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DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Noted artist
Upcoming exhibit to feature
paintings. PAGE 3
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Group bringing safety to town
he MOMS Club of
Hopewell Valley is spear-
heading an effort to bring
the nationally recognized
Safety Town educational pro-
gram to students in the dis-
trict.
Already established in near-
by communities such as
Hamilton and Ewing, Safety
Town is a realistic, child-sized
town with miniature streets,
buildings, crosswalks and
working traffic lights.
Safety Town offers an au-
thentic setting for bicycle,
pedestrian and vehicular safe-
ty instruction. The one-week
summer program offered to
rising kindergartners is direct-
ed by YMCA staff members,
with assistance from local
youth volunteers, and features
visits by police, firefighters,
paramedics and other local
first responders.
MOMS Club members re-
cently kicked off fund raising
with a booth at the Hopewell
Harvest Fair, where a minia-
ture Safety Town building was
on display.
Other fund-raising efforts
have included an electronics
recycling drive and a charity
Residents
want
their say
Hopewell Township voters
have spoken loudly: they want a
say in the municipalitys spend-
ing of $4.1 million on additional
capacity at the Ewing-Lawrence
Sewerage Authority.
The township committee on
Nov. 28 approved an agreement
with ELSA for up to 266,666 gal-
lons of sewage a day to be treated
at the regional authoritys treat-
ment plant. That capacity is to be
paid for with a $4.1 million gener-
al-obligation bond that would cost
each taxpayer an additional
$33.75 a year, based on a $450,000
home.
The Citizens for Tax Choice,
however, felt residents should
have their say on that general-ob-
ligation bond, and initiated a peti-
tion to get 667 signatures to get
the bond placed on a public refer-
endum.
That petition garnered 1,700
signatures in 18 days, and Citi-
zens for Tax Choice chairman
Robert Kecskes said: Based on
the volume of calls and emails we
received, we could have probably
gained several hundred more
over the next few days.
It was a pretty interesting ex-
perience, Kecskes said. I was
very surprised that the people
were as in tune to the issue as
Members of the MOMS Club of Hopewell Valley earned money for the
Safety Town project by cleaning up litter throughout town, including on
Burd Street and Yard Road in Pennington. Pictured from left are Aileen
Matticoli, Kate Fullerton, Erika Wojciechowiecz and Jackie Flannery.
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
please see GROUP, page 5
By JIM WRIGHT
The Lawrence Sun
please see PETITION, page 4
T
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3, 2012
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Special to the Sun
Boy Scouts from Troop No. 71, Hopewell, assembled more than 230 luminaria along Broad Street in
Hopewell Borough on Monday, Dec. 12, as part of Womanspace's Communities of Light event. As a
community service, the Scouts helped assemble and place luminaria in front of sponsoring businesses in
town. Donations went to Womanspace. Seen here are Scouts, from left, Jack Ottinger, Michael Fowler,
Nick Mosner and Jack Dallessio.
DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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There is still time to enroll chil-
dren ages 6 months to 24 months
in Har Sinai Temples Early
Childhood Centers winter-ses-
sion classes.
The temple offers two classes:
I've Got Rhythm, created for
children ages 6 months to 14
months, and Toddler Time To-
gether, a parent-and-child expe-
rience for children ages 15
months to 24 months.
Both classes begin the first
week of January and run
through early March at the Har
Sinai campus, 2421 Pennington
Road at Denow Road West.
The sessions begin Jan. 4 and
run through March 7 on nine
Wednesdays from 9:15 to 10 a.m.,
at a total cost of $110.
In Toddler Time Together,
parents and child participate in
hands-on activities designed to
enhance early learning.
Playtime, art, music, gym and
snacks figure into the Thursday
morning sessions that are held
9:30-10:30 a.m. from Jan. 5
through March 8. The cost of the
10 sessions is $150.
Both classes are open to all
children. Sign up now by calling
Magda Reyes at (609) 730-8100 or
emailing her at
magdahst@aol.com.
Noted artist Mel Leipzig will
exhibit a collection of his paint-
ings, entitled Mothers, at the Pen-
nington Schools Silva Gallery of
Art.
The exhibition opens on Jan. 6,
and continues through Feb. 2.
Gallery hours are Monday to
Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., or by
appointment.
A closing reception with the
artist will be held on Feb. 2, from
6 to 8 p.m.
For this exhibition, Leipzig has
assembled many paintings of
mothers with their children he
has made over the years.
Leipzig has dedicated his ca-
reer to painting people in their
environments. He is fascinated
with the seemingly accidental
ways in which figures relate to
their chosen surroundings, and
his compositions reflect the psy-
chological connection that he ob-
serves between the two.
Represented by Gallery
Henoch in New York, Leipzig has
had more than 40 solo exhibi-
tions, including a retrospective at
the New Jersey State Museum.
He has been presented numerous
awards, including a Fulbright
grant, a Louis Comfort Tiffany
award and four grants from the
New Jersey State Council on the
Arts.
In 1996, he received a grant
from the National Endowment for
the Arts, and in 2003, he was se-
lected for a Purchase Award by
the American Academy of the
Arts and Letters. The National
Academy of Design elected
Leipzig to membership in 2006.
His work is included in the col-
lections of the Whitney Museum
of American Art, the Cooper He-
witt Museum for the Decorative
Arts, the New Jersey State Muse-
um, the Noyes Museum, the Yale
Art Gallery, the University of
Pennsylvania and the White
House, among others.
Leipzig is a professor of art
history and fine art at Mercer
County Community College. His
work and his four-color process
were featured in the November
2011 issue of ARTnews magazine.
All events and exhibitions at
the Silva Gallery are free and
open to the public.
For further information, call
gallery director Dolores Eaton at
(609) 7374133.
Exhibition to feature paintings
Temple still accepting kids for winter classes
they were. I guess we explained it
pretty well in our letters.
Mayor James Burd said on Dec.
21, however, that the township
would be making a strong educa-
tion effort of its own on the ELSA
agreement and its ramifications
before the referendum.
People need a full understand-
ing before they go to the ballot
box, he said. I understand peo-
ples thoughts with regard to
taxes, but do we want to control
our destiny, or do we want a devel-
oper to come in and say that
Hopewell is not meeting its af-
fordable housing requirements
and that they will, but need the
sewerage capacity?
The petition was submitted to
the township clerk on Dec. 19,
and if at least 667 of the signa-
tures on the petition are authenti-
cated, the bond will be put
on a referendum sometime next
year.
Township Administrator Paul
Pogorzelski said the first $1 mil-
lion payment must be made for
the contract with ELSA to be
valid.
We cannot borrow the money
if the petition is successful, he
said in November.
The signatures were pretty
easy to get, Kecskes said. Peo-
ple were very willing to get in-
volved. I didnt know the interest
was this great.
The group had offered to drive
the petition to residents who
could not get out to sign it, and
Kecskes said about 100 residents
took the group up on its offer.
It was a small fraction of the
signatures on the petition, he
said.
Burd, meanwhile, had said at
the Nov. 28 meeting that the ELSA
agreement resulted in a rate of
about $15 per gallon of sewerage
compared with about $67 a gallon
were the existing sewer plant to
be upgraded.
Committeewoman Vanessa
Sandom noted at the meeting,
however, that excess sewerage ca-
pacity the township is paying for
could be taken by developers any-
way, and What we dont want to
do is encourage development to
pay off a debt.
Burd also said that without
the additional capacity, the town-
ship could eventually be subject
to a builders remedy if a develop-
er wanted to build affordable
housing in the township, but
did not have the sewerage capaci-
ty.
He said in a recent letter to the
editor: I voted yes (on the ordi-
nance) rather than rolling the
dice and taking an irrevocable
chance of having a builder bring
another development the size of
Brandon Farms into Hopewell
Township and see our school
taxes explode.
Sandom also voted against the
ordinance because it had not been
made clear to the public that the
agreement would be paid for
through a general-obligation
bond.
Township Attorney Steven
Goodell said at the Nov. 28
meeting the township must first
reserve flow at the authority be-
fore it determines what the
projects would look like, what
the costs would be and how to as-
sess those costs to the various
users.
Burd said the township is nego-
tiating with businesses in the
Pennington Circle who need the
capacity, in order for those busi-
nesses to pay their share of the
agreement and ease the tax in-
crease.
Even though a small fraction
of the current residents of
Hopewell would be served by
ELSA, the majority of the
Hopewell Township Committee
believes everybody should
pay for it, Kecskes said in a let-
ter, noting that the petition
effort was truly democracy in ac-
tion.
Your encouragement was
tremendously uplifting, he
wrote.
Harvey Lester, another CFTC
member added: No effort was
ever made by the township com-
mittee majority to inform the
township residents that this was
to be a general-obligation sewer
bond, where all taxpayers would
have to pay for this extra capacity,
not just the users. Now, thanks to
the forthcoming referendum
made possible by our petition,
residents have the opportunity to
be properly informed about all as-
pects of this complex sewer bond
issue.
Burd said the ordinance was
on its second public reading, but
Sandom agreed with resident
Jewel Latham that the governing
body had not adequately in-
formed the public that the bond
was general obligation.
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Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
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sale event at Jazams toy store.
Several club members participat-
ed in the Friends of
Hopewell Valley Open Space's
Clean Communities Clean-up
Day on Nov. 12, where they
earned cash for the Safety
Town project by picking up litter
along Hopewell Township
roads.
We enjoyed combining two
great causes: cleaning up
our community and raising
money to build Safety Town,
said club president Aileen
Matticoli. On the next cleanup
day in April, we plan to triple
our participation and money
raised.
The club is sponsoring its
biggest fundraising event to
date: an open play date for
Hopewell Valley kids at the
popular indoor playground
Bounce U in West
Windsor.
It's a great place for kids to
play, jump and get their energy
out during winter break, Matti-
coli said. All members of the
community are welcome; we'll
have the place to ourselves and
there will be plenty of refresh-
ments.
Those interested in purchasing
tickets to the Bounce U event
should email momsclubtitusville
hopewell@yahoo.com.
Information is also available
on Safety Town sponsorship
opportunities for local
businesses, which helps to pay for
the maintenance, new
construction and ongoing
operating expenses of the pro-
gram.
To learn more about Safety
Town and to register for the sum-
mer, visit
www.hvymca.org/preschool/safety
-town.
GROUP
Continued from page 1
Group earned
cash by picking
up litter on roads
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3, 2012
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
Posted on sun news
T
his is a week for reflection at
Elauwit Media. A time to take
a look back at the previous 12
months. What went right. What went
wrong. What we can do better.
This time last year, we had seven
newspapers. Now, we have 13. We
added Suns in Washington Township,
Tabernacle and Shamong in South
Jersey.
And we launched our first three
newspapers in Central Jersey: in
Lawrence, Montgomery and Hopewell.
While the growth is great, it also
presents challenges.
Weve brought new people on board.
Weve had to restructure our news-
room.
Weve had to deal with logistical is-
sues that happen every time we
launch a new newspaper.
But the response has been terrific.
We want to thank all of you who have
welcomed your Sun into your home.
Every week, you send us news items,
photos and suggestions about how we
can improve our newspapers. For that,
we are grateful.
This week also is a time to look
ahead. In next weeks editions, we will
feature interviews with local leaders,
who will offer their take on what 2012
will bring to your hometown and
school district.
For us, the early part of the year
looks like it will be another growth
spurt, as we expand our operations in
Central Jersey.
Later in the year? Well, well proba-
bly grow again. But, right now, were
not certain where and when that
growth will take place.
We promise to do our best to contin-
ue to bring you local news not found
elsewhere.
We always welcome your feedback
and ideas, and hope that you wont be
shy in sharing your thoughts with us
as we continue to grow and serve more
communities.
Another busy year
Thank you for helping us continue to grow
A busy 2011
This year saw Elauwit Media almost
double its number of newspapers.
Next year promises to bring more
growth. We thank you for your contin-
ued support.
Mover, accidental shootings and puppies
Two men accidentally
shottwice
A father and son were accidentally shot
while hunting in Jackson, then were acci-
dentally shot again while talking to an offi-
cial about the first incident, according to
the Asbury Park Press.
The official to whom they were talking
was also hit during that second round of
pellet fire.
But Larry Ragonese, a spokesman for
the state Department of Environmental
Protection, hastened to point out that this
kind of accident almost never happens.
Barry Lank
Lots of dogs, puppies
found in local home
More than 50 dogs and puppies have
been found living in squalor in a Mon-
mouth County home, according to the As-
bury Park Press.
The approximately 800-square-foot home
in Spring Lake Heights seems to have been
the site of an illegal puppy selling opera-
tion, according to Victor Buddy Amato,
chief law enforcement officer of the Mon-
mouth County Society for the Prevention
of Cruelty to Animals.
Borough health officials and animal pro-
tection advocates were examining the Jer-
sey Avenue home on Tuesday.
It is horrendous inside there. Its not fit
for animals let alone for humans, Amato
told the Press.
The urine stench. The feces. It is un-
bearable. Yard space for the dogs meas-
ured 20 feet by 20 feet.
Barry Lank
Professional mover kept some
of the things he hauled
Police say David L. Harris Jr. had a
unique method of stealing possessions
from peoples homes.
Victims would just call him up and pay
him to come in and load the things into his
moving van, according to The Times of
Trenton.
The 22-year-old Hamilton resident works
for a local moving company. But police say
he would not deliver all the goods particu-
larly some of the jewelry.
Barry Lank
Dont miss a thing!
This is a sampling of what you can find
everyday on The Central Jersey Sun,
online at http://cj.sunne.ws.
This guy is one of two charged with at-
tacking a homeless Wall man and posting
it on You Tube. The homeless man was
stalked to his camp in the woods, then
struck a few times. Hes apparently kneed
in the groin and knocked down with a kick.
Call 609-751-0245
and put The Suns to work for you!
Advertising in The Sun newspapers
is like visiting the Customer Store.
Stop by and pick up a few today.
The following items come from
reports on file with the Hopewell
Police Department:
An 18-year-old Ewing woman
was charged with failure to ob-
serve a traffic signal, after a
three-car accident Dec. 13 at 4:35
p.m. Police said the woman was
travelling south along Penning-
ton Road in a Toyota Camry when
she attempted to make a left turn
on to Denow Road, but hit a
northbound Dodge Caravan.
The impact caused the Camry
to hit a Chevy Trailblazer that
was stopped at the light at Denow
Road.
Police said signs are posted
along Pennington Road prohibit-
ing left turns.
Police said a 17-year-old passen-
ger in the Camry was taken to an
area hospital with a complaint of
neck pain. She was treated and re-
leased. Traffic was detoured
around the intersection for about
an hour during the accident in-
vestigation.
A 59-year-old Lambertville
woman was charged with drunk-
en driving on Dec 9 at 11:15 p.m.
Police said an officer stopped a
car for weaving in and out of its
lane while traveling along Route
29. A police sergeant spoke with
the driver, who allegedly had the
odor of alcohol on her breath.
After police performed field-so-
briety tests, the driver was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. In addition to the drunken-
driving charge, she was also
charged with refusal to submit to
a breath test, reckless driving and
failure to keep right. The driver
was later released to a relative
and her case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
A 19-year-old Pennington man
was charged with criminal mis-
chief, disorderly conduct and an
ordinance violation for discharg-
ing fireworks Dec. 8. A follow-up
investigation revealed the man
had thrown a firecracker into a
Quick Chek store July 6, causing
damage to the floor of the store. A
quantity of perishable food had to
be destroyed due to smoke dam-
age. The was processed at police
headquarters, and the case will
be heard in municipal court.
A 19-year-old man was taken
into custody at his home on an
outstanding Mercer County Supe-
rior Court bench warrant Dec. 7
at 1:20 p.m. The man was
processed at police headquarters
and was later remanded to the
Mercer County Correction Cen-
ter on the no-bail warrant.
A 41-year-old Elizabeth woman
was charged with driving an un-
safe vehicle after she lost the driv-
er-side rear tire on her 2000 Chevy
van Dec. 15 at 12:28 p.m. Police
said the woman was driving
along West Broad Street when the
tire came off and struck a park
bench and a building. The
benchs legs were broken and the
building suffered damage. The
van suffered damage to its axle
and brake drum.
A 20-year-old Pennington man
was charged with receiving
stolen property Dec. 8., after an
investigation revealed that he had
pawned jewelry stolen from a
Pennington Borough residence
on Nov. 8. He was processed at po-
lice headquarters and was later
released after posting $2,500 bail.
The case will be forwarded to
the Mercer County Prosecutors
Office for review.
A 46-year-old Lambertville
woman was charged with failure
to maintain lane after an accident
Dec. 17 at 1:44 p.m. on Route 29
near Pleasant Valley Road. Police
said a 2004 Honda Pilot struck a
utility pole, shearing it at its base,
approximately 15 feet off the
roadway. The driver and an 11-
year-old female passenger both
suffered minor chest injuries and
were transported to an area hos-
pital where they were both treat-
ed and later released.
An 86-year-old Monroe Town-
ship woman was charged with
careless driving, failure to yield
and driving with a suspended li-
cense Dec. 15 at 10:33 p.m.
Police said the woman was
driving a 2001 Honda Civic south
on Route 31 when she attempted
to make a left turn on to Mar-
shalls Corner Woodsville Road
and hit a 2005 Nissan Maxima,
causing it to run off the road and
hit a light stanchion. Police said
the woman had a complaint of
pain in her chest and was trans-
ported to a hospital, where she
was to be treated and released.
A 72-year-old Langhorne, Pa.,
man was charged with careless
driving Dec. 15 at 6:22 p.m. in the
parking lot of Central High
School.
Police said the man was trying
to make a U-turn in the front
parking lot in a 2002 Nissan Maxi-
ma, when he accidently hit the
gas pedal, causing the car to lurch
forward and hit two metal handi-
capped parking signs. The car
then continued down the grass
embankment, where it stopped
several feet from the parking lot.
Two spruce trees worth $300
were reported stolen from a Stony
Brook Road property sometime
between Dec. 15 at 8 a.m. and Dec.
18 at 2 p.m. Police said the trees
were five to six feet tall.
A 58-year-old employee of
Hopewell Valley Wine and Spirits
was charged with selling alco-
holic beverages to a person under
the legal age Nov. 23 after alleged-
ly selling a case of beer to a man
under age 21.
The 45-year-old owner of the
store, located in the Hopewell
Crossing Shopping Center, also
was issued a township ordinance
violation for the incident.
WEDNESDAY
December 28
FOR ALL
Movies for Adults: The Debt: 1:30
and 6:30 p.m. at the Hopewell
Branch Library.
TUESDAY
January 3
FOR ALL
Hopewell Seniors Connect: Down-
load eBooks Anywhere, Anytime: 10
a.m. at the Hopewell Branch Library.
Yoga: 5 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library.
calendar PAGE 8 DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3, 2012
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 103
Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Or by email:
calendar@hopewellsun.com.
Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
POLICE REPORTS
DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
The Hopewell Township Police
Department has investigated nu-
merous complaints regarding
fake cashier checks being re-
ceived by residents who thought
they were dealing with a legiti-
mate buyer or seller of goods.
Some people also have received
emails or phone calls telling them
that they won a lottery or sweep-
stakes, but that they needed to de-
posit this cashier check and send
money to a foreign country to re-
ceive their prize. Police said
these are most likely scams and
advise residents:
Do not cash or deposit a
cashier's check from someone you
do not know.
You may be held responsible
for a fake check that bounces.
Speak with a bank representative
before attempting to deposit a
check into your account if you
suspect the check may be a fake.
Never wire funds to a distant
buyer, via Western Union or any
other carrier.
If possible, try to deal with
local buyers and sellers only.
Never give out personal finan-
cial information such as bank ac-
count numbers or Social Security
numbers.
Police warn residents
of cashier check scam
The Hopewell Township Parks
and Recreation Department is
sponsoring a winter sticks indoor
field hockey program for girls in
grades 2 to 8 from Hopewell Val-
ley and neighboring municipali-
ties. The programs will be in the
Central High School gymnasium
on Sundays for five weeks from
Jan. 8 through Feb. 5. The com-
mon goals winter clinic for girls
in grades 2 to 5 will meet between
12:30 and 2 p.m. The league for
girls in grades 6 to 8 will be held
between 2 and 3:30 p.m., featuring
organized games and officiating
while maintaining a recreational
philosophy.
Participants will need to pro-
vide their own shin guards,
mouthpiece, proper footwear
(which can be sneakers) and
stick. The cost for the indoor field
hockey program is $83 per person
($75 for Hopewell Twp. residents).
For more information, call the
recreation department at 737-
3753. Registration forms are avail-
able at www.hopewelltwp.org.
Indoor field hockey being offered
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
DECEMBER 28, 2011-JANUARY 3, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
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All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
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List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
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