy screens (1. flower garden. naturalized areas. patio. pool fountain.8m high wood screen fence required between rear privacy areas of units Privacy screen returns may be required depending upon layout of townhouse blocks For large and/or high profile sites. a sculpture. Incorporate landscape features into rest areas to provide protection from environmental elements such as wind. ground-level units. other than vehicular routes. For example.8m minimum.Urban Design Manual LANDSCAPE SITE STANDARDS Standard Vehicular access to the site is to be defined by accent planting Main building entrances to be identified by a landscape area (accent and/or foundation planting) Pedestrian walkways to building entrances to be provided from the parking area Walkways.5m wide Width of walkway abutting parking stalls is 1. shall conform to the to the satisfaction of the General Manager of Development and Technical Services Retaining walls over 1.

For all other land uses 1.2: Tree Spacing Requirements Between Proposed and Adjacent Land Uses 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-79 .5 m 9m Adjacent Municipal Street 7.5 m 7. Curbed traffic islands defining major internal routes to be minimum of 2.7979797979791 Urban Design Manual LANDSCAPE SITE STANDARDS Standard Indus Com High Rise Res’al x Low Rise Res’al x Instit Drainage swales shall be graded with gradually sloping banks and sodded for stabilization and ease of maintenance Landscaped portable sign locations Recycling and garbage collection areas.5m bed width is required.6m wide (measured from back face of curb to back face of curb) for plant material installation Ground supported and portable sign locations Community Garden Minimum required soil: sod/seed (150mm depth). shrub beds (300mm depth) .N. 2.5 m 9m Adjacent Industrial 9m 12m 9m 6m 7.5 m 9m Adjacent Institutional 9m 6m 9m 6m 7.5 m 7.L. 3 3. Minimum bed width for landscaped areas along property lines in industrial or commercial land uses adjacent to residential or institutional land uses is 3m.1 Landscape Requirements for Various Land Uses Tree Spacing Requirements Between Proposed and Adjacent Land Uses Proposed Land Use Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Municipal Street Green Belt/Park Adjacent Commercial 12 m 9m 9m 6m 7. x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Figure 15.5 m 7. Figure 15. enclosures are only required if the recycling and garbage collection area is visible from street.A. trees (1000mm continuous soil depth or 20m3 per tree).0m continuous soil depth or minimum 20m of soil volume per tree for all tree planting areas within medians adjacent to road ways and islands within parking area.5 m N/A N/A Adjacent Green Belt/ Park 9m 9m 9m 9m N/A N/A Note: 1.5 m 9m Adjacent Residential 6m 6m 6m 6m 7. All plant material shall be nursery grown in accordance with C. Minimum 1. For industrial sites.

Promote the safety and orientation of users. within the 4. are required both around the perimeter of parking lots and on parking lot islands internally on the site. Unify. including trees. Screen adjacent areas from headlights. specific areas must be selected for the placement of portable signs. Reduce summer pavement temperatures. Conceptual layout and landscaping requirements for portable signs are found in Figure 15. for all new development or redevelopment sites.pdf Portable Signs The key requirements of portable signs are: Signage should not clutter the streetscape by way of graphic overload or too much information.municipalworld. Landscape plantings are to skirt the base of the lowest level of the trailer/sign bed while still providing adequate access to the portable sign.5 metres in height is required. Counter balance the ecological deterioration caused by extensive pavement area and exhaust emissions from automobiles. Define access aisles to and from parking facilities. within 10m of any traffic light.6m of any lot line.3. A minimum separation distance of 10 metres from • • C-80 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . Attractively and efficiently separate adjacent parking lots under separate ownership and serving separate developments (except in cases of joint legal access).57 visibility triangle where two lots abut at a street line. through landscaping. To be placed in such defined locations as shown on a landscape plan approved by the Director of Planning. Signage should compliment the architectural design and materials of the building(s) found on site. Break up the monotony of large expansive parking surfaces. and the view of cars. Signage should be integrated into the landscape design for the development and be illustrated on the approved Landscape Plan. Parking Lots: Landscape plantings.com/kitchener/680.57m visibility triangle at an entrance or exit to a site. • All building and ground-based signage is subject to the City of Kitchener Sign By-law. • • • • To keep portable sign locations out of the road right-of-way and improve the quality of the streetscape. The City of Kitchener Sign By-law can be found on-line at: http://code. or designate. Sign permits are required for all permanent and temporary signage including contractor’s signs for new construction. Removal or significant pruning of trees to accommodate signage is not acceptable.Urban Design Manual Signage within the Landscape: any existing or proposed tree trunk for signs greater than 2. or within the 4. Portable signs are prohibited within 0. the appearance of the subject site and co-ordinate it with the surrounding development. • • • • Ground Supported Signs All ground supported signs are subject to the requirements outlined in the City of Kitchener Sign Bylaw and should be designed and located to achieve the following: • Signage should not impact or interfere with the growth of either municipal street trees or on-site trees. Landscaping of parking lots shall: • • • • • Provide an aesthetically pleasing view from the street. Signage shall not obstruct drivers’ views of approaching pedestrians or vehicular traffic.

8181818181811 Urban Design Manual Figure 15.3: Conceptual Layout and Landscape Requirements for Portable Signs 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-81 .

Urban Design Manual Figure 15.4: Site Plan Illustrating Sign Restrictions for Sight Visibility Figure 15.5: Planting Areas for Parking Lots C-82 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .

No shrub shall be more than 0.8383838383831 Urban Design Manual Landscape Development External to the Parking Lot: When a parking lot is located adjacent to a public rightof-way. Plant with a minimum of one (1) shade tree and eight (8) square metres of shrub bed per 7.25 = Display area (in metres).5 linear metres of frontage. landscaped islands and peninsulas. which result from creating too much height for the width of the space. The landscaped strip may not include any paved area except pedestrian walkways and parking lot and loading zone driveways which cross the landscaped strip. • • • • • Divide lot into smaller sections by the use of curbed. The slope of the berm shall not exceed 33% (3:1) for lawn areas. The equivalent number of trees and combining of shrub beds can be provided in a group or groupings along the landscaped strip. excluding driveway openings Provide a minimum three (3) metre wide landscaped strip and a berm.5 metres of frontage. stone or finished concrete wall to screen the parking lot. no slope shall exceed 50% (2:1). Vehicles in the display area shall be located behind a continuous 30 cm height planting and all vehicles shall be parked at grade. for safety reasons and 1 metre maximum height within a visibility triangle.2 metres. The parking lot area landscape strip requirements for vehicular sales facilities will allow for the creation of picture frame(s) along streets for vehicular sales display. naturalistic forms. a landscaped strip shall be provided on the property between the parking lot and the right-of-way.5 linear metres of frontage. The use of these groupings will discourage monotonous linear planting and encourage imagination in design and layout. with a 0. the top of which is at least 0.5 linear metres of frontage and four (4) square metres of shrub beds abutting the wall per 7.5 linear metres of frontage undisturbed.91 metre high brick. Islands (and circulation aisles) should be oriented in the direction of pedestrian movement.6 metres high within the first metre parallel to the property line. Any of the following landscaped strip treatments may be used alone or in combination: Plant with a minimum of one (1) shade tree per 7. • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-83 . mass shrub bed plantings. However. Plant the resulting embankment with a minimum of one (1) shade tree and eight (8) square metres of shrub bed per 7. Provide a minimum three (3) metre wide landscaped strip and a maximum one (1) metre grade drop from the right-of-way line to the adjacent parking lot pavement. The following formula shall be used to determine the display area allowed per street frontage: Linear Distance of Street Frontage (from lot line to lot line or from lot line to corner in metres) x 0. The above noted groupings will provide opportunities for visibility windows. excluding driveway openings Provide a minimum three (3) metre wide landscaped strip between the right-of-way line and the parking lot. a three (3) metre wide landscape strip shall be provided as per the requirements contained in “Landscape Development External to the Parking Lot”. and pedestrian access points.75 metres higher than the elevation of the adjacent parking lot pavement. Islands or peninsulas are required at the end of the parking aisles. Berms should be graded to appear as smooth. Landscape Requirements for Development Internal to a Parking Lot: • Provide a minimum 3 metre wide landscaped strip between the right-of-way and the parking lot which is to be planted with a minimum of one (1) shade tree and twelve (12) square metres of shrub bed per 7. Berms planted with ground covers and shrubs may be steeper. The remaining shrubs are to be maintained at a maximum height of 1. Avoid narrow bumps. rounded. Landscape Requirements Around the Edge of Parking Lots for Vehicular Sales Facilities: When a vehicular sales facility is located adjacent to a public right-of-way.

Easily maintained. shall have a minimum dimension of 2.5 m. Hardy and strongly branched. It is also highly encouraged to install underground irrigation systems for areas of high stress such as interior landscaped planting areas in parking lots.e. sites zoned B-3. not pavement or turf. Lancaster Corporate Centre. or 2 ornamental single stem trees (e. Ground cover rather than turf under trees. Water used for irrigation shall be minimized to the amount needed to maintain adequate plant health and growth. This requirement applies to ornamental plantings within the streetscape. No vehicular parking space shall be located farther than twenty five metres (25m) from an interior shade tree planting area. Irrigation Design Criteria are as follows: • • • • • • Commercial properties require irrigation everywhere. All underground irrigation systems shall be designed and certified by a Landscape Architect or a certified irrigation designer. etc. All interior landscaped planting areas must be protected from the encroachment of automobile traffic by continuous concrete curbing. sites adjacent to Regional roads).) and a minimum one half of the island area to be covered with shrubs or perennial plantings. measured from backside of curb. C-84 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . Irrigation sprinkler layouts shall be designed to minimize the amount of spray that will fall on sidewalks.Urban Design Manual • Landscaped planting areas. including parking islands.5 square metres. depending on site conditions (i.9m high or less) and trees must be limbed up with no branches between 0.g. Crabapple. and adjacent buildings.6m high. plumbing code under Ontario Water Resources Act. Planting area shall contain no more than one shade tree per 11. multi-residential and institutional sites. Planting islands are to be designed to hold 1 shade tree.9m and 1.9m in height. Specifications for the irrigation system shall include a watering schedule with amendments for seasonal changes. minimum 50mm caliper. (Note: materials other than trees should be specified to be 0. • Irrigation Systems: The City requires the installation of underground irrigation systems for commercial properties and prestigious industrial sites (i. soil type. Free of nuisance fruit or berries. Plant material should be carefully chosen for parking lot treatments having such qualities as: • • • • • Pollution. The City also highly recommends underground irrigation systems for industrial. the maximum number of parking stalls in a consecutive row is 20 with a planting island separating the next 20 stalls or drive aisle. Serviceberry.). salt and drought tolerant. neighbouring properties. • Consideration must be given in the landscape design for winter maintenance/snow plowing and snow storage. • • • • • • • Plant material at intersections shall not obstruct drivers’ views of approaching pedestrians or vehicular traffic and must be less than 0. In addition. Silk Lilac. The City encourages the use of water efficiency system design and materials and the use of drip irrigation where appropriate. minimum 50 mm caliper shade tree and suitable ground cover.e. Cultivated landscaped areas shall be watered with an irrigation system. Islands and peninsulas are to be 1 m shorter (face of curb) than the length of the adjacent parking stall. Back flow prevention devices shall be placed per Ontario Regulation 815/84. etc.

The grading is to conform to the Site Grading. Location and size of water meter.5 m walkway around each garden to allow access to each side of a garden plot. The following irrigation system information should be included: • • • • • Location and type of all sprinkler heads. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-85 . A complete listing of the Native Trees and Shrubs of Waterloo Region is located in Section 14. • • Supply a hose bib for watering within a 30 m radius of any garden plot. Location of backflow prevention device. If a system is found to have overspray resulting in water wasted on paved or street areas. size and circuit numbers of all valves.35 sq.6 m x 4. bubblers. hoses. • • Supply a minimum of 2. Community Garden: The following are standards for the development of a community garden within a high rise or multiresidential development: • Supply a minimum of one garden plot per every 18 units within the development. Location of irrigation controller. then system modifications to prevent overspray will be required before the release of the letter of credit. Species restricted to the Carolinian Forest Zone have been highlighted.g.8585858585851 Urban Design Manual • Install separate control valves for turf and non-turf areas and to accommodate different water use requirements within each control valve circuit. • • • Invasive Non-Native Species: The planting of aggressive non-native species within or adjacent to woodlands or natural areas is discouraged in order to help safeguard the long term ecological integrity of these areas. Gardens are suggested to be 4. • • • Landscape Plan Submission Requirements: All landscape plans are to bear the Landscape Architect’s “Ontario Association of Landscape Architects” membership stamp and signature.6 m with a minimum of 1. Location. shovels. Ensure that the community garden location receives sufficient sunlight. Size of mainline and irrigation piping. Section 14 contains a list of trees and shrubs native to the Waterloo Region and a list of aggressive alien species which are not to be planted in the vicinity of woodlands and natural areas. Landscape plan(s) submissions are to conform to the City’s approved Site Plan. • Native Trees and Shrubs in Waterloo Region: The species making up this list are indigenous to the Waterloo Region and some are Regionally Significant. low angle trajectory sprinklers with pressure compensating devices. Although most Carolinian species are only found in North Dumfries Township some do occur north of this area (e. the requirement above will be waived with the provision that it will be reinstated if satisfactory landscape plans have not been produced after two formal submissions. Juniperus virginiana. etc. A table showing the manufacturer and model number of all parts used in the irrigation plan. m of garden area per unit. Location of rain sensors and/or tensiometer (a sensor which measures soil moisture and salinity) to avoid over watering. Supply a location (room at ground floor with an outside door or a garden shed) for the storage of tenants’ rakes. In some areas. or drip irrigation should be used to prevent excessive loss of water due to dissipation from winds and surface runoff. Eastern Red Cedar). Drainage and Siltation Erosion Control Plan and Storm Water Management Plans for this project as submitted by the Professional Engineer (s) for the project. Where it has been determined by the City’s Director of Planning that the proposed development will require limited landscaping.

Landscape structures . diameter and condition on the plan. play structures. All landscape plan(s) submissions are to be FOLDED to letter or legal size. they should be dealt with on an individual basis. The following declarations should be included on all Landscape Plans: • • A Key Plan at a scale of approximately 1:10.000 indicating the exact location of the site with a north arrow. Existing and proposed contours. exterior lighting. Landscape plans are to include the following information and drawing instructions: • Location of all temporary contractor signs.Urban Design Manual Landscape Plan(s) submissions are to be final design and working drawings. walkways. etc. Planting details . spread and special remarks. screens. Location and elevation of underground structures. types and additives (fertilizers. etc. Steps shall be shown indicating their number and size. hydrants. mulch etc. garbage enclosures. Location of walkways. curbs. All catch basins and sub-drains shall be clearly marked with proposed spot elevations.coniferous and deciduous trees and shrubs (stalking. caliper. street furniture. Building entrances and spot elevations at each entrance (door and garages) and show the finished ground floor elevations of all buildings. Natural features which are existing and those which the developer has designated for preservation. parking lots. ramps. installation. Playground structure details and CSA design standard certification Surface materials should be specified and installation details provided e. garbage enclosure. A plant list is to include the full botanical name. Adjacent roads and properties surrounding the subject lands are to be adequately marked with spot elevations to show the slope of the land.drainage and flow arrows to indicate direction of drainage. Soil depth/volume. shall be indicated. and all other existing and proposed features.). All existing trees to be either preserved or removed are to be accurately located and clearly identified as to the species. protective fencing. Snow storage areas or methods of snow disposal. Type and location of all easements. stairs. planters. Adult’s and children’s amenity areas should be illustrated and fully dimensioned. retaining walls.benches. Top and bottom of bank contours of all water courses within the property.). Proposed walls within the project boundaries are to be marked with “top of wall” and “bottom of wall” elevations. height.paving. seeding. etc. guying. quantity. fences. All landscape plan(s) submissions are to be submitted at a maximum scale of 1:250. peat moss. general areas of small trees or shrub growth may be shown. development notices. Trees on adjacent properties that will be impacted by the proposed development should also be noted. Spot elevations are to be shown at the top and bottom of the steps . common name. otherwise. ground supported and portable signs.g. sodding. must be indicated on landscape and site plans. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • C-86 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . If these trees are large. sight triangles and road widenings. etc. zone change notices. Plant material is to be clearly located and labeled with a key system.

for review and approval. Drainage and Erosion Control. And we further undertake to notify the City forthwith of any change of ownership of the said lands. Drainage and Siltation Control.8787878787871 Urban Design Manual We agree to implement the approved landscape plans within one year of the date of first occupancy and will retain the Landscape Architect/Designer to make periodic site inspections and on completion of the landscape works. Footings minimum 1.4 m on centre. we will forward to you a copy of the Site Development Works Notification Form from the Landscape Architect/Designer. I hereby certify that the Landscape Plans and the Site Grading. and Storm Water Management. City of Kitchener. City of Kitchener. __________________________________________ Date Fencing Requirements: _______________________________________ Signature of Owner _______________________________________ Name of Owner _______________________________________ Address Wood Fencing The following are standards for typical solid screen fencing: • • Height to be 1. and Storm Water Management Plans for this project are coordinated with respect to proposed works and site conditions. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-87 .8 m unless otherwise noted on the approved site plan.6. Posts maximum of 2.2 m deep poured concrete in sonotubes. galvanized rail hangers or brackets). before commencement of the works. _______________________________________ Date • ______________________________________________ Telephone • Chain Link Fence Galvanized chain link fencing is to be detailed and installed in a manner conforming to the detail found in Figure 15. agents or contractors to enter upon our land to which these drawings apply. agents or contractors of the rights hereby given to them. its employees. We hereby authorize the City. Acoustical Walls The design and structure of acoustical walls are to be certified by the Consulting Engineer for the project and approved by the Regional Municipality of Waterloo and the Supervisor of Site Plan Development. Fasteners are to be non-corrosive (e. Development and Technical Services.g. to complete the required site development works and agree to indemnify the City and its authorized agents and save them harmless from any and all actions arising out of the exercises by the City. its employees. Any revision to the landscape plans will be submitted to the Urban Designer. _________________________________________ Signature and stamp (if applicable) of Landscape Architect/Designer: __________________________________________ Date ___________________________________________ Signature and stamp of the Professional Consultant(s) for Site Grading.

6: Chain link Fence Details C-88 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .Urban Design Manual Figure 15.

For customers. commercial and industrial uses having concentrated numbers of users.8989898989891 Urban Design Manual Covered Parking Cycling Facilities The design of our urban areas has a significant impact on people’s ability/willingness to cycle. Are separated from motor vehicles. safe and viable mode of transportation. A 1.8 metres long and 0. Bicycle racks must be designed so that they: The Canadian climate permits cycling virtually year round. Bicycle Parking: Dimensions • Bicycle parking spaces should be at least 1. but not further from the entrance than the closest automobile parking space. secure locations within 15 metres of the main entrance to a building. Accommodate U-shape locks which secure the frame and both wheels. Because of its smaller size. The effectiveness of bicycle parking is often determined by location.5 metre aisle for bicycle maneuvering should be provided and maintained beside or between each row of bicycle parking.1 metres.6 metres wide. institutional. Are easily accessible from the street. Bicycle Parking Requirements Land Use Required Number of Spaces 10% of the number of automobile spaces required by the zoning by-law 6% of the number of students plus 10% of required parking spaces 10% of the number of students plus 10% of required parking spaces • • • • • • • • Do not bend wheels or damage other bicycle parts. Are covered where users will leave their bikes for longer periods of time. for example. Development in all land uses will provide bicycle parking according to the appropriate rate noted below and be designed and located to achieve the following criteria. Do not interfere with pedestrians. Curb cuts at the rack location discourage users from riding on the sidewalk to access the racks. the bicycle can be parked closer to the rider’s destination than a car. lockers or bicycle storage spaces within buildings. visitors and other occasional shortterm users. Covered parking is necessary for land uses where long-term bicycle parking is anticipated. awnings. a highly visible location with pedestrian traffic is preferable to obscure and dark corners. Have two points of contact with the bike. To reduce theft. The bikeway and trail network recommended in the City’s Bikeways Study and the Regional Cycling Master Plan identifies a network of routes and design specifications intended to make cycling a comfortable. Are securely anchored to a hard surface or a structure. sheltered bicycle parking should be provided to encourage cycling in all weather conditions. some residential. Covered spaces can be building or roof overhangs. All land uses except school-related Institutional College or University • Primary or Secondary School 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-89 . To promote transportation based on cycling. covered parking is also beneficial. Bicycle parking should be located in well lit. Leaving bicycles parked and exposed to precipitation for longer periods of time is a deterrent to cycling in inclement weather. but in no case further than 15 metres from an entrance where several entrances are involved. and overhead clearance in covered spaces should be at least 2.

be located within the main building. If HVAC equipment is utilized for garbage/recycling enclosures it must be screened in accordance with the provisions of Section 7. preferably. Industrial developments are required to have complete enclosures only when visible from a public street. storage of oil/grease recycling. Collection facilities associated with restaurants. coffee grounds or auto parts. institutional and commercial developments. C-90 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . As an alternative to a full enclosure. All medical waste storage facilities must contain an effective locking mechanism for security purposes. Additional storage for materials that relate to the proposed development may be required e. waste storage should. All garbage/recycling storage areas are to be designed such that they are easily accessible by service vehicles and do not require the collection vehicle to reverse out onto a public street. deep well collection systems may be used for any commercial institutional or multi-residential development.0.g.Urban Design Manual Garbage/Recycling Collection Structures: A structure to accommodate garbage and recycling complete with roof. grocery stores. Enclosures must be constructed of material that is similar to or compatible with the architecture of the main buildings. Although stand alone facilities may be used for facilities associated with any form of medical or dental use. walls and a solid door – is required for all multi-residential. It is preferred that such uses integrate garbage/recycling storage within the main building and incorporate adequate ventilation and seals to ensure rodent resistance and odor prevention. contain a higher percentage of food waste. etc. Garbage/recycling storage facilities shall not be situated next to a rear or side lot line that abuts existing or potential residential uses. Required building setbacks will apply to all structures.

Swales or culverts shall be provided within the trail corridor. design. Community Trails and the requirements to implement these facilities shall be considered in the preparation of: • City of Kitchener Subdivision Manual Trail Grading Requirements: • • • 5% preferred 8% maximum 20% maximum over distances of one meter or less Cross Slope: • • • 2% preferred 5% maximum 10% maximum over distances of one meter or less Width: • • Rough grading . Surface of recycled asphalt to a depth of 50mm or other surfacing as required for slope conditions. except in woodlands. Drainage: Concentrated surface runoff shall not be directed across or along the proposed trail surface. Filling only with trail surfacing is acceptable in these instances.9191919191911 Urban Design Manual 16. Community Plans. including oil and chip. parks. Kitchener Bikeway Study and Plans of Subdivision.0 meters Excavation: Existing soil topsoil shall be removed to a depth of 0. Granular base course of 50mm gravel to a depth of 200mm. wetlands and other natural areas. The sub-grade shall be compacted to 95% spd.4. engineering and final grading of all Community Trail routes shall be provided by the developer in all Plans of Subdivision. floodplains. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-91 .0 COMMUNITY TRAILS Grade: Definitions Community Trails are both a recreational facility and a non-vehicular traffic route. Community trails provide for a variety of recreational experiences. stormwater management areas. are universally accessible and are included in all land use designations throughout the city. stream courses. hot laid asphalt and boardwalks. Standards Community Trails shall be located throughout the City as identified in the Leisure Facilities Strategic Plan.0 meters Trail Surface – 3. Greenspace Management Plans. Planning and Engineering: Community Trails are a component of the urban infrastructure and are a requirement within all Plans of Subdivision. woodlands. Unsuitable soil shall be removed to additional depths as required and replaced with structural fill and compacted to 95% spd. Excavation may be deleted in woodlands or other areas where damage to tree roots or other vegetation would occur. abandoned railway lines. Surfacing: • • • • • • Community Plans Greenspace Management Plans Environmental Impact Statements for Subdivisions Draft Plans of Subdivision Grading Control Plans for Subdivisions Subdivision Agreements The planning. The primary corridors for Community Trails are provided by hydro corridors.3 meters (300mm) to provide for surfacing material installation.

1: Community Trail Entrance Sign Figure 16. Alternative routes shall be identified which are accessible to the physically challenged if the primary trail is not. Details: Figure 16. but a representational experience of all natural areas must be provided to all trail users.6: Community Trail Metal Gate C-92 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .4: Community Trail Asphalt Paving Figure 16. All trails need not be accessible to the physically challenged. Signage: Standard post type signage is required at all roadway intersections.5: Community Trail Stonedust Paving Figure 16.2: Community Trail Road Crossing Figure 16.Urban Design Manual Erosion: Re-vegetation of graded trail corridor shall be provided to prevent soil Erosion.3: Community Trail Bollard Figure 16. Vehicle Control Barriers: Bollards and standard park gates are required at all intersections with roadways or other vehicle routes to control vehicle access and user safety. Accessibility by the physically challenged shall be considered in the location and grading of Community Trails.

1: Community Trail Entrance Sign 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-93 .93939393931 Urban Design Manual Figure 16.

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Figure 16.2: Community Trail Road Crossing

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Figure 16.3: Community Trail Bollard

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Figure 16.4: Community Trail Asphalt Paving

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5: Community Trail Stonedust Paving 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-97 .97979797971 Urban Design Manual Figure 16.

6: Community Trail Metal Gate C-98 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .Urban Design Manual Figure 16.

0 BUILDING DESIGN AND SUSTAINABLE DESIGN ELEMENTS IN THE RIGHT OF WAY In January 2007 the Province’s Planning and Conservation Statute Law Amendment Act (Bill 51) came into effect and in the spring of 2009 the City of Kitchener amended its Official Plan and Site Plan Control By-law to make use of the new legislative powers afforded by Bill 51 to require and review plans. guidelines and design briefs. all proposals for either new development or for redevelopment will be required to submit and have approved drawings showing plan. As a condition of Site Plan Approval. The committee balances this need for flexibility against the need for consistency and fairness. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-99 . elevations and cross sections addressing the exterior design of buildings and sustainable design elements within municipal right-of-ways. The Committee is cognizant of the fact that each application is different and therefore flexibility is critical to the interpretation of the Manual’s design standards. The exterior design of all buildings proposed through site plan as well as proposed sustainable streetscape design elements shall be consistent with all applicable Council-approved design policies. wellintegrated and environmentally sustainable” and are in keeping with the City’s vision to further advance its Urban Design framework. without limitation: • Character • Scale • Appearance • Design features • Sustainable design. These legislative changes enabled the City to “promote development that is attractive. This Urban Design Manual and the component Design Briefs serve as guiding documents and reference points in the review of Site Plan applications and subordinate plans and documents. elevation and cross-section views for all buildings to be erected. Plans should be submitted that are sufficiently detailed to illustrate the following exterior building design considerations including. Building materials specifications and colour renderings will be required and samples of proposed materials may be requested.99999999991 Urban Design Manual 17. This includes all buildings to be used for residential purposes regardless of the number of units. The Site Plan Review Committee endeavours to achieve site and building designs of the highest caliber by evaluating each application on a site-by-site basis.

places to watch people? What is the history of the area or of the site: what images could be drawn upon to offer a community memory of the area? What are some characteristic traditions. decorative doorways. cultural enrichment and a sense of place. or as part of the building structure. • • • The City of Kitchener shall allocate one percent of the budget for civic building construction or renovation projects over $1. Public Art competitions are selected by jury process as facilitated by City staff (Arts & Culture Coordinator) and members of the Public Art Working Group. metal. lobby or other public area design elements. philosophers. It is intended that the application of the concept of Public Art include a wide range of art forms. festivities. neon. the City may identify and suggest opportunities for public art within the specific development or community area. public art should be viewed broadly to include visual art. barrier-free access and personal safety and security. Artwork creates a relationship between communities and development. on specific development sites.0 PUBLIC ART Definitions Public Art is artwork located on sites in publicly accessible spaces to provide visual stimulation. sculpture or other graphic expressions of any materials (glass. Building or landscape elements.000. fabric.) are considered public art and may be used. social events in the community? Are there local writers. Public art is to be cited in the request for proposal of all eligible projects. scientists. signage. building elements and landscape design. encourage play and exploration? How may the special needs of the elderly be taken into account . concrete. places to talk. wood. Public art should be sited at the more publicly accessible parts of the site. Public art should be sited in a manner which does not jeopardize other design objectives such as providing clear sight lines. Standards • balanced program that can be successfully integrated with the construction phase of the development. or strategic community locations. To assist in the development of site artwork theme and design.000 towards the provision of art to be displayed in pubic areas. architectural features. such as fountains.Urban Design Manual 18.to stimulate curiosity and imagination. celebrations. etc. the following public criteria may be considered: • What are the ages and socio-cultural backgrounds of the community expected to use this space? How can an art work pay particular attention to the needs of children . community leaders who could be • • • • • • • • • • C-100 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . Public art opportunities should be identified in the conceptual stages in any project or public work development in order to provide a well- • In the development of any project or community plan. Public art may play a functional or decorative purpose within buildings. The following considerations should be taken into account in determining the location for public art: • Public art is encouraged to be integrated into the site and conceived with the historical and future context in mind.providing seats. The City of Kitchener will encourage new commercial and institutional construction or renovations to include the provision for public art in the construction budget. murals. artists. shade.

accessible at all times and not under private management? What level of durability and maintenance will be required given the sites’ weather conditions? • • • • • • 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-101 .1011011011011011 Urban Design Manual celebrated in an imaginative work of public art? • What are the occupations or industries that were originally prevalent in the area.that is. or on which the community was founded? Are there any stories or legends associated with the region? What historical event took place on the site or recent events that are worthy of remembrance? How can the placement of the art work enhance the way people use the space? How can access by pedestrians of all ages be ensured? How can one ensure that the art work is in a public space .

Urban Design Manual 19. The need for and scope of any required study is generally determined at the pre-application stage for the proposal.0 REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY STUDIES For many development proposals additional studies or documentation may be required as either part of the initial site plan application or as a condition of final approval. Examples of possible supplementary studies could include but are not limited to: • • • • • • • • • • • • Angular Plane Analysis Heritage Impact Assessment Noise Study Record of Site Conditions Snow Deposition Analysis Transportation Impact Study Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Urban Design Brief Viewshed Analysis Wind Study Salt Management Report Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) Report C-102 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . the need for additional information may not be apparent until the formal site plan application is reviewed. Satisfactory completion of all required studies and the subsequent implementation of all approved recommendations related to the issue will be included in the conditions of final approval and the registered development agreement for the proposal. Occasionally.

development may occur around the heritage resource and create a sympathetic context where adjacent development would be compatible in style and form to the resource being preserved. Ruinification • Adaptive Re-Use Allows the exterior of a heritage resource to stand as a monument after the interior has been completely removed. leaving all or part of the original exterior and interior. Some degree of restoration and/or rehabilitation work may be required to properly preserve the resource. • Salvage Mitigation: Where it is not possible to retain the heritage resource intact. Conservation options should be based on the determination of the significance of the heritage resources in the area. An outline of the context of the development proposal as submitted. Restoration and/or rehabilitation is usually involved. An addition may be incorporated into the heritage resource to provide more living space or accommodate a new function. other less preferable options may be considered such as Salvage Mitigation. Consideration should be given to whether the new use of the heritage resource renders its significance invalid. or the heritage resource may itself be incorporated into a much larger building. and by mapping the context and setting of the heritage resources. including the completion of a detailed occupational and/or site biography. • This refers to maintaining the heritage resources without altering it or its setting. including identification of the potential impact the proposal would have on the heritage resources identified. acceptable only after other options have been considered and demonstrated not to be viable. 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-103 . recognizing however that such options should be regarded as “last resorts”. The ‘pros’ and ‘cons’ of each conservation option in favour of preserving the integrity and value of the resource shall be clearly identified and a preferred option recommended. Where Adaptive Re-Use and Incorporation strategies are considered. Incorporation • • Identification and evaluation of the significance of the heritage resources. Examples of conservation options include but are not limited to the following: • • This is an adaptive re-use strategy that typically requires significant alteration.1031031031031031 Urban Design Manual HERTIAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT Standards • Requirements of the Heritage Impact Assessment: The following typically make up the minimum required components of a Heritage Impact Assessment: This option is used when a heritage resource can be recycled. Provincial. its importance to the community. Consideration should be given to whether the new location of the resource renders its significance invalid. often for a new function. Regional and Municipal policies and standards as appropriate. Identification of several conservation options. Salvage mitigation strategies for Heritage Resources listed in order of preference include: Relocation • Avoidance Mitigation: Preservation/Conservation This option includes relocating a heritage resource away from the development to another setting. and should take into consideration existing Federal. Documentation of the heritage resources by way of photographs and/or measured drawings.

SHADOW STUDIES AND ANGULAR PLANE ANALYSIS Shadow studies and / or Angular Plane Analysis may be requested in support of applications for re-zoning or site plan approval to demonstrate that the height. Conservation options recommending the retention of all or part of the heritage resources shall identify the lot(s) or block(s) on which the heritage resources should be located. A detailed explanation why the application of conservation options is not possible must be provided. A street level wind impact study will quantify and compare existing wind conditions with the estimated conditions that would occur with the proposed development and be evaluated against standard appropriate comfort criteria for the City of Kitchener. In some instances. Snow accumulation increases structural loads. Heritage Kitchener (the Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee). walkways. Other requirements of the assessment may require the services of a professional heritage consultant. diminishing its heritage significance or preventing its use or appreciation as a heritage resource. demolition may be considered. These studies may be requested by the City for buildings greater than 12. STREET LEVEL WIND/SNOW IMPACT STUDY The design and positioning of new buildings shall have regard for the potential impact that the development may have on ground level wind conditions both on the proposed site and adjacent streets. The requirements for a wind impact statement may be imposed at an early stage in the consideration of applications for rezoning or site plan review. For heritage resources where impacts cannot be avoided or otherwise mitigated.0 m in height which may impact adjacent residential properties. Heritage Impact Assessments shall be completed by individuals who are qualified to comment on the various issues to be addressed in the assessment. a snow deposition study may be required as part of the site plan approval process. massing and/or location of a building will not create unacceptable impacts on adjacent lands. In addition. Where preliminary findings warrant a more detailed approach. measures or design modifications that may be taken to reduce adverse wind conditions to more acceptable levels. To some extent some of the information to be included in the assessment is available “in house” from the City Heritage Planner. including its loss or destruction. or which discourage the use of open space areas. and building entries. sometimes to the point of failure and drifts can obstruct roadways. the ‘preferred option’ shall identify recommended mitigative measures that would minimize adverse or negative impacts to the heritage resources.Urban Design Manual Symbolic Conservation • Includes recovering unique or important components of a heritage resource and incorporating those components into the construction of new buildings. In our region where snow can be a factor. The street level wind impact study shall be sufficient to describe the predicted street level wind conditions associated with the proposed development and the C-104 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 . public parkland or open spaces. New development should not alter existing wind conditions to the extent that it creates or aggravates conditions of wind turbulence and velocity which hamper pedestrian movement. and through the developer or applicant. sites and open space areas. snow loading and drifting can cause serious problems for buildings and structures. the wind impact statement shall include a wind tunnel analysis of the project. or copying distinctive elements of the lost resource into the subsequent development. The study should also include recommendations for reducing any potential negative wind related impacts from the development proposal including mitigation or design alteration.

This security is most commonly in the form of a Letter of Credit or certified cheque.1051051051051051 Urban Design Manual 20.xls 2010 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual – Part C: Design Standards C-105 .Site Plan Approval .ca/pdf/site_plan_letter_of_credit.the City may require the completion of a cost estimate for required site development works and the posting of performance securities to be held against the completion of such works.p df A fillable spreadsheet version of the current cost estimate form is available at: http://www. The full text of the City of Kitchener’s current Letter of Credit Policy can be found at: http://www. The cost estimate and required securities must be submitted prior to final site plan approval.kitchener.kitchener.0 LETTER OF CREDIT POLICY FOR SITE DEVELOPMENT WORKS Requirements for Cost Estimate and Letter of Credit: For development proposals approved under Section 41 of the Planning Act .ca/pdf/site_plan_letter_of_credit_ chart.

Site Alteration Permits are administered by the Engineering Services Department.ca/city_hall/departments/devtech _services/planning/tree_conservation.Urban Design Manual 21.0 SITE ALTERATION AND TREE CONSERVATION Site Alteration By-law The City of Kitchener passed By-law 2010-43 prohibiting or regulating the placing or dumping of fill. Additional information can be found at: http://www.html Tree Conservation By-law The City of Kitchener passed By-law 2010-42 prohibiting or regulating the destruction or injuring of tree(s). Under this By-law ‘site alteration’ activities on properties 0.kitchener. the removal of soil and the alteration of the grade of land.405 hectares (1 acre) and greater may require a Tree Conservation Permit to be obtained.kitchener.ca/city_hall/departments/devtech _services/engineering/development/site_alteration. Under this By-law the destruction or injuring of a tree(s) on properties 0.htm l C-106 City of Kitchener Urban Design Manual 2010 .405 hectares (1 acre) and greater may require a Site Alteration Permit be obtained. Tree Conservation Permits are administered by the Planning Department. Additional information can be found at: http://www.

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