Self-Assessment of Managerial Skills LIBR204-17 Tim Trevathan Assignment 1, Part 2

Assignment #1 Part 2

Assignment: Prepare a written comparative analysis of your performance on the management skills assessments based on the readings. Design a graph, table or chart showing the before and after results of each management skill assessment and provide brief written insightful comments with each Having the done skills assessment at the beginning of the class from http://college.cengage.com/business/griffin/fundamentals/3e/students/assessment/index.html
Textbook Site for: Fundamentals of Management
Ricky W. Griffin, Texas A&M University , Third Edition

Assess Your Management Skills
Assess your management skills by answering each of the questionnaires below that test how effective you will be as a manager. These assessments will give you immediate insight into how you might approach various management situations and how you can work to improve your management skills in the future. Skills of Effective Managers Self-Awareness Belief and Values Questionnaire The Strategic Manager Quiz Goal-Setting Questionnaire How is Your Organization Managed? Diagnosing Poor Performance and Enhancing Motivation Managing Diversity Assessing Your Mental Abilities Managerial Leadership Behavior Questionnaire Using Teams Understanding Control Defining Quality and Productivity

   

Skills of Effective Managers Self-Awareness Belief and Values Questionnaire The Strategic Manager Quiz

1

Self-Assessment of Managerial Skills

Assignment #1 Part 2

The outcomes from a before and after snapshot of taking the survey left me with a more complete application of library management theology and library specific issues. In reviewing the components from Management Basics for Information Professionals (Evans and Ward, 2007), my scores came out in the top-tier brackets of the surveys in all categories. This can be accurate based on my perception but can also have inaccuracies based on other’s perception of me and my leadership style. Having been self-motivated and working in work groups that had autonomous features to them while meeting to obtain group results, the factors that contribute to the Type ‘A’ organizational structure of past beauracratic environments as well as working independently being self-employed have created some drastic swings in skill-sets as well as a chasm of skills that would have been developed in newer environments in the 1995-2005 time frame that I was self-employed.
The score ranges are as follows: 10-23 You feel that essentially you have all the skills of an effective manager. 24-36 You are uncertain as to whether you have all the skills of an effective manager. 37-50 You do not feel that you have all the skills of an effective manager. Your score was 13. Based on your score: You feel that essentially you have all the skills of an effective manager.

Skills of Effective Managers Once the evaluation was done in post effort evaluation is occurs to me that I do not have an objective standard to work with. My management experiences of being managed as well as managing have ranged as widely as the environments they were conducted in. In seeing that older structures from past government and government-like private industry management structures compelled me to become more entrepreneurial to compensate for the lack of ‘voice’ I had in decision-making processes and the contribution to eventual outcomes. Since top-down management structures that micro-managed or ineffectively managed effort without expecting any results of typical of these environments, it gave me a passionate desire to work and be in management environments where I succeeded or failed based on my own best efforts. The evolution of skills to include building trams as a self-employed person to build out a national matrix of regional recruiters to service

2

Self-Assessment of Managerial Skills

Assignment #1 Part 2

needs of national clients who had locale specific or management specific needs that were localized came in to play at some junctures in emerging market-places like Florida, but for the most part, the ‘road-warrior’ requirements of consultants hopping on a plane to go the where the work or project was anywhere in the continental United States took away many local requirements.
Your score was 63. Based on your score: You are in the Top quartile; you feel that you are extremely self-aware and open to feedback from others.

Self-Awareness The development of my management style as a national recruiter for clients such as IBM Global, Oracle Corporation, Hewlett Packard Global Services, Compaq Computers Professional Services Division and many others led to volumes of requirements that forced using leveraging techniques to maximize my efforts and compensation. I moved from a solo environment of reward and performance to an aggregator of resources and candidates that would meet national demand from these organizations. By building a network of recruiters in the eight regions that had the most concentrated volume of needs, it left opportunities to share workloads and income potential. The challenge in this new found environment was that since recruiting had three primary structures; retained, contingency and temporary contracting needs, a choice had to be made as to how to best allocate time/money initiatives that pursued the greatest gain while allowing the highest rewards and least amount of time commitment servicing both partner recruiter relationships as well as client relationships. I had to setup a level of priority that spoke to the urgency and importance of those requirements so that clear delineation of responsibility for time requirements and accuracy of work presented to me did not bog my efforts to manage, maintain and service clients was not affected.

3

Self-Assessment of Managerial Skills

Assignment #1 Part 2

Belief and Values Questionnaire
Skill Self-Assessment: The Beliefs and Values Questionnaire (BYQ) contains six scales: There are six important dimensions of life measured by the BVQ. The dimensions are represented by the following scales: Scale I measures the theistic versus nontheistic orientation. High scores indicate a conventional religious outlook and low scores reflect a secular outlook. The average score for college students on this scale is 10. Scale II measures and achievement versus experience orientation. High scorers value constructive use of time and accomplishing goals. Low scorers believe in living for the moment. They tend to be spontaneous and are less inclined to make long-term plans. The average score on this scale is 11. Scale III shows detachment versus involvement. The higher scorer avoids emotional risk. This person values control and predictability. The low scorer considers it important to make commitments to get involved with life and people, even if this includes personal risks. The average score is 6. Scale IV is tolerance versus intolerance. The low scorer believes that there is one true system of beliefs and standards in matters of personal and social conduct. The high scorer has a liberal or tolerant outlook and rejects the idea of absolute truths. The average score is 10. Scale V is called behaviorism versus humanism. The high scorer tends to have a deterministic viewpoint with a strong faith in science as a means of understanding and dealing with people. The low scorer places emphasis on the uniqueness of each person and places high value on individualism and free will. The average score is 7. Scale VI is a measure of positive versus negative orientation. The high scorer is optimistic about life and people and believes times are becoming progressively better. The low scorer finds life to be sad and is pessimistic about the future. The average score is 10. Dimension Scale Your Score Scale I: Theistic vs. Nontheistic 10 Scale II: Achievement vs. Experience 10 Scale III: Detachment vs. Involvement 6 Scale IV: Tolerance vs. Intolerance 10 Scale V: Behaviorism vs. Humanism 7 Scale VI: Positive vs. Negative 15 Rights Reserved.

South-Western Publishing Co. All

Belief and Values Questions This required me to create initiatives and time servicing boundaries that communicated expectations to both clients and business partners. The first part of this was on the client-side and had to do with their expectations of me and turn-around times and volume and my expectations of their response to those efforts.

4

Self-Assessment of Managerial Skills

Assignment #1 Part 2

Since all clients are new until you have placed a person with them and you do not know if they are performing to your expectations an easy benchmark was established for all partner recruiters that interacted with me and my business entity. Assess Your Management Skills Strategic Management Rule #1 – Give them [the client] two resumes and see what they did with them [or no more than two resumes per partner recruiter to me] so that none of us was being cheated of time without return effort. In assessing long-term strategy and managing expectations, this spoke to communication being the foundation for the relationship to begin and exist. Rule #2 – Was a simple “Do unto others...” type rule that stated the obvious. Clients frequently wanted people ‘yesterday’ to fill their needs as a result of delaying their process to give the recruiters the task while they tried to fulfill the requirements more cheaply with internal staff. By getting responses in the form of a “yes, we want to talk to this candidate” or a “no, we’ll pass and this is WHY [allowing us to refine the search and ensure that we understood the requirement or the original requirement was communicated accurately]. Goal Setting Feed back from clients, internal recruiters, hiring managers and partner-recruiters was essential to good process flow and successful completion of a hire. Without coordination of skills between all entities, the process easily fell apart as a result of critical steps not being completed and falling to the wayside causing miscommunications and misunderstandings.

5

Self-Assessment of Managerial Skills

Assignment #1 Part 2

Client Expectations

Candidate Expectations

Recruiter Expectations

6

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.