DESIGN DESSERTATION A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER

PRACHI SHAH
PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH 5TH YR.B.ARCH

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH
Recreational and entrtainment quarter can be defined as family-oriented entertainment destinations. These centers combine shopping and recreation with entertainment to form an overall experience. Retail needs entertainment to draw people in and entertainment needs retail to support the overall operation. The goal of a UEC for a city or developer is, perhaps, to create tax revenue, or to sell food, or merchandise, but for the visitor the overriding concept is to have fun. Entertainment is the draw and a large part of what creates the unique experience of the entre. A UEC has to be created as a centre with the right balance of retail and entertainment. If the centre contained too much retail it read to the visitor as an ordinary shopping mall, conversely, if there were too many entertainment options people forget to make purchases. UECs are created on the fundamental of partnership between retail and entertainment. Combinations of this partnership provide variations of UECs which can be adopted depending on the culture and heritage of the city. The components that, typically, form a entertainment quarter are as listed below: 1. Movie halls 2. Restaurants, cafeterias 3. hotel 4. Shopping arcade 5. parks 6. Walk ways 7. semi open exhibition gallery 8. open air theatre 9. convention ground 10.water sports and adventure sports 11.promenade and squares 12.administration

Key Differences – Malls, Theme parks and Urban Entertainment Centres Malls A shopping mall or shopping centre is a building or set of buildings which contain retail units, with interconnecting walkways enabling visitors to easily walk from unit to unit. When the shopping mall format was first developed, signing larger department stores was necessary for the financial stability of the projects, and to draw retail traffic that would result in visits to the smaller stores in the mall as well. These larger stores are termed anchor store or draw tenant. Anchors generally have their rents heavily discounted, and may even receive cash inducements from the mall to remain open. In physical configuration, anchor stores are normally located as far from each other as possible to configuration, anchor stores are normally located as far from each other as possible to maximize the amount of traffic from one anchor to another. However, the concept of heavily discounted rents for anchor stores may not hold good today, as the economic profile of the consumer has changed and therefore, the stores may in turn have pay large sums of money as rent to avail
PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH
retail floor space. Classical forming out of Mall consists of one anchor tenant each at each side. Malls are usually closed buildings with numerous passenger car parking bays.

Amusement /Theme Parks Amusement park is the generic term for a collection of rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a large group of people. An amusement park is more elaborate than a simple city park or playground, usually providing attractions meant to cater to adults, teenagers, and small children. A theme park is a type of amusement park which has been built around one or more themes. Today, the terms amusement parks and theme parks are often used interchangeably. Most amusement parks have a fixed location, as compared to traveling funfairs and carnivals. Often a theme park will have various 'lands' (sections) of the park devoted to telling a particular story. Non-theme amusement park rides will usually have little in terms of theming or additional design elements while in a theme park all the rides gowith the theme of the park.

PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH
Recreational and entrtainment quarter are a partnership between retail and entertainment and created by variations of detail and entertainment combinations. They are generally compared to shopping malls in almost every respect but scale. UECs are not the stereotypical indoor climate controlled centres like malls but incorporate a variety of outdoor plazas, corridors, paths, trails, courtyards, and interior space.

Idea In order to provide better entertainment and shopping facilities to tourists (both domestic and foreign), it was suggested that an integrated system such as an Urban Entertainment Center (UEC) should be developed in major cities. Most cities have reasonable shopping and entertainment. Facilities like amusement parks etc. However, there is no integrated centre where the visitors can take the advantage of entertainment as well as retail shopping. The facilities envisaged to be provided to the visitors of the UECs are retail stores, theme/amusement parks, multiplexes, restaurants etc. In addition to these facilities which may be common to all UECs, city/district specific components may also be added for e.g.: a UEC in Pune may contain a heritage specific retail store or museum. Industry Overview Urban Entertainment Centers have combined both the shopping and recreation with entertainment to offer an overall experience to the visitors. Retail needs the entertainment to draw people in and entertainment needs retail to support the overall operation. Hence UEC falls on the crossroads of both the entertainment and retail industry. The entertainment component consists of Multiplexes (Movie halls), parks, etc. as depicted below.

PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH

“Up to 97 percent of urban youth prefer to watch movies in multiplexes. an Ernst & Young report on the retail sector released recently. It is set to penetrate tier II and tier III cities of the country. Multiplexes The entertainment industry in India is growing at a fair clip amongst which multiplex segment is touted to be one of the fastest growing segments. as their presence increases footfalls by approximately 40-50%. it reports that 328 new malls have come up in metros and Tier I. Organized retail is growing at estimated 25% growth year on year in the country. Around 600 malls were anticipated to get opened in India by the end of2011. a real estate consultancy firm.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B. III cities in 2010. II. parks PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . In a survey carried out by Jones Lang LaSalle Meghraj. the number of multiplexes in India grew by 80-100% in calendar year 2008.There are only 11 multiplexes for every million people in the country as compared to 117 in USA and 77 in France.ARCH Retail Industry The retail sector in India is highly fragmented and organized retail in the country is emerging at a faster pace. says the number of malls across the country is likely to increase with retailers firming up plans to exploit the potential in tier II cities. Entertainment Industry Entertainment industry in India is projected to be one of the major economic driving forces of the country. Multiplexes are one of the anchor tenants in large format malls. There were 73 multiplexes operating in India with 276 screens during the year 2005. Despite the current slowdown. contributing to 28-35% of the overall domestic box-office collections3. The great Indian retail story.” says a report recently released by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).

water sports and adventure sports 11. cafeterias 3.administration The diverse linguistic and religious ethnicities that are native to Karnataka combined with their long histories have contributed immensely to the varied cultural heritage of the state. “The Cumulative investment in this industry in the last eight to ten years was to the tune of Rs. Walk ways 7. open air theatre 9. One of the major advantages for the industry is the enormous amount of dormant/underutilized land in India's hinterland segments. Restaurants.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Shopping arcade 5. Movie halls 2. There are over 150 amusement and theme parks in the country.promenade and squares 12. In the next five years. sustained growth of the Indian economy will drive the amusement industry to grow both vertically (in terms of scale of investment) & horizontally (across the length and breadth of the country). Concept A pre-feasibility study is to be carried out for developing UECs in major cities. hotel 4. The parameters for prioritizing the cities are as follows: • Resident and Tourist Population • Economic growth of the city • Socio-economic profile (Economic Indicators) • Availability of Suitable land • Industrialization Components The various components could be • .40 billion approximately and we expect to grow at 25 percent every year".ARCH The size of the Indian Park business is estimated to be around Rs 4000 crore and has grown 6% annually till 2013 . DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . According to Indian Association of Parks and Industries (IAAPI). Variations of retail and entertainment combinations may be designed for the development of UECs depending on the needs of residents and tourists to each city. convention ground 10. Due to this reason the UEC could also comprise of heritage complexes to attract more number of visitors. semi open exhibition gallery 8. parks 6.B.

shopping malls. linguistic details etc. male and female ratio. major factors influencing economy etc.This factor is as important.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.  Socio-economic profile of the city. if not more.  Analyzing tourist attractions – The number of tourists visiting the city will definitely help in estimating the footfalls to UEC.  Industrialization of the city. site dimensions should be considered for selecting the site. connectivity. Tourists are the major revenue generators for the business entities such as hotels. The obligations pertaining to the project has to be well known.The factors such as population density. to other planning consideration as the level of industrialization of any city will increase the disposable income among the population and in turn will be important to ascertain the components of the UEC.A thorough study of the legal framework related to the development is a necessity. different acts pertaining to this sector has to be understood.The socio-economic profile of the city provides information about its major occupation. This could include the population. movie theaters.  Study of legal framework.ARCH Development consideration:  Selection of site. Factors Impacting Prioritization of City The factors considered for the prioritization of a city from the identified 14 cities are as indicated in the figure below: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .B. youth population. amusement parks etc.A suitable site should be selected in the whole city .Demographics of the city has to be studied in detail to establish any set up. This helps in understanding the profile of the people in the city. the prevailing economy scenario of the city. Planning considerations  Study of demographics.

Economic growth – The economic well-being of the city is to be noted to predict the future potential through mere extrapolation of the growth rate. which forms the basis of the design of PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Similarly the city should also have an air connectivity to attract more foreign tourists.  The urban structure provides the foundations for detailed design of the constituent elements.B. Connectivity .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH  • • • • Population & Tourism – In addition to the city population.The connectivity of the city with the other cities in the state and major cities in the country is essential so as to attract more crowds towards UEC. The tourists are those who visit the city especially for entertainment and other leisure activities. Land availability – The availability of land is also a major concern as the higher rate of growth of urban population has negative effect on this factor. the tourist population is also taken into account as the demand for UEC is majorly influenced by the tourist population. It creates a coherent framework. Industrial set up – The industries located in the vicinity of the city are responsible for the growth in disposable income of the city residents.

car. Undertake a movement assessment:       This will form the basis for improving the existing network or creating a new street pattern. cycling. streets. open space etc) work together as part of an efficient whole.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH individual developments .) include:                    Safety Air quality Convenience of journey Speed Walking down and up kerbs Pedestrian crossings Pedestrian and cycle (Toucan) crossings Segregated path Quality of transport Over bridges Underpasses Severance Noise Pollution Visual amenity Variety in visual amenity Pavement congestion Road congestion Quality of pavements PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . etc.in order to achieve the following: Integration Connection and overlap with surrounding areas. Functional efficiency So that individual elements (buildings.quite possibly by different actors .B. A sense of place Creating somewhere that is recognizably distinct but simultaneously strengthens local identity. Some of the factors to consider in relation to the various modes of transportation (walking. Environmental harmony Creating development forms that are energy efficient and ecologically sensitive. bus. Commercial viability Responding to the realities of market.

PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . have two frontages and can potentially offer more entrances to different parts of the building. for instance. Turn the corner: Corner sites are visually prominent. An extra layer of quality can be obtained for a small proportion of the total project budget. or incorporating a special use into the mix.ARCH Fit art to the place: Public Art can make a major contribution to giving a place character and identity. has a five per cent public art levy on all projects in their area. Corners are best emphasized by incorporating prominent entrances and/or windows at the apex. They therefore provide special opportunities for mixing uses. bringing people into and through places. expressing the height by. Cardiff Bay Development Corporation. although one or two percent is a more usual requirement. there are usually great benefits in preparing a public art strategy. for instance. For a large scheme. This identifies locations and types of work and provides a framework for commissioning artists and seeking funding. More tailored designs will be required or new types devised.B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Houses on corners need to face two ways. many standard building types used by housing developers are rarely able to do this. using a ‘mansion block’ of apartments.

Great urban architecture requires that at every scale. None of these movement systems exist in isolation. they are a crucial component of urban character. etc. Cladding systems tend to pose difficulties in evoking a human scale.determine visual quality and interest. then emphasize doors and windows and surface textures on the lower floors and in the immediate landscape. electricity. If their use is unavoidable. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .B. also the service utilities (water. streets. a building’s surface appears rich in detail. The key is to emphasize vertical rhythm in particular and avoid exposing blank walls. They depend upon movement systems .) which make urban life possible. Connections: Towns exist for interaction. So whatever their function.ARCH Keep it rich .roads. connections need to be thought of as an integral part of the urban fabric.from near and a far: The number and composition of elements on the building’s façade. gas. and the contrasting relationships between them .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Just as much as architecture or landscape they help determine whether places are good or bad.as viewed from near and afar . As well as being the means by which we get around and buildings are serviced. from a range of viewing distances. footpaths and public transport routes. These connections allow towns to work and link to the wider world.

The arrangement of spaces will take full account of the movement framework for the area. if the street is lined with shops it should be designed to enable people to get to the shops. including the analysis of vehicle movements. or have a beer in the sun.ARCH Why the Connections are Important? The success of a town or new development depends on how well the connections work. either within the development or nearby. A sense of place Making connections is an essential part of creating a sense of place. Movement choices Connections should give people the maximum choice in how to make their journeys. the more successful will be the integration of new and old. but how they contribute to the quality and character of the urban area: Linking up New developments need to be clearly linked to existing routes. cycling and public transport. Safe routes for all Maximizing choice in how people move around means creating routes all of which are felt to be safe. The more direct links there are. These are the main routes for vehicle movement. For example. Indeed a poor parking strategy can wreck a scheme. The parking problem Parking needs as much thought as connections. with a presumption in favor of walking. The measure of their success is not just their functional performance. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . • To allow their safe.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Inevitably there will be some main roads. cross the road. The re-integration of traffic and other activities is best done by creating a network of spaces rather than a hierarchy of roads. Segregated routes for people on foot and cycles are not always the best solution. pleasant and convenient use by pedestrians and cyclists. Signs and add-on traffic calming Streets for everyone In any development the design of streets should start by asking “what will happen on this street?” The street should be designed to suit the activities that we would like to see carried out on it.B. have a chat and linger in front of shop windows. This means that roads. but should be designed: • To minimize their negative effects on the area through which they pass. Better traffic management Design the layout of buildings and spaces to help control the flow and density of traffic. streets and the routes for utilities should be designed in response to the local context.

Sloping land offers special opportunities for the roofscape to emphasize natural forms and make a place of real distinction.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Point and line: A clear network of routes or paths allows an easily useable series of connections between places. but also conveys particular activities (churches or civic centers for instance) and concentrations of uses (such as clusters of office buildings indicating the business centre). creating a favorable image in the memory. The most memorable routes are often those with a varied sequence of long and short views.B.ARCH Create a skyline The skyline created by the roofs of buildings not only adds visual interest. Street crosssections designed to reflect the relative importance and use of routes will help users to move around with confidence. terminated with landmarks. Views and vistas aligned with key buildings are particularly useful to the visitor. Welcome people with an entrance: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

roundabouts. with thematic quieter areas giving way to occasional focal points. rail and bus stations are all arrival points.B. car parks. Main junctions. squares or other distinctive landscaping or by pulling back the building line Upgrade Now: Capture the Family Entertainment Market PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .ARCH The most important transport interchanges or nodes serve as gateways to a town or city centre. Create rhythms in the urban structure. This can be done by marking key focal points and gateways with landmarks.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Emphasizing their prominence is important to clarify where the centre begins (usually marked by a change of use and by building height) and prevent the indistinguishable blurring of centre and edge. footpaths.

One anchor attraction and a couple of video games do not make an FEC. Become a proactive market leader by expanding and upgrading to an FEC now. What you get for your investment in upgrading If you use your roller rink as the foundation to upgrade to an FEC. it is likely you will in the near future.and doing nothing is a choice .B. FECs vary greatly in size and mix of attractions. If you don't have one in your town now. Major participatory attractions like bowling. A closer look at FECs weECs work like shopping malls in which the department stores act as anchors. softcontained-play. miniature golf and children's rides pull in guests for the impulse items of video and redemption games and food and beverages. The scale and mix of attractions create a critical mass and synergy. Like a mall. This strategy works like a one-two punch. The major attractions have timeless appeal.ARCH Cinema's FunScape and Carmike's Hollywood Connection FECs. roller skating. generating traffic for the specialty shops. React to competitors after they come to your market. While your skating center gives you a great start. go-karts. The option you choose . The FEC industry has grown to include several thousand centers with new ones opening every week. These FECs are giving roller rink owners a run for the money and carving out a big slice of the market pie. you can set yourself up for a whopping increase in business. What some people call FECs are really just skating centers with a face-lift. What is left for roller rink owners? Are crumbs the best you can hope for? Not if you choose your options wisely. an FEC has two or more anchor attractions and a variety of secondary impulse attractions. You can:    Do nothing and watch your business whither and possibly die. while the games can be updated.determines your future. and that approach will not get you the dramatic expansion of business common to true FECs. it is the impulse items and birthday parties that generate the bulk of income. lazer tag. Here are the specific benefits that a FEC offers roller rink owners: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . it is only one piece of a successful formula.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. the FEC's drawing power is greater than the sum of its individual parts. While the major attractions are the initial draw.

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.Know the skaters PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . is critical to your success. What does it take to upgrade? Committing to an upgrade is the easy part. people stay longer and spend more money than they would if their only option is skating. FECs increase the frequency of visits. Mistakes at this stage can be disastrous. not just other roller rinks. In addition. This increases your market penetration. defined as the percentage of residents within the market area who are customers.ARCH     FECs can expand your market area. these benefits prepare you to face the future. The first phase of work. all competition. and your existing customer base has to be factored into the formula. every group of customers is different. 2. FECs increase market penetration. an interest that skating by itself may not generate. service level and pricing must be targeted to the specific customer groups within your market area. There is no generic formula that will work for your upgrade. and operating capacity Layout Theming Economics Operations and management To make the most of the synergy and to increase spending per visit. Every market area. your rink can be the start of something really big. Market research Facility scale. 6. Even more significant to rinks is the increase in frequency of visits. To do it right. New competitors will find you have increased customer loyalty by providing better value. Roller rinks that upgrade to an FEC reap dramatic gains in market area and penetration. Because there is more to do. you have to understand the strategy behind the upgrade. the skating center should be integrated into the mix of FEC attractions. The critical mass and mix of attractions means that your customers will be willing to drive farther to visit. Together. 3. First step . The mix. The diverse offerings mean that the experience is more interesting for customers. 5. has to be examined closely. concept development. 4. FECs increase the per-capita spending of your customers. Success requires that you address six important elements during concept development: 1. The FEC's mix appeals to a broader range of ages and customer types. You ignore those differences at your own peril. not left as a separate adjoining component.B. design. mix. With the right mix and design. size.

The only way to get the results you need is to work through an independent third party.000 questionnaires to get enough responses to be statistically useful. as well as within different skater segments to find important insights. The research should include analysis of your customer database information and both written questionnaires and interviews. you cannot be perceived as neutral. and uncover things you can do to delight them. Market research includes both primary qualitative and quantitative research of your current skaters. It usually takes mailing 800 to 1. you cannot be neutral. we mailed a four-page questionnaire and got a 65 percent rate of return. The questionnaire is mailed to a random sample of skaters' homes. find out where your customers live or work PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Since people are naturally reluctant to complain (most days anyway). If the budget warrants the cost. The written questionnaires should be designed not only to gather statistical information (age.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. as the business owner. Let's face it. Once the questionnaires are returned. That means you are the last person who should be mailing questionnaires or conducting interviews. the responses can be weighted. and all those others who would show up if only. and family composition). but behave differently. both one-on-one and in small groups. profession. professionally. Open-ended questions allow customers to reveal their likes and dislikes. Not surprisingly. Next. . Market and customer research allows you to do that by tailoring every aspect of your upgrade to delight current skaters. On one of our company's assignments. The responses should be tabulated as a whole.B. you can get the same information by asking them to suggest ways to improve their experience at your center. moderated focus groups are ideal. Consumers will often say one thing. people are more candid when talking to someone neutral. This job should be done by someone with broad FEC industry experience and skilled in market research techniques. or what is more important. They must be examined carefully to assure that they represent a true cross-section and significant sample of skaters. The results need to be properly interpreted. Customers are usually willing to help if they believe it will contribute to change. tabulating the results can get tricky. If not. but should also cover an evaluation of various aspects of your business. income. The challenge is to expand your customer base using these folks as the foundation. . The results also need to be interpreted within the framework of what actually works in an FEC. In-person interviews. a benefit that questionnaires rarely can provide. can uncover improvements that will make a real difference to your guests.ARCH You want to keep your existing customers after the upgrade.

consumer behavior. To learn more. those perceptions are usually dead wrong as you. natural or psychological barriers. Market research is important here because otherwise you rely on perceptions . people usually go to demographic data. Attracting those potential customers requires more than simple demographics or guesswork. you miss a method that works a whole lot better. Finding the real market area takes plotting the homes or work places of a random sample of several hundred skaters. a suburb of Kansas City. How do you find out your market area? Usually. and family size. Socio-economic/lifestyles break the population into 62 household groups based upon their socio-economics and lifestyles .000 per year which will vary depending on whether they live in a town outside Aspen.whether your own. and tastes. your manager or your designer are not your customer. values. and the socioeconomic/lifestyle composition of residents. Customers are influenced by where the competition is located. Your potential market area includes areas and residents your center is not serving. You see. As we have seen so often. it is time to figure out where they live or work . Expanding your market area. A real market area (see figure 1) looks like an amoebae. draw an accurate. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . demographic data puts your customers into a clump and gives you the average. But.your existing market area. Socio-economic/lifestyles. travel patterns. 15 and 20 minutes are laid over the existing map. If you stop there. and physical and psychological barriers. 10. you would grab a map and protractor. Demographics do not reveal those differences. accessibility by car or other transportation. Maps that show increases in drive time by 5. which encompasses about 85 percent of your current customers. detailed picture of your market area. or a high-rise in Chicago. on the other hand.ARCH Now that you know whom you serve. including age. income. and draw a circle ten miles out. travel patterns. The next step is to see how the existing market area could be expanded. This composite profile disguises the true makeup and behavior of a family with middle-aged parents earning $50. your manager's or those of your designer. Knowing what you have now gives you a good idea what the future might hold. that just tells you the measurable characteristics of the population in your trade area. Sure is simple.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Differences are evaluated to find out whether they are an attribute to competition (or the lack of it).B. right? The bad news is that it bears no relationship to the real world.

Your center will be only as good as the process that reveals your customers' needs. Want to know your market penetration rate . You are now ready to increase visits and expenditures of your existing customers and bring in new ones because you are giving people what they want. With the market and consumer research methodologies and data available. who enjoyed skating when they were young and just need a little encouragement to introduce their own children to the activity. tastes. and market research tells you what you need to do when you upgrade your skating center to an FEC to make them happy . to wow and delight them. wants. it makes sense to use the best tools on something as important as your business Enclavisation of tourism: Special Tourism Zones in India PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . party business can be dramatically increased. Skating gives you a strong base from which to start. A market-driven approach to concept development and facility design can make you a winner. the ideal mix of attractions. Give people what they want and you can count on their loyalty and enthusiasm. A market-driven process tells you what your customers really want. With a broader appeal. Excellence makes the difference between eating well and chewing crumbs from a dwindling slice of the youth market pie. theme and facility design can be developed to make your center a winner into the next millennium. Then.the percentage of residents in your market who skate? Comparing existing skaters' socio-economic/lifestyle composition with the socio-economic/lifestyle data for your potential market area tells you who your current skaters are and what segments of the market you are not capturing. The rewards of delighting your customer Pleasing guests depends on everything they experience at your center.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH You will not believe what this method can get you. Birthday and private parties are already an important part of rink business. upgrading to an FEC assures that your center can offer the level of entertainment that the modern customer expects. combined with analysis of your competition. and expectations. Now is the time for rink owners to tap into the memories of baby boomers.B. not what you want to give them.better than that.

Barbados. Egypt. In this scenario. the Netherlands. This process was abetted by liberal loans by international financial institutions like the World Bank and IMF to newly independent countries for creating such enclaves. 'Tourism as a phenomenon and set of processes has increasingly become embedded.ARCH This article argues that the Indian government's planned new policy of setting up Special Tourism Zones (STZs) along the lines of the country's Special Economic Zones (SEZs) will promote the 'enclavisation of tourism'. which would ensure a steady. countries across Asia. Germany and Japan . editors Alan Lew and Carolyn Cartier provide a useful interpretation on 'touristic landscapes'1 which could be our starting point to understand enclavisation in tourism. Gambia. whether intentionally or unintentionally. on the argument that tourism growth would create jobs and bring in much-needed investment into these nascent economies. France. Enclaves are also often viewed as safe investments. Spain. Indonesia. the process of decolonisation was gaining strength globally. the process of enclavisation in tourism has been a result of the need to create exclusive centres of tourism. converting lands. However. landscapes and common property into exclusive islands of leisure. Portugal.B. Africa. Thus. in the relationship between modernity and place. in how places are created and how they are experienced. Morocco and Tanzania to cater to tourists from Britain. post World War II. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . the Middle East and South America that had formerly been colonies and had now gained their political but not their economic freedom became ideal locations for creating tourism enclaves to specially satisfy the leisure needs of Western tourists. continuous and reliable flow of income from tourism through all seasons. Modernity and the economic processes that are supporting this demand are also simultaneously dictating the form and pace of such tourism developments.' The statement embodies the reality of how processes in the modern world have created the demand for tourism and leisure products that are fundamentally transforming the places people live in. Globally.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. EQUATIONS IN their insightful book Seductions of Place. The historical link that erstwhile colonial powers had with their former colonies could have been a possible cultural impetus for creation of tourism enclavisation. enclavisation exploits local resources but gives back little benefit to the local economy. the first tourism enclaves of the world were built in Kenya. Mexico. Tunisia. The economic revival of erstwhile colonial powers in Western Europe and the emergence of new economic powers like the US and Japan created a class of people with high disposable incomes that simultaneously generated high demand for leisure and holidays.their former colonial powers. the Dominican Republic and St Lucia. This is a model of tourism development that has been fought and rejected by many communities around the world. Caribbean islands like Jamaica. Brief history of enclavisation of tourism around the world A historical analysis of enclavisation in tourism takes us back to the mid-1960s when.

It was first introduced in the National Tourism Policy of 1992 through Special Tourism Areas (STAs).000 rooms. some of the identified locations were Bekal (Kerala). probably due to a lack of the necessary economic impetus from the central and state governments.the national trust fund for tourism development was set up to oversee the development of large-scale tourism projects across the country and to aggressively seek foreign and domestic investors as well as secure development loans from international institutions such as the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and World Bank. enclavisation has not stopped but has only assumed new forms and found new locations. Economically. The proposal never took off.B. But what is important to consider from the historical experience is that the process of enclavisation in tourism needs a strong economic impetus and a conducive social climate or impetus that demands such leisure products.an artificial creation that transformed a sleepy settlement of fisherfolk and coconut farmers into a banker's dream of 30. economic incentives that were given to boost tourism and especially private investment and a rising domestic and international tourist segment. Kancheepuram and Mahabalipuram (both Tamil Nadu). even with this enlightenment. India's earlier experiences The concept of identifying specific exclusive areas/zones for intensive tourism development is not new in India. widened income inequalities and socio-cultural effects are some of the adverse impacts that emerged and have been associated with tourism enclaves around the world. Between 1971 and 1993. Sindhudurg (Maharashtra). Mexico . these experiences have helped highlight the adverse impacts of enclavisation in tourism. these enclaves were exploitative of the region's natural and labour resources but ended up being nonremunerative as communities waited endlessly for some part of what tourists spent on their holidays to 'trickle down' to them. communities resisted vociferously. But sadly. It is important to learn from the experiences of local communities in these locations. FONATUR . the resultant environmental pollution. Nothing symbolises the impact of enclavisation in tourism better than the case of the infamous Zona Hotelera in Cancun. The long-term objective of the government in converting the entire Konkan coastal belt into a tourism hub PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Diu. Mexico was granted seven loans for large-scale tourism projects totalling $457. Despite the fact that the government's STA policy did not have the intended impact.5 million. In 1973. In these cases. But in some identified areas like Bekal and Sindhudurg where the government went all out to implement the policy. The intense resource usage by tourism establishments. enclavisation was a result of the socio-cultural identity that was given to these places as free-for-all tourist destinations. tourism enclaves nonetheless began developing spontaneously and organically in places like Goa and Kovalam in Kerala. In the recent past. Let us take the case of Bekal in Kerala and Sindhudurg in Maharashtra.ARCH It did not take long for the first signs of trouble to appear of how such tourism enclaves were impacting the lives of people in these newly created destinations.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. When the STA policy was proposed in 1992.

In Sindhudurg. a total area of 1. Enter the SEZs and STZs While the country was already witnessing vibrant and widespread protests against the SEZ Act 2005. the National Tourism Advisory Council (NTAC). a think-tank under the Ministry of Tourism (MoT) meant to advise it on policy issues. The image of Sindhudurg as a 'foreign tourist destination' has not only made it completely inaccessible to domestic tourists due to its ultra-expensive nature but also has gradually adulterated its socio-cultural ethos. For the project to become a reality. The tourism development model in the region was to cater specifically to the needs of foreign tourists with the sole intention of bringing in foreign exchange. the environmental degradation to the region and cultural erosion. it was finally withdrawn. situated on the south Konkan coastal belt. floated in November 2006 the proposal of PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Large-scale infrastructure projects like the Konkan Railway and Mangalore Airport were seen to facilitate the movement of tourist traffic. giving rise to anti-tourism protests and demonstrations in many places.000 acres with an 11km stretch of beach was acquired through a 'single window clearance' mechanism. resorts and the proposed Oros Airport. and the changing socio-cultural processes within urban India that are making specific demands on leisure and tourism products. the already unregulated and imbalanced structure of India's tourism economy. Following sustained struggles by the affected communities on the ground supported by larger campaigns against this project. Large acres of agricultural land were acquired by the government for the construction of five-star hotels. The plan was to construct an International Tourist Village in Bekal . the project failed to understand the ethos and concerns of the local community with respect to issues related to livelihood. In Bekal. In both the cases.000 crores (1 crore = 10 million) for development of the STA.B. it would violate coastal zone regulations. But what makes the current development of tourism through SEZs and STZs (see below) much more inimical than any previous government policy is the combination of the economic incentives that the SEZ policy has outlined. with Goa being right in the centre.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Tourism activities have caused the displacement of locals from areas like Mithabao. golf courses and tennis courts2. was earmarked by the central government for the development of an STA. Shiroda and Malwan.a resort of international standard that was to cater to the needs of foreign tourists with facilities like adventure sports. A writ appeal petition was filed in the Kerala High Court in 1995 highlighting that the project was being planned and pushed ahead with the greatest of secrecy. 30. had not complied with the necessary Environmental Impact Assessment and superseded the rights of the panchayats. The only motive behind the project was generating greater revenue and creating a tourist hub along the lines of Goa. Tarkali.ARCH was reflected in the choice of places like Bekal and Sindhudurg that border the Konkan coast. a stretch of land of 84 km in length and 1km in width.000 farming and fishing families covering four fishing panchayats would have been rendered homeless and would have lost their traditional livelihood3. with an initial investment of Rs 1.

etc. The tourism PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . housing.000 to 3.000 hotel rooms Facilities for shopping. It is thought that with these incentives. amusement parks. Exclusive tourism zones for non-resident Indians (NRIs) or elite world tourist zones for highend global tourists. The rest of the land can be used for developing infrastructure. where 'infrastructure' according to the same Rule includes 'social amenities' like roads. it suggests a series of policy reforms in five key areas. water. namely power. along the coastline The government should provide single window clearance for setting up of these zones 100% tax exemption for a period of 10 years Each STZ should be able to provide 2. and tourism. increased economic activities (i. The NTAC's proposal to the MoT suggested the following5: STZs are to be located in tourist destinations.e. Further. 'Bharat Nirman Plus: Unlocking Rural India's Growth Potential'. talks about a series of actions and steps to unlock the potential of rural India. cities. only 25% (as per the new proposal in the case of IT services or SEZ for special products the limit is 35%) of the total area in any SEZ need be statutorily used for developing and setting up industrial/manufacturing units for the designated purpose for which the SEZ was created. lower value-added tax. given the high potential for tourism-related activities in all SEZs and not only STZs. entertainment Exemption from import duty on capital goods Withdrawal of luxury tax. providing an enabling environment like hotels. A recently released report of the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII). resulting in improved infrastructure (i. private investors would come flocking to STZs. and it urges panchayats and local community organisations to capture opportunities created by the central and state governments.B.ARCH establishing Special Tourism Zones (STZs) along the lines of Special Economic Zones (SEZs) to boost tourism and increase investment. SEZs and tourism In fact. improved even beyond the infrastructure in existing SEZs). it proposes that the central government should establish a National Special Tourism Zones Authority that identifies areas as Special Tourism Zones and enacts a policy to facilitate their establishment and reform. entertainment facilities and shopping malls for business to thrive) and creation of jobs for the 'dependent communities' in the STZ area. This is because according to the SEZ Act and the Special Economic Zone Rules 2006 (to be henceforth referred as Rule). wastelands. and recreation and entertainment facilities. prepared by McKinsey & Company for CII (which was presented to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in June 2007). at the central and state level. agriculture. employment and infrastructure in the country4.6 Cashing in on this policy initiative and the blitzkrieg approval that the Commerce Ministry has been giving to SEZs. hotels. hospitals.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Among others.e. the last 18 months have seen many state governments initiating plans to either set up specific STZs or develop tourism within SEZs (see box). there will be a substantial compounded effect on local communities. leisure.

The leisure and entertainment tourism likely to be promoted within STZs and SEZs is not of a nature where communities will benefit or can participate.10 The new tourism enclaves The fundamental feature. resorts and other establishments within already-existing or upcoming SEZs7. About 5% of the area is being earmarked for leisure and recreation.B. It will come up near National Highway 8 in Gurgaon . there has been a dearth of lodging facilities in the hospitality sector. and a 131-km peripheral ring road. critical to decongesting the city. Therefore 'enclavisation' is inherent in the SEZ policy and this applies as well to STZs and any tourism development that takes place within SEZs. The Bangalore city-based Century Building Industries Pvt Ltd has charted out a plan to set up an SEZ for facilitating the establishment of educational. making high demands on air. Time Warner or Universal could be undertaken.8 Hospitality and leisure destinations. A golf course will also be set up in this special zone.0 million square feet of commercial space was likely to have been absorbed in the 2005-06 fiscal year in this sector and Bangalore is expected to have 27 new hotels.100 rooms in various segments over the next few years. will come up near the proposed Bangalore International Airport. with more investment into the city. According to a representative of the company. the Century group was also engaged in developing hotels. road connectivity and natural resources like land. rail and air. the 85-km Bangalore-Mulbagal road. health and hospitality infrastructure. To enhance the investment environment in the city. let us examine some characteristic features and commonalities of these tourism proposals: They all require high investment and are infrastructure-heavy. Therefore.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. off Devanahalli Road. growth and prosperity. a four-lane 157-km Nelamangala-Hassan road. approximately 7. The road projects across Bangalore and its outskirts include a four-lane stretch of 74-km Kundapur-Suratkal. But to get a more comprehensive picture of the enclavisation of tourism that will take place through this policy. and flaw. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .9 In Bangalore the Karnataka government is spending Rs 20. The Mukesh Ambani-led Reliance Industries Ltd has signed a pact with the Haryana government to develop India's largest SEZ in over 25. the government plans to increase connectivity by road. serviced apartments and mixed-use developments with approximately 6.000 crores for setting up six SEZs and many prominent corporates and developers have decided to invest in SEZs in Bangalore. planned on a 2. according to officials. educational institutions. A possible tie-up with Disney. water and power. Moreover. of the SEZ policy is that it seeks to create enclaves of investment.ARCH industry has already begun to make full use of this opportunity and is in the process of building tourism projects.and would extend to Jhajar district adjacent to the proposed Kundli-Manesar-Palwal expressway.000 acres at a cost of Rs 400 billion (nearly $9 billion). The SEZ. the sixlane road between K R Puram and Hoskote. with a new 75-room three-star hotel planned in the city. offshore banking and insurance.500-acre piece of land.a satellite township off the capital of Haryana . The SEZ would also have a foreign investor as partner. and medical tourism figure high on the priority list of the special zone.

Urban imaging strategies are therefore conscious efforts by places to seduce.In each of these STZ proposals. small townships or rural stretches that are near guaranteed sources of tourists. namely business travellers and domestic tourists mainly from big metros. The tourism and entertainment SEZ in Gorai-Manori is acquiring 1. for example. but in doing so they aim to package specific representations of a particular way of life or lifestyle of consumption. Thus. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . They are located in suburbs. STZs propose to provide tourism developers with land at subsidised rates on lease for 15 years as per the SEZ model. These characteristics indicate that STZs are coming up to cater to a very specific segment of people. big cities like Bangalore. the Delhi Commonwealth Games Village STZ requires 250 acres and the Haryana government's planned Tourism Economic Zone in Gurgaon to build 'Disneyland' is going to grab huge tracts of land as well although no official figure on the size of this project has yet been quoted.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.e. not only do they seek to develop something which is attractive. The tourism products/facilities coming up in these STZs exemplify this feature through the creation of massive accommodation complexes. including new buildings/flagship centres/shopping malls.000 hectares. Land grab by STZs and induced displacement . convention halls. Urban imaging processes include the development of a critical mass of visitor attractions and facilities. the intent of valorising and branding the developed area as a tourism zone is clear. Delhi. golf courses. Impacts of tourism development through STZs and SEZs Valorising of the region as a 'tourism destination' . amusement parks. STZs are coming up in coastal and hilly stretches where communities are dependent on natural resources like the coast and forests for livelihoods. this is not true. convention centres and the hosting of hallmark events.B. Mumbai. which include the increasing visitation by foreign business representatives and the burgeoning disposable incomes of the middle class in big metros that are creating a demand for easy and accessible leisure options.It is now well accepted that tourism has also contributed to the process of land-induced displacement in India. the costs of such a form of tourism are indeed going to be high. As the objective of such tourism development is only to cater to the leisure needs of specific segments of the population. While it might seem that the land requirements for tourism activities are not high. Further. there is little benefit that such tourism will bring to local communities. Manali. It is therefore clear that the impetus for developing tourism through STZs and in SEZs comes from the economic processes that the country is witnessing. ski-villages.ARCH All such STZs are adopting 'urban imaging strategies' to seduce the tourist. sports complexes. shopping malls. or are already part of a standard tourist itinerary (as in the case of Himachal and Kerala). On the contrary.. In particular. stadia. the primary identity of Gorai. i. and all of the villages being swallowed up in the Delhi Commonwealth Games Village is to be as 'tourism zones'. and as the model is thoroughly enclavised. and replicas of 'Disneylands' and 'Venices' that are culturally incongruous and environmentally damaging11. The location and the nature of products being developed all point in this direction.

as per the SEZ Act. none of the sections lays down that environmental regulations are applicable on the units within an SEZ. A report of the National Campaign on Dalit Human Rights (NCDHR). working hours. Director of the Babasaheb Ambedkar Research Institute. size and components within STZs are high cause for concern when it comes to the environmental fallout from these projects. the wordings in Section 49 and the SEZ rules categorically state that SEZ areas are outside the purview of the environmental regulations of the country. There are no provisions for monitoring the cumulative environmental impacts of all units coming under one SEZ or periodic review of the ecological effects of functioning of these industries in such zones. amusement parks. Employment . the matter is even more serious. in fact. it is observed that the employment opportunities have also been limited to low-end jobs like housekeeping and support services like cleaning. Thus. says that the SEZs would result in a sizeable number of Dalits in Karnataka losing their agricultural lands. If STZs are to be a leading model for tourism development.ARCH The displacement that these tourism projects would induce would be in the form of not only direct physical displacement in the takeover of land by the projects but also indirectly the loss of access to natural resources that such projects would bring along.The location. with the recent Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) Notification 2006 excluding tourism projects from the requirement of EIA clearances. security and the occasional guide services. which had been given to them by the government some time ago to provide them with social and economic security under a welfare scheme. The fate of the large sections of informal and unorganised labour in the tourism industry is thus likely to become even more pitiable. spas and luxury business hotels? In an industry that is already biased against local community/unskilled labour. are likely to shrink the space for the organised working class. as there are significant issues of labour rights and protection like contract labour. Generally. Further. With respect to STZs. dated February 2007. Jogan Shankar. gender disparity and discrimination. STZs.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. gardening. wages. increased deforestation and environmental pollution in these areas without any regulatory blanket.What meaningful high-end and skill-based employment can local communities currently living in tourism areas hope for in shopping malls. Further. There is growing evidence that labour laws and regulations are being significantly diluted by many state governments to benefit 'unhampered and even unaccountable' SEZ growth in the country. has indicated that the much-hyped SEZs in and around Bangalore. except in cases where developers have taken special effort to build the capacity of the local communities on skills and language12. This too has relevance for tourism. STZs will only increase the division without integrating capacitybuilding measures. child labour (which is particularly high in hotels and the restaurant sector) and even sexual exploitation that arise in tourism and need formal redress within labour laws.B. which are aimed at triggering economic development. there is even less possibility of these issues being addressed. Environmental impacts . Rather. the democratic spaces available to communities to decide on tourism PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . will come as a nightmare to thousands of poor Dalit families in Karnataka. large-scale services-related activities like tourism lead to excessive use of water.

B. However. skills and priorities and take into account regional specificities of ecology. Under mounting pressure. The transfer of power from local Panchayati Raj institutions (PRIs. as is happening in tourism-intensive areas like Kerala and Hampi. the local community has voiced serious opposition to the establishment of the SEZ. This change would bring a wider range of projects that are not directly tourism-based but related to it. in Gorai. Campaign efforts to oppose STZs and SEZs in India At the national level. At the local level. to replicate such an Act in other states points to the growing tendency to centralise such decisions. The recent ventures by state governments are a clear indication that STZs have not been abandoned but are instead being pushed and promoted by the state governments in different forms. has huge implication for local communities' participation in decision-making on issues such as control of natural resources like water and land (on which the tourism industry is highly dependent). the STZ proposal has been seriously contested by civil society around the country urging the MoT. entertainment facilities and amusement parks. plan and regulate developmental activities. Chilka Lake. in its report to the Planning Commission on the country's XI Five Year Plan. The recommendation by the Working Group on Tourism. Tourism benefits local communities only if the activities undertaken are suited to their abilities.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. which is being stressed for all tourism infrastructure developments. The Gorai Bachao Sangharsh Samiti Committee has been PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . for example. the units of governance at the village level) to Tourism Development Authorities in such zones. the Minister of Tourism. It is clear that local institutions are going to be bypassed by the proposed 'single window clearance' mechanism. Tourism and Culture. that by no means implied that the matter has been settled. and Kevadia (Gujarat).One of the most critical aspects of the SEZ policy and cause for serious contention has been the institutional arrangements the Act has made and state governments have set in place to expedite the process of setting up SEZs. Of further concern is the issue of substituting and prioritising tourism development plans over the general development plans in any area that is identified to have tourism potential. the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport. The SEZ Act and its implementation are raising serious concerns about the phenomenon of centralisation of power. culture and society. stated that STZs had only come up as a matter of recommendation the NTAC and that the Ministry was yet to take any decision with regard to STZs. usurping the existing constitutional powers of local bodies to prioritise. The Kerala Conservation and Preservation of Tourism Areas Act 2005 is a case in point as it gives overriding powers to supra committees to declare areas as special tourism zones. Institutional hegemony and bypassing democratic processes . in a statement in Parliament and letter to the Chairman of the Parliamentary Standing Committee from on Transport.ARCH development or voice their dissent/consent to projects under the available Environmental Clearance Regulations are not applicable to tourism industries. within the bracket of tourism to avail of this exemption. like shopping malls. Tourism and Culture and State Tourism Departments to seriously reconsider this proposal.

has stepped up its campaign against the project and has threatened to file a public interest litigation against the project in the High Court. The identity and raison d'ˆtre of a place cannot revolve around tourism. This is coupled with the availability of disposable incomes that can be expended on leisure options and the economic incentives for investment that the SEZ policy has provided.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.14 Conclusions As has been the case with how tourism enclaves started off historically. In Himachal. The Jan Jagran Manch (JJM). Residents are concerned that Gorai's mangroves and beaches will be destroyed once tourists start arriving. ethos. communities cannot be converted to hosts. second this view13. Any such policy move calls for an intense public consultation and debate with the local people and their representatives. culture. when weighed against the costs that these enclaves are bound to have on identity. the ski village project has been opposed by the local community. which is opposing the project along with the local community. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . According to the locals who have opposed the project since it was floated way back in 2005. It can only be one of the factors in the development and economic process and cannot be given such overriding powers. the project would spell disaster in the area as hotels and chalets would be sold to outsiders that would ruin the fragile ecology.B. Gorai village residents. in India the setting up of STZs is the result of the strong economic impetus being given to the industry and the need that the modern professional life of a certain portion of the country's working class has created for leisure. all fourth-generation fishermen or farmers. and tourism cannot be allowed to dictate the overall development process in any area. The very intent behind the creation of STZs as an easy leisure outlet for a certain segment of the population.ARCH spreading awareness among the local community on the potential implications of the tourism SEZ in the region. and livelihoods and political rights of the communities living in these areas. Kullu. and that the traditional lifestyle of villagers in the locality would be affected by the project that would attract large numbers of tourists from abroad. They fear that the ski village would pollute the local culture and sacred spots on hilltops which belonged to the deities. environment. is the primary and strongest reason for opposing them.

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. natural environments.B. Facilitation (Suvidha). vital to our economy. The Mission Our mission is to promote sustainable tourism as a means of economic growth and social integration and to promote the image of India abroad as a country with a glorious past. and development and promotion of tourist products would also be given importance. but a comparatively small role in the world tourism scene. India has immense possibilities of growth in the tourism sector with vast cultural and religious heritage. etc. a vibrant present and a bright future. Objectives PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . varied natural attractions. Policies to achieve this will be evolved around six broad areas such as Welcome (Swagat). Cooperation (Sahyog) and Infrastructure Development (Samrachana). but which envisages new initiatives towards making tourism the catalyst in employment generation.ARCH Draft: National Tourism Policy of India The Preamble Tourism emerged as the largest global industry of the 20th century and is projected to grow even faster in the 21st century. It would lead to larger foreign exchange earnings and create conditions for more Foreign Direct Investment. Conservation of heritage. A New Tourism Policy. development of remote areas and development of women and other disadvantaged groups in the country. Information (Suchana). therefore. which builds on the strength of the national Tourism Policy of 1982. Safety (Suraksha). besides promoting social integration is. environmental regeneration.

This would be in tune with India's traditional philosophy of giving the highest honour to a guest (Atithi debo bhava). the new tourism policy seeks to expand foreign tourist arrivals and facilitate domestic tourism in a manner that is sustainable by ensuring that possible adverse effects such as cultural pollution and degradation of environment are minimised. ensure intergovernmental linkages and co-ordination.B. Provide basic infrastructural facilities including local planning and zoning arrangements. The specific role of the Government will be to : i. This will be achieved by creating a Tourism Development Authority consisting of senior officials of the Government and tourism experts and professionals from the private sector. Co-operatives. so that they are encouraged to undertake repeated visits to India. non-governmental organisations and enterprising local youth to create public awareness and to achieve a wider spread of tourist facilities. local bodies. The New Tourism Policy also aims at making the stay of foreign tourists in India. the policy of the Government to encourage emergence of such a partnership. a memorable and pleasant one with reliable services at predictable costs. The State has to. will also be to develop tourism as a common endeavour of all the agencies vitally concerned with it at the Central and State levels. The focus of national policy.ARCH The objectives of tourism development are to foster understanding between people. (b) It will be the policy of government to encourage people’s participation in tourism development including Panchayati Raj institutions. particularly in the interior and remote areas and to strive towards balanced and sustainable development and preserve. ii. Tourism A Multi-Dimensional Activity (a) The Government will aim to achieve necessary linkages and synergies in the policies and programs of all concerned Departments/agencies by establishing effective co-ordination mechanisms at Central. to create employment opportunities and bring about socio-economic benefits to the community. It also has to play a pivotal role in tourism management and promotion. Plan tourism development as a part of the over all area development strategy. However. Given the low cost of employment creation in the tourism sector and the low level of exploitation of India’s tourism potential. (c) Public and Private Sector Partnership: A constructive and mutually beneficial partnership between the public and the private sectors through all feasible means is an absolute necessity for the sustained growth of tourism. therefore. enrich and promote India’s cultural heritage. public sector undertakings and the private sector. focused attention will be given for the integrated development of identified centres with well directed public participation. therefore. It is. State and District levels. therefore. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . (d) Role of the Government: Tourism is a multi-sectoral activity and the industry is affected by many other sectors of the national economy.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. One of the major objectives is the preservation and protection of natural resources and environment to achieve sustainable development. as friends.

ix. Initiate specific measures to ensure safety and security of tourists and efficient facilitation services. iii. shopping complexes. v. vii. Ensure preservation and protection of tourist attractions and give lead in green practices. time share. Undertake research. Rationalise taxation and land policies in the tourism sector in all the States and Union Territories and in respect of land owned by Government agencies like Railways. prepare master plans. etc. iv. vi.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. entertainment facilities. xi. Facilitate the growth of a dynamic tourism sector. Introduce regulatory measures to ensure social. Create nucleus infrastructure in the initial stages of development to demonstrate the potential of the area. Build and manage the required tourist facilities in all places of tourist interest. and facilitate formulation of marketing strategies. cultural and environmental sustainability as well as safety and security of tourists. museums and parks and provision of public conveniences and facilities. Provide the required support facilities and incentives to both domestic and foreign investors to encourage private investment in the tourism sector. viii. ethics and fair practices. xii. Non-core activities in all airports. etc. Undertake industry training and man-power development to achieve excellence in PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Organise overseas promotion and marketing jointly with the industry. Ensure that the local community is fully involved and the benefits of tourism accrue to them. restaurants. xiii. The private sector has to consider investment in tourism from a long term perspective and create the required facilities including accommodation. v.ARCH iii. vi. The specific role of the Private Sector will be to : i. ii. in areas identified for tourism development. major stations and interstate bus terminus such as cleanliness and maintenance.B. Sponsor maintenance of monuments. Facilitate availability of trained manpower particularly from amongst the local population jointly with the industry. luggage transportation. Involve the local community in tourism projects and ensure that the benefits of tourism accrue to them in right measure. Assume collective responsibility for laying down industry standards. Ensure that the type and scale of tourism development is compatible with the environment and socio-cultural milieu of the area. x. should be opened up to private operators to increase efficiency and profitability. (e) Role of Private Sector : Tourism has emerged as the largest export industry globally and all over the globe private sector has played the lead role in this growth. iv. vehicles parking facilities.

to allocate suitable land for tourism purposes at reasonable prices. Facilitate safety and security of tourists Endeavour to promote tourism on a sustained and long term perspective. The status needs to be extended to all tourism units irrespective of the annual turnover. Efforts will be made to adopt the technological advances in the tourism sector to PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .ARCH quality of services. in the promotion and marketing of destinations. Collaborate with Govt. Travel Agents. Participate in the preparation of investment guidelines and marketing strategies and assist in database creation and research. ix. Tour Operators and Tourist Transport Operators vide Notification No. Tourism Development Fund and Resources for Development It would be the policy of the Government to facilitate larger flow of funds to tourism infrastructure and to create a Tourism Development Fund to bridge critical infrastructural gaps.33(RE-98)1997-2002 dated 26. (f) Role of voluntary efforts: Voluntary agencies and volunteers have to contribute their expertise and understanding of local ethos to supplement the efforts of other sectors to provide the human touch to tourism and foster local initiatives.98 of the Ministry of Commerce. ii. Foreign Investments and Incentives and Rationalization of Taxes i. Exporthouse status has been accorded to Hotels. It would also be the endeavour of the Government to persuade the State/UT Governments to rationalise taxes. hotels and tourism related industries will continue to be in the priority list of industries for foreign investment.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. All such efforts shall be encouraged. harmonize movement of tourist transport across State borders. In view of large investment requirements in the tourism sector and the need for maintaining high quality standards in services. x. Priority would be given for development of tourist infrastructure in selected areas of tourist importance and for those products which are considered to be in demand in the existing and future markets so that limited resources are put to the best use. vii. viii. to put a cap of 20% on all taxes taken together on the accommodation and hospitality units. In order to off-set the specific constraints of tourism industry and to put in place the required infrastructure as quickly as possible. etc.B.11. Adoption of New Technologies a. particularly in less developed areas. appropriate incentive schemes would be considered.

ARCH provide better facilities to tourists and to market the tourism product. obtaining permits to visit certain areas. undergoing immigration checks. b. Information technology shall be given the pride of place in the efforts to promote Indian tourism. therefore.B. increasing use of portals as gateway to accessibility to tourism information. The Centre will be equipped with e-connectivity and networking facility to all state tourist offices. Efforts will be made to have similar state level Paryatan Bhawans in state Capitals. encouoragement to information technology and ecofriendly practices by the private industries and above all keeping abreast with the global technologies for promoting and facilitating tourism. use of internet for disemination of tourism related information. Central Government will take up with the State Government to enact suitable legislation on travel trade/ tourist police for protection and security of tourists and for providing institutional mechanism to deal with complaints received from tourists and the industry so as to create a better security perception amongst actual and potential visitors. be the endeavour of the Government to bridge the information gap through proper statistical documentation of the impact of tourism and its wide publicity to create awareness so that the economic and social significance of tourism is well recognised and tourism is given due attention and national priority Safety and Security The safety and security of tourists are of primary importance both from the point of view of tourism development and the national pride. payment of fees for certain facilities. c. It shall be ensured that Information Technology(IT) and Indian Tourism(IT) become synonymous. therefore. networking of States. These include obtaining visas. The economic and social benefits of tourism and its importance as an instrument of economic growth have to be fully recognised by all sections of the society. to the benefit of all concerned. given high priority in the national strategy for tourism development. Evey endeavour in this regard would increasingly rely on optimising the use of e-commerce/m-commerce. etc. money changing counters and information about all tourist centres in the country. The endeavour of the Government would be to improve efficiency in providing such facilitation services and make PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . The Central Government will set up a Paryatan Bhawan in New Delhi as a modern Tourist Interpretation Centre to cater to various needs of travelers. Facilitation Services Tourists have to pass through several Government agencies so as to meet the requirements under various laws. setting of tourist information Kiosks.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. It will be. foreign as well as domestic and to offer facilities for air and train reservation. It would. development of Handy Audio Reach Kit (HARK) Tourist Guidance System at important monuments and heritage sites.

India with vast cultural and religious heritage and varied natural attractions has immensed potential of growth in the tourism sector. Puri-Konark. 25 travel circuits and destinations have already been identified for development through joint efforts of the Central Govt. potential for development and availability of resources in these zones. Air.ARCH travel to and within India a pleasant experience. State Governments and the private sector. streamlining of luggage handling system at airports improving tourist facilitation services at the airports by adopting technological solutions are some of the important facilitation services proposed in this regard.Ts with a view to achieve overall economic development of the regions. Tourism Economic Zones will be created with private participation based on the intrinsic attractions. Efforts will be made to diversify the tourism products in such a way PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. and other relevant Ministries/Departments of the Govt. and as part of the strategy for removing regional imbalances.B.. The development of such zones will be guided by well conceived Master Plans and executed by specific Tourism Development Authorities which will be created by the Government involving senior officers from the Department of Tourism. Himalayan region and island States/U. Adequate backward and forward linkages will also be established to ensure flow of benefits to the local community. Areas of Special Interest: Government would initiate and support special programmes and schemes for the development of tourism in North Eastern States. of India. guidelines and enabling regulations and their enforcement. Introduction of issue of Visa on arrival at least for 15 days at all the airports. Steps will be taken to work towards the integrated development of all the tourist circuits of the country with the involvement of all the infrastructural departments. 2. MuttakaduMamallapuram and Diu as Special Tourism Area for integrated development. the State Governments and the private sector. road and rail connectivity to these areas will be established to facilitate direct and easy access to these zones from international and domestic destinations. Orissa and Maharashtra and Union Territory Administration of Daman & Diu have also declared Bekal Beach. State Governments of Kerala. Special Tourism Area and Areas of Special Interests 1. Sustainable Development and Perspective Plans The principle of sustainable development stipulates that the level of development does not exceed the carrying capacity of the area. professionals from tourism industry and representatives of Industry & Trade Associations. It will be governments’ policy to ensure adherence to such limits through appropriate planning instruments. computerisation of the system of issue of Visa. Tourist Circuits. 3. Tourism Economic Zone. Sindhudurg. Tamil Nadu.

ARCH that it supplements the main stream of cultural tourism. employment.B. Conservation and Development Tourism development needs to be properly guided and regulated to avoid adverse impact on the natural environment and cultural heritage which constitute the tourist attraction. Promotion and Marketing Promotion and marketing is an important component of tourism development and needs to be undertaken along with product development in conformity with consumer profiles and product characteristics. Comprehensive perspective plans for developing sustainable tourism by assessing the existing tourism scenario in each State/Union Territory with respect to availability of natural resources. Placing Tourism in the Concurrent List of the Constitution of India Tourism as a separate subject does not find a place in the Seventh Schedule of the Constitution of India even though a number of its components are either in the Union List or PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Professional Excellence Tourism being a service industry it is necessary to enhance its service efficiency. The new policy will strive towards excellence by introducing professionalism through training and retraining of human resources and providing memorable visitor experience to both domestic and international tourists. Government will continue its policy of trying to maintain balance through planning restrictions and by educating the people in appreciating their rich heritage and by eliciting their co-operation in preserving and protecting it. occupation. services and infrastructure will be developed by initiating immediate action in this direction. The policy of the Government therefore will be to develop and implement cost effective marketing strategies based on market research and segmentation analysis in each of the tourist generating countries. heritage and other socio-cultural assets. income levels etc. The policy of the Government therefore will be to foster positive win – win partnership with all the international agencies and other countries. quantitative/demographic factors like population. A judicious balance needs to be maintained between conservation and development. International Co-operation Tourism is a global industry requiring inputs from various international agencies and collaborations with other countries.

Giving impetus to Heli Tourism and Helicoper services to areas not serviceable by fixed wing Aircraft.B. and load factors and augmentation of capacity in the critical sectors either by the National Airlines or by encouraging Foreign Airlines. Tourism will be placed in the Concurrent List as such a step will provide a Constitutional recognition to the tourism sector and help in channelising development of tourism in a systematic manner by enabling the Central Government to bring in legislation governing the activities of various service providers in the tourism sector. (Action – Ministry of Tourism and Culture and State Governments) Augmentation of International Air Seat Capacity: Assessing sector wise and season wise air seat capacity. Improvement of accessibility in States and regions of tourist interest. Promoting arrivals in destination of interest by creating hub and spoke operations. Construction of similar State level Paryatan Bhawans at State Capitals. Special interest would be given to areas having important tourist centres which are not connected by trains/buses. foreign as well as domestic and offer air and train reservations. Action points relating to Suvidha (facilities) Paryatan Bhawan in Delhi and at State Capitals: Setting up of Paryatan Bhawan in Delhi as one stop tourist reception centre to cater to various needs of travelers.ARCH in the State List or in the Concurrent List. Action programme The following is a list of action points emerging from the National Tourism Policy indicating the Ministries/Departments/Agencies responsible for implementing these actions.   (Action – Ministry of Civil Aviation) Rail Services:PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . money changing counters and information about all tourist centres with e-connectivity and networking facilities to all State tourist offices. Under the new Policy. Construction of airports on Built-Operate-Transfer (BOT) through private sector participation.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

Identification.   (Action – Ministry of Surface Transport) Maintenance of Heritage Sites and Improvement of Tourist Facilities: Ensuring proper maintenance and professional site management of important tourist attractions/monuments under the control of Archaeological Survey of India/State Archaeology Departments. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Special funds need to be earmarked for this purpose. Providing standard signages on all roads leading to tourist spots. Ensuring uninterrupted inter-state movement of tourist coaches and vehicles through rationalisation and single point collection of taxes.    (Action – Department of Culture and State Governments) General Improvement of Tourist Facilities  Computerisation of the system of issue of visas by the Embassies/High Commissions.B. (Action – Ministry of Railways) Road Network: Providing wayside amenities along with filling stations or otherwise at a distance of about 100 kilometres on all the highways connecting important tourist centres. Improving hygienic conditions. Providing world class tourist facilities. Construction of budget hotels at important railway nodes. environment and passenger facilities in and around Railway Stations serving important tourist centres. trusts. documentation and video publishing of all the monuments which are great tourist attractions. etc. Involving local authorities. amenities and land scaping of area around important monuments in a phased manner. in the restoration/ preservation of tourist attractions and maintenance of the surroundings.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH    Increasing the number of tourist trains.

Augmenting information services at the airports. Ministry of External Affairs. Provision of special taxi and coach enclosures extending from arrival halls in all the international airports and controlled by security staff so that passengers can queue up easily and pick-up taxis and coaches without hassles. etc. railway stations. Mounting Video-Cameras in strategic places inside and outside arrival areas to prevent corruption. Removal of RAP/PAP restrictions from most parts of the country.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Ministry of Finance [Department of Banking] and State Governments) Action Points relating to Soochana (information)  Setting-up a chain of exclusive souvenir shops stocking specially manufactured and beautifully packed information books and other souvenir items at all the nationally important tourist places in a professional manner.ARCH   Introduction of issue of visas on arrival atleast for 15 days at all the airports. Improving tourist facilitation services at the airports by adopting technological solutions and imparting training to functionaries at the cutting edge level like customs and immigration officials. Providing international standard signages at tourist centres. Provision of money changing facility in all the tourist centres. Introduction of airconditioned taxis with electronic fare metres in all the international airports. guides. Providing direct access to airport hotels and railway platforms in all the international airports. Distribution of tourist information brochures through Indian Emabssies/High Commissions. airports. Streamlining of luggage handling systems at the airports to ensure that the luggage is transported and cleared within about 30 minutes after the arrival of the flights.           (Action – Ministry of Home Affairs. Ministry of Civil Aviation.B. etc. bus stands. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . taxi drivers.

Ministry of Home Affairs and State Governments) PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Setting up of Touch Screen Information Kiosks . Such technologies have helped sharing of information globally to the advantage of all. Providing a legal framework for the protection of tourists and their belongings. youth centers.      (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture.Department of Culture and State Governments)  There have been revolutionary changes in the computer and communication technologies and other relevant sectors. Strict prohibition of soliciting and enticing of tourists both within the airport premises and in its immediate neighborhood by unethical operators and traders and keeping both the airports and its vicinity tout free. use of virtual reality systems and video-conferencing for tourism promotion. to create awareness about the traditions of Indian hospitality and the importance of providing an assurance of safety and security to tourists so as to control touting. Providing an institutional mechanism to deal with the complaints received from tourists and the industry so as to create a better security perception amongst actual and potential visitors. etc. Model guidelines to be circulated to the State Governments. creation and maintenance of websites.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B. Information Technology for improving visitor information and facilitation should be effectively used.ARCH  Introduction of audio-guides at the important tourist places on a commercial basis. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and State Governments) Action Points relating to Safety and Security (Suraksha)  Launching of campaigns through local bodies.which are still changing. non-governmental organizations. etc. introduction of computer based information and reservation systems. Introducing tourist police at important tourist centers through the respective State Governments. production of CD-ROMs. (Action: . Central Government to take up with the State Governments to enact suitable legislations on travel trade/tourist police for protection and security of tourists. development of Tourism Portals with links to all tourism related web sites. are the activities proposed in this regard. extortion and harassment to tourists.

environment.B. financial institutions and external borrowing. Special funds have to be therefore. Ministry of Tourism & Culture will also be the agency to effect any changes in the master plan relating to land use for tourism infrastructure. appropriate incentive schemes would be considered. Very often. harmonize movement of tourist transport across State borders. created for such investments. (Action. It would also be the endeavor of the Government to persuade the State/UT Governments to rationalize taxes and to allocate suitable land for tourism purposes at reasonable prices.Ministry of Tourism and Culture and Ministry of Finance)  Development of tourism to the extent desired would involve heavy investments in infrastructure. particularly in less developed areas. At present NRIs & PIOs are allowed 100 per cent investment in tourism projects. Financial viability and commercial returns are the guiding factors in such investments. it would depend on investments to bridge certain critical gaps in infrastructure which by itself may not be commercially remunerative. electricity. Ministry of Finance and State Governments) Action Point relating to Cooperation PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Efforts will be made to prepare Master Plan for land use in each tourist destination/urban centre for infrastructure purposes. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture. etc. water. etc. maximum impetus and incentives need to be given to FDI and involvement of NRIs. in order to facilitate speedy implementation of tourism projects.   (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and State Governments)  Tourism being an area where generally strategic issues are not involved. The Institutions like Tourism Finance Corporation of India (TFCI) will be strengthened and a special fund namely Tourism Development Fund will be set up for development of Tourist Infrastructure. The resources for such investments have to come mostly from private investors.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. It will be the Endeavour of the Govt to provide single window clearance facilities in the areas like allotment of lands.ARCH Action Point relating to Infrastructure Development  In order to off-set the specific constraints of tourism industry and to put in place the required infrastructure as quickly as possible. PIOs and OCBs to evolve appropriate means to facilitate FDIs such as Special Purpose Vehicles (SPVs). sewerage.

clandestine selling of antiques and vandalism are some of the possible adverse effects of unimaginative and unregulated development of tourism. coastal tourism and urban/rural hygiene in tourist centers. beaches. Ministry of Environment and Forests and State Governments) Action Point relating to Product Development and Promotion  Giving guidance and financial assistance to State/Union Territory Governments for preparing tourism Master Plans and perspective plans identifying tourism resources. archaeological monuments. local bodies. are the activities envisaged in this regard apart from providing the requisite legal frame work for ensuring social. religious trusts. Ministry of External Affairs. Involvement of local community in the formulation and implementation of tourism development plans through District Tourism Promotion Councils. Involvement of non-governmental organizations to create environmental awareness on Eco-tourism.ARCH  Encouraging Panchayati Raj Institutions. creation of public awareness about such guidelines. mountains and places of natural beauty. and other community level institutions to take up tourism promotion activities through the general rural development and employment generation programmes and specific rural tourism development schemes. etc. national parks.B. etc. cultural and environmental sustainability. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Encouragement of non-governmental organizations to create and manage tourist facilities. disruption in the eco-system of environmentally sensitive regions. prioritizing development circuits and projects and specifying the most suitable forms of tourism.  (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture.    (Action: Ministry of Tourism & Culture and State Govt. Despoliation of natural environment. co-operatives.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. destruction of traditions in the culturally sensitive areas.) Action Point relating to Conservation  Formulation and publication of appropriate policies and guidelines.

Involvement of NRIs and PIOs in product development. etc.ARCH  Implementing integrated/intensive development of tourist destinations after assessing the carrying capacity. incentive tourism. local aspirations and the benefits likely to accrue to the community.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. conference and convention tourism. Amusement parks promote tourism by attracting both international and domestic tourists. Expand "Cruise Tourism". in view of the huge coastlines and large number of ports. as unique tourism products of India. Expand "Events Tourism" through organization of international events such as sports.g. also market existing cultural and religious festivals as tourist attractions. Involving the town and country planning agencies of Central and State Governments and integration of spatio-economic development plans with tourism development. accommodation and service sectors and PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH              . adventure tourism. eco tourism.. Ayurveda.B. spiritual tourism. which have already been restored. Developing natural health resorts of Yoga. etc. Developing heritage and village tourism as a package by identifying and developing villages around heritage properties. Developing seamless inter-modal transfers by improving linkages. generate demand in the transport. Expand "Shopping Tourism" through good value for money with the exquisite range of hand-crafted products made in the country. Diversifying the tourism product to make India a unique multi-attraction tourism destination which can meet the needs of all forms of tourism particularly rural tourism. Developing the places of pilgrimage by providing the requisite infrastructural facilities with a view to promote domestic and international pilgrim tourism. Focusing on the development of Eco-tourism. conferences etc. Varanasi as the present living city with roots into deep ancient civilization on similar lines as Jericho/Rome/Bethlehem. Develop a clear identity/theme around some important existing attractions and package them to offer an attractive product e.

become necessary to go beyond the beaten tracks and to facilitate direct visit of tourists to new destinations. Integrated development of special tourism areas and selected circuits.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and State Governments)  Peoples Participation in Development of Tourism: . The approach for the future development of tourism has to.    (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and State Governments)  Integrated Development of Tourist destinations: International tourist traffic to the country is largely confined to certain selected centres and destinations at present. It has. The National Action Plan for Tourism 1992 also reiterated the need for such a policy to achieve significant impact on infrastructural development with the limited resources available. did not succeed in view of persistent demands for several small projects to meet the needs of domestic tourists in almost every place of tourist interest. The activities in this regard would include: Creating public awareness about economic and social benefits of tourism amongst administrators.ARCH create employment opportunities. the choice of such new destinations for development will have to be based on their intrinsic attractions. therefore. The tourist traffic to some of the centres have even exceeded the carrying capacity with the attendant problems of environmental degradation.Tourism policy 1982 envisaged a selective approach based on travel circuit concept in the provision of tourism infrastructure to achieve intensive development of selected centers. presentations. take into account both the needs for selective development and the demands of a wide cross section of domestic tourists. potential for development and the carrying capacity as well as availability of PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . As a result there is a good deal of congestion and scarcity of facilities in some of these centres during peak seasons. Even the Government of India essentially followed a scheme approach instead of area approach in providing financial assistance for the development of tourism infrastructure. therefore. These policies. There is also a fair level of seasonality in the international tourist arrivals. The Government will prepare appropriate guidelines to encourage private sector to invest in development of amusement parks. However.B. planners and the masses through seminars. etc. Launching entrepreneurship development and self employment programmes to involve the educated youth in providing various tourist facilities and services and thereby creating employment opportunities. however. workshops.

Adequate backward and forward linkages will also be established to ensure adequate flow of benefits to the local community. the large number of monuments and archaeological remains scattered through out the country. i.The main strength of Indian tourism at present is its cultural attractions.ARCH resources. The development of natural health resorts of Yoga. Yoga. Ministry of Environment and Forests and State Governments) Action Points relating to Promotion and Marketing PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . cultural and environmental sustainability of tourism development and protecting the tourists. heritage trains and hotels for heritage tourism.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. spiritual tourism and eco-tourism will be given adequate attention. cruise tourism and shopping tours.B. Such development will be guided by well conceived master plans. river and mountain peaks for adventure tourism. snow. The tradition of Indian system of medicine and its curative and preventive effect are well known the world over. etc. ii. etc. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and State Governments)  Sustainable Development of Tourism: . The other activities in this regard would include: Providing a legal frame work through appropriate legislation for ensuring social. Evolving specific policies and guidelines for the development of specific forms of tourism like ecotourism. Creation of Tourism Economic Zones Constitution of Tourism Development Authorities   (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and State Governments)  Diversification of Tourism Products: . particularly. along with rural tourism. The country is also endowed with a number of other tourist attractions and options including beach tourism. adventure tourism. wild life and land scapes for eco-tourism. and executed by specific Tourism Development Authorities. Ayurveda etc. centres of pilgrimage for spiritual tourism. its art and artefacts and colorful fairs and festivals. Ayurveda and other forms of natural health resorts have thus become unique tourist attractions of the country. There are also facilities for conference and convention tourism. forests. technological parks and science museums for science tourism. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture.Assessment of carrying capacity and Environment Impact Assessment studies would be insisted while developing tourism in ecologically fragile areas and all developmental activities will be guided by such studies.

Tourism Industry and State Governments) Action Points relating to International Cooperation  Ensuring active participation in the activities of international agencies like United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).Thailand-Economic Co-operation (BIMSTEC). Developing a clear identity of Indian tourism product by promoting selected theme based tourist attractions. Bangaldesh-India-Myanmar-Sri Lanka. Developing a Millennium Yatra Package and Youth packages.  PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Observing 1999-2000 as Millennium/Explore India Year. Enhancing multilateral co-operation in tourism with different groups of countries like Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN). Economic and Social Commission for Asia and Pacific (ESCAP). agencies and the private sector in tourism promotion and marketing. Organising photo exhibitions and creation of a photo library.ARCH  Achieving effective co-ordination and synergy with other Departments. World Tourism Organisation (WTO). Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA). Identifying potential tourism markets and segments and adopting focussed marketing strategies based on research to make promotional and marketing efforts cost effective. Ministry of External Affairs. Enhancing the image of India as a fascinating multi-attraction and multi-activity destination with rich cultural heritage and a vibrant society. Organising Bauddha Mahotsav with international seminars and exhibitions at Sarnath/Bodhgaya.          (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture. Fully utilizing the Indian missions abroad for tourism promotion and related activities. etc.B. South Asian Association for Regional Co-operation (SAARC).[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Launching of a multi-media CD-ROM and creating an integrated website on Indian tourism. Indian Ocean Tourism Organisation (IOTO).

At least ten percent of Plan funds of the Ministry will be used for the promotion of tourism in North East apart from taking up special projects and schemes for the development of the area. Undertaking tourism impact assessment studies and case studies. unique forms of art and culture and affable tribal societies have hitherto remained backward due to various reasons including poor infrastructure. tabulation and dissemination. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture. Strengthening of statistical machinery and improvement of statistical systems on tourism both at the Central and State levels. particularly in North Eastern States. Development of Tourism Satellite Accounts in association with the Department of Statistics to estimate the economic benefits of tourism precisely and regularly. Launching of tourism awareness campaigns at all levels of society. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and Department of Statistics) The Action Points Relating to Professional Excellence  Strengthening the institutional set-up for human resource development including the setting-up of an Advanced Institute of Hotel Management and a Culinary Institute. Ministry of Commerce and Ministry of External Affairs) Action Points relating to Areas of Special Interest The seven States of the North East with beautiful landscapes.B. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH   . exotic wildlife.ARCH  Strengthening tourism promotion and investment through multilateral and bilateral agreements. Setting-up at least one Food Craft Institute in each State. (Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture. Islands and coastal areas which are identified will also be developed. Other Special Tourism areas such as Himalayan areas. Himalayan States and North Eastern States) Action points relating to the Economic and Social Benefits      Standardization of statistical definitions and methods of data collection.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Qualitative improvement and modernization of existing training institutions. These States alone offer enormous potential for the development of eco-tourism. lush green forests.

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH

Improving the standards of training in private institutes through accreditation and quality control. Setting up a National Tourism Documentation Centre equipped with modern technology systems to function as a repository of research findings and publications on tourism. Involving the tourism industry in human resource development activities and encouraging them to set-up independent training facilities. Streamlining and strengthening of guide training and training of other grass root level workers. Introduction of optional courses in tourism related topics at Graduate and under Graduate levels in order to meet requirement of trained personnel in this sector.

(Action – Ministry of Tourism & Culture and Tourism Industry) Inclusion of Tourism in the Concurrent List of the Constitution of India (Action- Ministry of Tourism & Culture)

The Death of Entertainment; Welcome to the New Mindset of Leisure Experiences
Modern consumers have drastically changed their thinking about their leisure time -- and about what constitutes entertainment. Meanwhile, much of the location-based entertainment (LBE) industry is stalled in an outdated mindset that keeps it from being competitive today. As fast as the world changes, it is amazing how slow some consumer-based industries are to change to stay in sync with the competitive landscape and the changing consumer. One of those industries is what is sometimes referred to as location-based entertainment or awayfrom-home entertainment. This, of course, includes cinemas, theaters, amusement parks,
PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH family entertainment centers and other entertainment-oriented venues. Although not a part of the entertainment industry per se, mixed-use projects that incorporate entertainment such as urban entertainment centers, malls, and many forms of shopping destinations - need to be included in this discussion. We believe the location-based entertainment (LBE) industry has developed a mindset, a set of assumptions so entrenched that most of its members are not even aware of the influence this mindset has on their thinking. This tendency to fall back on viewing the industry "the way things have always been done" makes it extremely difficult for the industry to break out of its mold and stay competitive. So exactly what is the main component of this mindset or paradigm? It's the very name by which the industry calls itself and the venues it creates - entertainment. By believing the industry is in the entertainment business, many of these entertainment-type attractions and venues are fast becoming out of sync with modern consumers and undermining the attractions' long-term prospects for success. Let's take a look at the word "entertainment." What exactly does it mean? We looked at its definition as found in many recognized dictionary sources, and they are all in general agreement. The one we found atWikipedia was the most comprehensive: Entertainment is an event, performance, or activity designed to give pleasure to an audience (although, for example, in the case of a computer game the 'audience' may be only one person). The audience may participate in the entertainment passively as in watching opera or actively as in computer games. By defining itself in such narrow terms, the LBE industry has created a mindset that blinds it to opportunity. Instead of "entertainment," a much more holistic view of the industry would focus on consumers' use of their free time. This shift in mindset would open up the industry to new opportunities to create experiences more in tune with consumers' needs and wants. That could be accomplished by dropping the word entertainment and adopting the word leisure to define both the industry and the venues and attractions it creates. What is leisure? We will again turn to Wikipedia: Leisure is one's discretionary time spent in non-compulsory activities, time spent away from cares and toils. Because leisure time is free from compulsory activities such as employment, running a business, household chores, education, day-to-day stress, eating, and sleeping, it is often referred to as 'free time.' The distinction between leisure and compulsory activities is not strict, as compulsory activities may be done for pleasure as well as long-term utility. The big difference between leisure and entertainment is that leisure is defined in terms of the consumers' time, free time, whereas entertainment is defined more as an activity that is
PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH offered to them. While entertainment is generally something that takes place in free time, it is only one possible type of leisure activity, and that is where entertainment misses the opportunity; it is narrow-minded in its view of consumers' pleasurable activities. So what happens is that by defining themselves as entertainment, many of the attractions and activities the industry creates are far too limited in scope. Entertainment restrains the thinking of what type of free-time experiences the consumer is looking for as well as what can be offered. In a sense the entertainment mindset says, "We are in the entertainment industry, so we have to offer only entertainment options to the consumer." The problem with the focus on entertainment is that in most cases the consumer is looking for more than just entertainment to entice them to leave their home to visit a destination venue. They are looking for the maximum benefit they can obtain for the expenditure of their free time. In today's world, for middle and higher income consumers, time is their currency. The growth of large-screen high-definition televisions and the DVD and cable industry are examples of how consumers are now able to get a movie entertainment experience in their own homes without the added effort, time and expense required to visit a movie theater. Cinemas are struggling to keep up attendance against the in-home DVD and cable television movie-on-demand competition. Another issue is that by defining itself only as entertainment, the LBE industry sets itself up to think in terms of competing with other entertainment options rather than competing with all of the consumers' free time or leisure options, both in the home and at locationbased leisure venues. In almost all situations, when consumers are considering leaving their home for a leisure experience that includes some entertainment, they are looking for more than just entertainment. In fact, many times, the entertainment is not the largest part of their equation or the main motivation. When friends and families go out together, they often are primarily looking for a social experience, an opportunity to talk and be together. The entertainment might only be the excuse to get together. Americans, at least, have a hard time socializing unless they are engaged in some form of activity. Leisure activities are often viewed as opportunities for relaxation and rejuvenation, a time away from the chores and stress of life, a break from the routine, not necessarily to be filled with entertainment. A significant shift is occurring in how middle and higher income consumers throughout the world are looking at many leisure activities. They are shifting from defining themselves based upon what they own to defining themselves based upon the experiences they have in their free time. Things are becoming much less important. Rather than material possessions, friends, personal development (enriching experiences) and time to oneself are moving to the forefront. As such, their choice of leisure activities is becoming increasingly important to them.
PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH Coupled with this is the increased importance of their leisure time. Although, at least in America, the amount of leisure time has actually increased over the past 30 years. Consumers have many more choices, and accordingly want to do more in the free time they have, so their free time becomes more precious to them. They also experience free time in smaller chunks of time, which means that leisure activities must be more deliberately scheduled. Although not really time-starved in a historical sense, consumers today feel time pressured. Time has a much greater value than in the past. For many consumers, their time is more valuable to them than their money. They sure don't want to squander their limited time on an activity that proves a waste not of the money, but of the time they have to invest in it. Today, time is the new currency. According to University of Colorado at Boulder researcher Leaf Van Boven, we no longer live in a material world, but rather an experiential world. Through a series of surveys and experiments that included more than 12,000 people over several years, Van Boven and fellow researcher Thomas Gilovich of Cornell University found that people from all walks of life were made happier by investing their discretionary income in life experiences rather than in material goods. Van Boven suggested three possible reasons that "experiential" purchases -- those made with the primary intention of acquiring a life experience -- make people happier than do material purchases.

Experiences are more open to positive reinterpretation, because they tend to be associated more with deeper personal meanings. Whereas possessions are always "out there" and separate from who we are. "For example, if you go on a hiking trip, and the weather is terrible, you might not view it as a pleasurable experience in the here and now," Van Boven said. "Instead, you may view it as a challenge, and over time remember the positive aspects of the experience more than the negative aspects. With material things you can't do this, because they are what they are." Experiences are a more meaningful part of one's identity. "Our culture highly values accomplishing goals and challenging oneself. We strongly value accomplishments," Van Boven said. "Also, experiences tend to be associated more with personal meanings than possessions." Experiences contribute more to social relationships. Van Boven said that experiences are more pleasurable to talk about and they more effectively foster successful social relationships, which are closely associated with happiness. "Experiences foster relationships because you tend to do things with other people, so there is a great social aspect to it," Van Boven said. "Furthermore, we often share stories about experiences because they're more fun to talk about than material possessions. They are simply more entertaining."

PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH

such a dinner cinemas where you not only see a first-run film. "It's a sign of social status in Europe to take a long vacation away from home. but also have a good meal. and the necessity to plan every minute of our waking days is upping the ante for each leisure decision. The amount of value placed on leisure time in Western cultures is not universal. perhaps a total 3+ hour experience. according to Mauro Guilllen. Having fun. Europeans have more leisure time than Americans and seem to place a higher value on it. It represents a lost opportunity in terms of the enjoyment you could have had during that time. and then attending the movie. For lower income individuals." The French average 7 weeks paid leave a year.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. The bar has been raised for the expectation level of leisure experiences. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . material purchases were higher in importance. status is not only conferred by money." The perceived scarcity of leisure time. if you can combine it with a meal and be socializing with family or friends at the same time? We are seeing many new forms of location-based leisure that have entertainment combined with other forms of leisure. In contrast. a Wharton management and sociology professor. desire to do more than available leisure time might allow. also is a sign of success and a source of social esteem. Why only invest time in an entertainment activity. Instead of going to a restaurant before the movie. the more any purchase will improve your quality of life. Our culture now so values the productive use of time that perceived waste of time is almost considered a sin. while Americans place a higher value on earning and spending. perhaps because the less discretionary income you have. not a single demographic segment reported being happier with their material purchases. However. bigger homes and spend more on material goods than Europeans. A bad movie is no longer a bad movie. Money is not everything in Europe. the Germans 8. This leads to a desire to multitask leisure time. you get to combine both into a 2hour experience. Americans on average have bigger cars.B. while Americans are lucky to have 4 weeks and often don't use it all.ARCH Van Boven's research found that a higher percentage of women were happier with experiences than were men and that individuals with higher incomes and more education especially tended to prefer experiential spending. or being able to have fun. The research authors summed up their findings: "The good life may be better lived by doing things than by having things.

the child is responding exactly the way the environment "told" them to and set them up to behave. when adults think a child is misbehaving.B. behaviors from children. It means true manipulation of the environment. zoos. The behavior can also disturb the enjoyment by other patrons. Boredom is an important design issue when it comes to younger children visiting a cultural or informal learning facility. and possibly unsafe.ARCH Designing museums. Often. A child subconsciously tries to test out what the environment affords her to do with it. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . They have a biologically programmed need to interact with the environment—to learn by hands-on. They are bored by passive exhibits (except of course with swimming sharks).[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Interactive in this case does not mean pushing a button and having technology talk to you. Young children read the environment differently than adults. botanical gardens and cultural and informal learning institutions for young children The design of the environment has a profound impact on the behavior and learning of young children. They look for ways to interact with what is referred to as the environment’s affordances. Environments that do not take this into account produce undesirable. Young children learn differently than adults and older children. interactive experiences.

museum and cultural environments are only designed with adults in mind. All to often. spatial. For example.B. bodily kinesthetic. Just how much talent we have in different areas depends on a combination of genetic and environmental factors. to not be able to enjoy exhibits. The best way to approach design for children is to design exhibits and events so they progressively meet children’s needs as they develop with a continuum of challenge that allows their skills and interests to match the task at hand. often to not even be able to see exhibits. to make the environment usable by all patrons—adults. Since children's skill levels change constantly as they develop. and their children misbehave and/or are bored. the result is a sensation of confidence. they become anxious and often claim boredom as a defense. It is important to follow the principle of universal design. If not challenged enough. If a family visits. the average height variation between a 3-year-old and an 8-year-old is 14". There are also distinct differences between the interests of girls and boys. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . interpersonal and naturalist. a University of Chicago psychologist. This conclusion is supported by Csikszentmihalyi. when their skills match the task at hand. They enjoy themselves. Therefore. has researched boredom in children. We tend to be most interested in activities that match our stronger intelligences. a professor of leisure studies at the University of Pennsylvania. physical range and abilities of children-and this varies greatly as children grow. the variety of exhibits and activities must appeal to the broadest range of multiple intelligences and to both genders. the family doesn't have a pleasant experience. Linda Caldwell.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Anthropometrics are very important. If they're challenged beyond their capability. They accordingly set younger children up to feel incompetent. She says children become bored when they don't think they have control over their lives and in what they are doing. people with disabilities and children. Design needs to match the size. the desired educational outcomes aren’t achieved and the family doesn't return or recommend the facility to their friends. has identified another factor in boredom. the point where boredom sets in is a moving target. logical-mathematical. kids are smart in different ways. This requires activities and events that are designed to work for a wide range of ages. they're bored. who points out that when an individual's capabilities are balanced with the challenges of a particular activity. or almost 40%. or being in control. musical. Harvard psychologist Howard Gardner has identified the theory of multiple intelligences that says we all possess eight distinct and somewhat autonomous intelligences to differing degrees — linguistic. He says that boredom is caused by a mismatch between what children have the ability to do and what they are expected to do. Are you bookish? Hooked on sports? Transported by music or art? Like adults.ARCH Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. Children's development runs a predictable course through different developmental stages. intrapersonal.

PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . environmental psychology and universal design. play. environmental factors. all kinds on unexpected and undesired behaviors and outcomes result. Children are going to use the environment in ways that their biology tells them to.B. so it's the responsibility of adults to design children's environments carefully to produce the desired behaviors and outcomes. wayfinding.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. ergonomics. zoo. botanical garden. If you put children in an environment not properly designed for them. Most adult designers have a completely different perception of the environment than the users they are designing for. Positive outcomes for children's behavior and learning in a museum. or cultural or informal learning setting will be produced only when the environment has been designed with a thorough knowledge of child development.ARCH Designing for children is no simple task. anthropometrics.

planning happens systematically ‘posterior’.] [ Over the last three decades in Mumbai. Perhaps globalisation and the urgency of integrating with a broader economic system are challenging the priorities of the governing authorities responsible for making the city? The case of the mill lands vividly illustrates the city’s runaway physical growth. the economic gain of a select few has driven the conversion of this rare asset into private commercial development. Yet. planning has been largely concerned with rearguard actions versus the avant-garde approaches that traditionally led planning. located in the crowded central district of Parel.ARCH The Phoenix Mills in Lower Parel have been transformed into an shopping and entertainment complex.B. as a recuperative and securing action.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.37 km2. In contemporary Mumbai. Thus today most infrastructure follows city growth rather than facilitating and opening up new growth centres within and outside the city’s core. In the development of the area’s 2. complete with a bowling alley and fast-food restaurants chains. despite being a PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

In sum.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. or the relocation of slums to make way for infrastructure. it has not defined its new role. environmentalists and planners just reacted too late to salvage whatever could be retrieved through Public Interest Litigation (PIL) within a set of legislative moves to divide this prime land. This is the result of a fundamental shift in the planning process whereby the government has privatised city development. and concerned citizens. And although the government has devolved itself of the responsibility of delivering urban amenities within a strategic framework. In this model. By default.ARCH vitally important and heavily publicised planning decision. the profession is chiefly engaged in recuperative action. While critical to the functioning of the city. these projects are an indication of the limited role of the architectural and engineering professions as well as all the other agencies involved in making the city. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . there needs to be greater engagement with city issues by the citizens and professionals in the city. planning and vision for the city accommodate the future? In order to evolve an approach relevant to this emerging scenario. transportation planning and urban form have no relationships with each other in the emergent landscape. akin to the state and concurrent lists at the national policy level. intervening post-facto to clean up the mess! It is therefore no coincidence that in Mumbai there is an increased celebration of projects involving ‘cleaning up’ – whether that is the restoration of historic buildings. no planning agency in Mumbai prepared a masterplan or strategy to integrate these lands for the benefit of the city. the private sector is determining the emergent form of Mumbai. Thus. professionals and institutions are seemingly unequipped to grapple with emergent issues in the city. Will it still be the custodian of the public realm or will it establish the checks and balances required for the unleashing of private enterprise for urban development? Today. the mill lands demonstrate the state of the profession of urban planning and the culture of architecture in the city. waterfronts and pavements. precincts or districts. roads and connections between parts of the city as well as broad policies for the metropolitan area. the macro level would concern itself with infrastructure.B. Here. How then do growth. To allow this to happen. there is an incredible disjuncture in the city between existing and allocated land use and the positioning of new infrastructure – a condition where land use. planning or decision-making about urban form should be addressed at two levels – the macro (or city) level and the micro or area/neighbourhood level.

labour pools and a virtual sea of energy and resources creating new forms of employment in the area. In the regional growth scenarios and projections of the Golden Triangle (connecting Mumbai. Currently only 50 per cent of the land. as their connection depends on how the eastern water’s edge is recycled for use. interestingly only 6 per cent of this land is under reservation by the BMC for public use with a meagre 0. This land also offers the potential to connect the peripheral areas of the city with the Metropolitan region as a whole. Cities by nature are contested territories. issues of urban form – floor space index (FSI) and transfer of development right (TDR) designations. people and infrastructure to PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . It is crucial that a city has an articulated strategy for its growth and builds a consensus reflecting the aspiration of its citizens.85 per cent of open space. aesthetics as well as health and hygiene – would enable city authorities to take responsibility for orchestrating growth in the region with the local level organisations (i. Nashik and Pune).B.e.ARCH At the micro level. roads and warehouses (often beautifully robust buildings with great reuse potential) create a sense of desolation that is offset by teeming populations. In the mill lands. Thus the area’s stretch of 14. special economic as well as agricultural export zones. seemingly underused infrastructure. Who commands what and how in a Democracy is determined by who participates or is excluded from the process. While this area is roughly 3 times larger than the area of the mill lands.3 km2 (1. In both these processes.4 km2 (836 acres). Large.800 acres) are grappling with great transformation as the economy of Mumbai moves into the post-industrial phase. land becomes an abstract entity reduced to blobs of colour on a land use plan – open to change and manipulation. The misappropriation of the mill lands demonstrates that without this engagement. the potential for connectivity using water transport could offer the much-needed transformation of mobility within the region. Similarly. This decentralised system would be far more efficient in managing as well as responding to crisis situations – like smaller pixels on a screen. ward offices or citizens’ groups) focused on the tactics for urban governance. the eastern waterfront could connect the old centre with the regional triangle’s emergent industries. the eastern waterfront is of great relevance to the city and the region. the state government and planning agencies sadly did not engage its citizens in the process of adapting this asset for future growth.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. In this context. people affected must necessarily participate in the process if the decisions are to be sustainable. 3. Equally daunting is determining the process most appropriate to trigger the conversion of this incredible resource of land. Cities grow and evolve by opening up new land for growth or recycling land within their domains. The eastern waterfront’s approximately 7.5 km of virtually inaccessible waterfront offers the potential for public access while re-orienting the perception of the region with regard to the city’s geography and physical form. we will get higher resolution in our cities on the ground. is used for port activities.

The eastern waterfront is a crucial zone that could transform Mumbai and compensate for the city’s many physical deficiencies. defined by the mangroves and flamingos that settle here during half the year.ARCH improve the city while safeguarding the interest of present users? Indeed. The challenge is how to rearrange the landscape to synergize these different components.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. the ecology of the region. The dense mangroves at the Versova Creek are an important part of the city’s fragile coastline and act as a buffer during high tide to help filter effluents discharged in the creek.B. couple with the heritage buildings and treasures such as the Sewri Fort and other fragments to comprise the rich fabric of Mumbai’s Eastern Waterfront.] [ PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

o Studying the element ‘street’ in Indian context. o To study the change in the spatial character of interacting spaces with the change in the culture.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH Impact of culture on interacting spaces. o Analyzing the space as an interacting space in different shades of Indian culture. Introduction: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . o Understanding the term interaction. o Studying the character of space and to understand the term ‘interacting space’. o Studying the different activities and their overlapping during different time period on the street and change in its character due to this. Studying the character of interacting spaces unfolding the various expressions of culture. o To understand the term ‘culture’ and different aspects of culture. o To analyze the change in the way of interaction between people and the need of direct interaction in today’s culture. o To study the human behavior and the need for interaction with respect to that.B. o To analyze its character and to study the reflections of culture on it.

chowks (i. perception and intuition. it absorbs changes and lives in present.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Importance of study: Education. remarkable forms of interacting spaces (where large number of people come together) are temple complexes.B. In Indian culture. quantitative and cultural aspects of urban space. There are enormous forms of interacting spaces in Indian culture from ancient time.e.) Interacting spaces are spaces which promotes the activity ‘interaction’ or which stimulates dialogue either between a person and person/people or between a space and a person which is expressed in different forms of communications. its emphasis. The character of the interacting space is changing according to the contextual change and the culture is expressed through these spaces where people gather and do socialize. street junctions). courtyards etc. the concept of ‘development’ has varied effects on the qualitative.ARCH Culture is the field of forces which influences and shapes the minds and attitudes of society which may be given (as a condition of mind) or self-chosen (out of conviction from knowledge. Culture is dynamic in nature. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . which functioned in many ways.

Though the mediums through which one can interact or communicate with other. they are very interdependent. tradition because culture is life style having tradition as its border.ARCH Though people are attracted towards individualistic living in society. and the influences and invasions which made the culture to change. need for an interacting space is there where a person or community can relax / share / enjoy the space. This thesis will aim at comparative study of influence of changing culture over interacting spaces. Applicability and Contributory value: People are copying from foreign at very superficial level. as vital interacting spaces. There are different aspects of culture. Study will help in finding out the role of interacting space in contemporary architecture.B. The study will analyze the interacting space unfolding different characters of culture.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. This study will help in analyzing the psyche of the interacting spaces. Thesis will include the study of climate aspect forming culture. studying their character. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . But the attitude that is culture is still there. have changed tremendously. being used by large public. without the physical existence.

The travel of such spaces till today’s context is shown. but the individual who constitutes people has definite identity. ghats. Spaces are known mostly through the activities they sustain. which are multivalent spaces that functioned in many ways. When we say ‘people’. bazaars. economic position and culture. where he can produce quality in every essence. But with in time constraints.ARCH Delimitations: The interacting spaces having cultural impact are temples. The spaces do not have any meaning without its users. age group. in the betterment of society. his individual ideology. which is a social need of every person. Places can be planned for interaction.B. Therefore dealing with architecture is attempting to create an environment where the occupant can perform his function well. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . It is necessary to understand the people for whom the spaces are meant. One can express architecture as a service to be rendered for well being of a human being. we consider a faceless human being. his needs and beliefs.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. The activities and behaviour reflects a person’s evaluations. the thesis focuses only expressions of different cultures in India which reflects the various aspects of culture. An individual represents certain social status. chowks and many others. his behavior and psychology can be analyzed and this analysis will certainly help us in designing well-used public place. INTERACTIOn Introduction: These are the expressions generated and are in between people. According to all these factors. The spaces are identified by human participation and activities.

desires and outlook. In the space. at interacting places. Each participant has a specified place to be during working hours and the interaction between individuals is in a repetitive format.2 People: In every formal setting. In interacting spaces.ARCH 1. to rest. to be identified needs space around him. human needs changes and accordingly space requirements also changes. So. Although they do not forget their roles but the strict rules of behaviour is loosened at home. Human being is a form existing in space. Thus. one can perform his duties about himself in anyway. people do not follow any role but subconsciously they follow certain behavioural pattern and these patterns are sometimes typical for certain persons.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. each individual is performing a role.3 Human behaviour: Every individual has his own particular response. at public places. But people want freedom from their roles in formal setting and want to interact with others and get relaxed. 1. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .B. recreate or interact in formal settings.

1.4 Patterns and activities: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . He needs a space to relate.B.ARCH Illustration-1 Form in a space Also human being is more relaxed in a space having sense of an enclosure.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

The pattern of acceptable behaviour covers every aspect of dress. There are thousands and thousands of activities. 1. Activity Activity Activity Private space Activity Public space PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . The pattern refers primarily to individual movement. action.ARCH Not only are there roles but there are patterns of action.5 Activity: ‘Activity’ is a group movement. The group patterns over here are referred to as an ‘activity’. If we change the context from the individual role player to the group and different kinds of pattern emerge. stay and living smooth and pleasant. Pattern suggests individual entry. bringing together all the players to function as a group in predetermined ways.B. Here the patterns are interweaving. place and action.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. performed in a thousand individual setting.

sit for relaxation. When the structure is unwritten. or sit for work.ARCH Illustration-2 Relation of activity and kind of space. This aspect is the social mores that govern acceptable behaviour between participants. to interact or sleep. Some activities are formally structured. they communicate meaning aside from the architectural setting. three people and so on.B. the second aspect of relationship cannot easily be shown graphically. The same positions can be repeated for two people. their social patterns. It is useful to discover in social activities. depending on number and mode. A person may stand. It is possible to plot all the possible physical relationship between one and each person. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Thus. Each of the modes and each of the size groups have reasonably well defined social connotations. a common understanding of the rules is of greater importance. Once activities are seen in their full dimensions as expression of cultural norms as well as useful actions. and others are informally.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. if we do not consider social rules of behaviour. But in fact all these are theoretically possible.

The goals and their fulfilment cannot be divorced in a settling. 1. A person cannot be defined by any one situation or activity alone. 1. job experience.g.6 Background: The background of individual may be determined by norms of education. and status and so on. He needs various kinds of fulfilment e.B. o o o Physical security The expression of spontaneity The securing and maintaining of membership in a definite human group.7 Interaction: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . The acceptable behaviour of person in society is based on certain goal that he wants to achieve.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Also one must presuppose the background of the participant.ARCH One must be aware of the social mores active in the situation.

was in need of social relation. Since ages people have been gathering and interacting at different places like wells. 1. Man is a social animal.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. temples. is called interaction. or a person with self. meeting new people and exposure to different ideas is essential for a well personality. But today. to face the difficulties. expressing in the form of verbal communication or other form of expression) or visual. Healthy interaction leads to the development of mature human being. It includes meetings of any form or visual contact between people. It can be a dialogue between two persons or in between a person and a group of persons. His need to interact with people is constant and omnipresent. Interaction is the dialogue in between. It is the relationship of behavioural and psychological aspects. They could vary from accidental meetings or prearranged meetings.e. Moreover. Very rarely can live without company. under trees. One can say that knowingly or unknowingly these gatherings have played an important role in people’s lives. chowks (road junctions) roadsides etc.ARCH Any form of meeting.B. It can be verbal (i. which stimulates mutual or reciprocal reaction amongst two people or group of people.8 Necessity of interaction: Man in the wild stage. the world has made enormous progress in all fields and man has conquered almost all animals not only that but PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

The houses fronts face each other.ARCH overpower the nature also. the housing system form the pattern where more importance being given to social matter. People compare with others his status and the status of the others. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . By promoting interaction. place & action. so as to have various types of connections like visual. faster and better with the help of skills and machines he has got. From ancient time.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Even then he cannot stay alone. The patterns of the acceptable behaviour cover every aspect of dress. educational. So.B. his family friends and other familiar persons.9 Classification according to social classes: People always orient themselves in terms of their position in society and the places of others. 1. He has proved himself as a far superior and stronger animal. social standing in society. facing together the problems of life and thus learns to appreciate and understand each other’s point of view. Behaviour of a person in particular set of surrounding can be guessed according to ones economical. sharing together the day-to-day struggles and joys. one learns to live in amenity. the necessity of interaction is there for a human being and will remain forever. He has to have the relation with the people interested in the same field. audio and conversation with the people of outside world. who can work alone.

They don’t have strict differentiation in age groups. 1. health & education is neglected.B.ARCH Society can be divided broadly into three classes. with the facility of food and water and chai tapari near working places are popular places for interaction. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . 1. The places secured from traffic providing shade. 1. The concept of privacy is not followed in strict sense.9. which is more formal. They always remain in groups.1-b INTERACTING SPACES: The people from these classes do physical labour. where expensive elements are exhibited.1 Lower income group: This class constitutes people on the verge of poverty line. workers. labours. In urban areas. They need places to relax. Children also have to earn their own bread.9. which are most neglected. The workers are dependent on each other. They are hands of the city. They are free in informal places. They fear they will look odd in such places. This priority is to earn food. All the members of the family must be earning. But generally live in congested and unhygienic areas. beggars belong to this class. They have learned to fight their own battles and thus sometimes exhibit overt aggression. These are also essential factors in a city.9.1-a BEHAVIOR: The style of upbringing affects the behaviours. They do not prefer the places. They are forced to live in unhygienic and congested places as they cannot make both ends meet. They may or may not have shelter.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

ARCH 1.2-a BEHAVIOR: Their behaviour with others is not aggressive. canteens parks may be called as typical interacting spaces for this income group. They love informal environment but can suit in informal environment. recreational areas are now becoming popular places for interaction. They want recreation after the whole day o office work.3-a BEHAVIOR: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .9. Picnic spots.2 Middle income group: This class occupies the major part of the society. These are the major users of these spaces which are public in nature.2-b INTERACTING SPACES: Bus stops. The people of this class follow certain rules of society. They mix with the others of the same class. 1.9. 1. 1.9. They give importance to education.3 Higher income group: This can be called as cream layer of society. Gives more importance to family.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.9. People in this group like to live isolate from rest of the society and wants to interact with the people of the same social status.B. 1.9. The places for different age groups may or may not be different.

1. The character of their idea about public space differs in many ways. They are less prone to interaction with others and like privacy. Their behaviour and reactions to certain environment can be called typical for that age group. recreational parks.ARCH They spend on recreational facilities more.10.10 Classification according to age groups: As the behaviour of the user will depend upon its social position if also depends upon to which age groups he/she belongs to.9. It is status symbol for them.1 Children (up to 6 years): PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . 1.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. They use public places like commercial plazas.B. gyms. The different age groups have different physical and psychological needs. picnic spots are interacting spaces for this group. recreational parks which are richly maintained.3-b INTERACTING SPACES: Clubs. These people feel more comfortable in formal kind of atmosphere. 1.

They need to be protected from harsh sun and high velocity of wind. They need secure places. 1. They should be provided with protected areas and shielded from other children. Though they are fully involved and completely engrossed in their play.1-b PHYSIOLOGICAL NEED: They need comfortable microclimate.1-a PHYSICAL NEED: Infant and toddlers always needs assistance in doing certain activities. This is the beginning of his social life.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. teachers or someone to whom child know in the atmosphere strange or unknown to the child. elder children. Slowly he develops awareness of surrounding and starts making friendship with others. Infant. They should be constantly intervened as they have habit to eat unnecessary materials like sand or soil.10 . steep slope.10 . They are forced to play in house.B. self is the centre of its own universe. 1. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . school-going children come under this group.e. They need to be protected from sharp corners. toddlers. 1. All such spaces designed for children are for school going i.10 . they need parents.ARCH In earliest childhood.1-c INTERACTING SPACES: There are very less spaces for these age groups.

intellectual and psycho-social development occurs. but also he can choose and influence the environment of which he is a part. He is constantly making discoveries about highness and lowness. climb or crawl through the play yard. crèche and day care centres are the need of today’s culture of the city.2 Children (6 to 10): These are school going children. nearness and farness etc. light and dark. run. The child’s reaction over his environment is one of the process through which physical. special attention needs to be paid to their eye level as they walk. he comes to learn that he has choices to make. the physical object through which he explore these concepts can stimulate his imagination and reinforce his joy of learning. Gradually.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. but that does not measure up as a person moves through it. The ability to be active in relation in relation to his external world influences is closely related to the child’s increasingly complex internal world of thoughts and feeling. physically self-sufficient. 1. There may exists private crèche and day care centre but are not designed considering the special needs and they do not support creative and imaginative play. activities to initiate.ARCH However. hardness and softness. The creation of an environment that looks good in plan. When designing for children.10. These children do need social interaction. options to exercise. The ability to mobilize physical and mental initiative reflects the role of activity as an essential factor in development and learning. he realizes that not only the powerful adult.B. A child’s response to his environment is far more direct and energetic than an adult’s. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

3 -a PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED: Teenagers have particular problems in regard to the use of public space. In deciding how to use their spare time. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . they have tended to develop their own style of life. The ideal location is where both vehicular and pedestrian traffic passes by providing best chances for seeing and being seen by others. Neighbourhood Park is a better place. group influence of friends is stronger than family forces. which is enhanced by physical association. The interaction with others is the main activity. A hangout area should be located which provide maximum view from passer-by.B. Seating may be provided in the form of retaining wall steps. A setting that allows seating on various levels in various posters is best. This dominance may prelude use of the place by other people.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. An area for socializing may be provided at the entrance of the park. They need social interaction and need to be held in esteem by others.10 .10. The expansion of the mass media has made it possible for the young to achieve a symbolic unity. 1.10.3 Teenagers: 1. For teenagers.4 Youths: Wherever young people have gathered together. Our society does not fully acknowledge their special needs. Privacy from other age groups is the strong need of these age groups.10 .ARCH 1. young people in contemporary society are much more strongly influenced by the views of their friends than parents.3 -b INTERACTING SPACES: Teenagers mass in large groups and takes possession of a particular spot. apart from adults. At this age. 1.

places where facility for food is available in vicinity.10 . The places that initiate enthusiasm and which are challenging in physical sense are preferred by youth.ARCH 1.B. A ‘katta’ is present at each ‘galli. 1. 1.’ It has produced typical culture where they are keen to develop new tasks and they are willing to experiment. with protest.5 Middle aged (30-60): The middle-aged people are generally settled in their life. This reflects in their interacting spaces.4 -a PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED: Youth culture is closely identified with the world of entertainment and more recently. They are engaged in their routine day work. 1.10 .10. The groups are seen chatting on steps of shops. corners anywhere from where they can view the traffic and activities going on the road but are not disturbed by others.4 -b INTERACTING SPACES: Parks. their family responsibilities and tensions. with the result that their leisure and interaction is extremely colourful and varied in contrast to the more stable and conventional pursuit of their elders.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.5-a PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .10 .

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. Places that will relieve tension and passive recreation are the main objective. 1. 1. canteen.6 Elderly: Owing to improved medical science and social welfare. These and other age related changes might reduce the older person’s sphere of activities. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Person becomes mature and the interaction becomes more and more formal or it remains to selective group of friends. more people are living past retirement age and for longer period. which are away from the chaos of street having the view of street.5-b INTERACTING SPACES: In formal places at work.g. Growing older means a number of subtle work role status. health. but not getting disturbed by it is preferred. social networks and self-confidence and make it more difficult for him or her to gain access to and enjoy the outdoors.10 . They like the places. transport nodes etc. Health and mobility have an important effect on both the amount of leisure available to the elderly and the quality of the enjoyment. e. restaurant. Bus stops.10. physical ability and sensory activity. cafes or corridors.ARCH They neither have aggressiveness that youths have nor the passive attitudes of elderly. In parks with families immediate surrounding of home.B. courtyards.

Retired persons as a whole face the problem of what to do with extra time available.6 -a PYSICAL NEED: The elderly people need safe and secure places. it should be designed to stimulate older persons to function without help of others. elders are respected. mentally. when they become physically incapable of doing their own things and began to loose their memory in the process of aging. Retirement from work particularly affect the men. Although the care centres for elderly or separate housing for elderly emerging rapidly in our society. Surface paved should be levelled brick paving. Some people are frustrated physically.6 -b PYSIOLOGICAL NEED: PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . Moreover.B.10 . 1. since women may well find that retirement from their job or from responsibilities connected with their children is replaced to some extend by activities connected with their grand children. 1. or society does not accept these places as good alternatives. The place should assure the elderly of its physical safety. if these are then it is most unaffordable.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. seating at appropriate places provided with back and handrails. environmentally and financially in the enjoyment of the free time.ARCH In our culture. even though their physical needs are taken care off their social needs are often neglected. The walkways should be of predictable no slip and no glare material. But in reality. still large population do not want to send elderly people to these centres. These facilities are not very good and caring. They need places away from traffic.10 .

1. This is not a time of life for active recreation or even active socializing rather it is a time for reflection and observation of passing world.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. The places where elderly persons expected to use for interaction should be shielded against high velocity wind.10 .B. Non-slippery levelled material can be used for it. Older people like peaceful and quiet environment. some times due to physical inabilities losses confidence and get frustrated. anxiety. which they can go to use by themselves. The place should be such that reducing the like hood of frustration. Older people most of the times go there to meet their friends. or even withdraw from too challenging on activity. 1.6-c PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED: Elderly person. If the place is provided with good draining system so that it becomes dry and non slippery after rain. The places.10 . But at the same time they also like to watch children playing and busy street from a safe location. encourage this feeling. It is necessary to reinforce a sense of autonomy and self esteem. The places that are provided with shade can be used more. Feeling a part of the activity is important for older people.6 -d INTERACTING SPACES: Temples and neighbourhood parks are the most used interacting places by older people. The walkways can be good place for interaction. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . the elderly persons will be encouraged to use the place in rainy season. which are looped back to original spot to avoid confusion. pathways looping back to the same place avoid confusion and missing is avoided.ARCH Elderly people are particularly susceptible to changes in temperature. Shady.

11. e.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.11.2 Informal interaction: Informal interactions generally take place instantly and spontaneously. (Illustration-4) PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . scheduled and organized. Many times these are very comfortable.g. These are not pre-planned. it could be classified into following two: 1.B. Duration can vary from seconds to hours.planned. must not be pre . theatre for performing arts or a play. Many times it is the one way dialogue i.e. This type of interactions generally happens in open spaces where people do feel more relaxed. group is interacting or responding to similar set of conditions. (Illustration-3) 1.11 Types of interaction: Depending on the nature of the interaction. It could also be a visual interaction where a person or a group of person could only see another person or a group of persons but cannot communicate verbally.ARCH 1. Informal interactions could be between two persons or between groups.1 Formal interaction: Formal interactions are generally pre-planned.

B.ARCH PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

Illustration-4 Informal interaction (may not be pre-planned).[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH Illustration-3 Formal interaction in an informal space. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

Every time a person reacts with his surrounding quality of space varies. Both these needs are satisfied by the act of architecture. architecture will help in making the character of the space. which will enhance the dialogue between people. So while designing such spaces.B. Another quality of man.ARCH 1. In order to interact with anything outside him.12 Architecture as relationship: The space in which human being exist changes continuously. where they can feel relaxed. Man’s need for interaction with other people demands spaces which are public in nature and his need for privacy demands a relatively secluded space. Thus. PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH . directly opposing to his need of interaction and equally universal. The foremost of these qualities shared by all that man can not exist in isolation.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR. architecture provides him with the maximum opportunity for interactions to occur which may be in the form of verbal communication or just through visual relief. is his need for privacy and security which can be a place for interaction with him. His life is based on interactions. man requires an appropriate environment.

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

  7RXULVP$0XOWL'LPHQVLRQDO$FWLYLW\ D.

7KH*RYHUQPHQWZLOODLPWRDFKLHYHQHFHVVDU\OLQNDJHVDQGV\QHUJLHVLQWKHSROLFLHVDQG SURJUDPVRIDOOFRQFHUQHG'HSDUWPHQWVDJHQFLHVE\HVWDEOLVKLQJHIIHFWLYHFRRUGLQDWLRQ PHFKDQLVPVDW&HQWUDO6WDWHDQG'LVWULFWOHYHOV7KHIRFXVRIQDWLRQDOSROLF\WKHUHIRUHZLOODOVR EHWRGHYHORSWRXULVPDVDFRPPRQHQGHDYRXURIDOOWKHDJHQFLHVYLWDOO\FRQFHUQHGZLWKLWDWWKH &HQWUDODQG6WDWHOHYHOVSXEOLFVHFWRUXQGHUWDNLQJVDQGWKHSULYDWHVHFWRU E.

.WZLOOEHWKHSROLF\RIJRYHUQPHQWWRHQFRXUDJHSHRSOH VSDUWLFLSDWLRQLQWRXULVPGHYHORSPHQW LQFOXGLQJ3DQFKD\DWL5DMLQVWLWXWLRQVORFDOERGLHV&RRSHUDWLYHVQRQJRYHUQPHQWDO RUJDQLVDWLRQVDQGHQWHUSULVLQJORFDO\RXWKWRFUHDWHSXEOLFDZDUHQHVVDQGWRDFKLHYHDZLGHU VSUHDGRIWRXULVWIDFLOLWLHV+RZHYHUIRFXVHGDWWHQWLRQZLOOEHJLYHQIRUWKHLQWHJUDWHG GHYHORSPHQWRILGHQWLILHGFHQWUHVZLWKZHOOGLUHFWHGSXEOLFSDUWLFLSDWLRQ F.

3XEOLFDQG3ULYDWH6HFWRU3DUWQHUVKLS$FRQVWUXFWLYHDQGPXWXDOO\EHQHILFLDOSDUWQHUVKLS PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.WLVWKHUHIRUHWKHSROLF\RIWKH*RYHUQPHQWWRHQFRXUDJH HPHUJHQFHRIVXFKDSDUWQHUVKLS7KLVZLOOEHDFKLHYHGE\FUHDWLQJD7RXULVP'HYHORSPHQW $XWKRULW\FRQVLVWLQJRIVHQLRURIILFLDOVRIWKH*RYHUQPHQWDQGWRXULVPH[SHUWVDQGSURIHVVLRQDOV IURPWKHSULYDWHVHFWRU G.ARCH EHWZHHQWKHSXEOLFDQGWKHSULYDWHVHFWRUVWKURXJKDOOIHDVLEOHPHDQVLVDQDEVROXWHQHFHVVLW\IRU WKHVXVWDLQHGJURZWKRIWRXULVP.

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

B.LW +$5.QIRUPDWLRQWHFKQRORJ\VKDOOEHJLYHQWKHSULGHRISODFHLQWKHHIIRUWVWRSURPRWH .ARCH  $GRSWLRQRI1HZ7HFKQRORJLHV D (IIRUWVZLOOEHPDGHWRDGRSWWKHWHFKQRORJLFDODGYDQFHVLQWKHWRXULVPVHFWRUWR SURYLGHEHWWHUIDFLOLWLHVWRWRXULVWVDQGWRPDUNHWWKHWRXULVPSURGXFWWRWKHEHQHILWRI DOOFRQFHUQHG E .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.QGLDQWRXULVP(YH\HQGHDYRXULQWKLVUHJDUGZRXOGLQFUHDVLQJO\UHO\RQRSWLPLVLQJ WKHXVHRIHFRPPHUFHPFRPPHUFHXVHRILQWHUQHWIRUGLVHPLQDWLRQRIWRXULVP UHODWHGLQIRUPDWLRQLQFUHDVLQJXVHRISRUWDOVDVJDWHZD\WRDFFHVVLELOLW\WRWRXULVP LQIRUPDWLRQGHYHORSPHQWRI+DQG\$XGLR5HDFK.

7RXULVW*XLGDQFH 6\VWHPDWLPSRUWDQWPRQXPHQWVDQGKHULWDJHVLWHVQHWZRUNLQJRI6WDWHVVHWWLQJRI WRXULVWLQIRUPDWLRQ.LRVNVHQFRXRUDJHPHQWWRLQIRUPDWLRQWHFKQRORJ\DQGHFR IULHQGO\SUDFWLFHVE\WKHSULYDWHLQGXVWULHVDQGDERYHDOONHHSLQJDEUHDVWZLWKWKH JOREDOWHFKQRORJLHVIRUSURPRWLQJDQGIDFLOLWDWLQJWRXULVP.QIRUPDWLRQ7HFKQRORJ\ .7.WVKDOOEHHQVXUHGWKDW .

7.DQG.QGLDQ7RXULVP .

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

B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH   $FWLRQSURJUDPPH  7KHIROORZLQJLVDOLVWRIDFWLRQSRLQWVHPHUJLQJIURPWKH1DWLRQDO7RXULVP3ROLF\LQGLFDWLQJ WKH0LQLVWULHV'HSDUWPHQWV$JHQFLHVUHVSRQVLEOHIRULPSOHPHQWLQJWKHVHDFWLRQV  $FWLRQSRLQWVUHODWLQJWR6XYLGKD IDFLOLWLHV.

  3DU\DWDQ%KDZDQLQ'HOKLDQGDW6WDWH&DSLWDOV6HWWLQJXSRI3DU\DWDQ%KDZDQLQ'HOKLDV RQHVWRSWRXULVWUHFHSWLRQFHQWUHWRFDWHUWRYDULRXVQHHGVRIWUDYHOHUVIRUHLJQDVZHOODV GRPHVWLFDQGRIIHUDLUDQGWUDLQUHVHUYDWLRQVPRQH\FKDQJLQJFRXQWHUVDQGLQIRUPDWLRQ DERXWDOOWRXULVWFHQWUHVZLWKHFRQQHFWLYLW\DQGQHWZRUNLQJIDFLOLWLHVWRDOO6WDWHWRXULVW RIILFHV&RQVWUXFWLRQRIVLPLODU6WDWHOHYHO3DU\DWDQ%KDZDQVDW6WDWH&DSLWDOV $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVPDQG&XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.

  $XJPHQWDWLRQRI.PSURYHPHQWRIDFFHVVLELOLW\LQ6WDWHVDQGUHJLRQVRIWRXULVWLQWHUHVW6SHFLDOLQWHUHVW ZRXOGEHJLYHQWRDUHDVKDYLQJLPSRUWDQWWRXULVWFHQWUHVZKLFKDUHQRWFRQQHFWHGE\ WUDLQVEXVHV3URPRWLQJDUULYDOVLQGHVWLQDWLRQRILQWHUHVWE\FUHDWLQJKXEDQGVSRNH RSHUDWLRQV*LYLQJLPSHWXVWR+HOL7RXULVPDQG+HOLFRSHUVHUYLFHVWRDUHDVQRW VHUYLFHDEOHE\IL[HGZLQJ$LUFUDIW &RQVWUXFWLRQRIDLUSRUWVRQ%XLOW2SHUDWH7UDQVIHU %27.QWHUQDWLRQDO$LU6HDW&DSDFLW\ y $VVHVVLQJVHFWRUZLVHDQGVHDVRQZLVHDLUVHDWFDSDFLW\DQGORDGIDFWRUVDQG DXJPHQWDWLRQRIFDSDFLW\LQWKHFULWLFDOVHFWRUVHLWKHUE\WKH1DWLRQDO$LUOLQHVRUE\ HQFRXUDJLQJ)RUHLJQ$LUOLQHV .

WKURXJKSULYDWHVHFWRU SDUWLFLSDWLRQ y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI&LYLO$YLDWLRQ.

PSURYLQJK\JLHQLFFRQGLWLRQVHQYLURQPHQWDQGSDVVHQJHUIDFLOLWLHVLQDQGDURXQG 5DLOZD\6WDWLRQVVHUYLQJLPSRUWDQWWRXULVWFHQWUHV &RQVWUXFWLRQRIEXGJHWKRWHOVDWLPSRUWDQWUDLOZD\QRGHV $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI5DLOZD\V.  5DLO6HUYLFHV y y y .QFUHDVLQJWKHQXPEHURIWRXULVWWUDLQV6SHFLDOIXQGVQHHGWREHHDUPDUNHGIRUWKLV SXUSRVH .

  5RDG1HWZRUN PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

ARCH y 3URYLGLQJZD\VLGHDPHQLWLHVDORQJZLWKILOOLQJVWDWLRQVRURWKHUZLVHDWDGLVWDQFHRI DERXWNLORPHWUHVRQDOOWKHKLJKZD\VFRQQHFWLQJLPSRUWDQWWRXULVWFHQWUHV 3URYLGLQJVWDQGDUGVLJQDJHVRQDOOURDGVOHDGLQJWRWRXULVWVSRWV (QVXULQJXQLQWHUUXSWHGLQWHUVWDWHPRYHPHQWRIWRXULVWFRDFKHVDQGYHKLFOHVWKURXJK UDWLRQDOLVDWLRQDQGVLQJOHSRLQWFROOHFWLRQRIWD[HV y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI6XUIDFH7UDQVSRUW.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.

QGLD6WDWH $UFKDHRORJ\'HSDUWPHQWV .PSURYHPHQWRI7RXULVW)DFLOLWLHV y (QVXULQJSURSHUPDLQWHQDQFHDQGSURIHVVLRQDOVLWHPDQDJHPHQWRILPSRUWDQWWRXULVW DWWUDFWLRQVPRQXPHQWVXQGHUWKHFRQWURORI$UFKDHRORJLFDO6XUYH\RI.QYROYLQJORFDODXWKRULWLHVWUXVWVHWFLQWKHUHVWRUDWLRQSUHVHUYDWLRQRIWRXULVW DWWUDFWLRQVDQGPDLQWHQDQFHRIWKHVXUURXQGLQJV 3URYLGLQJZRUOGFODVVWRXULVWIDFLOLWLHVDPHQLWLHVDQGODQGVFDSLQJRIDUHDDURXQG LPSRUWDQWPRQXPHQWVLQDSKDVHGPDQQHU .GHQWLILFDWLRQGRFXPHQWDWLRQDQGYLGHRSXEOLVKLQJRIDOOWKHPRQXPHQWVZKLFKDUH JUHDWWRXULVWDWWUDFWLRQV y y y $FWLRQ 'HSDUWPHQWRI&XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.    0DLQWHQDQFHRI+HULWDJH6LWHVDQG.

QWURGXFWLRQRILVVXHRIYLVDVRQDUULYDODWOHDVWIRUGD\VDWDOOWKHDLUSRUWV 'LVWULEXWLRQRIWRXULVWLQIRUPDWLRQEURFKXUHVWKURXJK.QGLDQ(PDEVVLHV+LJK &RPPLVVLRQV 6WUHDPOLQLQJRIOXJJDJHKDQGOLQJV\VWHPVDWWKHDLUSRUWVWRHQVXUHWKDWWKHOXJJDJHLV WUDQVSRUWHGDQGFOHDUHGZLWKLQDERXWPLQXWHVDIWHUWKHDUULYDORIWKHIOLJKWV .  *HQHUDO.PSURYHPHQWRI7RXULVW)DFLOLWLHV y &RPSXWHULVDWLRQRIWKHV\VWHPRILVVXHRIYLVDVE\WKH(PEDVVLHV+LJK &RPPLVVLRQV .PSURYLQJWRXULVWIDFLOLWDWLRQVHUYLFHVDWWKHDLUSRUWVE\DGRSWLQJWHFKQRORJLFDO VROXWLRQVDQGLPSDUWLQJWUDLQLQJWRIXQFWLRQDULHVDWWKHFXWWLQJHGJHOHYHOOLNHFXVWRPV DQGLPPLJUDWLRQRIILFLDOVWD[LGULYHUVJXLGHVHWF PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH y y y y .

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y y y y y y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI+RPH$IIDLUV0LQLVWU\RI([WHUQDO$IIDLUV0LQLVWU\RI&LYLO$YLDWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFH>'HSDUWPHQWRI%DQNLQJ@DQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.ARCH y .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

  $FWLRQ3RLQWVUHODWLQJWR6RRFKDQD LQIRUPDWLRQ.

 y 6HWWLQJXSDFKDLQRIH[FOXVLYHVRXYHQLUVKRSVVWRFNLQJVSHFLDOO\PDQXIDFWXUHGDQG EHDXWLIXOO\SDFNHGLQIRUPDWLRQERRNVDQGRWKHUVRXYHQLULWHPVDWDOOWKHQDWLRQDOO\ LPSRUWDQWWRXULVWSODFHVLQDSURIHVVLRQDOPDQQHU .QWURGXFWLRQRIDXGLRJXLGHVDWWKHLPSRUWDQWWRXULVWSODFHVRQDFRPPHUFLDOEDVLV y $FWLRQ'HSDUWPHQWRI&XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.

 y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

ARCH $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

  $FWLRQ3RLQWVUHODWLQJWR6DIHW\DQG6HFXULW\ 6XUDNVKD.

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y y y y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH0LQLVWU\RI+RPH$IIDLUVDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV. y /DXQFKLQJRIFDPSDLJQVWKURXJKORFDOERGLHVQRQJRYHUQPHQWDORUJDQL]DWLRQV \RXWKFHQWHUVHWFWRFUHDWHDZDUHQHVVDERXWWKHWUDGLWLRQVRI.

WZRXOGDOVREHWKHHQGHDYRURI WKH*RYHUQPHQWWRSHUVXDGHWKH6WDWH87*RYHUQPHQWVWRUDWLRQDOL]HWD[HVDQGWR DOORFDWHVXLWDEOHODQGIRUWRXULVPSXUSRVHVDWUHDVRQDEOHSULFHVKDUPRQL]H PRYHPHQWRIWRXULVWWUDQVSRUWDFURVV6WDWHERUGHUVHWF (IIRUWVZLOOEHPDGHWRSUHSDUH0DVWHU3ODQIRUODQGXVHLQHDFKWRXULVW GHVWLQDWLRQXUEDQFHQWUHIRULQIUDVWUXFWXUHSXUSRVHV0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH ZLOODOVREHWKHDJHQF\WRHIIHFWDQ\FKDQJHVLQWKHPDVWHUSODQUHODWLQJWRODQGXVH IRUWRXULVPLQIUDVWUXFWXUH .  $FWLRQ3RLQWUHODWLQJWR.WZLOOEHWKH(QGHDYRXURIWKH*RYWWRSURYLGHVLQJOHZLQGRZFOHDUDQFHIDFLOLWLHVLQ WKHDUHDVOLNHDOORWPHQWRIODQGVHQYLURQPHQWHOHFWULFLW\ZDWHUVHZHUDJHHWFLQ RUGHUWRIDFLOLWDWHVSHHG\LPSOHPHQWDWLRQRIWRXULVPSURMHFWV PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH y y .QIUDVWUXFWXUH'HYHORSPHQW y .QRUGHUWRRIIVHWWKHVSHFLILFFRQVWUDLQWVRIWRXULVPLQGXVWU\DQGWRSXWLQSODFHWKH UHTXLUHGLQIUDVWUXFWXUHDVTXLFNO\DVSRVVLEOHSDUWLFXODUO\LQOHVVGHYHORSHGDUHDV DSSURSULDWHLQFHQWLYHVFKHPHVZRXOGEHFRQVLGHUHG.

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.

V3.DQGLQYROYHPHQWRI15. y 7RXULVPEHLQJDQDUHDZKHUHJHQHUDOO\VWUDWHJLFLVVXHVDUHQRWLQYROYHGPD[LPXP LPSHWXVDQGLQFHQWLYHVQHHGWREHJLYHQWR)'.VVXFKDV6SHFLDO3XUSRVH 9HKLFOHV 639V.2VDQG 2&%VWRHYROYHDSSURSULDWHPHDQVWRIDFLOLWDWH)'.

$WSUHVHQW15.V 3.2VDUHDOORZHGSHUFHQWLQYHVWPHQWLQ WRXULVPSURMHFWV $FWLRQ0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVPDQG&XOWXUHDQG0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFH.

 y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

QIUDVWUXFWXUH $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH0LQLVWU\RI)LQDQFHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.ZLOOEHVWUHQJWKHQHGDQGDVSHFLDOIXQGQDPHO\7RXULVP'HYHORSPHQW)XQG ZLOOEHVHWXSIRUGHYHORSPHQWRI7RXULVW.

  $FWLRQ3RLQWUHODWLQJWR&RRSHUDWLRQ y (QFRXUDJLQJ3DQFKD\DWL5DM.QVWLWXWLRQVORFDOERGLHVUHOLJLRXVWUXVWVFRRSHUDWLYHV DQGRWKHUFRPPXQLW\OHYHOLQVWLWXWLRQVWRWDNHXSWRXULVPSURPRWLRQDFWLYLWLHVWKURXJK WKHJHQHUDOUXUDOGHYHORSPHQWDQGHPSOR\PHQWJHQHUDWLRQSURJUDPPHVDQGVSHFLILF UXUDOWRXULVPGHYHORSPHQWVFKHPHV (QFRXUDJHPHQWRIQRQJRYHUQPHQWDORUJDQL]DWLRQVWRFUHDWHDQGPDQDJHWRXULVW IDFLOLWLHV .QYROYHPHQWRIORFDOFRPPXQLW\LQWKHIRUPXODWLRQDQGLPSOHPHQWDWLRQRIWRXULVP GHYHORSPHQWSODQVWKURXJK'LVWULFW7RXULVP3URPRWLRQ&RXQFLOVHWF y y y $FWLRQ0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYW.QYROYHPHQWRIQRQJRYHUQPHQWDORUJDQL]DWLRQVWRFUHDWHHQYLURQPHQWDODZDUHQHVV RQ(FRWRXULVPQDWLRQDOSDUNVFRDVWDOWRXULVPDQGXUEDQUXUDOK\JLHQHLQWRXULVW FHQWHUV .

  $FWLRQ3RLQWUHODWLQJWR&RQVHUYDWLRQ y )RUPXODWLRQDQGSXEOLFDWLRQRIDSSURSULDWHSROLFLHVDQGJXLGHOLQHVFUHDWLRQRISXEOLF DZDUHQHVVDERXWVXFKJXLGHOLQHVHWFDUHWKHDFWLYLWLHVHQYLVDJHGLQWKLVUHJDUGDSDUW PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH IURPSURYLGLQJWKHUHTXLVLWHOHJDOIUDPHZRUNIRUHQVXULQJVRFLDOFXOWXUDODQG HQYLURQPHQWDOVXVWDLQDELOLW\ y 'HVSROLDWLRQRIQDWXUDOHQYLURQPHQWDUFKDHRORJLFDOPRQXPHQWVEHDFKHVPRXQWDLQV DQGSODFHVRIQDWXUDOEHDXW\GLVUXSWLRQLQWKHHFRV\VWHPRIHQYLURQPHQWDOO\ VHQVLWLYHUHJLRQVGHVWUXFWLRQRIWUDGLWLRQVLQWKHFXOWXUDOO\VHQVLWLYHDUHDV FODQGHVWLQHVHOOLQJRIDQWLTXHVDQGYDQGDOLVPDUHVRPHRIWKHSRVVLEOHDGYHUVH HIIHFWVRIXQLPDJLQDWLYHDQGXQUHJXODWHGGHYHORSPHQWRIWRXULVP $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH0LQLVWU\RI([WHUQDO$IIDLUV0LQLVWU\RI (QYLURQPHQWDQG)RUHVWVDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.

  $FWLRQ3RLQWUHODWLQJWR3URGXFW'HYHORSPHQWDQG3URPRWLRQ y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y y y y y y y y y .

2VLQSURGXFWGHYHORSPHQW $PXVHPHQWSDUNVSURPRWHWRXULVPE\DWWUDFWLQJERWKLQWHUQDWLRQDODQGGRPHVWLF WRXULVWVJHQHUDWHGHPDQGLQWKHWUDQVSRUWDFFRPPRGDWLRQDQGVHUYLFHVHFWRUVDQG FUHDWHHPSOR\PHQWRSSRUWXQLWLHV7KH*RYHUQPHQWZLOOSUHSDUHDSSURSULDWH JXLGHOLQHVWRHQFRXUDJHSULYDWHVHFWRUWRLQYHVWLQGHYHORSPHQWRIDPXVHPHQWSDUNV y y y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.B.QGLDDXQLTXHPXOWLDWWUDFWLRQWRXULVP GHVWLQDWLRQZKLFKFDQPHHWWKHQHHGVRIDOOIRUPVRIWRXULVPSDUWLFXODUO\UXUDO WRXULVPVSLULWXDOWRXULVPHFRWRXULVPDGYHQWXUHWRXULVPLQFHQWLYHWRXULVP FRQIHUHQFHDQGFRQYHQWLRQWRXULVPHWF 'HYHORSLQJQDWXUDOKHDOWKUHVRUWVRI<RJD$\XUYHGDHWFDVXQLTXHWRXULVPSURGXFWV RI.QYROYHPHQWRI15.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH y 'LYHUVLI\LQJWKHWRXULVPSURGXFWWRPDNH.VDQG3.QGLD 'HYHORSLQJVHDPOHVVLQWHUPRGDOWUDQVIHUVE\LPSURYLQJOLQNDJHV .

QWHJUDWHGGHYHORSPHQWRIVSHFLDOWRXULVPDUHDVDQGVHOHFWHGFLUFXLWV y y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUHDQG6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.QGLDHVVHQWLDOO\IROORZHGDVFKHPHDSSURDFK LQVWHDGRIDUHDDSSURDFKLQSURYLGLQJILQDQFLDODVVLVWDQFHIRUWKHGHYHORSPHQWRI WRXULVPLQIUDVWUXFWXUH7KHDSSURDFKIRUWKHIXWXUHGHYHORSPHQWRIWRXULVPKDVWR WKHUHIRUHWDNHLQWRDFFRXQWERWKWKHQHHGVIRUVHOHFWLYHGHYHORSPHQWDQGWKH GHPDQGVRIDZLGHFURVVVHFWLRQRIGRPHVWLFWRXULVWV7KHDFWLYLWLHVLQWKLVUHJDUG ZRXOGLQFOXGH &UHDWLQJSXEOLFDZDUHQHVVDERXWHFRQRPLFDQGVRFLDOEHQHILWVRIWRXULVPDPRQJVW DGPLQLVWUDWRUVSODQQHUVDQGWKHPDVVHVWKURXJKVHPLQDUVZRUNVKRSV SUHVHQWDWLRQVHWF /DXQFKLQJHQWUHSUHQHXUVKLSGHYHORSPHQWDQGVHOIHPSOR\PHQWSURJUDPPHVWR LQYROYHWKHHGXFDWHG\RXWKLQSURYLGLQJYDULRXVWRXULVWIDFLOLWLHVDQGVHUYLFHVDQG WKHUHE\FUHDWLQJHPSOR\PHQWRSSRUWXQLWLHV . y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

 PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

B.ARCH y y y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

 y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

 y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

B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH0LQLVWU\RI(QYLURQPHQWDQG)RUHVWVDQG6WDWH *RYHUQPHQWV.

GHQWLI\LQJSRWHQWLDOWRXULVPPDUNHWVDQGVHJPHQWVDQGDGRSWLQJIRFXVVHGPDUNHWLQJ VWUDWHJLHVEDVHGRQUHVHDUFKWRPDNHSURPRWLRQDODQGPDUNHWLQJHIIRUWVFRVW HIIHFWLYH (QKDQFLQJWKHLPDJHRI.QGLDQWRXULVPSURGXFWE\SURPRWLQJVHOHFWHGWKHPH EDVHGWRXULVWDWWUDFWLRQV y y y y y y y y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH0LQLVWU\RI([WHUQDO$IIDLUV7RXULVP.QGLDQ WRXULVP 'HYHORSLQJDFOHDULGHQWLW\RI.QGLD<HDU 'HYHORSLQJD0LOOHQQLXP<DWUD3DFNDJHDQG<RXWKSDFNDJHV 2UJDQLVLQJ%DXGGKD0DKRWVDYZLWKLQWHUQDWLRQDOVHPLQDUVDQGH[KLELWLRQVDW 6DUQDWK%RGKJD\D 2UJDQLVLQJSKRWRH[KLELWLRQVDQGFUHDWLRQRIDSKRWROLEUDU\ /DXQFKLQJRIDPXOWLPHGLD&'520DQGFUHDWLQJDQLQWHJUDWHGZHEVLWHRQ.QGXVWU\DQG 6WDWH*RYHUQPHQWV.  $FWLRQ3RLQWVUHODWLQJWR3URPRWLRQDQG0DUNHWLQJ y $FKLHYLQJHIIHFWLYHFRRUGLQDWLRQDQGV\QHUJ\ZLWKRWKHU'HSDUWPHQWVDJHQFLHVDQG WKHSULYDWHVHFWRULQWRXULVPSURPRWLRQDQGPDUNHWLQJ )XOO\XWLOL]LQJWKH.QGLDQPLVVLRQVDEURDGIRUWRXULVPSURPRWLRQDQGUHODWHGDFWLYLWLHV .QGLDDVDIDVFLQDWLQJPXOWLDWWUDFWLRQDQGPXOWLDFWLYLW\ GHVWLQDWLRQZLWKULFKFXOWXUDOKHULWDJHDQGDYLEUDQWVRFLHW\ 2EVHUYLQJDV0LOOHQQLXP([SORUH.

 $FWLRQ3RLQWVUHODWLQJWR.QWHUQDWLRQDO&RRSHUDWLRQ y (QVXULQJDFWLYHSDUWLFLSDWLRQLQWKHDFWLYLWLHVRILQWHUQDWLRQDODJHQFLHVOLNH8QLWHG 1DWLRQV'HYHORSPHQW3URJUDPPH 81'3.

(FRQRPLFDQG6RFLDO&RPPLVVLRQIRU $VLDDQG3DFLILF (6&$3.

:RUOG7RXULVP2UJDQLVDWLRQ :72.

3DFLILF$VLD7UDYHO $VVRFLDWLRQ 3$7$.

272.QGLDQ2FHDQ7RXULVP2UJDQLVDWLRQ ..

 (QKDQFLQJPXOWLODWHUDOFRRSHUDWLRQLQWRXULVPZLWKGLIIHUHQWJURXSVRIFRXQWULHVOLNH $VVRFLDWLRQRI6RXWK(DVW$VLDQ1DWLRQV $6($1.

067(&.QGLD0\DQPDU6UL /DQND7KDLODQG(FRQRPLF&RRSHUDWLRQ %.%DQJDOGHVK.

6RXWK$VLDQ$VVRFLDWLRQIRU 5HJLRQDO&RRSHUDWLRQ 6$$5&.

HWF PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH y .

B.ARCH y 6WUHQJWKHQLQJWRXULVPSURPRWLRQDQGLQYHVWPHQWWKURXJKPXOWLODWHUDODQGELODWHUDO DJUHHPHQWV $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH0LQLVWU\RI&RPPHUFHDQG0LQLVWU\RI([WHUQDO $IIDLUV.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

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

  $FWLRQSRLQWVUHODWLQJWRWKH(FRQRPLFDQG6RFLDO%HQHILWV y y y y y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

  7KH$FWLRQ3RLQWV5HODWLQJWR3URIHVVLRQDO([FHOOHQFH y 6WUHQJWKHQLQJWKHLQVWLWXWLRQDOVHWXSIRUKXPDQUHVRXUFHGHYHORSPHQWLQFOXGLQJWKH VHWWLQJXSRIDQ$GYDQFHG.QVWLWXWHLQHDFK6WDWHSDUWLFXODUO\LQ1RUWK (DVWHUQ6WDWHV .PSURYLQJWKHVWDQGDUGVRIWUDLQLQJLQSULYDWHLQVWLWXWHVWKURXJKDFFUHGLWDWLRQDQG TXDOLW\FRQWURO y y y PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .QVWLWXWH 4XDOLWDWLYHLPSURYHPHQWDQGPRGHUQL]DWLRQRIH[LVWLQJWUDLQLQJLQVWLWXWLRQV 6HWWLQJXSDWOHDVWRQH)RRG&UDIW.QVWLWXWHRI+RWHO0DQDJHPHQWDQGD&XOLQDU\.

ARCH y 6HWWLQJXSD1DWLRQDO7RXULVP'RFXPHQWDWLRQ&HQWUHHTXLSSHGZLWKPRGHUQ WHFKQRORJ\V\VWHPVWRIXQFWLRQDVDUHSRVLWRU\RIUHVHDUFKILQGLQJVDQGSXEOLFDWLRQV RQWRXULVP .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.QWURGXFWLRQRIRSWLRQDOFRXUVHVLQWRXULVPUHODWHGWRSLFVDW*UDGXDWHDQGXQGHU *UDGXDWHOHYHOVLQRUGHUWRPHHWUHTXLUHPHQWRIWUDLQHGSHUVRQQHOLQWKLVVHFWRU y y y $FWLRQ 0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUHDQG7RXULVP.B.QYROYLQJWKHWRXULVPLQGXVWU\LQKXPDQUHVRXUFHGHYHORSPHQWDFWLYLWLHVDQG HQFRXUDJLQJWKHPWRVHWXSLQGHSHQGHQWWUDLQLQJIDFLOLWLHV 6WUHDPOLQLQJDQGVWUHQJWKHQLQJRIJXLGHWUDLQLQJDQGWUDLQLQJRIRWKHUJUDVVURRWOHYHO ZRUNHUV .QGXVWU\.

  .QGLD $FWLRQ0LQLVWU\RI7RXULVP &XOWXUH.QFOXVLRQRI7RXULVPLQWKH&RQFXUUHQW/LVWRIWKH&RQVWLWXWLRQRI.

      7KH'HDWKRI(QWHUWDLQPHQW:HOFRPHWRWKH1HZ0LQGVHWRI /HLVXUH([SHULHQFHV 0RGHUQFRQVXPHUVKDYHGUDVWLFDOO\FKDQJHGWKHLUWKLQNLQJDERXWWKHLUOHLVXUHWLPHDQG DERXWZKDWFRQVWLWXWHVHQWHUWDLQPHQW0HDQZKLOHPXFKRIWKHORFDWLRQEDVHGHQWHUWDLQPHQW /%(.

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

ARCH :HEHOLHYHWKHORFDWLRQEDVHGHQWHUWDLQPHQW /%(.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.

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

ARCH H[SHULPHQWVWKDWLQFOXGHGPRUHWKDQSHRSOHRYHUVHYHUDO\HDUV9DQ%RYHQDQG IHOORZUHVHDUFKHU7KRPDV*LORYLFKRI&RUQHOO8QLYHUVLW\IRXQGWKDWSHRSOHIURPDOOZDONVRI OLIHZHUHPDGHKDSSLHUE\LQYHVWLQJWKHLUGLVFUHWLRQDU\LQFRPHLQOLIHH[SHULHQFHVUDWKHUWKDQ LQPDWHULDOJRRGV 9DQ%RYHQVXJJHVWHGWKUHHSRVVLEOHUHDVRQVWKDWH[SHULHQWLDOSXUFKDVHVWKRVHPDGH ZLWKWKHSULPDU\LQWHQWLRQRIDFTXLULQJDOLIHH[SHULHQFHPDNHSHRSOHKDSSLHUWKDQGR PDWHULDOSXUFKDVHV y y y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

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.QVWHDGRIJRLQJWRDUHVWDXUDQWEHIRUHWKHPRYLHDQGWKHQ DWWHQGLQJWKHPRYLHSHUKDSVDWRWDOKRXUH[SHULHQFH\RXJHWWRFRPELQHERWKLQWRD KRXUH[SHULHQFH 7KHDPRXQWRIYDOXHSODFHGRQOHLVXUHWLPHLQ:HVWHUQFXOWXUHVLVQRWXQLYHUVDO(XURSHDQV KDYHPRUHOHLVXUHWLPHWKDQ$PHULFDQVDQGVHHPWRSODFHDKLJKHUYDOXHRQLWZKLOH $PHULFDQVSODFHDKLJKHUYDOXHRQHDUQLQJDQGVSHQGLQJ$PHULFDQVRQDYHUDJHKDYH ELJJHUFDUVELJJHUKRPHVDQGVSHQGPRUHRQPDWHULDOJRRGVWKDQ(XURSHDQV.W VDVLJQRI VRFLDOVWDWXVLQ(XURSHWRWDNHDORQJYDFDWLRQDZD\IURPKRPH0RQH\LVQRWHYHU\WKLQJLQ (XURSHVWDWXVLVQRWRQO\FRQIHUUHGE\PRQH\+DYLQJIXQRUEHLQJDEOHWRKDYHIXQDOVRLV DVLJQRIVXFFHVVDQGDVRXUFHRIVRFLDOHVWHHP7KH)UHQFKDYHUDJHZHHNVSDLGOHDYHD \HDUWKH*HUPDQVZKLOH$PHULFDQVDUHOXFN\WRKDYHZHHNVDQGRIWHQGRQ WXVHLWDOO               PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .ARCH 7KLVOHDGVWRDGHVLUHWRPXOWLWDVNOHLVXUHWLPH:K\RQO\LQYHVWWLPHLQDQHQWHUWDLQPHQW DFWLYLW\LI\RXFDQFRPELQHLWZLWKDPHDODQGEHVRFLDOL]LQJZLWKIDPLO\RUIULHQGVDWWKH VDPHWLPH" :HDUHVHHLQJPDQ\QHZIRUPVRIORFDWLRQEDVHGOHLVXUHWKDWKDYHHQWHUWDLQPHQWFRPELQHG ZLWKRWKHUIRUPVRIOHLVXUHVXFKDGLQQHUFLQHPDVZKHUH\RXQRWRQO\VHHDILUVWUXQILOP EXWDOVRKDYHDJRRGPHDO.QFRQWUDVW DFFRUGLQJWR0DXUR*XLOOOHQD:KDUWRQPDQDJHPHQWDQGVRFLRORJ\SURIHVVRU.B.

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

ARCH FRQFHUQHGFLWL]HQVHQYLURQPHQWDOLVWVDQGSODQQHUVMXVWUHDFWHGWRRODWHWRVDOYDJHZKDWHYHU FRXOGEHUHWULHYHGWKURXJK3XEOLF./.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.QWHUHVW/LWLJDWLRQ 3.

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

OHYHODQGWKHPLFURRUDUHDQHLJKERXUKRRGOHYHO.QWKLVPRGHODNLQWR WKHVWDWHDQGFRQFXUUHQWOLVWVDWWKHQDWLRQDOSROLF\OHYHOWKHPDFUROHYHOZRXOGFRQFHUQLWVHOIZLWKLQIUDVWUXFWXUHURDGVDQGFRQQHFWLRQVEHWZHHQSDUWV RIWKHFLW\DVZHOODVEURDGSROLFLHVIRUWKHPHWURSROLWDQDUHD $WWKHPLFUROHYHOLVVXHVRIXUEDQIRUP IORRUVSDFHLQGH[ )6.

DQGWUDQVIHURI GHYHORSPHQWULJKW 7'5.

GHVLJQDWLRQVDHVWKHWLFVDVZHOODVKHDOWKDQGK\JLHQH ZRXOG HQDEOHFLW\DXWKRULWLHVWRWDNHUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRURUFKHVWUDWLQJJURZWKLQWKHUHJLRQZLWKWKH ORFDOOHYHORUJDQLVDWLRQV LHZDUGRIILFHVRUFLWL]HQV JURXSV.

QERWKWKHVHSURFHVVHV SHRSOHDIIHFWHGPXVWQHFHVVDULO\SDUWLFLSDWHLQWKHSURFHVVLIWKH GHFLVLRQVDUHWREHVXVWDLQDEOH7KHPLVDSSURSULDWLRQRIWKHPLOO ODQGVGHPRQVWUDWHVWKDWZLWKRXWWKLVHQJDJHPHQWODQGEHFRPHVDQ PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .IRFXVHGRQWKHWDFWLFVIRU XUEDQJRYHUQDQFH7KLVGHFHQWUDOLVHGV\VWHPZRXOGEHIDUPRUHHIILFLHQWLQPDQDJLQJDV ZHOODVUHVSRQGLQJWRFULVLVVLWXDWLRQV OLNHVPDOOHUSL[HOVRQDVFUHHQZHZLOOJHWKLJKHU UHVROXWLRQLQRXUFLWLHVRQWKHJURXQG &LWLHVJURZDQGHYROYHE\RSHQLQJXSQHZODQGIRUJURZWKRU UHF\FOLQJODQGZLWKLQWKHLUGRPDLQV.

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

WKHHDVWHUQZDWHUIURQWFRXOGFRQQHFWWKHROGFHQWUHZLWKWKH UHJLRQDOWULDQJOH VHPHUJHQWLQGXVWULHVVSHFLDOHFRQRPLFDVZHOODVDJULFXOWXUDOH[SRUW ]RQHV7KLVODQGDOVRRIIHUVWKHSRWHQWLDOWRFRQQHFWWKHSHULSKHUDODUHDVRIWKHFLW\ZLWKWKH 0HWURSROLWDQUHJLRQDVDZKROH 7KHHDVWHUQZDWHUIURQW VDSSUR[LPDWHO\NP DFUHV.

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

LVXVHGIRUSRUWDFWLYLWLHV/DUJH VHHPLQJO\XQGHUXVHGLQIUDVWUXFWXUHURDGVDQGZDUHKRXVHV RIWHQEHDXWLIXOO\UREXVW EXLOGLQJVZLWKJUHDWUHXVHSRWHQWLDO.

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

PSDFWRIFXOWXUHRQLQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHV  6WXG\LQJWKHFKDUDFWHURILQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHVXQIROGLQJWKHYDULRXVH[SUHVVLRQVRIFXOWXUH  o 8QGHUVWDQGLQJWKHWHUPLQWHUDFWLRQ o 7RVWXG\WKHKXPDQEHKDYLRUDQGWKHQHHGIRULQWHUDFWLRQZLWKUHVSHFWWRWKDW o 6WXG\LQJWKHFKDUDFWHURIVSDFHDQGWRXQGHUVWDQGWKHWHUP LQWHUDFWLQJVSDFH  o 7RXQGHUVWDQGWKHWHUP FXOWXUH DQGGLIIHUHQWDVSHFWVRIFXOWXUH PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH > 7KHGHQVHPDQJURYHVDWWKH9HUVRYD&UHHNDUHDQLPSRUWDQWSDUWRIWKHFLW\ VIUDJLOH FRDVWOLQHDQGDFWDVDEXIIHUGXULQJKLJKWLGHWRKHOSILOWHUHIIOXHQWVGLVFKDUJHGLQWKHFUHHN@            .B.

B.QGLDQFXOWXUH o 6WXG\LQJWKHHOHPHQW VWUHHW LQ.QGLDQFRQWH[W o 7RDQDO\]HLWVFKDUDFWHUDQGWRVWXG\WKHUHIOHFWLRQVRIFXOWXUHRQLW o 6WXG\LQJ WKH GLIIHUHQW DFWLYLWLHV DQG WKHLU RYHUODSSLQJ GXULQJ GLIIHUHQW WLPH SHULRG RQWKHVWUHHWDQGFKDQJHLQLWVFKDUDFWHUGXHWRWKLV o 7R DQDO\]H WKH FKDQJH LQ WKH ZD\ RI LQWHUDFWLRQ EHWZHHQ SHRSOH DQG WKH QHHG RI GLUHFWLQWHUDFWLRQLQWRGD\ VFXOWXUH o 7RVWXG\WKHFKDQJHLQWKHVSDWLDOFKDUDFWHURILQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHVZLWKWKHFKDQJH LQWKHFXOWXUH    .ARCH o $QDO\]LQJWKHVSDFHDVDQLQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHLQGLIIHUHQWVKDGHVRI.QWURGXFWLRQ &XOWXUHLVWKHILHOGRIIRUFHVZKLFKLQIOXHQFHVDQGVKDSHVWKHPLQGVDQGDWWLWXGHVRIVRFLHW\ ZKLFK PD\ EH JLYHQ DV D FRQGLWLRQ RI PLQG.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

 RU VHOIFKRVHQ RXW RI FRQYLFWLRQ IURP NQRZOHGJHSHUFHSWLRQDQGLQWXLWLRQ.

QWHUDFWLQJVSDFHVDUHVSDFHVZKLFKSURPRWHV WKHDFWLYLW\ LQWHUDFWLRQ RUZKLFKVWLPXODWHV GLDORJXHHLWKHUEHWZHHQDSHUVRQDQGSHUVRQSHRSOHRUEHWZHHQDVSDFHDQGDSHUVRQZKLFK LVH[SUHVVHGLQGLIIHUHQWIRUPVRIFRPPXQLFDWLRQV  .Q .QGLDQ FXOWXUH UHPDUNDEOH IRUPV RI LQWHUDFWLQJ VSDFHV ZKHUH ODUJH QXPEHU RI SHRSOH FRPHWRJHWKHU.  .

DUHWHPSOHFRPSOH[HVFKRZNV LHVWUHHWMXQFWLRQV.

FRXUW\DUGVHWF  7KHUHDUHHQRUPRXVIRUPVRILQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHVLQ.QGLDQFXOWXUHIURPDQFLHQWWLPHZKLFK IXQFWLRQHGLQPDQ\ZD\V PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

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

B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.QWURGXFWLRQ 7KHVH DUH WKH H[SUHVVLRQV JHQHUDWHG DQG DUH LQ EHWZHHQ SHRSOH  :KHQ ZH VD\ SHRSOH  ZH FRQVLGHUDIDFHOHVVKXPDQEHLQJEXWWKHLQGLYLGXDOZKRFRQVWLWXWHVSHRSOHKDVGHILQLWHLGHQWLW\KLV LQGLYLGXDOLGHRORJ\$QLQGLYLGXDOUHSUHVHQWVFHUWDLQVRFLDOVWDWXVDJHJURXSHFRQRPLFSRVLWLRQDQG FXOWXUH $FFRUGLQJ WR DOO WKHVH IDFWRUV KLV EHKDYLRU DQG SV\FKRORJ\ FDQ EH DQDO\]HG DQG WKLV DQDO\VLV ZLOO FHUWDLQO\ KHOS XV LQ GHVLJQLQJ ZHOOXVHG SXEOLF SODFH 3ODFHV FDQ EH SODQQHG IRU LQWHUDFWLRQZKLFKLVDVRFLDOQHHGRIHYHU\SHUVRQ  PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .QGLD ZKLFKUHIOHFWVWKHYDULRXVDVSHFWVRIFXOWXUHZKLFKDUHPXOWLYDOHQWVSDFHVWKDWIXQFWLRQHGLQ PDQ\ZD\V .17(5$&7.ARCH  7KHUHDUHGLIIHUHQWDVSHFWVRIFXOWXUH 7KHVLVZLOOLQFOXGHWKHVWXG\RIFOLPDWHDVSHFWIRUPLQJFXOWXUHWUDGLWLRQEHFDXVHFXOWXUHLV OLIH VW\OH KDYLQJ WUDGLWLRQ DV LWV ERUGHU DQG WKH LQIOXHQFHV DQG LQYDVLRQV ZKLFK PDGH WKH FXOWXUHWRFKDQJH 7KHVWXG\ZLOODQDO\]HWKHLQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHXQIROGLQJGLIIHUHQWFKDUDFWHUVRIFXOWXUH 7KLV WKHVLV ZLOO DLP DWFRPSDUDWLYH VWXG\ RI LQIOXHQFH RI FKDQJLQJ FXOWXUH RYHU LQWHUDFWLQJ VSDFHV  'HOLPLWDWLRQV 7KH LQWHUDFWLQJ VSDFHV KDYLQJ FXOWXUDO LPSDFW DUH WHPSOHV JKDWV ED]DDUV FKRZNV DQG PDQ\RWKHUV7KHWUDYHORIVXFKVSDFHVWLOOWRGD\ VFRQWH[WLVVKRZQ %XWZLWKLQWLPHFRQVWUDLQWVWKHWKHVLVIRFXVHVRQO\H[SUHVVLRQVRIGLIIHUHQWFXOWXUHVLQ.2Q .

QLQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHVWRUHVWUHFUHDWHRULQWHUDFWLQIRUPDOVHWWLQJVSHRSOHGRQRWIROORZDQ\UROHEXW VXEFRQVFLRXVO\WKH\IROORZFHUWDLQEHKDYLRXUDOSDWWHUQDQGWKHVHSDWWHUQVDUHVRPHWLPHVW\SLFDOIRU FHUWDLQSHUVRQV     +XPDQEHKDYLRXU PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.WLVQHFHVVDU\WRXQGHUVWDQGWKHSHRSOHIRUZKRPWKHVSDFHVDUHPHDQW6SDFHVDUHNQRZQPRVWO\ WKURXJK WKH DFWLYLWLHV WKH\ VXVWDLQ 7KH VSDFHV DUHLGHQWLILHG E\ KXPDQ SDUWLFLSDWLRQ DQG DFWLYLWLHV 7KH VSDFHV GR QRW KDYH DQ\ PHDQLQJ ZLWKRXW LWV XVHUV 7KH DFWLYLWLHV DQG EHKDYLRXU UHIOHFWV D SHUVRQ VHYDOXDWLRQVKLVQHHGVDQGEHOLHIV    3HRSOH .QHYHU\IRUPDOVHWWLQJHDFKLQGLYLGXDOLVSHUIRUPLQJDUROH(DFKSDUWLFLSDQWKDVDVSHFLILHGSODFHWR EHGXULQJZRUNLQJKRXUVDQGWKHLQWHUDFWLRQEHWZHHQLQGLYLGXDOVLVLQDUHSHWLWLYHIRUPDW%XWSHRSOH ZDQWIUHHGRPIURPWKHLUUROHVLQIRUPDOVHWWLQJDQGZDQWWRLQWHUDFWZLWKRWKHUVDQGJHWUHOD[HG $OWKRXJKWKH\GRQRWIRUJHWWKHLUUROHVEXWWKHVWULFWUXOHVRIEHKDYLRXULVORRVHQHGDWKRPHDWSXEOLF SODFHVDWLQWHUDFWLQJSODFHV .ARCH 2QHFDQH[SUHVVDUFKLWHFWXUHDVDVHUYLFHWREHUHQGHUHGIRUZHOOEHLQJRIDKXPDQEHLQJ7KHUHIRUH GHDOLQJZLWKDUFKLWHFWXUHLVDWWHPSWLQJWRFUHDWHDQHQYLURQPHQWZKHUHWKHRFFXSDQWFDQSHUIRUPKLV IXQFWLRQZHOOZKHUHKHFDQSURGXFHTXDOLW\LQHYHU\HVVHQFHLQWKHEHWWHUPHQWRIVRFLHW\  .B.

QWKHVSDFH RQHFDQSHUIRUPKLVGXWLHVDERXWKLPVHOILQDQ\ZD\          .OOXVWUDWLRQ)RUPLQDVSDFH   $OVR KXPDQ EHLQJ LV PRUH UHOD[HG LQ D VSDFH KDYLQJ VHQVH RI DQ HQFORVXUH +H QHHGV D VSDFH WR UHODWH     PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH (YHU\LQGLYLGXDOKDVKLVRZQ SDUWLFXODUUHVSRQVHGHVLUHVDQG RXWORRN7KXV KXPDQQHHGV FKDQJHVDQGDFFRUGLQJO\VSDFHUHTXLUHPHQWVDOVRFKDQJHV  +XPDQEHLQJLVDIRUPH[LVWLQJLQVSDFH6RWREHLGHQWLILHGQHHGVVSDFHDURXQGKLP.

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

W LV SRVVLEOH WR SORW DOO WKH SRVVLEOH SK\VLFDO UHODWLRQVKLS EHWZHHQ RQH DQG HDFK SHUVRQ $ SHUVRQ PD\ VWDQG RU VLW IRU ZRUN VLW IRU UHOD[DWLRQWRLQWHUDFWRUVOHHS  7KHVDPHSRVLWLRQVFDQEHUHSHDWHGIRUWZRSHRSOHWKUHHSHRSOHDQGVRRQ%XWLQIDFWDOOWKHVHDUH WKHRUHWLFDOO\SRVVLEOHLIZHGRQRWFRQVLGHUVRFLDOUXOHVRIEHKDYLRXU  7KXVWKHVHFRQGDVSHFWRIUHODWLRQVKLSFDQQRWHDVLO\EHVKRZQJUDSKLFDOO\7KLVDVSHFWLVWKHVRFLDO PRUHV WKDW JRYHUQ DFFHSWDEOH EHKDYLRXU EHWZHHQ SDUWLFLSDQWV GHSHQGLQJ RQ QXPEHU DQG PRGH (DFKRIWKHPRGHVDQGHDFKRIWKHVL]HJURXSVKDYHUHDVRQDEO\ZHOOGHILQHGVRFLDOFRQQRWDWLRQV  .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.OOXVWUDWLRQ5HODWLRQRIDFWLYLW\DQGNLQGRIVSDFH     6RPHDFWLYLWLHVDUHIRUPDOO\VWUXFWXUHGDQGRWKHUVDUHLQIRUPDOO\:KHQWKHVWUXFWXUHLVXQZULWWHQD FRPPRQ XQGHUVWDQGLQJ RI WKH UXOHV LV RI JUHDWHU LPSRUWDQFH .WLVXVHIXOWRGLVFRYHULQVRFLDODFWLYLWLHVWKHLUVRFLDOSDWWHUQV2QFHDFWLYLWLHVDUHVHHQLQWKHLUIXOO GLPHQVLRQV DV H[SUHVVLRQ RI FXOWXUDO QRUPV DV ZHOO DV XVHIXO DFWLRQV WKH\ FRPPXQLFDWH PHDQLQJ DVLGHIURPWKHDUFKLWHFWXUDOVHWWLQJ  PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .ARCH $FWLYLW\ 3ULYDWHVSDFH  $FWLYLW\ 3XEOLFVSDFH .B.

QWHUDFWLRQ PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .ARCH 2QH PXVW EH DZDUH RI WKH VRFLDO PRUHV DFWLYH LQ WKH VLWXDWLRQ $OVR RQH PXVW SUHVXSSRVH WKH EDFNJURXQGRIWKHSDUWLFLSDQW    %DFNJURXQG 7KHEDFNJURXQGRILQGLYLGXDOPD\EHGHWHUPLQHGE\QRUPVRIHGXFDWLRQMREH[SHULHQFHDQGVWDWXV DQGVRRQ  7KHDFFHSWDEOHEHKDYLRXURISHUVRQLQVRFLHW\LVEDVHGRQFHUWDLQJRDOWKDWKHZDQWVWRDFKLHYH$ SHUVRQFDQQRWEHGHILQHGE\DQ\RQHVLWXDWLRQRUDFWLYLW\DORQH  +HQHHGVYDULRXVNLQGVRIIXOILOPHQWHJ o o o  7KHJRDOVDQGWKHLUIXOILOPHQWFDQQRWEHGLYRUFHGLQDVHWWOLQJ   3K\VLFDOVHFXULW\ 7KHH[SUHVVLRQRIVSRQWDQHLW\ 7KHVHFXULQJDQGPDLQWDLQLQJRIPHPEHUVKLSLQDGHILQLWHKXPDQJURXS  .B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.WFDQEHYHUEDO LHH[SUHVVLQJLQWKHIRUPRIYHUEDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQRU RWKHUIRUPRIH[SUHVVLRQ.ARCH $Q\IRUPRIPHHWLQJZKLFKVWLPXODWHVPXWXDORUUHFLSURFDOUHDFWLRQDPRQJVWWZRSHRSOHRUJURXSRI SHRSOHLVFDOOHGLQWHUDFWLRQ.

RUYLVXDO  .W FDQ EH D GLDORJXH EHWZHHQ WZR SHUVRQV RU LQ EHWZHHQ D SHUVRQDQGDJURXSRISHUVRQVRUDSHUVRQZLWKVHOI  0DQLVDVRFLDODQLPDO+LVQHHGWRLQWHUDFWZLWKSHRSOHLVFRQVWDQWDQGRPQLSUHVHQW9HU\UDUHO\FDQ OLYHZLWKRXWFRPSDQ\0RUHRYHUPHHWLQJQHZSHRSOHDQGH[SRVXUHWRGLIIHUHQWLGHDVLVHVVHQWLDOIRU DZHOOSHUVRQDOLW\  6LQFHDJHVSHRSOHKDYHEHHQJDWKHULQJDQGLQWHUDFWLQJDWGLIIHUHQWSODFHVOLNHZHOOVWHPSOHVXQGHU WUHHV FKRZNV URDG MXQFWLRQV.QWHUDFWLRQ LV WKH GLDORJXH LQ EHWZHHQ .

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

ARCH VWD\DORQH+HKDVWRKDYHWKHUHODWLRQZLWKWKHSHRSOHLQWHUHVWHGLQWKHVDPHILHOGKLVIDPLO\IULHQGV DQGRWKHUIDPLOLDUSHUVRQV  )URP DQFLHQW WLPH WKH KRXVLQJ V\VWHP IRUP WKH SDWWHUQ ZKHUH PRUH LPSRUWDQFH EHLQJ JLYHQ WR VRFLDO PDWWHU 7KH KRXVHV IURQWV IDFH HDFK RWKHU VR DV WR KDYH YDULRXV W\SHV RI FRQQHFWLRQV OLNH YLVXDODXGLRDQGFRQYHUVDWLRQZLWKWKHSHRSOHRIRXWVLGHZRUOG  %\ SURPRWLQJ LQWHUDFWLRQ RQH OHDUQV WR OLYH LQ DPHQLW\ VKDULQJ WRJHWKHU WKH GD\WRGD\ VWUXJJOHV DQG MR\V IDFLQJ WRJHWKHU WKH SUREOHPV RI OLIH DQG WKXV OHDUQV WR DSSUHFLDWH DQG XQGHUVWDQG HDFK RWKHU VSRLQWRIYLHZ  6RWKHQHFHVVLW\RILQWHUDFWLRQLVWKHUHIRUDKXPDQEHLQJDQGZLOOUHPDLQIRUHYHU    &ODVVLILFDWLRQDFFRUGLQJ WRVRFLDOFODVVHV 3HRSOH DOZD\V RULHQW WKHPVHOYHV LQ WHUPV RI WKHLU SRVLWLRQ LQ VRFLHW\ DQG WKH SODFHV RI RWKHUV 3HRSOHFRPSDUHZLWKRWKHUVKLVVWDWXVDQGWKHVWDWXVRIWKHRWKHUV7KHSDWWHUQVRIWKHDFFHSWDEOH EHKDYLRXU FRYHU HYHU\ DVSHFW RI GUHVV SODFH  DFWLRQ  %HKDYLRXU RID SHUVRQ LQ SDUWLFXODU VHW RI VXUURXQGLQJFDQEHJXHVVHGDFFRUGLQJWRRQHVHFRQRPLFDOHGXFDWLRQDOVRFLDOVWDQGLQJLQVRFLHW\  6RFLHW\FDQEHGLYLGHGEURDGO\LQWRWKUHHFODVVHV  PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.

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

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.17(5$&7.1*63$&(6 %XVVWRSVFDQWHHQVSDUNVPD\EHFDOOHGDVW\SLFDOLQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHVIRUWKLVLQFRPHJURXS3LFQLF VSRWVUHFUHDWLRQDODUHDVDUHQRZEHFRPLQJSRSXODUSODFHVIRULQWHUDFWLRQ7KHVHDUHWKHPDMRUXVHUV RIWKHVHVSDFHVZKLFKDUHSXEOLFLQQDWXUH  +LJKHULQFRPHJURXS 7KLVFDQEHFDOOHGDVFUHDPOD\HURIVRFLHW\3HRSOHLQWKLVJURXSOLNHWROLYHLVRODWHIURPUHVWRIWKH VRFLHW\DQGZDQWVWRLQWHUDFWZLWKWKHSHRSOHRIWKHVDPHVRFLDOVWDWXV  D%(+$9.1*63$&(6 &OXEVJ\PVUHFUHDWLRQDOSDUNVSLFQLFVSRWVDUHLQWHUDFWLQJVSDFHVIRUWKLVJURXS7KHFKDUDFWHURI WKHLULGHDDERXWSXEOLFVSDFHGLIIHUVLQPDQ\ZD\V7KH\XVHSXEOLFSODFHVOLNHFRPPHUFLDOSOD]DV UHFUHDWLRQDOSDUNVZKLFKDUHULFKO\PDLQWDLQHG7KHVHSHRSOHIHHOPRUHFRPIRUWDEOHLQIRUPDONLQGRI DWPRVSKHUH  PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .17(5$&7.25 7KH\ VSHQG RQ UHFUHDWLRQDO IDFLOLWLHV PRUH .B.ARCH  D%(+$9.W LV VWDWXV V\PERO IRU WKHP 7KH\ DUH OHVV SURQH WR LQWHUDFWLRQZLWKRWKHUVDQGOLNHSULYDF\  E.25 7KHLU EHKDYLRXU ZLWK RWKHUV LV QRW DJJUHVVLYH  7KH\ PL[ ZLWK WKH RWKHUV RIWKH VDPHFODVV  7KH\ ZDQWUHFUHDWLRQDIWHUWKHZKROHGD\RRIILFHZRUN7KHSODFHVIRUGLIIHUHQWDJHJURXSVPD\RUPD\ QRWEHGLIIHUHQW7KH\ORYHLQIRUPDOHQYLURQPHQWEXWFDQVXLWLQLQIRUPDOHQYLURQPHQW*LYHVPRUH LPSRUWDQFHWRIDPLO\  E.

B.ARCH      &ODVVLILFDWLRQDFFRUGLQJ WRDJHJURXSV $VWKHEHKDYLRXURIWKHXVHUZLOOGHSHQGXSRQLWVVRFLDOSRVLWLRQLIDOVRGHSHQGVXSRQWRZKLFKDJH JURXSVKHVKHEHORQJVWR7KHGLIIHUHQWDJHJURXSVKDYHGLIIHUHQWSK\VLFDODQGSV\FKRORJLFDOQHHGV 7KHLUEHKDYLRXUDQGUHDFWLRQVWRFHUWDLQHQYLURQPHQWFDQEHFDOOHGW\SLFDOIRUWKDWDJHJURXS  &KLOGUHQ XSWR\HDUV.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.

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

17(5$&7.1*63$&(6 7KHUHDUHYHU\OHVVVSDFHVIRUWKHVHDJHJURXSV$OOVXFKVSDFHVGHVLJQHGIRUFKLOGUHQDUHIRUVFKRRO JRLQJLHHOGHUFKLOGUHQ7KH\DUHIRUFHGWRSOD\LQKRXVH  +RZHYHUFU©FKHDQGGD\FDUHFHQWUHVDUHWKHQHHGRIWRGD\ VFXOWXUHRIWKHFLW\7KHUHPD\H[LVWV SULYDWHFU©FKHDQGGD\FDUHFHQWUHEXWDUHQRWGHVLJQHGFRQVLGHULQJWKHVSHFLDOQHHGVDQGWKH\GR QRWVXSSRUWFUHDWLYHDQGLPDJLQDWLYHSOD\  &KLOGUHQ WR.ARCH 7KH\QHHGFRPIRUWDEOHPLFURFOLPDWH7KH\QHHGWREHSURWHFWHGIURPKDUVKVXQDQGKLJKYHORFLW\RI ZLQG 7KRXJK WKH\ DUH IXOO\ LQYROYHG DQG FRPSOHWHO\ HQJURVVHG LQ WKHLU SOD\ WKH\ QHHG SDUHQWV WHDFKHUVRUVRPHRQHWRZKRPFKLOGNQRZLQWKHDWPRVSKHUHVWUDQJHRUXQNQRZQWRWKHFKLOG            F  .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.

 7KHVHDUHVFKRROJRLQJFKLOGUHQSK\VLFDOO\VHOIVXIILFLHQW7KHVHFKLOGUHQGRQHHGVRFLDOLQWHUDFWLRQ 7KHFUHDWLRQRIDQHQYLURQPHQWWKDWORRNVJRRGLQSODQEXWWKDWGRHVQRWPHDVXUHXSDVDSHUVRQ PRYHVWKURXJKLW :KHQGHVLJQLQJIRUFKLOGUHQVSHFLDODWWHQWLRQQHHGVWREHSDLGWRWKHLUH\HOHYHODVWKH\ZDONUXQ FOLPERUFUDZOWKURXJKWKHSOD\\DUG  PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

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

[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.ARCH  0LGGOHDJHG .

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

OOXVWUDWLRQ.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH 'HSHQGLQJRQWKHQDWXUHRIWKHLQWHUDFWLRQLWFRXOGEHFODVVLILHGLQWRIROORZLQJWZR  )RUPDOLQWHUDFWLRQ )RUPDO LQWHUDFWLRQV DUH JHQHUDOO\ SUHSODQQHG VFKHGXOHG DQG RUJDQL]HG 0DQ\ WLPHV LW LV WKH RQH ZD\ GLDORJXH LH JURXS LV LQWHUDFWLQJ RU UHVSRQGLQJ WR VLPLODU VHW RI FRQGLWLRQV HJ WKHDWUH IRU SHUIRUPLQJDUWVRUDSOD\ .B.

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

        PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .ARCH           Illustration-3 Formal interaction in an informal space.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.

OOXVWUDWLRQ.ARCH .[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.B.QIRUPDOLQWHUDFWLRQ PD\QRWEHSUHSODQQHG.

       $UFKLWHFWXUH DVUHODWLRQVKLS PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .

Q RUGHU WR LQWHUDFW ZLWK DQ\WKLQJ RXWVLGH KLP PDQ UHTXLUHV DQ DSSURSULDWHHQYLURQPHQW%RWKWKHVHQHHGVDUHVDWLVILHGE\WKHDFWRIDUFKLWHFWXUH   7KXVDUFKLWHFWXUHSURYLGHVKLPZLWKWKHPD[LPXPRSSRUWXQLW\IRULQWHUDFWLRQVWRRFFXUZKLFKPD\ EHLQWKHIRUPRIYHUEDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQRUMXVWWKURXJKYLVXDOUHOLHI  $QRWKHUTXDOLW\RIPDQGLUHFWO\RSSRVLQJWRKLVQHHGRILQWHUDFWLRQDQGHTXDOO\XQLYHUVDOLVKLVQHHG IRUSULYDF\DQGVHFXULW\ZKLFKFDQEHDSODFHIRULQWHUDFWLRQZLWKKLP  0DQ V QHHG IRU LQWHUDFWLRQ ZLWK RWKHU SHRSOH GHPDQGV VSDFHV ZKLFK DUH SXEOLF LQ QDWXUH DQG KLV QHHGIRUSULYDF\GHPDQGVDUHODWLYHO\VHFOXGHGVSDFH  6RZKLOHGHVLJQLQJVXFKVSDFHVDUFKLWHFWXUHZLOOKHOSLQPDNLQJWKHFKDUDFWHURIWKHVSDFHZKLFK ZLOOHQKDQFHWKHGLDORJXHEHWZHHQSHRSOHZKHUHWKH\FDQIHHOUHOD[HG      PRACHI SUDHIR SHAH .B.[A LANDMARK RECREATIONAL AND ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER ] 5TH YR.ARCH 7KH VSDFH LQ ZKLFK KXPDQ EHLQJ H[LVW FKDQJHV FRQWLQXRXVO\ (YHU\ WLPH D SHUVRQ UHDFWV ZLWK KLV VXUURXQGLQJTXDOLW\RIVSDFHYDULHV7KHIRUHPRVWRIWKHVHTXDOLWLHVVKDUHGE\DOOWKDWPDQFDQQRW H[LVWLQLVRODWLRQ  +LV OLIH LV EDVHG RQ LQWHUDFWLRQV .

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful