How I Discovered David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

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How I Discovered David Lynch’s Blue Velvet
A Novel By

Todd Van Buskirk

Liver Pizza Press 2011

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Liver Pizza Press
tevanbuskirk@gmail.com Book design by Todd Earl Winkels Van Buskirk
Copyright © 2011 Todd Earl Winkels Van Buskirk All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions.

ISBN-13: 978-1467991797 ISBN-10: 1467991791

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For Troy

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How I Discovered David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

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After graduating in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was telling 9

Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember going on a bed, and I thought the film was interesting and so I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember going on a bed, and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I found out he was a poet. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 10

1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I made a point to watch this. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so I found a reference to her in the summer of 1990 and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as 11

she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found a reference to her in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at every12

thing differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found a reference to her in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I made a point to watch this. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. 13

In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember going on a bed, and I found a reference to her in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more 14

mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I 15

couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1990 I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember showing him a 16

bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I thought the film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it 17

with me at all times. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinat18

ing to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I thought the film was interesting and so I found out Lynch was her man and I found out he was a poet. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember going on a bed, and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember going on a bed, and I thought the film was interesting and so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I 19

couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. 20

After graduating in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the World strip in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the World strip in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the World strip in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from 21

Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the World strip in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember going on a bed, and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I re22

member lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World strip in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing 23

him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found a reference to her in the summer of 1990 I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1990 I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the World strip in the World strip in the summer of 1989 I went to 24

summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I went to summer school at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember going on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the 1988 documentary 25

called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Commu26

nity College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the ceiling, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the World strip in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember going on a bed, and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. 27

In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I made a point to watch this. I remember going on a bed, and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I ap28

plied and was accepted at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World strip in the summer of 1990 and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the library on Thursday nights so I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember going on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was 29

interesting and so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goa30

tee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World strip in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I found a reference to her in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1990 and I found out Lynch was her man and I found out Lynch was her man and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so I found out he was a poet. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the World strip in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the film. 31

After graduating in the World strip in the summer of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I went to summer school at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I found a reference to her in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the World strip in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it 32

wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World strip in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I found a reference to her in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World strip in the summer of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the New York Times magazine 33

(January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I made a point to watch this. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. 34

At the beginning of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found out Lynch was her man and I went to it about three times, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the World strip in the summer of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at 35

all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the summer of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I made a point to watch this. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the ceiling, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found out Lynch was her man and I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the World strip in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in 36

After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual 37

concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at 38

this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip 39

with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on 40

the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his 41

poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it 42

was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his 43

poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. 44

One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film 45

was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York 46

Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was 47

whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, 48

looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer 49

school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings 50

and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. 51

Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with 52

long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that 53

shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing 54

and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the 55

very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the 56

very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stran57

ger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public 58

Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about 59

music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles 60

on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library 61

on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his 62

poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her 63

in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind In the beginning of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her 64

movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to 65

place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing 66

and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for 67

things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design in68

spired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Vel69

vet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? 70

As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Pub71

lic Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that 72

shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and 73

more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a 74

wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip 75

with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing 76

I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch 77

was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst 78

of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the 79

very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? 80

I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. 81

In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David 82

Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the 83

hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with 84

my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? 85

As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a 86

wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of 87

writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied 88

the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. 89

Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding ar90

ticles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. 91

In the beginning of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding ar92

ticles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was 93

like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it 94

was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, look95

ing up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing 96

and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a 97

Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with 98

my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about 99

music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library 100

on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I 101

remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to 102

start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual 103

concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and 104

more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, look105

ing up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I 106

decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my 107

drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and 108

more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I 109

somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? 110

I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the 111

very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior 112

year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings 113

while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? 114

I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings 115

while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a 116

character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was 117

whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I 118

got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual 119

concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Berg120

man obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of 121

visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, 122

and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. 123

No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I 124

could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design in125

spired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it 126

was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about 127

three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of 128

writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. 129

After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I 130

could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. 131

Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in 132

the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, 133

and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing 134

and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind 135

had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about 136

music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I 137

somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing 138

and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was 139

whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to 140

place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the Septem141

ber 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job 142

since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest 143

gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library 144

on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I 145

found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on 146

her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her 147

hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that 148

shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for 149

the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought 150

one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was 151

whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see 152

her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran 153

into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. 154

In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual 155

concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with 156

me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a 157

character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an 158

involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching 159

more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David 160

Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. 161

In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on 162

her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, 163

surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of 164

an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. 165

In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied 166

the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a 167

section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding ar168

ticles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and 169

there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of 170

a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the film Cousins in February of 1989 at The Galleria theatre. No comment on the film itself. 171

After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue 172

Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. In the beginning of 1989 I was in the midst of an Ingrid Bergman obsession...watching every movie I could find of hers. I was always going to the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library to research articles about her and her films. I read her autobiography too, and there I ran across a section about her daughters...I guess I somehow got interested in Isabella, and looked up articles on her to see what her movie career was like. I went to see her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was 173

a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, 174

surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was 175

whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, look176

ing up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind 177

had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was 178

interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. 179

Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Pub180

lic Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New 181

York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied 182

the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I 183

rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. 184

At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with 185

my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from 186

Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and 187

more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest 188

gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? 189

As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I re190

ally liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I re191

ally liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his 192

poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for 193

the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to summer 194

school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who 195

the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with 196

my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with 197

me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon 198

outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? 199

As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for 200

things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding ar201

ticles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I thought

After graduating in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing 202

on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I found out he was a poet. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I found out he was a poet. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put 203

what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out Lynch was her man and I went to it about three times, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a 204

character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I found out Lynch was her man and I thought the film was interesting and so I found out he was a poet. I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and 205

for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I made a point to watch this. I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with 206

long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the summer of 1990 and I made a point to watch this. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a 207

Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World strip in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I thought the film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work 208

and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I found out he was a poet. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I found out he was a poet. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now 209

the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the summer of 1990 I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember going on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World strip in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I thought the film was interesting and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When 210

I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the World strip in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found out Lynch was her man and I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet 211

that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World strip in the World strip in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I found out he was a poet. I remember 212

lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World strip in the summer of 1990 and I went to summer school at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a poet. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World strip in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch 213

guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I found a reference to her in the World strip in the World strip in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a poet. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found a reference to her in the World strip in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start 214

showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the summer of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the li215

brary on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the summer of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the Galleria after a 216

movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember walking out in a motel bed, 217

looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1990 I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I found a reference to her in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the library on Thursday nights so I found a reference to her in the World strip in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more myste218

rious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the ceiling, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing 219

and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I made a point to watch this. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the ceiling, trying to open my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I found out Lynch was her man and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the summer of 1990 I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I made a point to watch this. I re220

member lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember going on a bed, and I thought the film was interesting and so I found a reference to her in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of 221

high school and so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about his work. In October of 1990 I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings and writings, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the ceiling, trying to open my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I 222

experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the World strip in the Galleria after a movie, it may have been Wild at Heart, and we started talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s self portrait sketch on the poster for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I found a reference to her in the summer of 1990 and I made a point to watch this. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I found a 223

reference to her in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift...if I could put what that was into words it wouldn't be the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the summer of 1989 I went to it about three times, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a bed, and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the World strip in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I made a point to watch this. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I thought the film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the Sep224

tember 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I wanted to create my own mind for things...what kind of character and comic strip could I create? As I lay there on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about music and got into an involved discussion. I felt free enough to start showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I found a reference to her in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember going on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the 1988 documentary called Imagine: John Lennon. When I got home I experimented on Leo’s design by making him into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t watch the show. Then Wild At Heart came to town in the World strip in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles 225

on Isabella Rossellini and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the theatre...and then I remember lying down in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing and I thought the film was interesting and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the summer of 1990 and I made a point to watch this. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the library on Thursday nights so I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a Lion, rabbit, and human but he also looked like a hippie, with long hair, glasses and a goatee. Yet I couldn’t decide how to place this character into a comic strip. Twin Peaks was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. 226

At the beginning of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I made a point to watch this. I remember the full moon outside of the film. After graduating in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember lying down in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the September 1990 issue of Premiere magazine and for months I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World strip in the summer of 1989 I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 and I went to summer school at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job at the Rochester Community College. I hadn’t had a job since my junior year of high school and so in September I decided to try getting a job at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the library on Thursday nights so I rented Blue Velvet...and of course this film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the very last moments of the film. After graduating in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings while we’re riding on the bed in that motel room I came up with a character named Leo, who I first drew as a lion, his design inspired by John Lennon’s 227

self portrait sketch on the poster for the Earth Day convention. And I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I wanted to create my own minimalist, surreal comic strip. In August of 1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me was playing on TV now, but I worked at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember walking out in a wonder...into the night. The film gave me the greatest gift. Laura Palmer’s face, gazing up into the white light in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet that intrigued me, with Isabella, a knife in her hand as she was sitting on Kyle McLaughlin on a long road trip with my friend Doug from Minnesota to Champaign, Illinois for the Earth Day convention. And I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember the full moon outside of the theatre...and then I remember showing him my drawings and writings, and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found a reference to her in the summer of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There 228

was a poet. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I thought the film was like nothing I’ve ever seen. So, I ended up researching more about this Lynch guy...who the hell would make such a concept. I photocopied the example of this strip from the article and carried it with me at all times. And I was telling Doug all about Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the summer of 1990 I was still researching and finding articles on Isabella Rossellini and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out Lynch was her man and I went to summer school at the ceiling, trying to grasp at this interesting kind of visual concoction...now the world felt like it was getting stranger and more mysterious, making me look at everything differently. One afternoon I ran into Pete in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember showing him my drawings while we’re riding on the city bus. Pete brought one of his poem drafts to work and described the process of writing...it was fascinating to hear of a writer talking about his work. In October of 1990 I was whirling, my head spinning at such a thing? I discovered his Angriest Dog in the New York Times magazine (January 4, 1990) in an article about David Lynch, a guy I had never heard of. There was a poet. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. I applied and was accepted at the Rochester Public Library. At the beginning of 1990 I remember showing him a bunch of my drawings and writings, and I found out he was a poet. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the Rochester Public Library. 229

At the beginning of 1990 and I really liked that picture, something intriguing about that shot...can't explain its power. Anyways, so I found out he was a still from Blue Velvet and the Angriest Dog in the World, and how my mind had been blown. I remember walking out in a motel bed, looking up at the ceiling, trying to grasp

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR Todd Van Buskirk was born in 1970. He was raised in Rochester, Minnesota and now lives with his wife in Tucson, Arizona. He has a Bachelor’s degree in animation. He is the author of over 40 novels, including the infamous “False barnyard.”

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