You are on page 1of 8

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 'The compilation of the dissertation in the present form would not have been possible but for

the valuable guidance, assistance, encouragement and contribution of various people at different stages of time. I am grateful to my guide, MS. AMIE MOULIK who helped me to organize my thoughts, work and study so as to compile this project report. It was due to her constant guidance and support that I was able to study the topic in a detailed and analytical manner. Idea
he idea of having my own eatery had been simmering in my mind for a decade, but it took me a year to refine and serve it. Months of brainstorming and sweating it out paid off when I opened my first outlet, Goli Vada Pav, at Kalyan, Mumbai, in 2004. I began my career as a management trainee , in 1989, in what is now the Centurion Bank. After four years, I set up a financial services firm, Balaji Corporate Services. Since one of the services included raising funds for retailers, I got a chance to study the trials and tribulations of running a retail chain. During all these years, I knew I wanted to start my own business, but it was only in 1995 that I decided which field it would bethe food industry. I toyed with several ideas but kept procrastinating as I didn't believe the financial climate was conducive to starting a business. The impetus finally came from a neighbour, who was the then CEO of Kellogg's India. "No matter what we do, Indians prefer desi food," he once told me. This got me thinking about the vast opportunity in ethnic

food, especially if one were to consider the population of more than a 100 crore. If I could target even a fraction of this populace, the profit could be huge. The important question was: what should I serve? I wanted it to be finger food, something that could be eaten easily on the move. I whittled down the choice to idli and vada pav, finally settling on the latter. During the incubation period, if I mentioned the idea to anyone, they would snigger and ask, "Goli de rahe ho (are you pulling my leg)?" As a fitting response to this mockery, I named my venture Goli Vada Pav. By January 2003, the blueprint was ready. Besides my family, the only person who supported me through this and eventually joined hands with me was Shivdas Menon, an old friend and colleague. Menon and I put a huge chunk of our savings in the venture and also borrowed money from friends and relatives. We invested Rs1 crore to buy equipment and a van, and build a 500-sq-ft kitchen at Dombivli. We hired 20 people to handle the kitchen, eatery and transportation. For the next one year, we visited every vada pav vendor to get the taste of our product right. We would surreptitiously ask them the number of pavs they sold every day to get an estimate of their sales. The first few years were financially tough as is the case with all startups.

It is many things to many people -- it is simple, tasty, and yes, very cheap. But it is certainly not the stuff of dreams, especially the global kind. What then was Jumbo King's inspiration for weaving an entire fast food chain around this very inconspicuous product, namely, the vada pav?

imple actually. Here was a product available at almost every nook and

corner of Mumbai, hugely popular and selling for as little as Rs 5. But the people selling it had absolutely no vision for putting any kind of consistency or expertise around it. In many ways, vada pav resembled the burger sold in the United States for just 15 cents before McDonald's made a grand appearance and decided to throw their might behind it. Instinctively, we sensed a huge opportunity in this product, which could be branded, had mass appeal and was already selling in the city. We knew we were taking a big risk. With Mumbai and Thane alone

consuming nearly 18 to 20 lakh (1.8 to 2 million) units of vada pav a day and stiff competition, mainly from the street, why would people come to us? Only because we were selling to people a product they were already consuming every day, but with an important value add -- hygiene. Mumbais very own burger. The vada is made of a spicy potato filling deep fried in a gram flour batter. Along with a hot and spicy garlic chutney, it is served inside a small "Laddi Pav". I have fond memories of sharing a vada pav with my son while travelling on a business trip to Vapi by train. Although vada pav is a Maharashtrian dish, I was surprised to find it popular even in Gujarat. Another travelling ritual on my frequent drives to Pune is to stop at a small caf on the highway to grab a quick vada pav and a steaming hot cup of masala tea that chases away all my travel fatigue

Add your private note


Preparation Time: 10 mins. Cooking Time: 30 mins. makes 8 pieces. Show me for servings

Ingredients
8 ladi pavs (small squares of white bread) 1 recipe Dry Garlic Chutney

For the vada filling


1 1/2 cups boiled and mashed potatoes 2 green chillies, chopped 1 1/2 tbsp grated garlic 1 tsp mustard seeds ( rai / sarson) 1/4 tsp asafoetida (hing) 6 to 8 curry leaves (kadi patta) 1/2 tsp turmeric powder (haldi) 1 tbsp oil

For the outer covering


3/4 cup besan (Bengal gram flour) 1/4 tsp turmeric powder (haldi) a pinch of baking soda

1 tsp oil
salt to taste

Other ingredients
oil for deep-frying

Method

For the vada fillling


Pound the green chillies, ginger and garlic using a mortar and pestle. Heat the oil and add the mustard seeds. When they crackle, add the asafoetida and curry leaves and saut for a few seconds. Add the pounded mixture and saut again for a few seconds. Add the potatoes, turmeric powder and salt and mix well. Remove from the fire and cool. Divide into 8 equal portions. Shape into rounds.

For the outer covering


Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and make a batter using approximately 1/3 cup of water. Dip each round of the vada filling into the batter and allow it to coat the mixture well . Deep fry in hot oil, till golden brown. Drain on absorbent paper and keep aside.

How to proceed
Slice each pav into half and spread some dry garlic chutney inside. Place one vada in each pav and serve immediately.

Tips
Laddi pavs are small square shaped white bread rolls which are available at local bakeries.

You can also use bread roll or slices if the pav is not available. RECIPE SOURCE : Chaat

Receipt

batata vada and vada pav


Serving size - 4

Ingredients
Filling 6-8 medium sized boiled potatoes pav ( A kind of bun, In India it is known as Pav) - If pavs are not available, you can use any other bun. Pick the unsweetened and rough rolls. Masala 1 small piece ginger, 4-5 flakes garlic, 4-5 (or more) green chilies, 1/2 cup cilantro/coriander leaves (chopped), Tempering 1 teaspoon turmeric powder, 8-10 curry leaves, 2 teaspoon mustard seeds, 1/4 tsp asafoetida, 1 tbsp oil Cover 2 cups gram flour (besan), approx. 1 cup water, 1 tsp turmeric powder, 1 tsp chili powder(optional), salt to taste oil for frying

Method

1.Grind ginger, garlic and green chilies together into a paste. 2.Peel and mash potatoes with a potato masher (or simply use hands). Do not mash completely. Let some small chunks remain. 3.Add ginger, garlic and green chili paste, coriander leaves, and salt to the potatoes. 4.Put 1 tbsp oil in a pan/kadai. Add mustard seeds. When they splutter, add turmeric powder and curry leaves. Pour this tempering over the mashed potatoes and mix gently. 5.Make small balls of mashed potato mixture. (You can flatten the balls if you like) 6.Add some salt, turmeric powder and chili powder to the gram flour. Add water gradually and keep mixing with a spoon or wire whisk. Remove lumps if any. The batter should not be too watery or too thick. If lifted by a spatula, it should flow in a ribbon like consistency. 7.Heat some oil in a pan. To check if oil is heated enough, drop some batter in the oil. If the batter immediately floats on the surface of the oil, the oil is ready. Also make sure that the oil is not too hot. Else, the vadas turn dark from the outside before they are actually done from the inside. 8.Now dip each ball in the batter, letting the excess batter drip off and slowly add to the hot oil. Do not overcrowd the pan, or the temperature of the oil reduces which in turn slows down the frying process. Like this, fry all the vadas until golden. Remove on a paper towel and drain. Batata Vadas are ready. 9.For Vada Pav, split Pav keeping the base intact and spread garlic chutney or green chutney inside it. Place the vada in it. Serve hot.

Ingredients: Serving size - 4 6-8 medium sized boiled potatoes 2 cups gram flour (besan) oil for frying salt pav ( A kind of bun) - If pavs are not available, you can use any other bun. Choose the ones which do not taste sweet. Masala 1 small piece ginger, 4-5 flakes garlic, 4-5 (or more) green chilies, 1/2 cup coriander leaves (chopped), For tempering 1 tea spoon turmeric powder, curry leaves, 1 teaspoon mustard seeds, 2 teaspoon oil Method: 1. Grind ginger, garlic and green chilies together into a paste. 2. Peel and smash potatoes with a potato masher (or simply use hands). Do not smash completely. Let some small chunks remain. 3. Add ginger, garlic and green chili paste, coriander leaves, and salt to the potatoes. 4. Then take 2

teaspoons oil in a kadai. Add mustard seeds. When they splutter, add turmeric powder and curry leaves. Pour this tempering on the mashed potatoes and mix gently. 5. Make small balls of mashed potato mixture. (You can flatten the balls if you like) 6. Add some salt, turmeric powder and chili powder to the gram flour. Add water gradually and keep mixing with a sppon or wire whisk. Remove lumps if any. The batter should not be too watery or too thick. If lifted by a spatula, it should flow in a ribbon like consistency. 7. Heat some oil in a pan. To check if oil is properly heated, drop some batter in the oil. If the batter immediately turns soild and float on the surface of the oil, the oil is ready. Also make sure that the oil is not too hot. Otherwise, the vadas become dark from the outside before they are actually done from the inside. 8. Now dip each ball in the batter, letting the excess batter drip off and slowly add to the hot oil. Do not overcrowd the pan, else the temperature of the oil reduces which in turn slows down the frying process. Like this, deep fry all the vadas until golden. Remove on a paper towel and drain. Batata Vadas are ready. 9. For Vada Pav, split Pav keeping the base intact & spread garlic chutney or green chutney on the inner surfaces of it. Place the vada in it. Serve hot. Tip: Instead of adding whole curry leaves, you can grind them along with the ginger- garlic paste to bring out their flavor. Variation: Substitute 1 tsp udad dal (split black gram) for mustard seeds in the tempering.

Read more: http://www.awesomecuisine.com/recipes/137/1/VadaPav/Page1.html#ixzz1h6vFOvCT

Limitations..

vada pav (Marathi: ) , sometimes spelled wada pav, is a popular vegetarian fast food dish native to the Indian state of Maharashtra. It consists of a batata vada sandwiched between 2 slices of a pav. The compound word batata vada refers in Marathi and Gujarati to a vada made out of batata, the latter referring to a potato. Pav refers to unsweetened bread or bun and may be etymologically related to the Portuguese word for bread - Po[citation needed] (and batata is the Portuguese word for potato). Vada pav was supposedly devised by snack vendor Ashok Vaidya outside Dadar station in 1971.[1]

inely cut green chilies and ginger and a phodani (tempering) of mustard seeds and turmeric are added to a mash of boiled potatoes, and after dipping patties of the mash in an herb-seasoned batter of gram flour, the patties are deep-fried. Vada pav is typically served with a chutney (sauce) which is commonly made out of shredded coconut meat, tamarind pulp, and garlic. Variations of the above basic dish include "cheese vada pav" (where slices of cheese are added); there is "schezwan vada pav" (where the pav is layered with schezwan sauce); "samosa pav" (where a "samosa" is used instead of a vada); and "Jain vada pav" (where vada ingredients do not include onions, garlic and potatoes). Vada pav served in the nearby state of Gujarat is usually fried in Butter or edible Oil. The Pav is first fried in a mixture of Butter or Oil and dried red chilly powder. After that the chutney is applied in the hot fried Pav and the Vada is placed in between. This is the only difference between Vada pav in Gujarat and Maharashtra. In the state of Gujarat, the original unfried Vada Pav recipe is referred to as "Bombay Vada Pav". This dish was initially started as the most cheapest form of a meal for low income group, but due to its taste, this dish became so popular that many sophisticated hotels also have started dishing out this wonderful dish, at extra cost of course. However, this dish has still retained its charm as an evergreen dish, and many people have it at breakfast, lunch or even dinner as well.