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Example of Ballad Poetry: The Mermaid by Author Unknown 'Twas Friday morn when we set sail, And we had

not got far from land, When the Captain, he spied a lovely mermaid, With a comb and a glass in her hand. Chorus Oh the ocean waves may roll, And the stormy winds may blow, While we poor sailors go skipping aloft And the land lubbers lay down below, below, below And the land lubbers lay down below. Then up spoke the Captain of our gallant ship, And a jolly old Captain was he; "I have a wife in Salem town, But tonight a widow she will be." (Chorus) (Chorus) Then up spoke the Cook of our gallant ship, And a greasy old Cook was he; "I care more for my kettles and my pots, Than I do for the roaring of the sea." (Chorus) Then up spoke the Cabin-boy of our gallant ship, And a dirty little brat was he; "I have friends in Boston town That don't care a ha' penny for me." (Chorus) Then three times 'round went our gallant ship, And three times 'round went she, And the third time that she went 'round She sank to the bottom of the sea.

An example of lyric poetry: I Felt a Funeral in my Brain by Emily Dickinson I felt a Funeral, in my Brain, And Mourners to and fro Kept treading - treading - till it seemed That Sense was breaking through And when they all were seated, A Service, like a Drum Kept beating - beating - till I thought My Mind was going numb - And then I heard them lift a Box And creak across my Soul With those same Boots of Lead, again, Then Space - began to toll, As all the Heavens were a Bell, And Being, but an Ear, And I, and Silence, some strange Race Wrecked, solitary, here And then a Plank in Reason, broke, And I dropped down, and down And hit a World, at every plunge, And Finished knowing - then -

Example of Prose poetry: Toad, hog, assassin, mirror by Larry Levis Toad, hog, assassin, mirror. Some of its favorite words, which are breath. Or handwriting: the long tail of the y disappearing into a barn like a rodents, and suddenly it is winter after all. After all what? After the ponds dry up in mid-August and the children drop pins down each canyon and listen for an echo. An example of Haiku: None is travelling by Basho None is travelling Here along this way but I, This autumn evening. The first day of the year: thoughts come - and there is loneliness; the autumn dusk is here. An old pond A frog jumps in Splash! Lightening Heron's cry Stabs the darkness An example of an Epic Poetry: Hiawatha's Departure from The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow By the shore of Gitchie Gumee, By the shining Big-Sea-Water, At the doorway of his wigwam, In the pleasant Summer morning, Hiawatha stood and waited. All the air was full of freshness, All the earth was bright and joyous, And before him through the sunshine, Westward toward the neighboring forest Passed in golden swarms the Ahmo, Passed the bees, the honey-makers, Burning, singing in the sunshine. Bright above him shown the heavens, Level spread the lake before him; From its bosom leaped the sturgeon, Aparkling, flashing in the sunshine; On its margin the great forest Stood reflected in the water, Every tree-top had its shadow, Motionless beneath the water. From the brow of Hiawatha Gone was every trace of sorrow, As the fog from off the water, And the mist from off the meadow. With a smile of joy and triumph, With a look of exultation, As of one who in a vision Sees what is to be, but is not, Stood and waited Hiawatha. Clouds come from time to time and bring to men a chance to rest from looking at the moon. In the cicada's cry There's no sign that can foretell How soon it must die. Poverty's child he starts to grind the rice, and gazes at the moon. Won't you come and see loneliness? Just one leaf from the kiri tree. Temple bells die out. The fragrant blossoms remain. A perfect evening!

An example of Narrative Poetry: John Barleycorn by Robert Burns

There was three kings into the east, Three kings both great and high, And they hae sworn a solemn oath John Barleycorn should die. They took a plough and plough'd him down, Put clods upon his head, And they hae sworn a solemn oath John Barleycorn was dead. But the cheerful Spring came kindly on, And show'rs began to fall; John Barleycorn got up again, And sore surpris'd them all. The sultry suns of Summer came, And he grew thick and strong, His head weel arm'd wi' pointed spears, That no one should him wrong. The sober Autumn enter'd mild, When he grew wan and pale; His bending joints and drooping head Show'd he began to fail. His coulour sicken'd more and more, He faded into age; And then his enemies began To show their deadly rage. They've taen a weapon, long and sharp, And cut him by the knee; Then ty'd him fast upon a cart, Like a rogue for forgerie. They laid him down upon his back, And cudgell'd him full sore; They hung him up before the storm, And turn'd him o'er and o'er.

They filled up a darksome pit With water to the brim, They heaved in John Barleycorn, There let him sink or swim. They laid him out upon the floor, To work him farther woe, And still, as signs of life appear'd, They toss'd him to and fro. They wasted, o'er a scorching flame, The marrow of his bones; But a Miller us'd him worst of all, For he crush'd him between two stones. And they hae taen his very heart's blood, And drank it round and round; And still the more and more they drank, Their joy did more abound. John Barleycorn was a hero bold, Of noble enterprise, For if you do but taste his blood, 'Twill make your courage rise. 'Twill make a man forget his woe; 'Twill heighten all his joy: 'Twill make the widow's heart to sing, Tho' the tear were in her eye. Then let us toast John Barleycorn, Each man a glass in hand; And may his great posterity Ne'er fail in old Scotland!

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