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AURORAS PG COLLEGE
STUDENT HANDBOOK 2009-2010
MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
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STUDENT HANDBOOK
2010-2011
MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
1
st
year 1
st
SEMESTER
AURORAS PG COLLEGE
RAMANTHAPUR, HYDERABAD- 500013
PH: 040-27030787Fax: +914027036468
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WELCOMENOTE
My dear Students,
The College has produced 13 MBAbatches and 15 MCAbatches of students till now. Majority of the students have
been placed in reputed Multinational Companies and many got admitted into renowned National and International
Institutes of higher learning. Now it is time for you to emulate your exemplary seniors and to reach higher echelons
of the society.
The College has a clearly defined goal of evolving into one of the best institutes for Post Graduate education. The
central concern of this institution is to strive for pedagogical and scholastic excellence. To reach the envisaged goal,
the college provides highly committed and qualified faculty and excellent infrastructural facilities for curricular, co-
curricular and extra-curricular activities. . Dynamism, experience and erudition characterize the teaching community
at Aurora. Highly qualified with MBA/MCA/M. Tech/M.Phil and Ph.D. degrees, the faculty bring their veritable
expertise and application oriented attitude to the classroom.
One of the innovative features of Aurora is its novel teaching-learning process, that synthesizes conventional
mechanisms of learning through lectures and laboratory sessions, with interactive process like Seminars, Guest
Lectures, Industry-Institute Interaction, Mini Projects, problem - solving sessions and Assignments that makes
learning a pleasure. This handbook, another unique feature of this college, helps you as a ready reckoner in giving
detailed institute interaction and assignment dates to prepare you well in advance. In addition, it also helps in
creating a base for you to prepare for competitive examinations like IES, GATE, GRE etc withits exhaustive reference
material.
The college has been successful in getting reputed organizations for placements and I am happy that preparations
are made to see that all the students of this college would have their future clearly defined.
From the Institutes side, we assure you that we leave no stone unturned to implement and achieve the above goals.
You too, as a student, have a crucial role to play in this arduous but exciting enterprise of makingAurora synonymous
with learning.
I invite you all to join me in this journey towards excellence.
with all best wishes
Principal
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PURPOSEOFTHEBOOK
Education has to be placed and organized in an effective manner, both from the institutions side as well as the
students. This would help to achieve things with great clarity and commitment.
Aurora is the first in the country to give a comprehensive student handbook which forms a major aid for the students
to prepare for the classes in advance, know the details of various deadlines, details of the syllabus, co-and extra
curricular activities to be organized etc. It also gives indication of events and activities planned for each semester so
that the student will have an advanced view of all the academic schedules to be implemented in the course of the
semester.
The handbook seeks to inform the student about the rules and regulations of the college, in order that they may
conduct themselves in an appropriate manner. In addition, the handbook makes the student aware of the history of
the college, and the culture and values that it upholds.
The publication of this student handbook was taken up to help students chalk out a systematic plan of study and
to make optimal use of their time. Though a laborious task, our faculty took the preparation of the handbook as a
challenge and completed it in time with high sense of commitment.
Structure of the book
The first part, or the administrative section, comprises the history of the college, college timings, courses offered,
festivals and functions, rules and regulations, code of conduct, facilities, student support system, student related
matters and activities, teaching-learning process & centers of excellence.
The second part gives academic details, like the departmental profile, departmental tree, purpose of the department
almanac for course duration and tentative dates of theory and lab exams; course structure for credits and the number
of hours allocated for various programs; time table - a week-wise calendar of the subject, class time, and the name of
the faculty handling the subject; subject-wise details like the session plan, question bank assignments, guest
lectures, and students seminars; laboratory details; adjunct courses; industrial tours and visits; and finally, the
schedule of unit tests.
The third part provides student details, distribution of students into learning groups and the tasks assigned to each
of these groups.
Everyones cooperation in the successful implementation of all the activities listed out in the handbook is earnestly
solicited. Suggestions for improvement are always welcome.
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ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS
Page No
1. HISTORY 3
1.1 The Beginning
1.2 The Leap
1.3 The Name and Logo
1.4 The Icon & Heritage
1.5 The Traditions
1.6 The Culture
1.7 The Vision
1.8 The Mission
1.9 Quality Policy
2. THE COLLEGE 4
2.1 Introduction
2.2 The Goal
2.2.1 Research
2.2.2 Teaching
2.2.3 Training
2.3 Timings
3. COURSES OFFERED 4
3.1 Department of Management
3.1.1 Master of Business Administration
3.1.1.1 Course Objective
3.1.1.2 Distinct Features of the Course
3.1.1.3 Graduate Destinations
3.2 Department of Computer Applications
3.2.1 Master of Computer Applications
3.2.1.1 Course Objective
3.2.1.2 Distinct Features of the Course
3.2.1.3 Graduate Destinations
4. FESTIVALSANDEVENTS 5
4.1 Festivals
4.1.1 Independence Day
4.1.2 Teachers Day
4.1.3 Ganesh Chaturthi
4.1.4 Republic Day
4.1.5 Guru Purnima
4.1.6 Vasantha Panchami
4.2 Events and Celebrations
4.2.1 Induction Day
4.2.2 Foundation Day
4.2.3 Aurora Family Day
4.2.4 Annual Day
4.3 Events
4.3.1 National Paper Presentations
4.3.2 Adjunct Courses
5. RULES&REGULATIONS 7
5.1 Dress Code
5.2 ID Cards
5.3 Attendance
5.4 Cell Phones
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6. CODEOF CONDUCT 8
6.1 Ragging
6.2 Discipline
6.3 Lab Code
6.4 Punctuality
6.5 Academic Punishments
7. FACILITIES 11
7.1 Academic Facilities
7.1.1 Library
7.1.2 Laboratory Facilities - MCA Department
7.1.2.1 Language Laboratory
7.1.2.2 DBMS &Application Lab
7.1.2.3 Software Engineering Laboratory
7.1.2.4 OS and Networks Lab
7.1.3 Laboratory Facilities - MBA Department
7.1.4 Laboratory Facilities - Communication Department
7.2 General Facilities
7.2.1 Internet
7.2.2 WIFI Facility
8. SUPPORTSYSTEMS 12
8.1 Placements
8.1.1 Academic Requirement
8.1.2 Attendance
8.1.3 Limited Opportunity
8.1.4 Penalization for Non-acceptance
8.1.5 Commitment
8.1.6 All About You
8.2 Website
9. STUDENT MATTERS 14
9.1 Admission Procedure
9.1.1 Eligibility
9.1.1.1 Management Quota
9.1.1.2 Merit Quota
9.1.2 Filling in the Form
9.1.3 Documents & Admission
9.2 Fees
9.3 Examination System
9.3.1 Internal Evaluation - MCA
9.3.1.1 Theory
9.3.1.2 Practicals
9.3.2 External Evaluation
9.3.2.1 Theory
9.3.2.2 Practicals
9.3.3 Project Evaluation
9.4 Promotion / Detention Rules
9.5 Eligibility for Degree
9.5.1 Award of Division
9.5.2 Award of MCADegree
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9.6 Readmission Rules
9.6.1 Detained for Shortage of Attendance
9.7 Issue of Documents
9.7.1 Bus Passes and Bonafide
9.7.2 Originals
9.7.3 Memorandum of Marks
9.8 Scholarships
9.9 Violation of Academic Issues
9.9.1 Backlogs
9.9.2 Assignments
9.9.3 Seminars
9.10 Change of Address
9.11 Transfer of Admission
9.11.1 From College to College
10. STUDENTCLUBS 18
10.1 Literary Club
10.2 Cultural Club
10.3 Nature Club
10.4 IT Club
11. TEACHING-LEARNINGPROCESS 19
11.1 Conventional Learning Methodology
11.1.1 Lectures
11.1.2 Laboratories
11.1.3 Projects
11.2 New Teaching Methodology (Interactive Learning)
11.2.1 Learning Groups
11.2.2 Guest Lectures
11.2.3 Student Assignments
11.2.4 Student Seminars
11.2.5 Industry - Institute Interaction
11.2.6 Mini Projects
11.2.7 Industrial Tours
11.2.8 Adjunct Courses
11.2.9 Student Counselling
11.2.10 Alumni Association
11.2.11 IT Meets
11.3 Guidelines for Final year project work
11.4 Guidelines for Interactive Learning Methodology
11.4.1 Guest Lectures
11.4.2 Student Assignments
11.4.3 Student Seminars
11.4.4 Industry-Institute Interaction
11.4.5 Mini Projects
11.4.6 Adjunct Courses
11.4.7 Student Counselling
11.4.8 Alumni Association
12. CENTERSOFEXCELLENCE 26
12.1 Centre for Communications & Personality Development
12.2 Centre for Career Counselling
13. IMPORTANTRELIGIOUSFESTIVALS 26
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ACADEMIC DETAILS
1. Department Profile 27
2. Tree View-Theory 34
3. Almanac 35
4. Course Structure 36
5. Subject-Wise Details
5.1 Discrete Mathematics 37
5.2 Probability and Statistics 61
5.3 Computer programming and ProblemSolving 83
5.4 Elements of Information Technology 99
5.5 Modern Economic Analysis 115
6. Laboratory Details
6.1 Computer programming using C++ Lab 129
6.2 Elements of Information Technology Lab 137
7. Communication Skills 145
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ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS
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1. HISTORY
1.1 THEBEGINNING
It was in 1989 that Ramesh Nimmatoori, a young post-graduate in Computer Science and Engineering, dared to
dream. He made a humble but determined beginning withAurora Degree College, set up under the aegis of the
Aurora Educational Society. The college had four departments, namely mathematics, computer science, statistics,
and electronics, with 62 students. They were housed in a rented premises in the then suburban locality of
Habsiguda. The college was later shifted to Gandhinagar, but by December 1992, the college moved to its
current location at Chikkadpally, a bustling area in the heart of the city.
1.2 THELEAP
In 1993, two new departments were added -- biological sciences and commerce. The student strength rose to
600 that year. From then on, there was no looking back and by 1998, the Degree College had more than 2000
students enrolled in various branches of study, and is now rated among the top 20 degree colleges in the
country. In 1995, the Aurora Educational Society established a postgraduate college which offered two
programmes, namely, Master of Computer Applications and Master of Business Administration. In 1998,
Aurora touched new heights when it established its engineering college on a sprawling 600 acre campus. It
was a bold venture in the area of higher education. Not long after, four more engineering colleges came up,
followed closely by two postgraduate colleges. Today, Aurora happens to be one of the largest educational
groups in the state of Andhra Pradesh, with 17000 students on its rolls, more than 1400 faculty and around 500
administrative staff.
1.3 THE NAMEAND LOGO
Aurora the name for the college derives from aurora borealis, the celestial northern lights. It also has
association with the Sun God Apollo and the Roman Goddess of Dawn, Aurora. The name symbolises the
fusion of Indian and Western traditions of representing the Sun as a symbol of knowledge and power.
Education is a penance for knowledge and Aurora treats it thus. The logo has three critical components -- the
Italian colours lilac and wild pink; the Egyptian pyramid signifying the letter A, and most importantly, the logo
being emblematic of the spirit of the college i.e. the temple of learning.
1.4 THE ICONANDHERITAGE
Aurora is inspired by the great Indian Teacher Chanakya, who redefined the role of a teacher as being that of
a torchbearer of society. He gave the clarion call Tasmat Uttishta Bharata Oh Indian, Awake! Seeking
inspiration fromthis great Indian, Aurora imparts man-making education which is firmly rooted in Indias rich
tradition, with our focus clearly on modern science & technology.
1.5 THE TRADITIONS
Aurora is known for establishing unique traditions in every aspect of its functioning. Be it pedagogical
practices, advertising strategies, discipline, extra curricular activities and events, Aurora is in the forefront.
Today, it is no exaggeration that people across the country believe that Aurora is a trendsetter.
1.6 THECULTURE
Aurora nurtures a knowledge culture. It facilitates in tapping the latent potential of both the students and the
staff. Auroras students and faculty command a distinct recognition among their peers and counterparts. It is
this unique culture which has become the hallmark of Aurora.
1.7 THE VISION
Achieving high standards of excellence in computer education and research by synergizing professional
inputs, cutting edge technologies, learning ambience and social relevance.
1.8 THE MISSION
To groomhigh caliber software professionals who are familiar with cutting edges and emerging technologies
and who embrace continuous learning as the mission of their life and career.
1.9 QUALITYPOLICY
We at APGC, are committed to offer the best in class academic services to students in terms of quality
teaching, state-of-art infrastructure, continuous and updated curriculum, cutting edge professional inputs,
intense learning ambience and ceaseless search for excellence so that we become a leading school of com-
puter science in the country in a decade from now.
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2. THECOLLEGE
2.1 INTRODUCTION
The College is located at Ramanthapur, 10 km from the Secunderabad Railway Station. The college offers
postgraduate courses in Management and Computer Applications (MBA & MCA).
Aurora prepares not just students with PG degrees in their hands, but people with a rounded personality.
It is for this reason that Aurora has become a brand to be trusted among students looking for quality
education.
2.2 THEGOAL
In seeking to fulfill its comprehensive mission, Aurora pursues three principal institutional goals: effective
teaching, meaningful research, and service to society. Contribution towards the realization of these
goals essentially constitutes the standard by which members of the academic staff are evaluated.
2.2.1 RESEARCH
The college acknowledges that the preservation and expansion of knowledge through scholarly
enquiry are functions that distinguish institutions of higher learning. The institution believes that
scholarly enquiry promotes effective teaching, besides being a service to society. Aurora, therefore,
seeks to preserve knowledge in its archives and libraries; employs teaching faculty holding research
degrees awarded by reputed institutions of advanced education; honours those who achieve
distinction as scholars; maintains laboratories, research centers, and numerous administrative
entities that function to promote the expansion of knowledge.
2.2.2 TEACHING
Aurora is committed to the transmission of knowledge. The Institutions primary responsibility is
to its student clientele, and, in this regard, effective classroom teaching is Auroras most pervasive
medium for the dissemination of the results of its facultys scholarly endeavors. The central
concern of the Institution is, therefore, excellence in those instructional activities that provide
students with opportunities for a comprehensive education and a specialized professional training.
The Institution assigns substantial weight to teaching in its process of faculty evaluation,
recognizing that excellence requires not only knowledge on the part of a teacher but a continuing
quest for knowledge, a constant review of curricula and modern teaching methods, flexibility and
creativity in the classroom, and an unceasing effort to individualize instruction. Towards this end,
Aurora seeks to measure the quality of instruction through both student and peer evaluation, and
regularly subject its academic programs to external review by accrediting agencies.
2.2.3 TRAINING
Aurora is an educational institution striving to utilize the services of its highly motivated team of
people, whose collective expertise encompasses virtually every field of human endeavor for the
benefit of the community. Aurora reaches out to serve society by training young men and women
not only in their respective areas of specializations but also in all aspects of human development.
2.3 TIMINGS
The college functions 6 days a week, from 9:10 AM to 4:30 PM, with a lunch break of 40 minutes, from
12:30 to 1:10 PM.
3. COURSESOFFERED
The college offers two Post-Graduate Courses viz.,
1. Master of Computer Applications (MCA)
2. Master of Business Administration (MBA)
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3.1 MASTEROFBUSINESSADMINISTRATION
3.1.1 COURSEOBJECTIVE
The MBAdegree offered by the OUis a two-year programme which aims to equip students with the basic
knowledge of all areas of management and provide in-depth knowledge in a chosen area of specialization.
The first two semesters focus on the fundamentals of marketing, finance &human resources. Apart from
core specialization subjects, students are also taught general foundation courses like statistics, operations
research and operations management. The last two semesters provide in-depth knowledge in an area of
choice. In these semesters, students are taught general management subjects like strategic management
and technology management, which help themperformwell in middle-level managerial positions.
3.1.2 DISTINCTFEATURESOFTHISCOURSE
The MBAis a professional course comprising four main streams -- Marketing, Finance, Human Resources
and Systems . The student is expected to choose one of the above at the beginning of the Third Semester
in order to specialize in it.
3.1.3 GRADUATE DESTINATIONS
Students can seek admission into research programmes in various business schools across the globe.
They can also get into the executive-level or middle-level management positions. Some of the companies
which recruit our MBAs regularly are HSBC, GE, Satyam, Bajaj Alliance, Food World, Mudra, ICICI,
HDFC, SIS InfoTech, Mahindra Satyam, BloomSoft, Value Labs, HCL, Leisux, INGVaysya, Cap Gemini,
GarimIndustries Ltd, iGate Global Services, Deloitte, NCR, Choice Solutions, Amdocs etc.
3.2 MASTEROFCOMPUTERAPPLICATIONS
3.2.1 COURSEOBJECTIVE
The main objectives of the course are: to impart basic understanding of concepts, strategies, tools and
techniques of information technology; to provide a strong foundation in all technical aspects of computers
and their applications; to develop communication and soft skills necessary for IT professionals; and to
give hands-on experience in IT applications in industry through projects on computer application software.
3.2.2 DISTINCTFEATURESOFTHECOURSE
The program aims at imparting comprehensive knowledge with equal emphasis on theory and practice.
The course curriculum will have enough flexibility to enable a student to undertake advanced studies in
Computer Science.
3.2.3 GRADUATE DESTINATIONS
The MCA program prepares students to take up positions as Systems Analysts,
Systems Designers, System Developers and Managers in any field related to information technology.
4. FESTIVALS&EVENTS
Following are the important events in the Aurora calendar that all the colleges of Aurora Consortium
celebrate. These celebrations symbolize the cultural features that are unique to Aurora.
4.1 FESTIVALS
4.1.1 INDEPENDENCEDAY
August 15 is one of the most important days celebrated at Aurora. The day does not hold mere ceremonial
significance for us. On this day, the faculty, staff and students of Aurora reaffirm their commitment
towards the process of nation-building. Various social development activities and community services
are initiated on this day.
4.1.2 TEACHERSDAY
September 5, the birthday of Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, is celebrated as Teachers Day all over the
country. One of the important days in the Aurora calendar, it is a day on which students give the campus
a festive look. Cultural programs and a formal get-together mark the occasion. The faculty highlight the
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role and contribution of a teacher in a students life. The college presents the Best Teacher award for
teachers who have distinguished themselves in their fields. Senior teachers from other institutions are
also invited and honoured on this day.
4.1.3 GANESHCHATURTHI
On this day, the Aurora fraternity worships Lord Ganesha, also known as the Vighnaharta. His blessings
are sought for the smooth conduct of all activities. This year the chaturthi of the bright lunar fortnight
comes on 11
th
September 2010 and will be celebrated as the birthday of Lord Ganesha.
4.1.4 REPUBLICDAY
Celebrated on January 26, the Republic Day is another occasion when the staff and students get an
opportunity to uphold their commitment as responsible citizens of India and derive inspiration from the
great leaders and intellectuals whose vision has guided this nation on the path of progress.
4.1.5 GURUPURNIMA
The first guru, Sri Krishna Dvypayana (Vyasa Bhagavan), born on Ashada Purnima, is considered to be
the most revered among all the gurus. Aurora celebrates Guru Purnima in order to recognize his contribution
to the world of letters.
The college celebrated Guru Purnima on 25
th
July, 2010.
4.1.6 VASANTHAPANCHAMI
It is an auspicious day for the Aurora Consortium. On this day, in the year 1989, we laid the foundation
stone of theAURORAEDUCATIONALSOCIETY. On Vasantha Panchami, we worship Devi Saraswati -
- the Goddess of Learning and Intelligence.
The college celebrated Vasantha Panchami on 20
th
January, 2010.
4.2 EVENTSANDCELEBRATIONS
4.2.1 INDUCTIONDAY
Every year the new batch of students is warmly welcomed by the college. While the induction is meant
to make students feel at ease in their new environs, it has a serious purpose behind it. It is an initiation
into the culture and traditions upheld by the college. Students are primed about the rules and norms of
the college, and the challenges that they would encounter over the years in such a demanding course. A
week-long celebration consisting of lectures by distinguished personalities, cultural events, and a formal
get-together mark the induction process every year.
For the batchof 2009, the inductionday was heldonSeptember 4th, 2009.
4.2.2 FOUNDATIONDAY
On the Foundation Day of the college, an eminent personality is invited to give the Foundation Day
Lecture. This is the day when the college takes pride in reaffirming its commitment to the cause of
education.
The FoundationDay is heldonVasantha Panchami every year.
4.2.3 AURORAFAMILYDAY
The Aurora Family Day is a festive occasion organized every year by the Aurora Consortium. The staff
along with their families are invited for a get-together. It is an opportunity for everyone to know one
another and to strengthen personal and professional bonds.
TheAurora Family day is plannedtentatively inthe first weekof January, every year
4.2.4 ANNUALDAY
The annual day celebrations of the college take place at the end of the academic calendar. Sports, cultural
and literary competitions are conducted as a run-up to the main program. Parents, alumni, and other
guests are invited for the event. The annual day is an occasion for the college to speak about its
commitments and its achievements in the academic year. The annual report is presented to the college
board a week before the proposed day.
The annual day celebrations are plannedtentatively on10th during March/April of every year.
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4.3 EVENTS
4.3.1 NATIONALPAPERPRESENTATION
Anational level paper presentation is intended to be organized in the month of October. More than 200
colleges fromall over India are expected to participate. The event includes paper presentation. This event
will make Students & Faculty aware of the various developments in the field of Information Technology
& instill an interest for research for them.
For 2009-2010 academic year it was held on 9th &10th of February 2010.
4.3.2 ADJUNCTCOURSES
An adjunct course on LINUX Administration and Database Administration was conducted for the
faculty of Computer Applications on 5th, 6th &7th of March 2010.
5. RULES&REGULATIONS
5.1 DRESSCODE
Students must observe the following dress code:
Gents: Formal Shirt of Light CreamColor, Jet Black Trousers &Tie. Black Shoes, Belt and ID-Card.
Ladies: Formal Shirt of Light CreamColor, Jet Black Trousers, Half/full Shoes and ID-Card.
Please note that Jeans and T-shirts do not formpart of the dress code. Those who are improperly dressed, and
have a shabby appearance will not be allowed into the college premises.
5.2 IDCARDS
Students will be issued ID cards only after they fill up their details in a prescribed form that will be issued to
themat the time of registration. Students are expected to come with their blood group details for this purpose.In
case the card is lost, a duplicate IDcard will be issued against a payment of Rs 100. Students will not be allowed
into the college campus without the ID card.
5.3 ATTENDANCE
The continuous evaluation system adopted by the OU and the college clearly expects every student to be
responsible for regularity to class, internal tests and other tasks assigned to him/her in the course. As such,
students are advised not to absent themselves without the prior submission of leave letter to the respective
counselors.
1. Astudent has to put in a minimum of 75% attendance in aggregate of all the subjects in the semester.
2. Condonation of shortage of attendance in aggregate upto 10% (between 65% to 75%) in a semester may
be recommended by the College Academic Committee to the OU with supporting evidence only in
genuine and valid cases.
3. A student will not be promoted to the next semester unless he/she satisfies the attendance requirement
of the present semester.
4. Shortage of attendance below 65% in aggregate shall in no case be condoned.
5. Students whose shortage of attendance is not condoned are not eligible to take their examination of that
class and their registration shall stand cancelled. They may seek re-admission for that semester when
offered next.
6. A stipulated fee shall be payable towards condonation of shortage of attendance.
7. Students coming out in the middle of a class or entering late into a class will be seriously viewed and
attendance will not be given for that hour.
8. The monthly attendance of each student, along with the unit test marks, will be displayed on the
notice board in the first week of every month. Also a copy of that will be sent to the parents at the address
registered with the college. Postage costs will be borne by the student.
9. Students will not be given lab attendance unless they submit practical records of the previous lab
sessions.
10. In case of ill-health, a student has to submit the proof or evidence of absence and the leave application
to the Principal/Head of the department, immediately on rejoining the college. Late submission of leave
application will not be accepted for consideration at the time of condonation of shortfall of attendance.
11. Students with less than 75% of attendance will not be permitted to participate in co-curricular, extra
curricular and sports activities. No college facilities like bus pass, travel concessions, scholarships will
be admissible for them.
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5.4 CELLPHONES
Students are NOT allowed to keep their cell phones in SWITCH ON mode on the college campus. If any
student is found in possession of camera cell phone, it will be seized by the college and will not be returned.
6. CODE OF CONDUCT
6.1 RAGGING
Ragging is a cognizable and punishable offence.Any student found indulging in ragging will be dealt with
severely as per the existing orders. It is to be noted that ragging in professional colleges has been banned
within or outside the college by the Government of AP, vide Act 26 1997. An extract of the Act is given below.
Ragging includes words either spoken or written, signs, sounds, gestures and visible representation meant to
harass and torture. Ragging is an act which causes or is likely to cause insult/annoyance or fear/apprehension/
threat/ intimidation/outrage of modesty/injury to a student.The full text of Act 26 is placed in the college library.
PENALTYFORRAGGING
S No Nature of Ragging Punishment
1 Teasing, embarrassing and humiliating
Imprisonment upto 6 months or fine upto
Rs.1000/- or both.
2
Assaulting or using criminal force or
criminal intimidation or both
Impri sonment upto 1 year or fine upto
Rs. 2000/ -
3
Wrongful restraining or confining or
causing hurt
Impri sonment upto 2 years or fi ne upto
Rs. 5000/ -
4
Causing grievous hurt, kidnapping or
raping or committing unnatural offence
Imprisonment upto 5 years and fine upto
Rs.10000/-
5 Causing death or abetting suicide
Impri sonment upto 10 years and fi ne upto
Rs. 50, 000/
1. Students convicted of an offence under section 4 of this Act and punished with imprisonment for a term
shall be dismissed from the educational institution.
2. Any student convicted and punished under this Act for more than six months shall not be admitted in
any other educational institution.
3. Any student dismissed from a college for ragging will be debarred from seeking admission in any other
course of study in any college / university in the state.
4. A student against whomthere is prima facie evidence of ragging in any formwill be suspended fromthe
college immediately.
6.2 DISCIPLINE
Discipline is a priority for the success of any venture. Be it related to matters of general conduct, attendance,
punctuality, dress, body language or academic performance, discipline has a bearing on all aspects of a
students personality. At Aurora, discipline is valued and promoted, both among the staff and students.
Students are expected to abide by the rules of the college and refrain from any activity that harms the dignity
of the individual or casts a slur on the image of the institution. Any violation of the college norms shall be dealt
with strictly and the student will be penalized accordingly. Cooperation of parents/guardians is essential in
this regard.
1. Consumption of alcoholic beverages, narcotics and other addictive substances on the college premises,
or coming to college having consumed elsewhere, will entail dismissal from the college and conduct
certificate will not be issued.
2. Smoking on the college campus is strictly prohibited and the student will be suspended fromthe college
with immediate effect and recommended for punishment as per Section 4 of the Cigarettes and Other
Tobacco Products Act 2003.
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3. Ragging is a legal offence as per Act 26 of the AP Legislative Assembly 1997. Students are cautioned
against indulging in any activity that may be classified as ragging in and around the college campus,
in student buses or at boarding/alighting points. Those found aiding and abetting are also equally
accountable for their actions. Ragging entails suspension, dismissal, heavy fines, and imprisonment.
4. Adherence to the Dress Code laid down by the college is a must.
5. Entry shall not be given if a student is late to college. Students are supposed to be present in the college
by 9:00 AM. The entry of latecomers will be regulated and monitored by the college authorities.
6. The kind of language we use is a reflection of our personality and our home environment. Use of slang
and abusive language, whistling in the college premises, are strictly discouraged and liable to be penalized.
7. Not attending classes while being on the premises and en masse absenteeism are both viewed with
displeasure.
8. Students are advised to mind their body language. It communicates more than words. Slouching in
corridors or sitting on the parapet walls or on the steps at the entrance are discouraged.
9. Any damage to college property, scribbling on walls, tables, drawing boards, is seriously viewed.
10. Rising to greet when a teacher enters the classroom adds value to ones own personality Conduct
towards faculty and peer group should be impeccable.
6.3 LABCODE
1. Students should report to the scheduled labs as per the time table.
2. Students who turn up late to the labs will in no case be permitted to performthe experiment scheduled for
the day.
3. After completion of the programs, certification of the staff in-charge in the observation book is necessary.
4. Students should bring a notebook of about 100 pages and should write the programs before entering the
Lab.
5. Any damage to the compuler or burn-out of components will be viewed seriously and is punishable
by penalty or the dismissal the student from the lab for the semester/year.
6. Students should be present in the labs for the total scheduled duration.
7. Requisition of Systems for extra practice should be done 24 hrs. prior to the practice.
6.4 PUNCTUALITY
1. All students shall strictly observe the college time. If any student comes late to college, he/she will not
be allowed to the class and attendance will not be marked for that hour.
2. If anyone is found to be regularly late, administrative action, including suspension from classes shall be
initiated.
3. All the students should strictly adhere to the deadlines specified for the submission of assignments,
laboratoryreports, seminar and project reports, failing which students will be given academic punishment(s).
6.5 ACADEMICPUNISHMENTS
Anovel method of correcting acts of misconduct has been devised. Instead of monetary penalization, students
will be given academic punishments for a range of undesirable acts, like giving proxy attendance, not attending
classes regularly, cutting classes while on campus, not observing the dress code, scribbling on college property,
littering the classroom and many more such acts.
1. Make a power point presentation on a specified topic.
2. Give a seminar to junior students on a relevant topic.
3. Come to college on holidays or during vacation to take an examination based on previous question
papers.
4. Student may lose attendance for 5 days.
5. Prepare notes for all the subjects.
6. If found guilty of littering the campus, the student may have to conduct sanitation week in the college
premises.
7. If a student loses a library book, he/she has to replace the book with a new copy and write a brief on
library management.
8. Present a seminar on an issue related to environmental science.
9. Present a seminar on the topic covered in the class and clarify peer doubts.
10. Take notes of the hour and answer students queries on that topic in the next class.
11. Gather information on a topic that is not discussed in the prescribed textbook.
12. Write an appropriate program and submit along with updated observation book.
13. Student must give an apology letter stating that he/she will lose 2 days attendance if the action is
repeated.
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14. Must answer a previous exam paper.
15. Prepare 20 objective-type questions from one unit and submit it in two days time.
16. Collect 5 communication protocols and explain themin detail.
17. In the event of harassing a junior, the student offers a detailed apology in the juniors class.
18. Give a seminar on the subject that is a pre-requisite for the course under study.
19. Give a detailed list of the subjects studied so far.
20. Attempt not less than 3 lab exercises.
21. Type chapter notes. This will:
i. increase notemaking speed
ii. the student will learn something about what is being typed
iii. spellings of some key words will be known
iv. notes can be verified by the teacher and circulated to others in the class.
22. Download at least 1MB of tutorials from the Internet on a specified subject.
23. Record his/her reading voice on a cassette for a chapter or part, and submit to the teacher.
24. Do a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities &Threats) analysis chart in a creative fashion under
the direction of one of the disciplinary committee members.
25. Do a role play in English on the topic given by the teacher for at least 7 minutes.
26. Prepare a mind map on the entire topic and present it to the class.
27. Give an extempore for at least 5 minutes on the topic being dealt with in the next class.
28. Solve a problem in the presence of the teacher from the syllabus covered.
29. Solve five problems related to the topic of the day.
30. Present the topic under discussion to the class in the next period itself.
31. Learn ten words given by the teacher. Student should write the synonyms, antonyms, and the different
forms of those words.
32. Write a composition (250-300 words) on a theme suggested by the teacher.
33. Answer essay type questions pertaining to the unit under discussion.
34. Derive all the equations present in the entire syllabus
35. Present a seminar on any topic in the presence of the Principal and the HOD.
36. Prepare a brief on a mathematician who has made significant contribution to the field.
37. Write five or more derivations pertaining to any subject and circulate copies in the class.
38. Repeat the same topic next day and engage the class for the full hour.
39. Prepare charts of difficult circuits, computer programs etc., for display in class.
40. Collect 50-100 jokes related to science &technology.
41. Draw cartoons for any magazine related to science & technology.
42. Suggest two books which are not available in the library. The title, author, publisher, cost, and the name
of the book shop where they are available should also be mentioned.
43. Download the literature on current trends pertaining to the subject under discussion.
44. Write an assignment three times on the topic of the day.
45. Give a seminar on discipline and respect.
46. Submit a write-up on discipline in public places.
47. Write a board stating, Smoking is injurious to health.
48. Write a board stating, Tobacco is injurious to health.
49. If a student is found scribbling on college property, he/she has to clean up the scribbled space.
50. Drawall circuit diagrams in the lab once.
51. Collect the profile of the faculty holding the session.
52. Submit wall posters for the lab.
53. Submit a write-up on the history of the college.
54. Collect information on advancements related to his/her field.
55. Collect related news fromvarious journals.
56. Write a paper.
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7. FACILITIES
7.1 ACADEMICFACILITIES
7.1.1 LIBRARY
Our library is truly a learning centre with reading space for more than 100 students at a time. The library
stocks textbooks, reference books, journals, magazines and newspapers. It also has an archive of
editorial clippings on interesting subjects.The library subscribes to a large number of national and
international journals and also has a very large collection of reference books on advanced disciplines. In
all, the college library has more than 15,000 volumes and around 6000 titles covering various advanced
topics pertaining to the subjects offered by the college. Adynamic CDlibrary presents data and information
in bytes. Furthermore, information is compiled for the students from various international websites and
is collated topic-wise in the form of printouts. All this is made available free to the students. Supporting
this excellent library facility is the computer-enabled digital library giving access to various international
journals. The college libraryalso offers reprographic facilities like photocopying, lamination, spiral binding,
etc.The library provides facility for the borrowing of books, magazines, freeware and CDs. There is a
separate Book Bank facility supported by the Social Welfare Department of the Governmet of Andhra
Pradesh for SC/ST students.
7.1.2 ISSUEOFLIBRARYCARDS
Every MCA student will be issued three library cards. The student is entitled to borrow a book, CD or
bound journal. MCA students should produce the fee receipt and three stamp-size and one pass-port
size colour photos. Students who secure the first rankin their class or have attendance of more than
85%will be issued an additional library card. Astudent can keep the book for a maximumperiod of 10
daysand CDfor a maximumperiod of 2 days.Bound journals should be returned within seven days. Afine
of Rs. 5/- per day on each book will be charged for late returns. Alost book has to be replaced with the
same title or an amount two times the cost of the bookshouldbe paid.
7.1.3 LABORATORYFACILITIESMCADEPARTMENT
7.1.3.1 LANGUAGESLABORATORY
The MCAdepartment has established a networked laboratory with 150 computer systems (90 systems
in Lab-1 & 60 Systems in Lab-2). The lab has facilities for learning and enhancing skills in all the
necessary programming languages like C/C++, MS-Office, Oracle, OS (Unix), Java, Rational Rose etc.
The college has in its possession legal versions of all the above programming languages. Efforts are
afoot to enhance the facilities in the laboratory in order to encourage projects and research work in the
area of computer science.
7.1.3.2 DBMS AND APPLICATIONS LABORATORY
This lab, with 90 networked systems, is the hub of all database-related activities. It is equipped with
legal versions of Oracle 8i, Data Warehousing and Data Mining tools and other related software. The
lab is also equipped with all the necessary aids and tools to facilitate training and applications
development in the areas of Multimedia and Web-based applications. Students can also develop
projects relating to Data Mining and Warehousing. In addition, the lab has Microsoft development
tools on different platforms.
7.1.3.3 SOFTWARE ENGINEERINGLABORATORY
The lab has state-of-the-art hardware and software facilities with 60 computers innetwork for necessary
skill upgradation and development work in software engineering. Supported by specialized software
tools like Designer2000 and Rational Rose, this lab has enabled the development of the online
examination software. Developed by a team of experts in the college itself, this software has been in
use for the past three years in the college for internal assessment.
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7.1.3.4 OS AND NETWORKS LABORATORY
This is a lab with 60 networked state-of- the-art computing facilities. The lab has all the popular
operating systems like all the variants of Microsoft OS products, SCO Unix, and Linux. Acore group
of faculty has been active in the Linux club that is proactively promoting and popularizing the concept
of Open Source Technologies. The group also conducts adjunct courses regularly in OST for students
who have undergone a course in at least one operating system. The team is also working towards
developing some projects in this area. The lab is equipped with suitable software for application and
reasearch work in networking technologies such as protocols and cryptographic implementations.
7.1.4 LABORATORYFACILITIES- MBADEPARTMENT
7.1.4.1 LANGUAGESLABORATORY
The MBAdepartment has established a networked laboratory with 120 computer systems (90 systems
in Lab-1 & 30 Systems in Lab-2). The lab has facilities for learning and enhancing skills in all the
necessary programming languages like MS-Office, Visual Foxpro, SPSS, MSDNetc. The college has
in its possession legal versions of all the above software.
7.1.4.2 DBMS AND APPLICATIONS LABORATORY
This lab, with 120 networked systems, is the hub of all database-related activities. It is equipped with
legal versions of softwares. The lab is also equipped with all the necessary aids and tools to facilitate
training and applications development in the areas of multimedia and web-based applications. Students
can also develop projects relating to Client Server Applications. In addition, the lab has Microsoft
development tools.
7.2 GENERALFACILITIES
7.2.1 INTERNET
The college has broadband internet connectivity through optical fibre line, enabling students to have
access to online resources. This will establish an essentially electronic and digital virtual private network
for continuous communication. Internet connectivity is especially important for the library as it provides
access to the libraries worldwide. Moreover, all the computer systems are being brought under an
intranet, which helps in effective and paperless communication for the entire college.
7.2.2 WIFI Facility
The entire college campus is WIFI enabled and one can browse internet from anyplace on the campus.
8. SUPPORTSYSTEMS
8.1 PLACEMENTS
1. The Placement Cell of Aurora works in tandemwith the students to compile information about each and
every student under an exhaustive portfolio titled All About You.
2. Interaction with companies and organizations in the form of emailing, phone calls, mailing brochures,
hospitality and scheduling placement activities is done weeks in advance by the placement cell.
3. The placement cell coordinates with the Centre for Career Counselling, where the students are educated
about the difference between a job and a career. The Centre for Career Counselling strives to provide
information and counselling to students, which will enable them to identify not only their strengths but
also the areas that need further improvement.
4. The cell is also assisted by the Centre for Communication. This centre does the preliminary job of
scouting and grooming students who are potentially employable. The confidence and self-esteem of
students is enhanced through SWOT sessions, group discussions, mock interviews and sessions on
bodylanguage, etiquette etc.
5. All the final year students undergo interaction with the placement officer. During these interactive
sessions, the officer acquaints them with the activities of the placement cell and helps them to prioritize
their future plans.
6. Student placement coordinators are selected fromfinal years in the months of Julyor August. Coordinators
are given the necessary orientation for helping their team members.
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7. Students are categorized on the basis of their performance in an aptitude test conducted by the cell and
the centre for communication in the month of June. Based on the results, the students are groomed to
evolve into confident young professionals ready for recruitment.
8. An e-mail club has been established to facilitate communication with the students.
9. A placement fete is organized by the students. Distinguished personalities from the industry are invited
to address and motivate them about the prospects of early career placements. This fete also includes
several competitions like best resume competition, mock interviews, group discussions, JAM sessions,
interview-based dressing, etc.
10. The alumni of Aurora working in reputed organizations are invited to interact with students and explain
their strategies and share their hands-on experiences with them.
11. Students are encouraged to collect and display placement-related literature on the notice board.
The best contribution is duly rewarded.
Based on the observations made in the last few years with regard to the attitude of students
towards placements, the placement cell has come out with a Placement Charter, which sets guidelines
for the system to be effective and to maximize results. An extract from the charter is given below.
8.1.1 ACADEMICREQUIREMENT
It is mandatory for a student to have a consistent academic record which would be measured in
terms of their percentage of marks. Aggregate must be 65% and above. Also, he / she should not
have any backlogs.
8.1.2 ATTENDANCE
A student with more than 75% attendance in each and every subject can get the benefit of registering
for placements.
8.1.3 LIMITEDOPPORTUNITY
In order to provide a fair chance to each student, a maximum of 3 opportunities for placements will
be given. The students are advised to take this seriously and prepare themselves to ensure their
selection.
8.1.4 PENALIZATIONFORNON-ACCEPTANCE
A student once selected in a particular company is required to take up the appointment, failing
which he may not be allowed to participate in the placement process.
8.1.5 COMMITMENT
Recruiting companies generally have a stipulation that an employee should hold the job at least for
a period of two years. The placement cell expects this commitment to be present in all the selected
students.
8.1.6 ALLABOUTYOU
To facilitate the employer to have an insight into all the aspects of the prospective employee, the
placement cell makes available a copy of All About You directly to the prospective employers.
8.2 WEBSITE
Our website www.aurora.ac.in is a mine of information. Provided in the most interactive manner, it helps
in establishing a virtual family of students, faculty and parents.
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9. STUDENT MATTERS
9.1 ADMISSION PROCEDURE
Students should have completed their study upto Degree level, and appeared for the ICET examination
Integrated Common Entrance Test (ICET) for Admission into M.B.A. / M.C.A. Courses of all Universities in
the Andhra Pradesh and their Affiliated Colleges (conducted on behalf of APSCHE).
9.1.1ELIGIBILITY
1. The candidates should be Indian Nationals and should satisfy local/non-local status requirements
laid down in the Andhra Pradesh Educational Institutions (Regulations of Admission) order, 1974 as
amended upto date (As per G.O. Ms No : 108, Higher Education Dept., dated 30-7-2005).
2. The candidates other than Indian nationals should satisfy the rules of the Universities concerned.
3. Apass (or) appeared at the final year examination of Bachelors Degree (except BOLand BFA) of any
University in Andhra Pradesh or any other university recognized as equivalent thereto.
4. The candidates seeking admission into MBA course should have passed a Bachelors Degree
Examination of not less than three years duration from any recognized University or equivalent
thereof besides passing SSC or equivalent examination with Mathematics as one of the subjects.
5. The candidates seeking admission into MCA course should have passed Bachelors Degree
Examination of not less than 3 years duration in any discipline with Mathematics at 10+2 level (OR)
should have passed Bachelors Degree Examination of not less than 3 years duration in any discipline
with Mathematics as one of the subjects.
6 The candidates who are appearing for the final year degree examination shall also be eligible to
appear for ICET- 2010.
9.1.2 FILLINGINTHEFORM
The candidates are required to fill up an application form in their own handwriting giving all their
personal and academic details. This will enable proper communication between the college and the
students.
9.1.3 DOCUMENTS FOR ADMISSION
Candidates should submit their admission forms with the allotment letter either issued by the
convener or the management, along with one set of photocopies of the following certificates:
1. Transfer Certificate from the Institution where the candidate last studied
2. Date of Birth Certificate & SSC Memorandum of Marks
3. Migration Certificate by students coming from other than Osmania University
4. Bonafide Certificate for classes I to XII
5. Income Certificate of the parent/guardian (if necessary)
6. Nativity Certificate from the Mandal Revenue Officer (if necessary)
7. Caste/Community Certificate froman officer, not belowthe rank of Mandal Revenue Officer (if
necessary)
Note: The college reserves the right to cancel the admission of a candidate at any stage if it is
detected that the admission is against the rules and regulations of the University.
9.2 FEES
Conveners Quota Management Quota
I Year
Tuition Fee Rs.27,000 Rs.78,000
Student Expenses Rs. 5,500 Rs. 5,500
II Year
Tuition Fee Rs.26,700 Rs.63,000
Student Expenses Rs. 2,500 Rs. 2,500
III Year
Tuition Fee Rs.24,300 Rs.63,000
Student Expenses Rs. 2,500 Rs. 2,500
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9.2.1MODE OF PAYMENT
Two separate crossed Demand Drafts/Bankers Cheques for Rs. 26,700 and Rs. 6,500 drawn on any
nationalized bank favouring the Principal, Auroras PGCollege, and payable at Hyderabad, need
to be submitted along with registration.Those who fail to make the payment before the last date will
have to pay fine as detailed below, in addition to the tuition and other fees.
Period : 10 Days -- Rs.100
Next 20 days @ Rs.10 per day
The fine amounts may be added to the student expenses and consolidated Demand Drafts/Bankers
Cheques may be taken as outlined above.Tuition fees will not be accepted beyond 20 days and
admission of defaulters will be cancelled.
Registration
After payment of the fee, the student shall have to register for Odd Semester and shall attend the
counseling as per the schedule.
MCA - II year : 2nd August
MCA - III year : 3rd August
The following are to be produced at the time of registration:
1. Fee payment receipt
2. 6 stamp-size photographs
3. 6 window envelopes with postage worth Rs 5 affixed on each, and 4 envelopes with postage
worth Rs 25 affixed on each.
NOTE
1.Parents are requested to accompany their wards for registration on the scheduled dates.
2. For students of SC and ST communities, fee is not collected from the eligible students,
inanticipation of sanction of schlorship from the government. (Please contact the office for
details.) SC/ST/BC students who are not sanctioned scholarships should clear all fee dues
before obtaining their certificates.
9.3 EXAMINATION SYSTEM
The examination system consists of internal exams and end exams. Internal exams are conducted by the
college on behalf of the Osmania Unversity . The end examination will be conducted by Osmania University.
The performance of a student in each semester shall be evaluated subject-wise with a maximum of 100
marks for theory and 50 marks for practical subject. In addition, industry-oriented mini project, seminar
and project work shall be evaluated for 25 marks.
For theory & practical subjects , the distribution shall be 20 marks & 25 marks for internal evaluation and
80 marks for theory and 50 marks for practical end examination.
9.3.1 INTERNAL EVALUATION- MCA
9.3.1.1 THEORY
The classes which shall be on a semester basis, shall have two tests which includes two internal
tests for 20 marks. All the tests are of one hour duration. The performance in the best two
internal tests will be considered. The distribution of syllabus for conducting the tests shall be as
follows : -
1 - 2 Units - I Internals
3 - 4 Units - II Internals
9.3.1.2 PRACTICALS
For Practical subjects, there shall be a continuous evaluation during the semester for 25 sessional
marks and 50 end examination marks. Of the 25 marks for Internals, 12.5 marks shall be awarded
for I Lab Internals and 12.5 marks for the II Lab Internals.
9.3.2EXTERNALEVALUATION
9.3.2.1 THEORY
The performance of a student in each semester shall be evaluated subject-wise with a maximum
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of 100 marks . In addition, industry-oriented mini project, seminar and project work shall be
evaluated for Grading for MBAand 25 marks for MCArespectively.
For theory subjects, the distribution shall be 20 marks for internal evaluation and 80 marks for
the end examination.
9.3.2.2 PRACTICALS
The end examination shall be conducted at the concerned colleges by the external examiner from
other college. The external examiner is appointed by the Osmania University. The evaluation of
papers is for 50.
Note: A student has to carry the hall ticket and identity card to the examination centre , else the
student may not be permitted to write the exam. Students are instructed not to carry any
objectionable material to the exam hall. All the students have to produce their hall tickets to the
invigilators and should be present in the examination hall at least 15 minutes before the
commencement of the examination.Any student found guilty of malpractice/improper conduct is
liable to disciplinary action as per the Osmania University Malpractice Rules. All such cases
are referred to the College Malpractice Prevention Committee, which, after going through the
reports, submits its recommendations to the Osmania Unversity Malpractice Committee
(Controller of Examinations) that has the final authority to decide the case.
9.3.3 EVALUATIONOFPROJECT
Students will have to take up an industry-oriented mini project, in collaboration with an industry of
their specialization, during the academic year for MBA - II year and MCA - III year. The Major
Project is done in II Semester, MCAIII year.
9.4 PROMOTION/ DETENTIONRULES
The student is required to put in a minimum of 75% of attendance for promotion from I semester as well
as II semester as per the Osmania University rules. The promotion of the student from I year to II year
is required to pass 75%of subjects for both the semesters ( I Sem & II Sem ) for MBA Course and 50%
of subjects is required to pass for the both semesters ( I Sem & II Sem ) for MCA Course, after I year and
75% of subjects by the end of II year.
9.5 ELIGIBILITY FOR DEGREE
9.5.1 AWARDOFDIVISION
All the students who have fulfilled the academic requirements as per the OU rules are awarded
division in the following four classes:
1. First Class with distinction 70% and above
2. First Class Below 70% but not less than 60%
3. Second Class Below 60% but not less than 50%
4. Pass Below 50% but not less than 40%
9.5.2 AWARDOF MCADEGREE
A student will be declared eligible for the award of MCA Degree provided he/she fulfills the
following academic regulations:
i. The student who has pursued a course of study for not less than three academic years for
MCAand completes the same in not more than double the academic years.
ii. A student who fails to fulfill all the academic requirements for the award of the degree within
3/3 years (regular student) from the time of admission, shall forfeit the seat in the course and
the seat shall stand cancelled.
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9.6 RE-ADMISSIONRULES
9.6.1 DETAINEDFORSHORTAGEOFATTENDANCE
A student detained for shortage of attendance has to seek readmission in the same semester/class,
and should register at the beginning of the semester/year only. Attendance is considered from day
one onwards.
9.7 ISSUEOFDOCUMENTS
9.7.1 BUS PASSES AND BONAFIDES
Students are required to submit their applications for bus passes and bonafides in schedule time
and collect the same day. This work has to be done only during a free period. A student found
irregular to college may be denied the pass.
9. 7.2 ORIGINALS
The original certificates and memoranda of marks submitted by the student will not be returned
during the study period. They can be issued to the student for valid reasons, after seeking approval
from the Principal. Students should submit an application to the Principal requesting for the same.
The documents have to be returned to the college at the earliest.
9.7.3 MEMORANDUMOFMARKS
The examination cell at the college will give the memoranda of marks after they have been issued by
the university.
9.8 SCHOLARSHIPS
All the SC, ST, and BC students can apply for scholarships, subject to fulfillment of annual income
criteria. Fresh applications for scholarships have to be submitted at the College office.
The documents to be enclosed with the application are:
1. Caste & Income certificates issued by the MRO
2. Photocopies of SSC, intermediate marks memo
3. Transfer certificate
4. Photocopy of parents electoral card/ration card
The following are the rules and regulations pertaining to scholarships:
1. Candidates seeking fee exemption have to submit their application form within the stipulated
time failing which will not be eligible for exemption.
2. Students with less than 75% attendance are not eligible for maintenance allowance.
3. Students applying for scholarships have to open a savings bank account with any nationalized
bank before submitting the application form.
4. The renewal of scholarships will be recommended to the authorities concerned only if the
candidate secures 75% attendance and gets promoted to the next class/semester.
Note : On scrutiny, if any student is found producing wrong evidence or information he/she will
be rusticated from the college.
9.9 VIOLATION OF ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
9.9.1 BACKLOGS
It has been observed that students do not take the end semester/year exams seriously and
consequently perform poorly. This not only puts unnecessary pressure on the students but also
projects a negative image of the college. In order to discourage students fromaccumulating backlogs,
the college has decided to impose the academic punishment.
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9.9.2 ASSIGNMENTS
The students should submit their assignments as per the schedule given in the student handbook.
The defaulters will not be allowed to write the corresponding unit test.
9.9.3 SEMINARS
The students should submit their synopsis one week before the scheduled date. The synopsis
should mention the books referred to. Students who fail to give the seminar on the prescribed date
and time will have to give the seminar on another day approved by the coordinator for twice the
time of the normal seminar.
9.10 CHANGEOFADDRESS
In case of change in permanent/contact address, students are required to incorporate the same in the
registration cards to be filled by them at the beginning of every semester. If there is a change in the
middle of any semester, students can forward an application for change of address to the college office
through the Administrative Officer.
9.11 TRANSFEROFADMISSION
9.11.1FROMCOLLEGETOCOLLEGE
The transfer of admissions fromone college to another college will be considered on grounds of ill health
for students of second year only. Students who desire a transfer fromone college to another shall submit
their applications to the Commissioner, Technical Education, Government of Andhra Pradesh, along with
the following documents:
1. No objection certificates from both the colleges
2. Medical certificate froma Civil Assistant Surgeon working in a government hospital.
Note: Transfer of students of the III year MCA,may be considered on very serious health grounds.
10. STUDENTCLUBS
The Aurora ethos believes that true education can be accomplished not through imposition but through
aspiration. Nothing can accomplish this better than the club activities that are by the students, of the students
and for the students.
10.1 LITERARYCLUB
The literary club organizes activities like debate, education, essay writing, and general quiz during the academic
year. Competitions are organized on special days like August 15 and the Annual Day. Students with talent and
inclination are motivated to participate. The club also provides a forum for developing communication skills
and cultivating a creative outlook towards their profession.
10.2 CULTURALCLUB
Under the umbrella of the cultural club, students are encouraged to organize dramas, music, painting, singing
& dance competitions, etc. These activities tap the creativity of students and go a long way in making them
successful as creative professionals. Such activities hone their personalities and allowthemto be in sync with
other aspects of their being.
10.3 NATURECLUB
This club promisses to rediscover man as part of the wonderful creation called Nature. Students here are
involved in photo exhibitions, nature protection activities and awarenes-building programs especially on
sustainable development.
10.4 ITCLUB
This club is a reflection of newideas in the field of information technology. It shares the latest information on
emerging trends, events and personalities involved in designing and working of technologies.
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11. TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS
The college is making all attempts in right earnest to fulfil its mandate of becoming a world class institution
of higher learning. The newteaching methodology is a major step in this direction. The salient feature of
the methodology is that it synthesizes conventional mechanisms of learning such as lectures, lab
sessions and projects, with interactive teaching-learning aids like seminars, guest lectures, expert sessions,
industrial visits, and assignments.
11.1 CONVENTIONAL LEARNING METHODOLOGY
11.1.1LECTURES
Lectures are designed to provide the framework of a subject. They normally last for an hour and are given
by expert faculty. Students are expected to note the main points. Handouts summarizing the important
points or explaining complex concepts are frequently given. OHPs, LCDs, smart classrooms and other
such advanced teaching aids are used to enrich the lectures.
11.1.2 LABORATORIES
Laboratory work is essential to science and engineering. It provides students with an opportunity to
apply their knowledge and develop appropriate practical skills. Both group and individual project work is
undertaken in the scheduled laboratory sessions.In addition to the programs prescribed in the syllabi,
students are expected to carry out application-oriented and advanced experiments in the laboratories.
11.1.3 PROJECTS
The knowledge acquired by the students during the course of their studies is reflected in the project work
undertaken. The project delineates not only the knowledge of students in various theoretical courses,
but also shows the applicational skills of the candidate. Needless to say that the project report submitted
by the student would be referred to a group of experts for assessment. The serious involvement of staff
members in the students project work will go a long way in increasing their rapport with the students and
the department also benefits by way of infrastructure and development.
11.2 NEW TEACHINGMETHODOLOGY(INTERACTIVELEARNING)
The interactive learning methodology was introduced in the academic year 2004-05. After observing the
workings of the new methodology on a pilot basis during the last four years and the benefits it yielded, it was
felt necessary to implement the concept more rigorously in order to derive maximumadvantage of this concept.
It aims at giving the students experience in the practical implementation of theoretical concepts and stimulates
their interest in changing technologies.
11.2.1 LEARNINGGROUPS
An innovative concept of learning groups has been introduced to make learning truly interactive
and creative. The students in each class are facilitated to form learning groups of three each. Each
learning group is named after a scientist. It is mandatory for the students to know the contributions
of the scientist after whom the group is named. The group is also expected to submit a profile of the
scientist to the organizer. The idea behind learning groups is to enhance interaction and teamwork
among the students. Separate learning groups are formed for various activities. Each learning
group is guided by a faculty organizer and is ranked based on performance.
11.2.2 GUESTLECTURES
In addition to the curriculum designed by the university, the students need to be exposed to the
latest developments in the field. In view of this, the college invites experts from the industry and
centres of higher learning for giving lectures on topics of current interest. Guest lectures inculcate
rich insights and inspire students to identify the thrust areas for individual and collective excellence.
They go a long way in providing a thorough understanding of concepts, new application areas and
developments which a student may not get exposed to otherwise.
19
11.2.3 STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS
The submission of assignments is mandatory for all the learning groups. The learning group is
given a set of assignments normally from the question bank on each subject. The handbook provides
a question bank for each unit (minimum of 30 questions) with questions drawn from the Osmania
University Examinations. These assignments will enable the students to prepare well for the final
examinations. Each learning group has to submit 5 assignments in all from every subject.
11.2.4 STUDENTSEMINARS
The faculty and all the students are conscious of the importance of student seminars, which form
an important aspect of the new teaching methodology. The seminars are meant to instill confidence
in students and to motivate them constantly to improve both their domain knowledge and
communicative competence. The student seminars have been introduced to hone presentation
skills of the students in order to give them the confidence to aspire for better career opportunities.
11.2.5 INDUSTRY-INSTITUTE INTERACTION
A continuous and healthy interaction with industries is essential for any post graduate college to
retain its dynamism. This will go a long way in upgrading the skills of the staff and the students.
With this objective, Auroras P.G. College is on the verge of signing MOUs with industries. This
is an important step in identifying the common working areas for mutual benefit.
11.2.6 MINI PROJECTS
The goal of the mini projects is to get the student to explore research and development initiatives
in a specific area. The mini projects commence in summer. The projects are undertaken in an
industry or research lab or other academic institutions, as decided by the project advisor. It may,
in some cases, result in a student continuing the work for the final project also, with the concurrence
of the department.
11.2.7 INDUSTRIAL/ EDUCATIONALTOURS
It is important for students of technical education to keep themselves abreast of changes taking
place in the industry. Towards this end, the college regularly organizes industrial tours. Every
semester, students are expected to visit at least one industry or company, either Indian or
multinational. They must prepare in advance a detailed note on the industry to be visited. Information
could be collected from the website of the company or any other source. The students, guided by
the faculty, shall conduct a survey/interview of the people and the place visited and then prepare
a detailed report of the tour for a class presentation.
11.2.8ADJUNCTCOURSES
The adjunct instructor integrates academic content from the lecture with study strategies/ techniques
in order to improve problem-solving skills. Every year during the intervening period of I & II
semesters, each department conducts at least one adjunct course in the areas not covered by the
university curriculum. A minimum of three adjunct courses are to be conducted based on the
response, availability of resource persons and the necessary inputs for conducting the courses.
11.2.9 STUDENTCOUNSELLING
For the creation of a healthy academic atmosphere in the college, interaction between the students
and the staff is essential. Staff members are required to counsel the students for academic and
cocurricular activities. Students are also free to discuss personal problems that affect their work
and day-to-day functioning with the staff and seek their counsel.
20
11.2.10 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Aurora is proud to have its students in key positions at several prestigious organizations in India and
abroad. This gives importance to the activities of the Alumni Association. The Association helps its
members and also the students currently studying in the College in various activities.
11.2.11 ITMEETS
The students of the college organise an IT Meet entitled Compteaserevery year inviting participation
and delegations from different colleges. It has various competitive events like programming contest, IT
Quiz, Brain Compiler etc., to stimulate interactive learning.
11.3 GUIDELINESFORFINALYEARPROJECTWORK
The final year project work reflects the knowledge acquired by the students during the course of their study.
The project, an essential ingredient of the PGprogramme, draws upon the theoretical knowledge and applicational
skills of the student. Needless to say that the project developed by the student would be evaluated by experts
to assess the skills of the candidate. Students are advised to follow meticulously the guidelines given. The
serious involvement of staff members in the projects will go a long way in increasing their rapport with the
students. The department also reaps benefits in terms of infrastructure and development.
Final Year Project is the most important component of MCAprogram, which paves the way for the students
career choices and placement opportunities. This program is intended to focus on application of skills of
young and aspiring software professionals to lead and pursue IT Carreer by bridging the gap between the
campus and corporate worlds.
OBJECTIVEOFTHEPROGRAM
Final Year Project inducts the students into organizational real-life situations, which cannot be replicated or
taught in the classrooms. In order that Final Year Project becomes meaningful for both the students and the
host organizations it is imperative that the project necessarily focus on areas which are of direct interest and
concern to the host organizations. All the students are advised to followmeticulously the following guidelines
in this regard.
1. Every student of Final Year Project is expected to be in regular contact with the Faculty, for seeking
guidance and reporting on his/her progress from time-to-time.
2. Students must get an overview of the host organization for understanding their requirements. They
should prepare the software requirement specification, physical and logical design, user interfaces
accordingly using the desired high-level language and test within the stipulated period of 15 weeks.
3. Student should always observes formal dress code.
4. Students are expected to be courteous and polite in their interactions with host organization, maintaining
strict confidentiality of company information and cordial relationships with Company Managers and
Executives.
5. Students should never criticize the host organizations Executives or policies and should desist from
making adverse comments about college and/or Faculty guide.
6. The tasks and assignments allotted to individual students by the host organization should always be
completed on time.
7. The students are expected to be punctual to their duties and are not expected to leave the office without
prior permission of external guide at the host organization.
8. Students should desist from inviting their friends to visit their work area at the host organization.
9. All the equipment/material/accessories provided by the host organization on returnable basis to the
student, must be returned and never held back by the student.
10. Students must facilitate the meeting of Faculty guide and the external guide regularly.
11. Students should strictly adhere to the deadlines for submission of weekly reports and making seminar
presentations.
21
11.4 GUIDELINESFORINTERACTIVELEARNINGMETHODOLOGY
11.4.1GUESTLECTURES
The college organizes one guest lecture for each subject in every semester. Learning groups will be
involved in conducting the guest lectures. The procedure to be followed is as follows:
1. Arrangement for guest lecture : The faculty concerned, in coordination with the guest lecture
coordinator, will arrange the guest lecture keeping in viewthe speakers availability on the planned
date for the lecture.
2. Briefing the Principal / HOD: The faculty will brief the Principal / HODone week in advance about
the speaker invited to deliver the guest lecture. The biodata will also be obtained.
3. Bringing the guest speaker to the college: One of the learning groups will be responsible for
arranging the vehicle and escorting the guest speaker to the college.
4. On arrival, the guest speaker must be introduced to the HOD and the Principal by the coordinator,
and hospitality must be extended to the guest.
5. Seating Arrangement: The students should be seated as per the learning groups.
6. Attendance: Attendance will be taken before the commencement of the session.
7. Introducing the expert (5 min): Astudent will be entrusted with the responsibility of preparing the
guest speakers profile based on the biodata, and also introduce the speaker to the audience.
8. Astudent will be delegated the responsibility of arranging for the LCD, OHP, collar microphone,
and other necessary equipment, in consultation with the guest lecture coordinator.
9. Recording the guest lecture: The guest lecture should be recorded on an audio system and one of
the learning groups is to be entrusted with the responsibility of handing over the recorded lecture
to the coordinator.
10. Question and Answer session will be allocated 20 minutes.
11. Vote of thanks (2 min): The vote of thanks will be given by a student of the learning group who will
also announce the date for the next guest lecture.
12. Lecture material: All the material brought by the guest speaker has to be filed by the coordinator.
13. Photographs: Photographs should be taken, developed, printed and filed in a photo album.
14. If the coordinator has a class during the guest lecture slot, he/she should depute another lecturer
to take care of the arrangements and reception of the speaker.
15. It is mandatory for all the faculty members of the department who are free during the guest lecture
slot to attend the talk.
16. Feedback forms will be distributed to each learning group before the start of the guest lecture, and
later, at the end of the lecture, will be collected and filed by the staff in-charge.
17. Each learning group must submit a synopsis of the guest lecture topic within two days to the
faculty coordinator.
11.4.2 STUDENTASSIGNMENTS
The following are the guidelines for the submission of assignments.
1. On completion of a unit, each learning group has to submit assignments on 2 questions,
which are listed in the assignment learning group table.
2. The learning group must adhere to the dates given in the assignment submission table for
submitting the assignments.
3. Students are supposed to collect the corrected assignments from the staff members.
4. In addition to the prescribed assignments, the students are advised to collect the assignments
from other learning groups and prepare answers to the questions.
5. If the learning group fails to submit the assignment on or before the deadline given, they will
be asked to do double the number of the prescribed assignments, and may not be allowed to
write the mid-examinations.
22
11.4.3 STUDENTSEMINARS
The college conducts student seminars from the first semester of the Ist year. Aminimum of twenty
seminars are given for each class in all the six subjects prescribed. Students of each class are
grouped into batches of three to form a learning group.
Two learning groups are to present a seminar on the given topic in each of the scheduled session.
The following is the procedure to be adopted:
1. Prior Information: To enable the students to have the information in advance, the seminar
topics along with the schedule are included in the student handbook.
2. Preparation of the synopsis and presentation material: The learning groups will submit the
text and the synopsis of the seminar material along with the profile of the scientist one week
in advance to the department coordinator.
3. Editing of synopsis: The subject faculty edits the synopsis and returns the same to the
student within three days.
4. Scrutiny of presentation material: The subject faculty will scrutinize the presentation material to
ensure that it contains relevant and sufficient matter to sustain each student for twenty minutes.
5. Physical arrangements: The essential arrangements for the seminars will be completed a half-
hour before the scheduled time by the learning groups in consultation with the coordinator.
6. Soft copy: The presentation material should be on a CD and loaded onto the computer
earmarked for the purpose, one day in advance.
7. Publicity: The synopsis is to be displayed prominently on the notice board in the seminar hall
or classroom, as the case may be, before the commencement of the seminar.
8. Seating arrangement: Students shall be seated according to the learning groups in the seminar hall.
9. Faculty watch: Three faculty members of the department who are free during the seminar slot
may watch the proceedings.
10. Blank evaluation papers will be distributed to all the learning groups before the commencement
of the seminar and the filled-in papers will be collected at the end.
11. Time break-up:
3 minutes - Introducing the scientist
2 minutes - Introducing group members and the flow of the presentation
20 min (20 x 3 = 60 min.) - Each member for his presentation
10 minutes - Q & A session
12. Student attendance: Attendance of the students shall be marked similar to that for classwork.
13. Q & A session: Members of the learning groups will pose questions on the seminar topic
which will be answered by the presenters.
14. Summing up: At the end of the seminar, the faculty in-charge of the programme presents the
gist of the seminar, and also conveys to the students the observations made by the faculty on
the presentation. The assessment of the faculty and their final grading of the performance in
the seminar will be announced after the last seminar.
15. The programme concludes with a vote of thanks by the seminar presenting group.
16. Result reporting : After the completion of the programme, the faculty presents a report to the
college seminar coordinator -- whether successful or to be rescheduled. If the seminar has
been successfully conducted, a complete assessment performance of the seminar is to be
submitted. If the seminar has to be rescheduled, the date will be decided by the department
coordinator in consultation with the principal.
17. Record of the programme: Soon after the programme, the faculty in-charge will submit a copy
[both soft and hard] of the material presented to the head of the department.
18. Responsibility for the equipment: The seminar group will be held responsible for the equipment
used for the seminar, and they are required to hand over the equipment intact to the stores in-
charge on conclusion of the seminar.
23
Note :
1. Once proposed and approved, no further changes in the schedule of presentation or in the
seminar topics would be entertained.
2. a. If any student in the presentation group is absent for the seminar, he/she has to give a
seminar for 30 minutes on a new topic in the presence of their parents, if so warranted.
b. Students of the class, other than the presenting group, who absent themselves from the
seminar without taking prior permission fromthe coordinator are liable for severe academic
punishments, besides their parents being summoned and briefed about it, if considered
necessary.
11.4.4 INDUSTRY-INSTITUTE INTERACTION
The college has established contact with industries with the primary intention of:
1. Developing consultancy activity
2. Giving the staff hands-on experience by allowing them to work in the industry for at least two
months in a year
3. Conducting industrial tours for students
4. Arranging mini projects in the summer
5. Catering to industrial requirements by encouraging students to work on projects that will
directly benefit the industry
6. Assisting the placement cell in identifying positions for students in the industry.
11.4.5 MINI PROJECTS
Guidelines to students for carrying out mini/summer projects
Summer projects are due to be carried out by the 2nd and 3rd year MCA students in collge lab /
various Industries.
Students are required to note the following:
1. To start with the student should have a clear idea of the nature of the mini project viz.
observation of process, participation and development of any process.
2. Students must wear their identity cards.
3. On a daily basis, the students should write down the significant points of learning and the
activities carried out.
4. Students must report to the industry/organization on all working days till the completion of
the project and make proper use of the time allocated.
5. Students are required to obtain a list of specialized books/manuals available in the lab along
with the information on the author, publishers, date of publication, etc. This will facilitate our
library to procure them.
6. A project report is to be prepared in the prescribed format. The project report must contain
the following:
a. Profile of the organization where the project is being carried out. This may include an
outline of the areas of activity, important personnel with their addresses (both official
and residential), and the outline of the future plans of the company, if available.
b. Any special processes and procedures followed in the use of this may also be mentioned.
7. The format of the project report is as follows:
a. Title Page
b. Certificate of Completion (signed by both the external and the internal guides)
c. Contents
d. Abstract (limited to one page)
e. Main Report
f. Conclusion and Scope for Further Research
g. Appendix
h. Bibliography
24
11.4.6 ADJUNCTCOURSES
1. 100% attendance is compulsory during the entire period of the course.
2. Depending upon the nature of the adjunct course, students may be asked to pay a nominal
fee.
3. The adjunct course may be conducted in association with a technical society or an institution
of learning institution.
4. Students have to follow meticulously the training schedule prepared by the department by
way of practicals, assignments, etc.
5. At the end of the course, students may be asked to write an examination for evaluation
purpose.
6. Only those students who satisfy the above criteria will be awarded a certificate.
11.4.7 STUDENTCOUNSELING
The following are the guidelines for student counseling:
1. Each staff member is assigned two learning groups (20 students) -- one from each class.
2. Staff members are required to continuously monitor the academic progress of the students.
3. Staff should be aware of the marks of the students in internal and external examinations.
4. Staff members should note the backlogs of the students.
5. Staff members should try to find the reasons for poor performance in various subjects.
6. Staff members are to continuously monitor the attendance of the students and ensure that the
students attend the classes regularly.
7. Staff members may try to arrange extra coaching as needed by the student or a set of students.
8. Staff members should have the personal details of the students -- address, contact numbers,
parents, etc.
9. Staff members are advised to post the information regarding the progress of the students to
their parents.
10. The counseling staff are also responsible for the behavior of the students on the campus.
11. Students are advised to continuously interact with their counselors and follow the guidelines
given below:
Students are supposed to intimate the counselors regarding the difficulties they may face in
understanding any subject/s.
Students have to seek the guidance of staff members in academic, cocurricular and
extracurricular activities.
Students have to meticulously follow the advice given by the counselor from time to time.
Students have to voluntarily disclose their address, parents name, and contact numbers.
11.4.8ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
The following are the activities conducted by the alumni association:
1. Holding mock interviews, mock screening tests and group discussions for members as well as
for the existing final year students
2. Providing career assistance to help members shape their careers through career counseling
and identification of appropriate agencies in the area of career counseling
3. Upgrading mailing lists of alumni to facilitate contact with them for events such as joining
professional clubs, homecoming, and reunions
4. Collecting information on the nature of jobs of alumni for publication in magazine/newsletter
This helps in identifying the experts generated by the institution working in various
organizations and also to create knowledge centres.
5. Creating and updating the database of the alumni [class-wise & year-wise].
25
12. CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE
The centres for excellence developed in various departments based on the expertise available help in
motivating the student community in cocurricular and extracurricular activities. Each department has
identified centres of excellence in a specific area, based on the research work being done by the faculty,
the industry-institute interaction in that specific area and the infrastructure facilities being developed
by the department. This enables the students to conduct their projects in an effective manner. These
centres not only guide the students in their project work but also motivate them to go for higher studies.
The following are the centres of excellence existing at Auroras P.G. College:
12.1 CENTRE FOR COMMUNICATION AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT
This centre enhances the language and communication skills of the students. The importance of good
communication skills cannot be overemphasized in a globalized world. Aurora imparts special training to
students to be efficient communicators by conducting group discussions, simulations, and mock-interview
sessions, debates, extempore speaking, etc. This will ensure that every Auroran is well equipped to
carve a niche for him/herself in the challenging global scenario.
12.2 CENTRE FOR CAREER COUNSELING
This centre, run by committed faculty coordinators, aims to increase students awareness about courses,
alternatives and job opportunities available after graduation in various fields and disciplines. The centre
collates relevant information from over 500 brochures of universities/institutes across the world, and
presents them as easy-to-understand posters displayed in the college premises. The college also invites
professional counselors and experts to interact with the students and to advise them on the myriad
career challenges that they are likely to encounter.
13. IMPORTANT RELIGIOUS FESTIVALS
Sunday, 15th August 2010 - Independence Day
Thursday, 2nd September 2010 - Sri Krishna Ashtami
Friday, 10th September 2010 - Ramzan
Saturday, 11th September 2010 - Vinayaka Chavithi
Saturday, 2nd October 2010 - Gandhi Jayanthi
Friday, 15th October 2010 - Durga Ashtami
Sunday, 17th October 2010 - Vijaya Dasami
Friday, 5th November 2010 - Deepavali
Wednesday 17th November 2010 - BaKrid
Friday 17th December 2010 - Moharram
Saturday 25th December 2010 - Christmas
27
MCA I Year, Semester I
1. DEPARTMENTPROFILE
The Department of Computer Science has been in existence since 1992. The present intake of the Department
is 120
Thirteen batches of students have successfully completed their MCA Programme.
The pass percentage in 2004 was 96.67% with 27 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2005 was 94.6% with 38 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2006 was 96.42% with 36 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2007 was 94.80% with 53 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2008 was 97.88% with 52 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2009 was 98.18% with 65 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2010 was 100.00% with 57 first classes.
The Department has 22 strong Computer Science Faculty including 2 Statistics and 1 Mathematics Faculty.
The Department is manned by dedicated teachers, devoted students, committed supporting staff and
expert technical staff.
1.1 STAFF
Atotal of 22 faculty members and 5 technical staff are committed for the development of the department. In
addition to the departmental load of 25 theory courses and 14 lab courses, the department offers 3 theory
courses and 3 lab courses on an average per semester as service subjects.
1.2 STUDENTS
The students of MCA department are the most technically competent and devoted towards studies.
They have participated in Paper Presentation/Technical Quiz/Programming contests organized by other
colleges as detailed below.
Sl.
No.
Name Of The Student Section Event Organization
1 MD.Javeed Shareef MCA III Paper Persentation-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
2 Nasreen Sultana MCA III Paper Persentation-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
3 E.Ravi Kumar MCA III G.K & Anthashkari-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
4 M.Sangameshwar MCA III Caroms-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
5 Naresh MCA III Quiz-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
6 Venugopal Reddy MCA III Quiz-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
7 Raghu Ram MCA III Quiz-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
8 Ch.Mahesh MCA III Chess-Winner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
9
B.Sampath
B.Naresh
MCA III Carroms-Doubles-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
10 Raghu Ram MCA III Carroms-Winner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
28
MCA I Year, Semester I
1.2.1 MCASTUDENTSPLACEDFORTHEYEAR2010
S.No Name of the Student Company
1 Murali Aetukuri Mahindra Satyam
2 Mahipal Cherukupalli Mahindra Satyam
3 Burgu Sravanthi Mahindra Satyam
4 Ruchi K Parekh Mahindra Satyam
5 Ravi Kumar Oleti Mahindra Satyam
6 Gopikrishna N Purapu Mahindra Satyam
7 Modupalli Aruna Mahindra Satyam
8 C. Mahipal Mahindra Satyam
9 Gurram Venkatesh Value Labs
10 Gaddam Maharaju Value Labs
11 D.Mohan Value Labs
12 Venkatesh Value Labs
13 Suman Value Labs
14 G. Rama Raju Value Labs
15 Mangunuri Satish Value Labs
16 Ranjith Kumar Value Labs
17 Madhavi Dasari Bloom Soft
18 B Rana Prathap Bloom Soft
19 Peddi Naresh Bloom Soft
20 Suroju Prashanthi Bloom Soft
21 Md Abdul Sami Bloom Soft
22 Bukka Navitha Bloom Soft
23 Sarangi Parvathi Bloom Soft
24 Shaik Nasreensultana Bloom Soft
25 M.Sreedhar Bloom Soft
26 M. Swarna Latha Bloom Soft
27 Shaga Sunitha Bloom Soft
28 B. Veeraiah Naidu Bloom Soft
29 K. Vijaya Lakshmi Bloom Soft
30 S. Praveen Bloom Soft
31 Deva Ramanjaneyulu Bloom Soft
32 Kishan Kumar Sakala Leisux
29
MCA I Year, Semester I
S.No Name of the Student Company
33 V. Shiva Shree Leisux
34 K. Vijaya Lakshmi Mallepalli Tech.
35 Sobhan Babu ING Vysya
37 Ravinder CapGemini
38 Ramesh CapGemini
39 K.Rajendra Kumar Data Monitor
40 E.Ravi Kumar Zeta Interactive
41 G.Santhosh Sierra Atlantic
42 G.Venkateswarulu Sierra Atlantic
43 Sasupalti Sierra Atlantic
44 B.Sandeep Sierra Atlantic
45 P.Mani Kumar Grarim Industries Ltd.
46 M.Ramesh iGate Global Services
47 K. Bhagya Laxmi Deloitte
48 B.Sravan Kumar Deloitte
49 V.Pavan Kumar Globe Web Soft
50 K.V.N.Raju Globe Web Soft
51 T.V.Madhavi Accenture
52 Kalyan Chakravarthi Accenture
53 Nasreen sulthana shaik Accenture
54 Krishna Sampath T ISRO
55 K.Phani Kumar Amazon.com
56 Padmavathi Google
57 Rajesh NCR
58 Sandeep Reddy R NCR
59 Manoj NCR
60 Saritha NCR
61 Narsing Amdocs
62 Buchayya Guptha Amdocs
63 Naveen Amdocs
64 Manohar Raju LGS (Lanco)
30
MCA I Year, Semester I
S.No. Name of the Student Company
65 Janardhan LGS (Lanco)
66 Bharath ADP
67 Karthik Missam Technologies
68 Venkata Vijay Kumar Nysa Animation Studio
69 Ch. Vamsidhar Andhara Bank
70 P. Naresh SBI
71 A. Raju SBI
72 M. Rama Rao SBI
73 A. Murali IDBI Bank
74 Md Jareed Shareef Pawaniy Co (Sudi Arabia)
75 S. Suresh Kumar Canara Bank
76 I. Rajith Kumar Prima Imapact Informatics Solutions
77 Naga Dath Ajit APCTP
78 Raj Kumar Polaris
79 CH. Pranitha Aurora's Engg College, Bhongir
80 M. Niranjan Zeta Interactive
81 K Bhagyalaxmi HCL
82 Vijaya Kumar Jinnga ICICI Bank
83 Pavan Kumar Joshi Met Iom IT Solution
84 Parvathi Choice Solutions
31
MCA I Year, Semester I
1.3 EVENTS &ACTIVITIES REPORTOFTHEDEPARTMENT
1. Parents day meeting-1st February 2009
2. Two-day faculty development program-"BIT-2009" 4th &5th February2009
3. Faculty development seminars
4. Two professional bodies meets.
5. Two day Workshop - CISCO
6. Three day Workshop on Computer Networks.
1.3.1 PARENTS' DAYMEETING- 1st FEBRUARY2009.
As part of the Auroras culture to bridge the gap between the students and their parents and to update the
later with their ward's performance as also to take feedback to improve the facilities provided by the
college. The college organises parents meets fromtime to time. This year also Auroras PG College, MCA
dept. organized Parents' Meet on 01
ST
Feb 2009. About 40-45 parents' attended the meeting. Parents were
englightened about the current intitatives of the college, to improve the overall standards of their wards.
Parents were also detailed about the MOU with various IT giants.
1.3.2 ATWO-DAYFACULTY DEVELOPMENTPROGRAM- "BI T- 2009".
As part of the culture of Aurora, to expose the faculty to the latest happenings in the IT world, the
department of MCAhas organized a two-day seminar, under the banner of BIT2009, wherein a large no
of MCA teachers from twin cities colleges were able to update themselves with the hot technologies
grooming in and around the IT world.
Number of Faculty Participated 40
1
ST
DAY: 04-02-2009
FORENOONSESSION:
SPEAKER: Ms.Rama Patnaik, Wipro Tech.
Topic: GreenIT
AFTERNOONSESSION:
SPEAKER: Mr.Bhudeb Chakravarthy,IIIT.
Topic:Rational Rose inProject Development Perspective.
2
nd
DAY: 05-02-2009
FORENOONSESSION:
SPEAKER: Ms.RitaAshar,SQLStar International Ltd.
Topic: Service OrientedArchitecture.
AFTERNOONSESSION:
SPEAKER: Ms.RitaAshar,SQLStar International Ltd.
Topic: WebOrientedArchitecture.
1.3.3. FACULTYDEVELOPMENTLISTOFPUBLICATIONS- INTERNATIONAL
1. Two international publications by Mr.Pradosh Chandra Pattnaik,HOD,MCA in International Journal for
Computer Science and networks.
2. Two international publications by Mr.E.Devender Rao, in International Journal for Computer Science and
network security.
3. One international publications by Mr.Md.Ismail in International Journal for Computer Science.
4. One international publications by Mr.Saradhi Seshagiri in International Journal for Computer Science.
32
MCA I Year, Semester I
1.3.4. PROFESSIONALBODIESREPORT
1. All the MCA2nd year Students are registered for the student membership of "Computer Society of India".
(CSI).
2. Section-wise student's Registration forms submitted for CSI registrations.
Section II A 60 Section II B &C 116 Section II D 53
Total = 229
3. Registration fee per student : Rs.200/-
1.4 LABORATORIES
The department has 4 fully equipped laboratories with material worth about Rs.1.15 crores.
WehaveLicensedSoftwareof Rational Rose2003, BorlandC++andMicrosoft CampusAgreement and
Corporateeditionof SymantecNortonAntivirus10.5.
Sl No.
Computer
Systems
Operating System
Applications
1 LAB-1
88 PCs
Windows XP, Windows 2003
Server,
Redhat Linux.
Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
Borland C++; Rational Rose 2003,
Oracle 8i; MS Visual Studio, Tomcat
Server; JDK 1.5, D2K
2 LAB- II
55 PCs
Windows XP, Redhat Linux Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
Borland C++, Oracle 8i, JDK 1.5,
CA, D2K
3 LAB III
25 PCs
Windows XP Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
JDK 1.5, McAfee
4 LAB IV
26 PCs
Windows XP Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
JDK 1.5, McAfee
33
MCA I Year, Semester I
1.5 TEACHING-LEARNINGPROCESS
The department has adopted a novel way of teaching which is expected to improve the standards of
students academically. In this process, the following events were conducted during the semester.
Guest Lectures
S.No. Name of the Guest Faculty Course Topic Date
1
Mr. C.Pradeep
MCA II
Software Testing
17-04-10
2
Mr. R.Madhav
MCA III
.Net Frame Work
25-02-10
Student Seminars
Each student in a class gave a minimum of two seminars one Technical and one General.
Based on assigned learning groups students should give seminars in seminar sessions.
Student Project
Agroup of 6 students of each II Year and III year MCAare given a Project either Application or System,
to analyze and implement in a semester.
Student Assignment
Questions picked up from previous question papers of in University exam and Campus recruitment are
given to students groups as assignments. The assignments submitted are corrected and thereby students
are given guidance in attempting typical questions.
Student Tutorials
The students are given programs in sessions monitored by faculties fromthe respective field of expertise.
The students in small groups are assisted to prepare themselves and to write logical and application
oriented programs.
Future Plans
1. Steps will be taken to improve the pass percentage by identifying the weak students and the subjects they
are falling back. Accordingly, special classes will be conducted for their improvement.
2. Attendance monitoring has to be done strictly with periodic warning given to those falling short of 75%.
3. A state level conference on latest trends is planned by the department in the next semester.
4. Adjunct courses to make students aware of the new technologies will have to be conducted.
5. Students are given mini projects to be supervised carefully by the faculty.
6. At least one technical visit has to be arranged for each batch in the coming semester.
7. Staff members have to be encouraged to pursue higher education.
8. Staff members will be deputed for National & International conferences for enhancing their technical
skills.
34
MCA I Year, Semester I
2
.
T
r
e
e
V
i
e
w
-
T
h
e
o
r
y
35
MCA I Year, Semester I
PRACTICE
BEYONDCLASS
ROOM&
SYLLABUS
PERSONALITY
DEVELOPMENT
LOCAL
INDUSTRIAL
VISIT
SUMMERMINI
PROJECTS
ADJUNCT
COURSES
INDUSTRIAL
TOURS
VISITSTO
INSTITUTESOF
EXCELLENCE
STUDENTS
SEMINARS
PROJECT
REPORTS
REPORTSON
GUEST
LECTURES
LOCALVISITS
INDUSTRIAL
TOURS
SPORTS
DEBATTING
ESSAYWRITING
PROFESSIONAL
STUDENTS
FORUMS
SYMPOSIUMS
C++LAB
DSLAB
WEB
PROGRMMING
LAB
UMLLAB
UNIXSYSTEM
PROGRMMINGLAB
&
NETWORK
PROGRMMINGLAB
DBMS
LAB
EITLAB
ADVANCED
JAVALAB
CORE
JAVA
LAB
TREEVIEW- PRACTISE
COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
2.1 Tree View- Practice
3. ALMANAC
ISEMESTER
Commencement of classes : 27-09-2010
Last date of Instructions (15 weeks) : 08-01-2011
Theory examinations I/I, (main) : 17-01-2011to27-01-2011
Practical Exams : 31-01-2011to09-02-2011
II SEMESTER
Commencement of classes : 14-02-2011
Last date of Instructions : 28-05-2011
Theory Examinations I/I, Supplementary) : 30-05-2011to11-06-2011
Theory examinations (I/II Main) : 13-06-2011to25-06-2011
Practical Exams (Main &Supplementary) : 27-06-2011to07-07-2011
Summer Vacation : 08-07-2011to31-07-2011
36
MCA I Year, Semester I
4. COURSESTRUCTURE
Sub. code Subject T P
CS 601 Discrete Mathematics 4 -
MAT 602 Probability and Statistics 4 -
CS 603 Computer programming using C++ 4 -
CS 604 Elements of Information Technology 4 -
CM 605 Modern Economic Analysis 4
Practicals
CS 651 Programming Lab I (C++ Programming) - 3
CS 652 Programming Lab II (EIT Lab) - 3
Total 20 6
Note: All end Examinations (theory and Practical) are of three hours duration
T : Theory P : Practicals
37
MCA I Year, I Semester
5. SUBJECTDETAILS
5.1 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
5.1.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.1.2 Scope
5.1.3 Prerequisites
5.1.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.1.5 Suggested Books
5.1.6 Websites
5.1.7 Experts Details
5.1.8 Journals
5.1.9 Findings and Developments
5.1.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.1.11 Session Plan
5.1.12 Tutorial Plan
5.1.13 Question Bank
38
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.1.1 OBJECTIVESANDRELEVANCE
Keeping in view the basic computer related concepts and provide a coherent development and common
theme for these ideas, the syllabus has been so designed. Students begin to see the relevance of abstract
ideas and are therefore better motivated.
5.1.2 SCOPE
The syllabus is designed in such a way that it support and the more advanced courses in computer science
programs such as in the areas of automata, computability, artificial intelligence, Switching theory &computer
representation of discrete structures.
5.1.3 PREREQUISITES
Competence at degree level, in the following topics is expected:
i. Introduction to logic
ii. Elementary set theory
iii. Functions
iv. Group theory
v. Graph theory
5.1.4 SYLLABUSO.U
UNITI
OBJECTIVE
Logic is the discipline that deals with the methods of reasoning. Logical reasoning is used in computer
science to verify the correctness of programs and to prove theorems. Inter relationship of set theory, and
logic are being discussed. In order for students to be able to read technical articles and books in computer
science, it is necessary for them to know something about predicate calculus.
SYLLABUS
Fundamentals of Logic:Basic Connectives and Truth Tables,Logical Equivalence,Logical Implications,
Use of Quantifiers ,
Definitions and proof of Theorems.Boolean Algebra: Switching Functions ,Logical Gates, Dont
Care Condition.
Set Theory : Sets and Subsets, Set operations and the Laws of set theory, Counting and Venn
diagrams.
UNITII
OBJECTIVE
The concept of partially ordered sets, including lattices are useful in the construction of logical
representations for computer circuits. .
SYLLABUS
Properties of Integers : The well ordering principle, Recursive definitions, The DivisionAlgorithm,Euclidian
Algorithm Fundamental Theorem of arithmetic. Functions: Cartesian Product , Functions ,onto Functions
,Special Functions , Pigeonhole Principle,Composion and Inverse Functions, Computational
Complexity.Relations: Partial Order Relations, Lattices, Equivalence Relations and Partitions.
Leadership is not a one-day thing. It is a constant commitment to excellence, a habit . . . a daily practice.
39
MCA I Year, I Semester
UNITIII
OBJECTIVE
Techniques for counting are important in mathematics and in computer science, especially in the analysis
of algorithms. In addition, recurrence relations are another tool for the analysis of computer programs.
SYLLABUS
Principle of Inclusion and Exclusion.:Principles of Inclusion and Exclusion, Generalization of Principle,
Derangements, Rooks Polynomial, Arrangements with Forbidden Positions. Generating Functions :
Introductory examples, Definitions and examples, Partition of Integers, Exponential generating Function,
Summation operator.
UNITIV
OBJECTIVE
In this unit we study a special type of relation that is exceptionally useful in a variety of computer science
applications and is usually represented by its digraph. These relations are essential for the construction of
databases and language compilers.It also discusses about the concept of emigroup and monoid theory
which is very important in certain areas of computer science such as formal language theory, syntactic
analysis and automata
SYLLABUS
Recurrence Relations: First - order linear recurrence relation, Second - order linear homogeneous recurrence
relation with constant coefficients,Non-homogeneous recurrence relation,Divide and conquer algorithms.
Algebraic Structures: Definition , Examples and properties. Groups: Definition, Examples and elementary
properties , Homomorphism, Isomorphismand Cyclic groups.
UNITV
OBJECTIVE
Graph theorybegins with very simple geometric ideas and has many powerful applications. Here an alternate
definition of graph that includes the more general multigraphs and is more appropriate for the applications
are developed.
SYLLABUS
Graph Theory: Defintions and examples, Subgraphs, Complements and graph isomorphism,vertex degree
Planar Graphs: Hamiltonian Paths and Cycles, Graph colouring. Trees: Defintions, Properties and examples
, Rooted Trees, Spanning trees and Minimal Spanning Tree.
5.1.5 SUGGESTEDBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS
T1. Ralph P.Grimaldi, Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics, Pearson Education, 4th Edition,2003.
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Discrete Mathematical Structures withApplications to computer science, J.P. Tremblay and R. Manohar
.
R2. Kenneth H Rosen Discrete Mathematics and its Applications TataMcgrawHill, 6th edition,2007..
R3. Joe L.Mott, A kandal & T.P. Baker, Discrete mathematics for Computer Scientists & Mathematicians,
PrenticeHall N.J.
R4. Kevin Ferland, Discrete Mathematics, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2009.
Leaders make decisions that create the future they desire.
- Mike Murdock
40
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.1.6 WEBSITES
1. www.elservier.com
2. www.maths.mq.edu.an
3. www.archives.math.utk.edu
4. www.depaul.edu
5. www.mathforum.org
5.1.7 EXPERTSDETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Jan van den Henvel
Professor, Reader in Mathematics
University of UK,
Email: j.van-den-henvel@lse.ac.uk
2. Mr. Jason. Brown
Associate Professor,
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Canada
Email: jason.brown@dal.ca
NATIONAL
1. Dr. K. KumkumDewan
Department of Mathematics,
IIT, Madras.
Email: kkdewan123@yahoo.co.in
2. Prof. ChoudumS. A
Professor in Discrete Mathematics
IIT, Madras.
Email: sac@iitm.ac.in
REGIONAL
1. Mr. G. L. Reddy
Lecturer in University of Hyderabad,
Department in Mathematics,
University of Hyderabad.
Email: glrsm@uohyd.ernet.in
2. Dr. Anandbabu
Professor,
Department of Mathematics,
Osmania University,
Hyderabad.
Email: anandb@hotmail.com
I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying that I approved of it.
- Mark Twain
41
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.1.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. SIAM Journals DM.
2. Journal of the American Mathematical Society .
3. AKCE International Journal of Graphs and Combinations.
4. Discrete Mathematics
5. Discrete Mathematics and Applications
6. Journal of Discrete Mathematical Sciences & cryptography
7. Journal of Graph Theory
8. Computers & Mathematics With Applications
NATIONAL
1. Journal of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.
2. Journal of Discrete Mathematical Science, Cryptography
3. Nordic Journal of Computing .
4. Bulletin of Calcutta Mathematical Society
5. Indian National Science Academy
6. Indian Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics
5.1.9 FINDINGSANDDEVELOPMENTS
1. NewDirections in Enumerative Chess Problems, The Electronic Journal of Combinatoric, NoamD. Elkies
(2004), Vol. 11(2).
2. Random Matrices, Magic Squares and Matching Polynomials, The Electronic Journal of Combinatoric,
Persi Diaconics andAlex Gambard (2004), Vol. 11(2).
3. Eulerian Graph and Related Topics, Anals of Discrete Mathematics, Fleischner Herbert, Part 1. Vol. 2.
4. Antisymmetric Flows on Planar Graphs, T.H. Marshall, Vol.52,Issue 3.
5. Improper Choosability of Graphs and MaximumAverage Degree, Frederick havet, Jean-Sebastien Sereni
(2006), Vol. 52, Issue 3.
6. Sunflower in Lattices, The Electronic Journal of Combinatoric, Geoffrey Mc. Kenna (2005), Vol. 12(1).
5.1.10 STUDENTSEMINARTOPICS
1. Matrix Representation of Graphs.
2. Graph theory in Operations Research.
3. Electrical NetworkAnalysis by Graph theory.
4. Finite State Machines and Automata.
5. Number Theory.
6. Recurrence Relations and Generating Functions.
Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.
- Albert Einstein
42
MCA I Year, I Semester
How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.
- Henry David Thoreau
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules & sub Modules
Lecturer
No.
Books
Referred
Remarks
UNIT - I
Introduction, Basic connectives
and Truth Tables
L 1 T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.12
R3 - Ch.2
Logical Equivalence L 2 T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.12
R3 - Ch.2
logical Implications L 3 T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.12
R3 - Ch.2
T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.13
Use of quantifiers and Definitions L 4
T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.13
Mathematical
logic:
Theorems and Proofs L 5 T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.13
Switching Functions L 6 T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.13
Logical gates L 7 T1 - Ch.1
R2 - Ch.13
Boolean
Algebra
Dont Care Condition. L 8 R4 - Ch.13
R5 - Ch.15
T1 - Ch.2
R2 - Ch.1
Sets and Subsets, Set Operations
and Law of set Theory.
L 9
T1 - Ch.2
R3 - Ch.3
1
Set theory
Counting and Venn Diagrams L 10 T1 - Ch.2
R3 - Ch.4
UNIT II
T1 - Ch.4
T2 - Ch.6
R2 - Ch.14
The Well ordering principle,
Recursive defintions
L L1 11 1
T1 - Ch.4
R2 - Ch.14
The Divisional Algorithm L 12 T1 - Ch.4
R2 - Ch.14
2 Properties of
Integers
Euclidian Algorithm L 13 T1 - Ch.4
T2 - Ch.6
R2 - Ch.13
5.1.11 SESSIONPLAN
43
MCA I Year, I Semester
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and Sub-modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
Fundamental Theorem of
Arithematic.
L14
T1 - Ch. 4
T2 - Ch. 6
R2 - Ch. 13
Cartesian Product ,Functions
Onto functions , Special
Functions
L15
T1 - Ch. 4
T3 - Ch. 6
R2 - Ch. 13
T1 - Ch. 4
T3 - Ch. 6
Pigeonhole Principle
L16
R4 - Ch. 14
R5 - Ch. 11
Compositions and Inverse
Functions
L17
T1 - Ch. 3
T2 - Ch. 9
R2 - Ch. 11
R3 - Ch. 6
Functions
Group Theory
Computational Complexity L18
T1 - Ch. 3
T2 - Ch. 9
R2 - Ch. 11
R3 - Ch. 6
Partial Order Relations
L19
T1 - Ch. 3
T2 - Ch. 9
R2 - Ch. 11
R3 - Ch. 6
Lattice
L20,
L21
T2 - Ch. 11
Relations
Equivalence Relations and
Partitions
L22 T2 - Ch. 11
UNIT III
Principle of Inclusion and
Exclusion,
L23
T3 - Ch. 2
R2 - Ch. 6
R3 - Ch. 6
Generalization of the principle L24
Derangements L25
T3 - Ch. 2
R2 - Ch. 6
R3 - Ch. 6
Rooks Polynomial L26
T3 - Ch. 2
R2 - Ch. 6
R3 - Ch. 6
Principle of
Inclusion and
Exclusion
Arrangements with Forbidden
Positions
L27
R4 - Ch. 6
R5 - Ch. 8
Introduction , Definitions and
examples
L28
T3 - Ch. 2
R2 - Ch. 6
R3 - Ch. 6
Partition of integers L29
R4 - Ch. 6
R5 - Ch.8
Exponential Generating
Function
L30
T3 - Ch. 2
R2 - Ch. 6
R3 - Ch. 6
3
Generating
Functions
Summation Operator L31
T3 - Ch. 2
R2 - Ch. 6
R3 - Ch. 6
I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestioned ability of a man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor.
- Henry David Thoreau
44
MCA I Year, I Semester
Do thou restrain the haughty spirit in thy breast, for better far is gentle courtesy.
- Homer
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and sub-modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT IV
First order linear recurrence
Relations
L32
T1 - Ch. 5
T3 - Ch. 5
R1 - Ch. 1
R2 - Ch. 9
Second order linear
homogeneous recurrence
Relations
L33
T1 - Ch. 5
T3 - Ch. 5
R4 - Ch. 8
Non homogeneous recurrence
Relations
L34
T3 - Ch. 5
R1 - Ch. 9
R2 - Ch. 9
Recurrence
Relations
Divide and Conquer algorithms L35
T3 - Ch. 5
R1 - Ch. 3
R2 - Ch. 10
Algebraic
Structures
Definition , Examples and
properties
L36
T3 - Ch. 5
R1 - Ch. 3
R2 - Ch. 10
Examples and elementary
properties
L37
L38
T3 - Ch. 5
R4 - Ch. 9
Homomorphism L39
T3 - Ch. 5
R5 - Ch. 7
Isomorphism L40
R4 - Ch. 9
R5 - Ch. 6
4
Groups
Cyclic Groups L41
R4 - Ch. 10
R5 - Ch. 7
UNIT V
Definitions and Examples L42
T3 - Ch. 5
R1 - Ch. 5
R2 - Ch. 9
Sub graphs and Complements L43
R4 - Ch. 8
R5 - Ch. 6
Graph Isomorphism, vertex
Degree
L44
T3 - Ch. 5
R1 - Ch. 9
Planar Graphs :Hamiltonian
Paths
L45
R5 - Ch. 6
Hamiltonian Cycles L46
T3 - Ch. 5
R4 - Ch. 8
5. Graph theory
Graph coloring L47 R5 - Ch. 5
Definitions Properties and
examples
L48
T3 - Ch. 5
Rooted Trees L49
T3 - Ch. 5
R1 - Ch. 8
Spanning Trees
L50
L51
T3 - Ch. 5
Trees
Minimal Spanning Trees L52 R1 - Ch. 8
45
MCA I Year, I Semester
No objects of value are worth risking the priceless experience of waking up one more day.
- Jack Smith
5.1.12 TUTORIALPLAN
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1 Boolean algebra Some abstract concepts.
T2 DNF, CNF
Workout more problem to make the concept
clear
T3 DNF, CNF, Karnaugh maps Problem related to minimization of circuits
T4
I
Functions & Recursion
Mathematical induction, and strong induction,
structural induction and problems related to
recursion.
T5
Representation &
minimizations, Boolean
functions.
Related theorems & problems
T6 Product & Quotient of Groups Related theorems & problems
T7
Product & Quotient of semi
group
Related theorems & problems
T8
II
Coding & decoding of binary
information
Error correction, error detection & problems
T9 Permutations
Counting methods to make concepts more
clear.
T10 Combinations Related problems to make concept more clear.
T11
Binomia/Multinomial
Theorem
Problems related to these theorems.
T12
III
Recurrence relation Related problems
T13
Types of graphs and their
properties
Concepts & Problems related to them.
T14 Trees and spanning trees Difference b/w them and their properties
T15
Breadth first and depth first
search
Some more Examples.
T16
IV
Binary search trees. Related problems.
T17 Planar graphs. Some more problems.
T18 Euler formula / Euler circuits. Difference b/w them & related problems.
T19 Hamiltonian graphs & circuits. Related problems.
T20
V
Four colour problems Related concepts.
46
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.1.13 QUESTIONBANK
UNIT-1
1. i write and explain the Truth Table for the following formula
R) (Q Q) (P
ii Differentiate between Universal Quantifier and Existential Quantifier, with the help of examples.
iii. Describe about NAND and NOR gates.
(Feb-2010)
2. i. Write and Explain the following:
i The rule of Universal Specification.
ii The rule of Universal Generalization.
ii. Describe about Dont Care Conditions.
iii. There are 100 people in a group. In this group, 23 people speak English, 26 people speak Telugu , 30 people
speak Hindi and 7 people speak both English and Telugu , 8 people speak English and Hindi and 10 people
speak English and Hindi .And 3 people speak all three languages. Find howmany people do not speak any
language. (Feb-2010)
3. i. Write and explain in thr Truth Tabble for the following formula. (July 2010)
R) (Q Q) (P
ii. Write the PRedicate Logic for the following statements:
Assume your own predicates.
i. Some apples are red.
ii. All flowers are yellow.
iii. There exists a fruit, which is green and tasty.
iii. Decribe about Disjunctive Normal Forms.
4. i. Determine the sets Aand B, where A-B = {1,3,7,11}, (July 2010)
B-A= {2,6,8} andA

B= {4,9},
ii. Write and explain the Principle of Duality in set Theory.
iii. There are 50 students in a group. In this group there are ten students who passed only mathematics eight
students who passed only physics, six students who passed only chemistry. And there are four students
who passed both Mathematics and Physics, three students who passed both Physics and Chemistry and
two students who passed both mathematics and chemistry. Only one student passed all the three subjects.
Find how many students failed all the subjects.
5. i. Define: (i) Conjunction (ii) Disjunction
(iii) Converse (iv) Inverse
ii. Define disjunctive normal formand obtain the disjunctive normal formof
( v p ~p v q p ( ( ~r)))
iii. If A={1,2,3,4,5} and R= {(1,1), (1,2),(2,3),(3,4), (4,5)} is relation onA, then compute (i) R
2
(ii) R
00
6. i. Showthat (~p ^ (~q^r)v (q^r)v(p^r)<=>r
ii. Obtain the sum of projcts canonical form(sum of products canonical form of ( ~p v ~q)>(~p ^ r)
iii. Define : (i) Recursion (ii) Primitive recursive function and showthat addition is primitive recursive.
7. i. Show that (Jun 09)
R R P R Q R Q P . v . v . . ) ( ) ( ) 7 ( 7 (
ii. Obtain the principal disjunctive normal formof
Self-pity is our worst enemy and if we yield to it, we can never do anything good in the world.
- Helen Keller
47
MCA I Year, I Semester
). 7 7 ( 7 ) (( P Q Q P P v .
iii. Find the transitive closure of relation Ron X, where X= { } c b a , , and R= { } > < > < > < a c c b b a , , , , ,
8. i. Define a conditional statement and construct the truth table for ). ( ) ( P Q Q P . (Jun 09)
ii. Obtain the product-of-sums canonical form of . 7 ( ) ( RP P Q P . v .
iii. Let MR =
(
(
(

1 1 1
0 1 1
1 0 1
be the relation matrix on the set {a, b, c}.Find the relation matrices of
~
R
,
2
R
and
Ro
~
R
.
9. i. Express the following statements in symbolic form:
Let s,t and u denote the following primitive statement: (Jan 08)
S:Partha goes out for a walk.
T:The moon is out .
U:It is snowing.
i. If it is snowing and the moon is not out ,then Partha will not go out for a walk.
ii. It is not the case that Partha goes out for a walk if and only if it is snowing or the moon is out.
ii. Let X={1,2,3,4,5,6,7}and R={<x,y>/x-y is divisible by 3}.
Show that R is an equivalence relation.Draw the graph of R.
10. i. Showthat the functions f and g which both are fromNXNto Ngiven by f(x,y)=x+y and g(x,y)=xy are onto
but not one to-one. (Jan 08)
ii. Let D(x) denote number of divisors of x. Showthat D(x) is primitive recursive.
11. With an equivalent formula for P(QR) V(RP) (Jun 07)
which does not contain biconditional and conditional.
12. Let f: R R and g: R Rwhere Ris the set of real numbers. Find fog where f(x)= x
2
-2 and g(x) = x+4.
(Jun 07)
13. Define/Explain
i. Conjunction and Disjunction (Jun 07)
ii. DNF, CNF, PDNF, PCNF. (May06)
iii. Well-formed formula. Explain howmany is it generated. (Jan 05)
iv. Functionally complete set with examples (Feb 04)
14. Express the following statement in symbolic form using the propositions given below:
C: Rahul is a cricket player.
H: Rahul is a hard worker.
M: Rahul is a mathematician.
Rahul is either a hard worker or a cricket player but not both. (Jan 07)
Smell is a potent wizard that transports you across thousand of miles and all the years you have lived.
- Helen Keller
48
MCA I Year, I Semester
15. S.T for any two sets A& B: (Jan 07)
i. A- (AI B) =A-B
ii. (A) U (B) _ (AUB)
(A) I
(B) = (A I B)
16. Prove or disprove whether the following is a tautology.
i. P (P
A
(R P)) (Jan 07)
ii. (Feb 4, Jan 05)
iii. (Aug 04, Jun 07)
iv. (Apr 02)
v. (Jan 07)
vi. (Jun 07)
17. Obtain PDNF and PCNF of:
i. (Jan 07)
ii. (Jul 04), Jun 05, Aug04)
iii. (Jan05,Feb04)
iv. (Mar 03)
v. (Apr 02)
vi. (Jan 07,Jun 07)
18. Obtain DNF and CNF for
i. (Jan 07)
ii. (Jun 05)
iii. (Jun 07)
iv. (Jun 07)
v. (Jun 07)
19. Show the following equivalences:
i. (Feb04).(Jan07).
ii. (Jan 05, Aug 04, Jan 05, (Jul 04)
iii. (Aug 04 , (Jul 04)
iv. (Apr 02)
20. Express the following the statements in symbolic form. (May06)
i. Aparna is intelligent but lazy.
ii. Kumar is not intelligent and not lazy.
iii. Babji is neither intelligent nor lazy
iv. Goutamis intelligent and not lazy.
21. Verify whether the following is a tautology or not (May06)
UNIT-II
1. i. Prove the following by mathematical induction .
1.3+ 2.4 + 3.5 + ..+n(n+2) = ( n ) * ( n+1 ) * ( 2n+7 ) / 6
ii. Write and explain the DivisionAlgorithm. Give an example. (Feb-2010)
No human thing is of serious importance.
- Plato
49
MCA I Year, I Semester
2. i. State and prove the Pigeonhole Principle
ii. Describe the following:
i Inverse Functions ii Lattices. (Feb-2010)
3. i. Prove the following by mathematical induction. (July 2010)
1
2
+3
2
+5
2
+....(2n-1)
2
=(n)*(2n-1)*(2n+1)/3
ii. Write and explain the EuclideanAlgorithm Give an example.
4. i. Explain about the following functions. Give suitable examples. (July2010)
i. Onto Functions ii. One-to-One Functions
iii. Inverse Functions iv. Composite Functions
5. i. Define the terms : (i) Partial ordering(ii) Linear Ordering (iii) Lattice and drawthe Hasse diagramrepresenting
the postive divisors of 36 (i.e. D
36
)
ii. Define : BooleanAlgebra. If B is BooleanAlgebra then showthat (a+b)=a;b for all a,bCB.
iii. i If f(x
1
,x
2
,x
3
) = m(0,1,2,5) is a three input function transformf into its canonical sum-of-products
form.
ii. If f(x
1
,x
2
,x
3
) = (0,2,4,5) convert f into its canonical product-of-sums form.
6. i. If (G,*) is a group then show that (July 2010)
(a*b)
-1
= b
-1
*a
-1
for all a a,b CG.
ii. Define : Cyclic group and showthat every cyclic group is abeliam.
iii. Define: Parity check code and determine the code words for the parity check code (3,4).
7. i. Find the complements of every element of the lattice (S
30
, D). (Jun 09)
ii. Show that in any Boolean algebra B,
(i) ) ( c a b bc a b a + = + s (ii) ) ( ' b a b a a + +
For all a, b, c
. B e
iii. Minimize the Boolean expression.
F (a, b, c, d) = (2, 3, 4, 7, 10, 11, 12, 15)
8. i. Define a semigroup and a free semigroup generated by an alphabet. (Jun 09)
ii. Define minimum distance of a code. Find the minimumdistance of the code
C={<0, 0, 0, 0>, <0 1, 1, 0>, <1, 0, 1, 0>, <1, 1, 0, 0>}
iii. Let H be a k x n matrix with entries 0 and 1. Then the set of words x = <x
1
, x
2
, 000, x
n
> which belong to the
set C = {x% (x . H
t
= 0) mod 2} is a group code under the operation
.
9. i. Use the Karnaugh map representation to find a minimal sum of products expression of the following
function: f(a,b,c)= (0,2,3,7). (Jan 08)
ii. Show that if (a
*
b)
2
=a
2
*
b
2
for a and b in a group G, then a
*
b=b
*
a.
10. i. Let S={1,3,7,9} and G=(S,multiplication mod 10). Showthat Gis a group.
ii. Consider the (3,9) encoding funcions
e(000)=000 000 000 e(100)=010 011 010
e(001)=011 100 101 e(101)=111 101 011
e(010)=010 101 000 e(110)=001 011 000
e(011)=110 010 001 e(111)=110 000 111
Find the minimumdistance of e. Howmany errors will e detect?
iii. Consider the (3,5) group encoding function e : B
3

B
5
defined by
e(000) =00000 e(100) =10011
e(001) =00110 e(101) =10101
The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.
- Plato
50
MCA I Year, I Semester
e(010) =01001 e(110) =11010
e(011) =01111 e(111) =11100
Decode the following words relative to a maximum likelihood decoding Function (Jan 08)
ii) 00111(i) 11001 (ii) 00111
11. Define Hasse diagram. (Jun 07)
12. Define Boolean algebra. (Jun 07)
13. Obtain the sum of products canonical form:
(Jun 07)
14. Prove that 1 is the only complement of 0 in lattice. (Jun 07)
15. P.T the following lattice is not modular (Jun 07)
16. If G is group such that (a b)
n
= a
n
b
n
for three consecutive integers then ab= ba (Jun 07)
17. What is a partial ordering relation ? Let X={1,2,3,..7} and R={ ( X,Y)/(X-Y) is divisible by 3} in X. show
that R is an equivalence relation. (Jun 07)
18. Obtain product of sums canonical formof the Boolean expression X
1
* X
2
using four variables X
1,
X
2,
X
3
&
X
4.
(Jun 07)
19. Using karnaugh solve the following Boolean function. Also drawthe circuit diagramafter simplification.
f ( a, b, c, d) = (5,7,10,13,15). (Jun 07)
20. Let n be a positive integer and S
n
be the set of all divisors of n. Let n=30.
Let D denote the relation of division .such that for any a,b, aDb iff a divides b.
Drawthe lattice <S
30
,D> (Jan 07)
21. Define Lattice and name the different types of lattices. (Jan 07)
22. The cube representation of a switching function is given below: (Jan 07)
Write the Boolean expression for this function and then simplify it by using laws of Boolean algebra.
23. Use karnough map and find minimumsum of products for
f( w, x, y, z)=

(0,1,2,3,13,15) (Jan 07)
It was such a lovely day I thought it was a pity to get up.
- W. Somerset Maugham, "Our Betters", 1923
51
MCA I Year, I Semester
24. Obtain canonical sum of product and product of sum for the expression (Jan 07)
f ( a,b,c)= ab + bc
25. State and prove De Morgans laws in Boolean algebra. (Jan 07)
26. Define the terms and give an example (Jan 07)
i. Semi group
ii. Group
27. Prove that the set {1,2,3,4,5,6} is finite abelian group of order 6 under multiplicative modul 7. (Jan 07)
28. Show that in any Boolean algebra
(a + b) (a+ c) = ac + ab = ac + ab +bc. (Jan 07)
29. S.T a lattice < L , , *> is distributive iff (a*b) (b* c) (c* a) =
(a b) * (b c) * (c a)

a ,b ,c L. (May06)
30. Obtain the product of sums canonical form of the expression [( X
1
+ X
2
) (X
3
X
4
)] and draw the circuit.
(May06)
31. Obtain the sum of products canonical form and draw the circuit of the Boolean expression
(X1 X2 ) (X
1
1
*X
1
3
). (May06)
32. Use karnaugh map and simplify the function f (a, b, c, d)=

(1, 3, 5, 7, 9). (May06)


UNITIII
1. i Determine the number of postive integers n where 1<=n<=100 and n is not divisible by 2,3 or 5
ii. Describe about Rook Polynomials. (Feb 2010)
2. i. Let A={1,2,3,4} and B={u,v,w,x,y,z}. Howmany one-to-one functions f: A>B satify none of the following
conditions? Feb 2010
C1 : f(1) = u or v C2 : f(2) = w
C3 : f(3) = wor x C4 : f(4) x,y, or z
3. i. State and prove Principal of Inclusion and Exclusion. (July 2010)
ii. Find the number of derangement of 1,2,3,4.
iii. Briefly explain about Rook Polynomials.
4. i. Howmany integer solutions are there for the following equation, where c1, c2, c3,c4 > = 0. (July 2010)
c1+c2+c3+c4 =25
ii. Find the co-efficient of x
5
in (1 2x)
-7
.
iii. Discuss about Exponential Generating Function.
5. i. State and prove Pascals identity. (July 2010)
ii. Find the number of integral solutions to
x
1
+x
2
+x
3
+x
4
+x
5
=16
iii. A farmer buys 4 cows, 2 goats and 5 ducks from person who has 7 cows, 5 goats and 8 ducks. Find the
number of choices the farmer has.
6. i. Twelve persons are made to sit around a round table. Find the number of ways they can sit such that 2
specified persons are not together.
ii. Among the integers 1 to 200, find the number of integers that are
Art is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the
tediousness of life.
52
MCA I Year, I Semester
i divisible by 2 or 5 or 9
ii. not divisible by 5
iii. Find the coefficient of abc
2
in the expansion of (2a-b-c)
4
July 2010)
7. i. In how many ways can 10 people be seated in a row so that a certain pair of them are not next to each
other? (Jun 09)
ii How many terms are there in the expression (2x 2y 5 z)
8
? Find the coefficient of x
3
y
3
z
2
in it.
iii. Derive a formula for | (n), where n is a natural number and| is Eulers phi function, using the principle
of inclusion and exclusion.
8. i. In how many ways can a 8-letter word with 3 different vowels and 5 different consonants (in English
alphabet). How many of these begin with b and end with c? (Jun 09)
ii. Out of 1000 students 200 students can speak Hindi and 50 can speak English, while only 20 can speak both
Hindi and English. Howmany speak neither Hindi nor English.
iii. State and prove Pascals Identity.
9. i. Achain letter is sent to 10 people in the first week of the year. The next week each person who received
a letter sends letters to 10 new people and so on. How many people have received letters after10 weeks
and at the end of the year ? (Jan 08)
ii. Six distinct symbols are transmitted through a communication channel. A Total of 12 blanks are to be
inserted between the symbols with at least 2 blanks between every pair of symbols. In howmany way can
the symbols and blanks be arranged ?
iii. Determine the number of terms in the expansion of (x
1
+x
2
+x
3
+x
4
+x
5
)
10.
Also find the coefficient of x
1
2
x
3
x
4
3
x
5
4
in the above expansion.
10. i. In how many ways can 23 different books be given to 5 students so that 2 of the students will have 4
books each and the other 3 will have5 books each? (Jan 08)
ii. Howmany ways are there to distribute 10 balls into 6 boxes with at most 4 balls in the first 2 boxes (that is,
if x
i
=the number of balls in box i, then x
1
+x
2
s4) if all the balls are indistinguishable ?
iii. Compute howmany integers between 1 and 1000 are not divisible by 2,3,5 or 7.
11. i. Show that A _ B AI B=A (Jun 07)
ii. X={1,2,3}, A={a,b}. Howmany mappings are formed?
12. Consider the letters of the alphabet DELHI. Howmany words of length 7 can be formed fromthis alphabet
with repetitions of the letters are allowed? (Jun 07)
13. i. If
1,

2,
.................
p
belong to a commutative ring Aand n is a positive integer then prove that
(
1
+
2,
+.................+
p
)
n
=

[ n ]
1
n1

2
n2
.

p
np
.
n
1
n
2
...n
p
ii. When (2x
1
-3x
2
+5x
3
)
6
is expanded, the coefficient of x
1
3
x
2
x
3
2
. (Jun 07)
14. Prove that (t) =
=
N
J
W
0
( j ).(t - 1)
j
(Jun 07)
15. Showthat g (n, k) = (n/n-k) (n-k/k). (Jun 07)
16. Find the number of 4 permutations of the letters of the word UNIVERSAL. (Jun 07)
The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt within the heart.
- Helen Keller
53
MCA I Year, I Semester
The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining.
- John F. Kennedy M
17. Prove that the size of each of these sets that is the cardinality of each of there sets is
[m]
n
=m(m-1)(m-n+1) (Jun 07)
18. Find the coefficient of x
3
y
7
in (x+y)
10.
(Jun 07)
19. Solve the recurrence relation
a
n
+6a
n-1
+99a
n-2
=3 given a
0
=0 &a
1
=1 (Jun 07)
20. Define partial function. Give an example. (Jan 07)
21. Solve the recurrence relation.
F
n
=F
n-1
+F
n-2
given F
0
-1, F
1
=1. (Jan 07)
22. What is a primitive recursive function? Show that g (x, y) =x*y is primitive recursive. Also find g(x , y)
recursively where x=3 &y=3. (Jan 07)
23. Solve a
n
=a
n-1
+1/n(n+1),a
0
=1 by substitution. (Jan 07)
24. Howmany different passwords are there that involve 1,2,or 3 letters followed by 1,2,3 or 4 digits?(Jan 07)
25. There are 30 females and 35 males in a junior class while there are 25 females and 20 males in the senior class.
In how many ways can a committee of 10 be chosen for a college technical fest so that there are exactly 5
females and 3 juniors on the committee? (Jan 07)
26. Determine the coefficient of x
5
in(a+bx+cx
2
)
10
. (Jan 07)
27. Find the coefficient of x
1
2
x
3
x
4
3
x
5
4
in(x
1
+x
2
+x
3
+x
4
+x
5
)
10
(Jan 07)
28. In howmany ways can the letters { 5.a,4.b,3.c} be arranged so that all the letters of the same kind are not in
a single block. (Jan 07)
29. How many integers between 10
5
and 10
6
have no digits other than 2,5 or 8? (Nov06)
30. In how many ways can we choose 3 out of 3n successive positive integers so that their sum is divisible by
3? (Nov06)
31. Howmanyways are there to distribute 10 balls into 6 boxes with at most 4 balls inthe first 2 boxes if the balls
are indistinguishable? (Nov06)
32 Determine the no .of terms in the expansion of (x-7y+3z-w)
25
. (Nov06)
33. State that for n
>
2,
C(n
1
1)-2c (n
1
2) +3c (n
1
3)(-1)
n-1
nc (n
1
n) =0 (Nov06)
34. Show that for n
>
0
C(n
1
0)
2
+c(n
1
1)
2
++c(n
1
n)
2
= c(2 n
1
n). (Nov06)
35. Howmany integral solutions are there of x
1
+x
2
+x
3
+x
4
=20 if
1
s
x
1
s
6, 1
s
x
2
s
7, 1
s
x
3
s
8, 1
s
x
4
s
9 (Nov06)
54
MCA I Year, I Semester
If you wish to be brothers, let the arms fall from your hands. One cannot love while holding offensive arms.
- Pope Paul VI
36. Three Americans, three Mexicans and three Canadians are to be seated in a row. Howmany ways can they
be seated so that no two country-men sit together. (Nov06)
31. Find the value of Fun(1024,729) where the Fun (m,n) is recursively defined as follows.
Fun(0,n)=n
Fun(a,b)=Fun(b,a)
Fun(a,b)=Fun(a mod b,b ) if a>b. (May06)
32. State that the function f(x,y)=x+y is primitive recursive. (May06)
UNIT-IV
1. i Solve the following recurrence relation, where n>=1, and a
2
= 98. (Feb 2010)
a
n
=7a
n-1
ii. Explain about Non-homogeneus Recurrence Relations.
2. i. Write and explain the procedure Binary Search. (Feb 2010)
ii. Describe about Algegraic Structures.
iii. Differentiate between Isomorphism and Homomorphism.
3 i Find the Recurrence relation with initial condition ,that uniquely determine the following geometric
progression. (Jul 10)
2,10,50,250,1250..
ii Solve the following recurrence relation ,where n>=1 and a0=7.
An-an-1= 3n2
iii Briefly explain about Divide and Conquer approach.
4. i Explain about the following : (Jul 10)
i Characteristic Equation
ii. Algebraic Structure
iii Abelian Group
iv Cyclic Group.
5. i. Define the termi) Graph ii) Simple graph and Showthat the maximumnumber of edges in a simple graph
is n(n-1)/2. (July 2010)
ii Define :Isomorphism of graphs and showthat the following graphs G and G are Isomorphic
55
MCA I Year, I Semester
iii. Define the terms i) Tree ii) Binary Tree and show that any non-trivial tree has at least one vertex of
degree one
6 i . Suppose that a tree T has N
1
vertices of degree 1,2 vertices of degree 2;4 vertices of degree 4.Find N
1
ii. Find the maximum possible height of a binary tree with 13 vertices and draw the graph of the tree
iii. Find network of minimal cost (i .e minimal spanning tree) for the cities (July 2010)
in the figure given below.
7. i. If G = (V, E) is a non-directed graph with V= { v
1
, v
2
, , v
n
}then prove that
n
i 1 =
E deg (
i
) = 2 %E%. If Gis a
k-regular graph then prove that k
n
= 2 %E%.
ii. Showthat the following Graphs Gand G are isomorphic.
b
a
c
d
G
p q
s r
G
iii. Prove that a simple non directed graph G is a tree if any only if G is connected and contains no cycles.
8. i. If G is a nontrivial tree then prove that G contains at 2 vertices of degree 1. (Jun 09)
ii. Find 3 spanning trees from the following graph by destruction of cycles.
c
d
a b
e
Do thou restrain the haughty spirit in thy breast, for better far is gentle courtesy.
- Homer
56
MCA I Year, I Semester
iii. Find the minimal spanning of tree of the following connected weighted graph.
9. i. Generalized Peterson Graph P(n,k) consists of an outer n cycle, n spokes incident to the vertices of
this n cycle and an inner n cycle attached by joining its vertices to every K- th spoke . Prove that
P(n,k) is isomorphic to P(n, n k)
ii. Find a depth first search spanning tree for the given graph. (Jan 08)
10. i. What is a binary search tree ? Build a binarysearch tree for the sequence of numbers 17,23,4,7,9,19,45,6,2,37
and 99. (Jan 08)
ii. Explain Kruskals algorithmfor finding a minimal spanning tree. Apply the same to obtain a minimal
spanning tree from the following graph: (Jan 08)
7 b
11. Define graph and mixed graph. (Jun 07)
12. Showthat the following graph G and G
1
are isomorphic.. (Jun 07)
Do thou restrain the haughty spirit in thy breast, for better far is gentle courtesy.
- Homer
57
MCA I Year, I Semester
13. Showthat a graph G is a tree iff G has no cycles and (E) = (Jun 07)
14. Drawthe parsing tree of the formula [(p->(7Q))->(p^Q)]. (Jun 07)
15. Determine a telephone network of minimal cost for the cities in the given figure. (Jun 07)
16. Derive a formula for the maximumpossible height of a complete directed tree of degree k with n vertices
(Jan 07)
17 Showthat if H(n) is the maximumpossible height of a height balanced binary tree with n vertices then it is
in 0(log n). (Jan 07)
18. Prove that an isomorphic to the given digraphs (Jan 07)
19. Show that the sum of the out-degree and the in-degree of a node v is equal to total degree, for a given
digraph
20. Define
i. tree
ii. Binary tree
iii. complete graph
iv. pseudograph and give the examples. (Jan 07)
21. Using the prims algorithm fine the minimumspanning tree of the graph (Dec 06)
How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.
- Henry David Thoreau
58
MCA I Year, I Semester
I met a hundred men going to Delhi and everyone is my brother.
- Indian Saying
UNITV
1. i Explain about the following, with the help of examples. (Feb 2010)
i Spanning Subgraph ii Isomorphic Graphs
ii Write and explan the Kruskals Algorithm.
2. Explain about the following. (Feb 2010)
Give suitable exaple
a) Euler example b) Planner Graph
c) Hamiltonian Path d) Spanning Tree
3 i. Explain about Hamitonian Cycle. Give an Example . (Jul 10)
ii Explain when two graphs are said to be isomorphic,Give an example.
iii Write and explain the Prims Algorithm.
4. Explain about the following. Give suitable examples (Jul 10)
i Regular Graph.
ii Bipartite Graph
iii Graph Colouing
iv Hypercube
5. i Show that the following graph G is Planer
ii Showthat the graph G given belowis Eulerial and find an Eulerian circuit in :
iii. Find three distinct Hamiltonian circuits in the weighted graph given below .Also find their weights
59
MCA I Year, I Semester
To express the most difficult matters clearly and intelligently, is to strike coins out of pure gold.
- Geibel
6. i. If a graph G has more than two vertices of odd degree, then show tat there can be no Euler path in G.
ii Showthat every tree with 2 or more verticles is 2-chromatic.
iii. Find the chromatic number of the following graph G:
7. i. State and prove Eulers formula for connected plane graphs. (Jun 09)
ii. Show that K
3, 3
is non planer.
8. i. Prove that a non directed multi graph has an Eulerian path if and only if it is connected and has 0 or exactly
2 vertices of odd degree. Jun 09)
ii. Determine the chromatic number of the following graph.
9. i. State the conditions for a nondirected multigraph to have an Euler path and Euler circuit. (Jan 08)
ii. Using Grinbergs theoremdetermine whether the graph with regions of degree 5, 8 and 9 with exactly one
region of degree 9 is Hamiltonian or not.
iii. What is the chromatic number of a cycle and a tree ?
10. i. With the help of Kempe Chain argument, show that a planar graph G with less than 30 edges is 4
colorable. (Jan 08)
ii. At a certain chemical company, the owner has received three shipments that contain a total of seven
different chemicals. The nature of these chemicals is such that for all 1did5, chemical i cannot be stored
in the same storage compartment as chemical i + 1 or chemical i + 2. Determine the smallest number of
separate storage compartments needed to safely store these seven chemicals.
11. If Gisagroup s.t (ab)
n
= a
n
b
n
for three consecutive integers ,s.t ab=ba (Dec 06)
60
MCA I Year, I Semester
Smell is a potent wizard that transports you across thousand of miles and all the years you have lived.
- Helen Keller
12. Showthat every simple planar is 5 colourable. (Dec 06)
13. Define Walk, trail (Dec 06)
14. Compare Euler graph and Hamiltonian graph (Dec 06)
15. Prove that a complete graph k
n
is planar iff n4 (Dec 06)
16. Check for Euler circuit and euler path for a given graph. (May06)
17. Prove that every tree with two or more vertices is 2- chromatic (May06)
18. Write short notes on (May06)
i. Euler graph
ii. Four color theorem
iii. Flow in the transport network
iv. Max flowmin cut theorem
19. S.T If G is a connected planar graph then : (Dec 06)
| V| -| E| +| R| = 2.
20. Find the chromatic number of (Dec 06)
i. Cycle
ii. Tree
61
MCA I Year, I Semester
5. SUBJECTDETAILS
5.2 PROBABILITYANDSTATISTICS
5.2.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.2.2 Scope
5.2.3 Prerequisites
5.2.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.2.5 Suggested Books
5.2.6 Websites
5.2.7 Expert Details
5.2.8 Journals
5.2.9 Findings and Developments
5.2.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.2.11 Session Plan
5.2.12 Tutorial Plan
5.2.13 Question Bank
62
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.2.1 OBJECTIVEANDRELEVANCE
The modern development in the field of not only management, commerce, economics, social sciences,
mathematics and so on, but also in our life likepublic services, defence, banking, insurance sector, tourism
and hospitality, police and military etc are dependent on a particular subject known as statistics.
5.2.2 SCOPE
Statistics play a vital role in enriching a specific domain by collecting data in the relevant field, analyzing
the data by applying various statistical techniques and finally making statistical inferences about the
domain.
5.2.3 PREREQUISITES
In the present world, statistics has almost a universal application. Government applies Statistics to make
the economic planning in an effective and a prag-matic way. The businessman plan and expand their
horizons of business on the basis of the analysis of the feedback data. Most of the research scholars of
today apply statistics to present their research papers in an authoritative mannar. Thus the list of people
using statistics goes on and on and on. Due to these factors it is necessary to study the subject of statistics
in an objective manner.
5.2.4 SYLLABUS- O.U.
UNIT-I
OBJECTIVE
Statistical analysis therefore it is must to know about data collection technique including distinction of
primary data and secondary data and also to represent the data graphically using Histogram frequency
polygon. Collection of data plays the very important role for any.
SYLLABUS
Data validation and information abstraction: Methods of collecting dataefficiently, gathering information
fromdata charting
UNIT- II
OBJECTIVE
Probability is a branch of Mathematics. In olden days it is applied to enhance the chances of winning in
different games of gambling. Further to achieve a target fixed for any activity, it is possible to know how
much percentage, the target fixed can be achieved. For unpredictable phenomena in the filed of business,
economics and social sciences or even in day to day life application of probability is indispensable.
SYLLABUS
Probability: Laws of probability, Probability distributions, Discrete equiprobable, binomial, poisson.
UNIT-III
OBJECTIVE
It is an extension of probability when the activities are involved a continuous randomvariable. Continuous
random variable arise when deal with quantities which are measure on a continuous scale viz., speed of a
car, the amount of alcohol in a persons blood etc. The continuous Probability distribution is used in
No objects of value are worth risking the priceless experience of waking up one more day.
- Jack Smith
63
MCA I Year, I Semester
decision making analysis. Among all the continuous probability distribution normal distribution is most
important and it serves as the guiding instrument in Researches. It is indispensable tool for the analysis
and the interpretation of the data obtained by observation and experiment in Physical and Social sciences,
Medicine, Agriculture and Engineering
SYLLABUS
Continuous distributions: Rectangular, normal gamma and beta
UNIT-IV
OBJECTIVE
Different Statistical methods are used to find out the following:
i. Overall performance of the data available.
ii. To knowwhich activity is more prevalent in the data available.
iii. To find-out average annual growthrate, Average distance traveled by different modes of convenience.
iv. Measures of dispersion is used to know the consistency of the data, comparison of different distributions
etc.
v. Kurtosis is one of the technique used in biological sciences.
vi. Skewness is applied to find out lack of symmetry in the distribution
SYLLABUS
Statistical methods: Frequency distributions mathematical expectation, moments, skewness and kurtosis.
UNIT- V
OBJECTIVE
To determine the degree of relationship between any two relative variables namely viz., price and demand,
price and supply, crop yield and rainfall etc. The coefficient of determination is widely used in economic
analysis to know what percentage of any dependent variable depends upon the independent variable.
Regression technique is used to know the average relation between any two related variables and it is one
of the best forecasting technique. There is hardly no field without of application of sampling techniques. It
is widely used by most of the business organization while they are launching any New Product in the
market. In simply it can be stated that going in detail about the entire information on hand, by taking a
sample from the entire data it is possible to take a decision about the entire data under statistical enquiry.
SYLLABUS
Correlation and regression, Introduction to tests of significance, z, t, tests
5.2.5. SUGGESTEDBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS
T1 Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics, SC. Gupta, S.K. Kapoor, Sulthan Chand and Sons
T2 Fundamentals of Statistics, S.C. Gupta, Himalaya Publishing House
T3 Statistics for Management Richard. I. Levin, David S.Rubin, Prentice Hall of India
T4 Statistics ,Murray R.Spiegel, John J. Schiller, R. Alu Srinivasan, Tata McGrawHill
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Probability and Statistics for Engineers , Richard A. Johnson, Pearson Education
R2 Probability and Statistics for Engineers , Mendenhall Beaver Beaver, Thomson Brooks / cole
If you keep on saying things are going to be bad, you have a good chance of being a prophet.
- Isaac Bashevis Singer
64
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.2.6 WEBSITES
1. www.math.csusb.edu
2. www.athforum.org
3. www.stat.standford.edu
4. www.mathpages.com
5. www.42explore.com/satatistics.htm
5.2.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Andrew W. Appel
2. Murray R. Spiegel Harvard University
3. John J. Schiller, Associate Professor,Temple University
4. RAlu Srinivasan, Temple University
5. Richard A. Johnson, University of Wisconsin, Madison
6. Richard I. Levin University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
7. David S. Rubin University of North Carolina
8. Dr. C.R. Rao, Eberly Professor, Emiritus of Statistics and Director-Centre of Multivariate Analysis -
Pennsylvania State University - USA.
9. Dr. JNK Rao, School of Mathematics &Statistics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.
NATIONAL
1. S.C. Gupta, Reader, Department of Statistics, Hindu College
2. V.K. Kapoor, Reader, Department of Mathematics, Shri Ram College of Commerce, University of Delhi,
Delhi.
REGIONAL
1. Dr. J. Lakshminarayana
Department of Statistics
Andhra University, Vishakapatnam.
Email: jlnaul951@yahoo.com
Ph: (o) 0891-2844648. 0891-2754446.
2. Dr. K. Srinivasa Rao
Department of Statistics
Andhra University, Vishakapatnam.
Email: ksraoau@yahoo.co.in
Ph: (o) 0891-2844680. 0891-2560861
3. Dr. G. L. Reddy
Department of Maths and Statistics,
University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad.
Email: glsm@uohyd.ernet.in
5.2.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science
2. International Journal of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
3. International Journal of Tomography and Statistics
Nothing is so strong as gentleness. Nothing is so gentle as real strength.
- Frances de Sales
65
MCA I Year, I Semester
4. International Journal of Statistics and Management System.
5. AJournal for Combinatory, Probability and Computing
NATIONAL
1. Journal of Statistics and Management Systems.
2. Journal of Computational Statistics and Data Analysis
5.2.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS
1. Probabilistic passing strategies, mark-jan nederhot, Giorgio satta, pp: 406-436
Journal of ACMJournal of ACM, Vol.53, issue 3, may 06
2. Numerical and geometric algorithms and crowds, Richard Szeliski, pp: 1135-1143. Journal ofACM, Vol.53,
issue 3, may 06.
3. Statistical accelecations for animated global illumination, mark meyer, johnAndersonpp: 1075-1080. Journal
of ACM, Vol.53, issue 3, may 06
4. Experimental analysis of dynamic all pairs shortest path algorithms, council demetrescu, ginseppe, F.
Italiano. pp: 578-601. ACMtransactions on algorithms Vol.2, issue 4, October 06
5.2.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS
1. Statistical Quality Control Charts
2. Application of Non-parametric tests
3. Analysis of Variance Technique
4. Forecasting Techniques
5. Multiple Regression Analysis
The best cure for anger is delay.
- Seneca, A.D.
66
MCA I Year, I Semester
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU Syllabus Modules and sub Modules
Lecturer
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT-I
Introduction to Statistics L 1 T1-Ch.1
T1-Ch.2
Types of data collection and
methods of data collection
L 2 T2-Ch.2
1 Data Validation and
information abstraction
Methods of collecting data
efficiently, gathering
information from data
charting
Data representation by
different diagrams and graphs
L 3,L 4 T1-Ch.2
T2-Ch.4
T3-Ch.2
T4-Ch.2
UNIT-II
Laws of Probability and terms
used in probability
L 5 T1-Ch.3
T2-Ch.12
Definition of Probability
mathematical, empirical and
subjective probability
L 6
Set theory concepts, Laws,
and Axioms of Probability
L 7
T1-Ch.3
T2-Ch.12
T3-Ch.4
T4-Ch.6
Theorems on complementary
events
L 8
Multiplication, Conditional
Probability Theorems
L 9
Bayes Theorem L 10
Related Problems L 11
T1-Ch.3
T1-Ch.4
T2-Ch.12
T3-Ch.4
T4-Ch.6
Probability
Random Variable L 12 T1-Ch.5
T2-Ch.13
Probability Distribution Theorems on Expectations
Related problems
L 13
L 14
T1-Ch.5
T2-Ch.13
T2- Ch.13
Binomial Distribution
Derivations of Mean, Variance
L 15
Recurrence relation L 16
Binomial Constants L 17
Related Problems
T1-Ch.8
T2-Ch.14
T3-Ch.5
T4-Ch.7
Poisson Distribution
L 18
Derivations mean, variance L 19
M.G.F L 20
Poission Distribution
Constants
L 21
2
Discrete, Equiprobable
Binomial and Poisson
Related Problems L 22
T1-Ch.8
T2-Ch.14
T3-Ch.5
T4-Ch.7
One's mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions.
- Oliver Wendell Holmes
5.2.11. SESSIONPLAN
67
MCA I Year, I Semester
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU Syllabus Modules and sub Modules
Lecturer
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT-III
Rectangular Distribution
Related Problems
L 23
T1-Ch.9
T1-Ch.9
Normal Distribution
Derivations Properties
L 24
L 25
T1-Ch.9
T2-Ch.14
T3-Ch.5
Related Problems L 26
L 27
T1-Ch.9
T2-Ch.14
T3-Ch.5
Gamma Distribution L 28 T1-Ch.9
Beta Distribution.1st Kind L 29 T1-Ch.9
3 Continuous Distribution
Beta Distribution.2nd Kind L 30 T1-Ch.9
UNIT-IV
Frequency Distribution L 31
Dispersion Methods L 32
T1-Ch.2
T2-Ch.2
T3-Ch.5, 6
T3-Ch.3
T4-Ch.3, 4
Moments Derivations L 33
Raw Moments Derivations L 34
Skewness Concepts L 35
T1-Ch.2
T2-Ch.7
T4-Ch.5
Problems L 36
L 37
Kurtosis Concepts L 38
4 Statistical Methods
Problems L 39
L 40
T1-Ch.2
T2-Ch.7
T4-Ch.5
UNIT V
Definition of correlation
co-efficient and types of
correlation co-efficient
L 41 T1-Ch.10
T2-Ch.8
T3-Ch.12
T4-Ch.14
Measurement of
Correlation co-efficients
L 42 T1-Ch.10
T2-Ch.8
T4-Ch.14
Problems L 43
Properties of correlation
co-efficient
L 44
T1-Ch.10
T2-Ch.8
T4-Ch.14
Regression equations L 45
Properties of Regression
co-efficients
L 46
5 Correlation and Regression
Problems L 47
T1-Ch.10
T2-Ch.9
T4-Ch.15
Fear is that little darkroom where negatives are developed.
- Michael Pritchard
68
MCA I Year, I Semester
No objects of value are worth risking the priceless experience of waking up one more day.
- Jack Smith
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU Syllabus Modules and sub Modules
Lecturer
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
Large Sample tests (Z-test) L 48
Problems L 49
T1-Ch.14
T2-Ch15,16, 17
T3-Ch.7, 8, 11
T4-Ch.9,10
Small samples tests (t-test) L 50 T1-Ch.14
T2-Ch15,16,17
T3-Ch.7, 8, 9
Problems L 51 T1-Ch.14
T2-Ch.15,16,17
T3-Ch.7, 8, 9
x
2
- test L 52
Introduction to tests of
significance Z, t,
2
tests
Problems L 53
T1-Ch.14
T2-Ch.18
T3-Ch.11
T4-Ch.12
69
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.2.12. TUTORIALPLAN
The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence regardless of their
chosen endeavor. - Vince Lombardi
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1
Data collection and validation Methods & Types of Data collection,
Validation of data
T2
Classification and tabulation of data Data presentation in a suitable
statistical table
T3
Diagrams, graphical presentation of Data Different types of diagrammatical
representation of data
T4
I
Gathering information from Data charting Drawing inferences using different
Statistical techniques
T5 Probability
Definition and Axioms of prob.
Addition, Multiplication and
Conditional probability Theorems.
T6 Bayes Theorem Theorem and problems
T7
Binomial Distribution
Definition, Mean, variance, M.G.F.,
Additive property
T8 Poisson Distribution
Definition, Mean, variance, M.G.F.,
Additive property
T9
II
Rectangular Distribution
Definition, Mean, variance and
problems
T10 Normal Distribution
Properties, Symmetrical property,
Area property.
T11 Gamma Distribution
Definition, Mean, variance and
M.G.F.
T12
III
Beta Distribution
1, 2 Definitions, Moments of
1, 2
T13 Statistical Methods
Measures of Central tendency,
Dispersion Methods
T14 Moments Central and Non - Central Moments
T15 Mathematical Expectation Theorems on expectations
T16
IV
Kurtosis and Skewness
Definitions and Types of Kurtosis
and skewness
T17 Correlation and Rank Correlation Definition and its properties .
T18 Regression analysis
Types of Regression lines, properties
of Regression Coefficiates
T19 Sampling Theory
Large, small sample tests and
problems
T20
V
x
2
Chi - Square
Tests of independent of attributes,
Goodness of fit.
70
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.2.12 QUESTIONBANK
UNIT-I
1. i. Write a note on collection and classification of data by quoting appropriate examples.
ii. Tabulate the following information of the 1,000 colleges in Bihar in 1977, 230 were Government Colleges and
the rest were Private colleges. Number of Students and teachers in Government Colleges are 79,200 &2,640
respectively and in Private Colleges were 3,68,000 and 9,200 respectively. Prepare a table to provide infor-
mation about the College Population in Bihar and about number of students per teacher in different types
of Colleges. (July 2010)
2. i. Explain the differences between Primary and Secondary data.
ii. For the following data draw an appropriate diagram. The following data demonstrates sector wise outlay
during III &IVFive Year Plan.
Sector III % IV %
(a) Agriculture 14,302 -19.12 21,007 -20.9
(b) Transport and 16,230 -21.7 28,000 -27.9
Communication
(c) Industries 22,160 -29.6 24,090 -24.0
(d) Irrigation and Power 22,103 -29.6 27,321 27.2 (July 2010)
3. i. Explain the terms, classification and tabulation. Point out their importance in a Statistical Investigation.
ii. For the follwoing data on production of fertilizers in India for the selected yeras are given. Represent the
data with an appropriate graphical representation and comment on your observation. (Feb 2010)
Year : 1950-51 1960-61 1970-71 1980-91 1900-2001
Production: 20 29.5 82 101.9 119.8
(million tones)
4. i. Write a short note on collection and classification of data.
ii. Arrange the information given below in a tabular form. In a literacy survey, 4 villages A,B,C and D were
included: their populations being respectively820(420 males), 950(503 males), 1020(297 males) and 570(297)
and it was found that the numbers of literate males were 87,123,186 and 151. While the numbers of literate
If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude. Don't complain.
- Maya Angelou
females were 25,42,50 and 9 respectively. (Feb 2010)
5. i. Write about different random sampling methods.
ii. Explain the rules for constructing a statistical frequency table. (June 09)
6. i. What are sampling and non-sampling errors- explain. (June 09)
ii. The data given belowis related to employment in public sector establishments of India for different years.
Represent this data by a multiple bar diagram(year wise)
Sector 1991 1996 2001 2004 2005 (Data in Millions)
Central Govt. 7.3 9.5 11.1 12.7 13.2
State Govt. 2.2 2.8 3.1 3.2 3.3
Quasi Govt. 0.9 1.4 2.2 3.3 3.5
Local bodies 1.2 1.8 1.9 2.2 2.4
7. i. Distinguish Between classification and tabulation of statistical data. What purposes do classification
and tabulation serve ? Mention the important basis of classification.
71
MCA I Year, I Semester
ii. Explain what do you mean by a frequency distribution. (June 08)
8. i. The following is an extract formthe annul report of an insurance Company in India for 1969-70
During 1969-70, newbusiness of Rs. 1,036.08 crores was introduced under 14.01 lakh policies as against
Rs. 929.35 crores of business under 14.54 lakh polices in 1968-69 in 1967-70, 4.77 lakhs polices in the
previous year. The totel income of the corporation during 1969-70 amounted to Rs. 346.35 crore made up
of Rs. 260 .41 crores of premiumRs. 78.43 crores of inserts. Rents and Rs. 7.51 crores of miscellaneous the
overall expense ratio for the year for tlife business was 27.7 % as against 27.5% in the previous year.
Arrange the above suitable diagram or diagrams.
ii. Write also an explanatory note on the data, adding your cornments there on. (June 08)
9. i. Distinguish between primary and secondary data. Distinguish the various methods of collecting primary
data.
ii. Discuss in detail about data validation. (Jan 08)
10. i. Explain the importance of Diagramatic representation in Statistics and describe the procedure to draw a
Pie diagram.
ii. Represent by means of percentage bar diagram the following data: (Jan 08)
11. i. Explain various methods of collecting primary data with their merits and limitations
ii. What are different sources of secondary data. (Jun 07)
12. i. What are the advantages of diagrammatic representation of data? Write a brief note on multiple bar diagram
ii. Construct histogram for the following frequency distribution of students: (Jun 07)
13. i. Write about central tendency of measures.
ii. Acyclist covers the first 5 km at an average speed of 10 kmper hour, another 3 km at 8 km. Per hour and
the last 2 km at 6km per hour.Find the average speed for the entire journey. (Jun 07)
14. i. Explain about graphical representation of data.
ii. Given belowis the data pertaining to a life testing experiment of electric lamps: (Jun 07)
Marks Frequency
00-10 02
10-20 13
20-30 22
30-40 38
40-50 47
50-60 22
60-70 06
If I have the belief that I can do it, I will surely acquire the capacity to do it, even if I may not have it at the beginning
- Mahatma Gandhi
Items of Expenditure Family A Family B
Food 150 350
Clothing 38 120
Rent 360 130
Education 24 68
Miscellaneous 70 95
72
MCA I Year, I Semester
Life of electric lamp No. of bulbs
000 250 287
250 500 105
500 750 350
750 1000 230
1000 1250 125
Construct a histogram for this data.
15. i. Explain the rules for construction of statistical tables. (Jan 07)
ii. In 1991 census, in an area of a state,it was found that out of the total population of 128 million belonged
to urban areas .In urban areas 25 million were Hindu males, while of the urban female population of 34
million, only 12 million were non-Hindus. Out of total 41 million non Hindus in the whole area ,only 23
millions were males. Also there were 22 million of Hindu females living in rural areas. Represent this data
in a tabular form.
16. i. What are the most appropriate diagrams to represent the following data?
a. The world book production during the last 10 years
b. The number of Allopathy and Homeopathy doctors in a state during the last five years.
c. The number of salaried employees getting salaries in the ranges
a1-a2,a2-a3,a3-a4.an-1-an
d. The monthly expenditure on different items by a family.
ii. Describe:
a. Pie diagram
b. Pictogram
c. cartogramwith an example each (Jan 07)
17. i. Give a detailed discussion on methods of primary data collection with their merits and limitations.
ii. Discuss the editing of secondary data. (Jan 07)
18. i. Explain about bar diagrams. (Jan 07)
ii. Given below is the item wise expenditure of three families in different towns of A.P. Represent it using a
suitable bar diagram.
Item of expenditure Family-A Family-B Family-C
Food 600 300 350
Clothing 360 200 300
Rent 2150 2600 2700
Education 540 700 800
Miscellaneous 180 200 270
19. i. Define classification of data and describe types of classification.
ii. The average marks of 600 students in an examination is 42.Among them the average marks of the top
150students is 76,while that of the last 250 students is 28.what are the average marks of the remaining
students (May06)
20. i. Write a note on:
a. Data Validation
b. Sampling Errors
ii. Tabulate the following information: In a trip organized by a college, there were 80 persons each of whom
The ability to summon positive emotions during periods of intense stress lies at the heart of effective leadership.
- Jim Loehr
73
MCA I Year, I Semester
paid Rs.15.50 on average . There were 60 students each of whompaid Rs.16.Members of the teaching staff
were charged at a higher rate.The number of servants was 6(all males) and they were not charged anything
.The number of ladies was 20% of the total of which one was a lady staff member. (May06)
UNIT-II
1. i. State and prove the Bayes Theorem.
ii. The Chances of X,Y,Z becoming Managers of a certain company are 4:2:3. The probabilities that bonus
scheme will be introduced if X,Y,Z become managers are 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 respectively. If bonus scheme has
been introduced, what is the probability that X is appointed as the manager.b (July 2010)
2. i. Define Poisson distribution. Show that for a Poisson distribution, the coefficient of variation is the
reciprocal of the standard deviation.
ii. In Poisson frequency distribution, frequency corresponding to 3 successes is 2/3 times frequency
corresponding to 4 successes. Find the mean and standard deviation of the distribution. (July 2010)
3. i. Define the Classical, Mathematical and Statistical probability. The first 12 letters of the alphabets are
written down at random. What is the probability that there are 4 letters between Aand B?
ii. State and prove Bayes theorem. (Feb 2010)
4. i. Define Binomial distribution and derive the mean and variance of the distribution.
ii. In eight throws of a dice, 5 or 6 is considered a success. Find the mean number of successes and the
standard deviation. (Feb 2010)
5. i. Give Mathematical definition of probability. What are its limitation? how statistical definition helps to
overcome these limitations?
ii. Prove addition theoremfor two events. Afactory needs two types of rawmaterials Aand B. The probability
of not having adequate supply of material A is 0.07 and that of material B is 0.05. A study shows that
probability of shortage of both material A and B is 0.03. What is the probability that the factory is short
of either material? (June 09)
6. i. Obtain the p.m.f. of Poisson dist as a limiting case of Binomical dist.
ii. Assume that on the average one telephone number out of 8 called between 11AM and 12:00 noon on week
days is busy. What is the probability that of 5 randomly selected telephone numbers are called what is the
probability that (i) not more than 2 are busy and (ii) atleast 3 of them will be busy. (June 09)
7. i. Define the probability and list out the Laws of Probability. Also, define event, favorable and exhaustive
events with an example.
ii. A student in section C has 3 friends fromsection-A5 friends FromSection- B and 4 friends fromsection-
D .The provability of no classes in each of the section A,B and D is 1/3. Somebody saw the student with
one of his friend outside the class-room. What is the probability. That the friend is rom section-A
(June 08)
8. i. Define Binomial distribution and derive the mean and variance.
ii. The probability that a sales programme results in success is 0.6 and the probability of its failure is 0.4
Success brings a profit of Rs. 1,000 and failure a loss of Rs. 300. Find the expectation of gain (Profit or
Loss). (June 08)
9. i. State and Prove additive law of probability for n events.
ii. A bag contains 8 white and 4 red balls. Five balls are drawn at random. What is the probability that 2 of
them are red and 3 white ? (Jan 08)
Dream no small dreams for they have no power to move the hearts of men.
- Goethe
74
MCA I Year, I Semester
10. i. Define Binomial Distribution and prove its additive property. (Jan 08)
ii. It is given that 3% of the electric bulbs manufactured by a company are defective. Using the Poisson
approximation, find the probability that a sample of 100 bulbs will contain exactly one defective.
11. i. State and prove multiplicative lawof probability for n events.
ii. Froma pack of 52 cards, two cards are drawn at random. What is the probability that one is an ace and the
other is a king? (Jun 07)
12. i. Define Poission distribution and derive its moment generating function.
ii. Amachine produces 10 per cent defective items. Ten items are selected at random. Find the Probability of
not more than two items being defective. (Jun 07)
13. i. State Bayes theorem.
ii. Three tables, practically indistinguishable in appearance, have two drawers each.Table one contains a 100
rupees bundle in one drawer and a 50 rupees bundle in the other table two contains 100 rupees bundles
and table three contains 50 rupees bundles in both the drawers. One table is selected at randomand one of
its drawers is opened. A 100 rupees bundle is found. What is the probability that the other drawer also
contains a 100 rupees bundle.(A bundle contain 100 notes of same denomination.) (Jun 07)
14. i. Define Poisson Distribution and state its properties.
ii. A legal document of 25 pages is found to have, on an average, 1.75 mistakes per page.If a page is selected
at Random, what is the probability that three are atmost 3 mistakes in that page ? (Jun 07)
15. i. State additive lawof probability for n events. (Jan 08)
ii. Five salesmen A, B, C, D and E of a company are considered for a three member delegation to represent
the company in an international trade conference. What is the probability that either Aor B are selected
as delegates? (Jan 07/ Jan 08)
16. i. Define binomial distribution and state its properties.
ii. A company claims that only 2 % of their production are defectives. If a sample of 12 items is selected at
random from this production, what is the probability that there are at most 2 defectives? (Jan 07)
17. i. Define Binomial distribution and derive its mean and variance. (Jan 07)
ii. There are independent Poisson variates such that
P (X= 1) = P(X= 2) and P (Y= 2) = P(Y= 3) find the variance of (X 2 Y).
18. i. State and prove Bayeas Theorem.
ii. There are 10 urns of which each of 3 urns contains 1 white and 9 black ball, each of other 3 urns contains
white and 1black ball and of the remaining 4 urns, each contains 5 white and 5 black balls. One of the urns
is selected at random and a ball taken blindly from it turns out to be white. What it is the probability that
an urn containing 1 white and 9 blacks balls was selected? (Jan 07)
19. i. Define binomial distribution and derive its mean and variance.
ii. If X,Y are independent passion variates such that
P(X= 1) = P(X= 2) and P (Y= 2) = P (Y= 3) find the variance of (X- 2Y). (Jan 07)
20. i. Define Poisson distribution and derive the mean and variance.
ii. Xis a randomvariable following binomial distribution with mean 2.4 and variance
1.44. Find: i. P ( X
>
5 ) ii. P (1<X
s
4). (May 06, Feb04)
Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.
- General George S. Patton
75
MCA I Year, I Semester
The ability to summon positive emotions during periods of intense stress lies at the heart of effective leadership.
- Jim Loehr
21. i. Give the mathematical and statistical definition of probability. What is meant by mutually exclusive events?
Give an example of (a) 3 mutually exclusive events (b) 3 events which are not mutually exclusive.
ii. A is one of 6 horses entered for a race and is to be ridden by one of 2 jockeys X and Y. It is 2 to 1 that X
rides Ain which case all the horses are equally likely to win. If Yrides Ahis chance of winning is tripled.
What are the odds against Y winning? (May06)
UNIT-III
1. i. Define Normal distribution and derive the Median of the distribution.
ii. If Xis Rectangularly distributed with mean 1 and variance 4/3, find P (x < 0 ). (July 2010)
2. i. Define Beta distribution of second kind and derive the mean and variance of the distribution.
ii. Define Gamma distribution and derive the mean and variance of the distribution. (July 2010)
3. i. Define normal distribution and show that Mean=Median for this distribution. (Feb 2010)
ii. Suppose that X is uniformaly distributed over ) , ( o o , where o > 0. Determine o so that;
). 1 | | ( ) 1 | (| ) ( 3 . 0 ) 2 / 1 ( ) ( , 3 / 1 ) 1 ( ) ( > = < = < = > X P X P iii and X P ii X P i
4. i. Define Gamma distribution and find the M.g.f of this distribution.
ii. Define the Beta distribution of second kind and find the mean and variance. (Feb 2010)
5. i. Derive Mode of normal distribution.
ii In a sample of 150 workers in a firm the mean and standard deviation of daily wages were found to be
Rs.120 and Rs.30 respectively. Find the percentage of workers getting wages between Rs.85 and rs.160 in
the firm assuming that the wages distribution is normal. (June 09)
6. i. Derive the mean and variance of Beta distribution of first kind. (June 09)
ii. Derive the first four rawmoments of gamma distribution.
7. i. Define Gamma distribution and derive the mean and variance. (June 08)
ii. Showthat the MGF of a randomvafoable X having standard normal Distribution is Gx (t) = e 2
8. i. Define beta distribution of first kind and derive mean and variance.
ii. If a string of length / meter is cut into 2 pieces at a random point along its length. What is the probability
that the longer piece is at least twice the length of the shorter one? (June 08)
9. i. State the chief properties of the normal distribution
ii In a large of men, 5 percent are under 60 inches in heights and 40 percent are between 60 and 65 inches.
Assuming a normal distribution, find the mean height and standard deviation. (Jan 08)
10. i. Define rectangular distribution and derive its mean and variance.
ii. If X ~ Y(), show that as gamma distribution tends to standard normal distribution. (Jan 08)
11. i. Define normal distribution and state its properties. (Jun 07)
ii. The monthly income of a group of 10,000 persons was found to be normally distribution with mean Rs. 750
and standard deviation Rs.50. Show that of this group about 95% persons had income exceeding Rs.668.
12. Define Beta distribution of second kind. Find its mean and variance. (Jun 07)
76
MCA I Year, I Semester
The goal of an effective leader is to recondition your team to be solution focused rather than problem focused.
- Jim Rohn
13. i. Define Beta distribution of first kind and find its mean and variance.
ii. In a normal distribution Q1 = 54.52 and Q3 = 78.86. Find the median of the distribution. (Jun 07)
14. i. When does a variable follow gamma distribution and what are its properties?
ii. Derive the moment generating function of normal distribution. (Jun 07)
15. i. Define normal distribution. Showthat for normal distribution Q.D=
3
2
S.D
ii. In a normal distribution 31%of the items are under 45 and 8%items are over 64, Find the mean and standard
deviation of the distribution. (Jan 07)
16. i. Define gamma distribution. State and prove its additive property. (Jan 07)
ii. If X follows ) ( , Show that as

gamma distribution tends to Standard normal distribution.
17. i. Define Gamma distribution and obtain mean and variance.
ii. Define the Beta variate of the first kind. Obtain its mean and variance. (Jan 07)
18. i. A distribution is given by f(x) dx = 1/2a dx,-a
. a x s s
Find the first four central moments and obtain | 1
and | 2.
ii. Define Normal distribution . Suppose the temperature during Jun is normally distribution with mean 20C
and standard deviation 3.33C. Find the probability p that the temperature is between 21.11c and 26.66C.
The normal values are P(0
2 s s Z
) =0.4772 and P(0
33 . 0 s s Z
) = 0.1293 (Jan 07)
19. i. Define continuous randomvariable and showthat for normal distribution Median equals Mode and Mean.
ii. For a Rectangular distribution dp = k.dx : 1
. 2 s s x
Show that Arithmetic mean > Geometric mean>
Harmonic mean. (May06)
20. i. Define the Beta variate of the second kind and state its relation with Beta variate of first kind and find mean
and variance of first kind.
ii. Obtain the m.g.f for Gamma distribution and hence find mean and variance. (May06)
UNITIV
1. i. State and prove the Multiplication theorem of expectation.
ii. Given the following data, compute the following:
i. E (X) ii. E (2X+ 3) iii. E (4X+ 5) iv. E (X
2
) v.V(X) and V(2X+ 3).
x -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3
P(x) 0.05 0.1 0.3 0 0.3 0.15 0.1 (July 2010)
2. i. Explain the methods of measuring skewness and Kurtosis of a frequency distribution.
ii. Calculate the first four moments of the following distribution about the mean and hence find
2 1
| | and .
x 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
f 1 8 28 56 70 56 28 8 1 (July 2010)
3. i. State and prove the addition theorem of Expectation.
ii. Write a short notes on Kurtosis. (Feb 2010)
77
MCA I Year, I Semester
4 i.. The following is the distribution function of a discrete r.v.x :
x -3 -1 0 1 2 3 5 8
f(x) 0.10 0.30 0.40 0.5 0.75 0.9 0.95 1.00
i) Find the probability distribution of x, ii) Find P(X is even) and ) 8 1 ( s s x P , and
(iii) Find ) 0 / 3 ( ) 0 / 3 ( > > > = x x P and x X P
ii. If the r.v.Xhas the p.d.f f(x) =
)
`

< < +
otherwise
x x
; 0
1 1 ; ) 1 ( 2 / 1
(Feb 2010)
5. i. If x1, x2, .... xn are nrandom variables and a1, a2, .... an are n read constants, then show that
V
|

=
n
i 1
a
i
x
i | =
( ) +

=
i
n
i
x iv a
1
2

= =
n
i
n
j
aiaj
1 1
2
Cov ( ) xj x,
ii. The joint pdf of two-dimensional randomvariable (X, Y) is given by
f (x,y) = kx
2
y;0 < x < 1; 0 < y < 1 = 0; elsewhere
(i) Find the value of K.
(ii) Find the mariginal distributions of Xand Y.
(iii) The mean and variance of X (June 09)
6. i. Define characteristic function of a randomvariable X. If Xis a randomvariable with characteristic function
) (t | and )
( '
'
r
E
x
r
=
exists then show that r
r
r
r
t
t
i
c
c
=
) (
) (
'
|
t = 0
ii. The mean and standard deviation of 20 items is found to be 10 and 2 respectively. At the time of checking
it was found that one item out of 8 was incorrect. Calcuate the corrected mean and standard deviation if
(i) the wrong itemis omitted (ii) the wrong itemis replaced by its correct value 12. (June 09)
7. i. Define expection and prove the multiplication theoremof expectation
8. i. Write a short note Skewness and kurtosis.
ii. Compute the first 4 central moments of the data
X1 3 2 4 6
F1 2 5 8 15 (June 08)
9. i. Define raw and central moments. Establish the relationship between central moments in terms of raw
moments.
ii. Define Skewness. What are different measures of skewness? In a frequency distribution the first four raw
moments about a point 4 are 1,4,27,108. Find first four central moments. (Jan 08)
10. i. State and prove addition theoremof mathematical expectation for n random variables.
ii. A randomvariable X has the following distribution:. (Jan 08)
No objects of value are worth risking the priceless experience of waking up one more day.
- Jack Smith
ii. Let Xbe a continuous r.v with pdf.f (x) = k for 1 < x < 3 find
(i) k (ii) P (1< x < 2 ) (iii) P (x<3 ) (June 08)
78
MCA I Year, I Semester
X : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
P(X): K 2K 3K 4K 5K 6K 7K 8K 9K
Find (i) The value of K (ii) P(Xs5) (iii) P(2sX<5)
11. i. What is positive and negative Skewness? Give different formulae for measuring Skewness and kurtosis.
ii. The first four moments of a distribution about the value 3 of the variable are -1.5,17,- 30 and 108.Find the
moments about mean. (Jun 07)
12. i. If Xand Yare continuous randomvariable, showthat E(X+Y) = E(X)+E(Y).
ii. The random variable x has probability density function
f(x) =cx
2
,0
2 s s x
= 0 otherwise.
Find the constant c, mean and variance. (Jun 07)
13. i. If X and Y are continuous random variables, then prove that
a. E(X+Y) =E(X)+E(Y)
b. E(XY) = E(X) E(Y), if Xand Yare independent, assuming that all expectations exits.
ii. Define Moments. Establish the relationship between the moments about mean (central moments) in terms
of moments about any arbitrary point and vice versi. (Jan 07)
14. i. Two randomvariable X and Yhave the J.P.d.f
F(x,y) = 2-xy;0 x 1 =0; otherwise.
Find :
a. Marginal probability density function of X andY.
b. Conditional density functions
c. Var (X) and Var (Y)
d. Covariance between (x,y)
ii. Write a note on Skewness. (Jan 07)
15. i. Give a detailed notes on Skewness and its measures.
ii. The first three moments of a distribution about the value 2 are 1, 16 and -40. Show that the mean is 3,
variance is 15 and 3 =-86. (Jan 07)
16. i. If X1 and X2 are two independent randomvariables, showthat E(X1,X2) = E(X1)E(X2).
ii. A continuous random variable X has the following distribution.
(x)=K(x)
2 0 < < x
= 0 otherwise
Find the value of K and mean of X. (Jan 07)
17. i. Define Mathematical expectation and prove if X is random variable and a and b are constants then
a. E(aX+b) =aE(X)+b
b.V(aX+b). =a
2
+V(X).
ii. Find the expectation of the number on a dice when throw. Also when two unbiased dice are thrown, find
the expected values of the sum of number of points on them. (May06)
The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence regardless of their
chosen endeavor. - Vince Lombardi
79
MCA I Year, I Semester
18. i. Write a brief note on kurtosis.
ii. Calculate the coefficient of Skewness based on moments for the following (May06)
Variate (X) 01-05 06-10 11-15 16-20 21-25 26-30 30-35
Frequency (f) 03 04 68 30 10 06 02
UNITV
1. i. Show that the coefficient of correlation r is independent of change of scale and origin of the variable.
Also, prove that for 2 independent variables r = 0. Showby an example that the converse is not true. State
the limits between which r lies.
ii. Explain what are regression lines.Why are these two such lines? Also, derive their equations.
(July 2010)
2. i. Define Chi-Square and derive the expression for a 2 X 2 Contingency Table.
ii. Measurements of the fat content of 2 kinds of ice cream, Brand A and Brand B, yielded the following
sample date:
Brand A: 13.5 14.0 13.6 12.9 13
Brand B : 12.9 13.0 12.4 13.5 12.7
Test the Null hypothesis
2 1
= (where
1
and
2
are the respective true average fat contents of
the 2 kinds of icfe cream) against the alternative hypothesis
2 1
= at 5 % 1 o.s. (the table values for
8 and 9 d.f are 2.31 and 2.262). (July 2010)
3. i. Prove that Spearmans Rank Correlation Cofficient is given by
,
) 1 (
6
1
2
2

n n
di
where di denotes the
difference between the ranks of ith individual.
ii. Define
2
X
and explain the computation of
2
X
for a 2 x 2 contingency table. The following data is
collected on two attributes:
Cinegoers Non
Cinegoers
Literate 83 57
Illiterate 45 68
Based on this, can you conclude that ther is no relation between the habit of cinema going and literacy.(The
table value is 3.841) (Feb 2010)
4. i. Compare and contrast the roles of correlation and regression in studying the interdependence of two
variates.
ii. For 10 observations on price (X) and supply (Y) the following data were obtained:
3467 5506 , 2288 , 220 , 130
2 2
= = = = = XY and Y X Y X . Obtain the line of
Regression of Y on X and estimate the supply when the price is 16 units, and find out the standard error
of the estimate. (Feb 2010)
5. i. Show that correlation coefficient is independent of shift of origin and scale.
ii. Given that x = 4y + 5 and y = kx + 4 are the two lines of regression of XonYand Yon X respectively. Find
the value of k, means of Xand Yand correlation coefficient between Xand Y. (June 09)
I don't want to achieve immortality through my work... I want to achieve it through not dying.
- Woody Allen
80
MCA I Year, I Semester
Dream no small dreams for they have no power to move the hearts of men.
- Goethe
6. i. Describe the test procedure for paired t-test. (June 09)
ii. For the date in the folowing table, test for independence between persons ability in Mathematics and
interest in Statistics. Test at 5% level of Significance.
7. i. Explain the concept of correlation and regression. Distinguish between correlation and regression.
ii. Fit a regression line of Y on X for the following data: (Jan 08)
X : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Y: 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
8. i. Explain F-test for testing equality of two population variances. (Jan 08)
ii. Test the independence of attributes from the following data, stating the assumptions.
A1 A2 A3 A4
B1 45 50 52 48
B2 60 51 49 28
B3 46 45 72 38
9. i. State and prove the properties of regression co-effcients.
ii. the two lines of regression in a bivariate distribution are X+9Y=7 and 4X+Y=16. Find :
a. Correlation co-effcient between X and Y,
b.Mean values of X and Y. (Jun 07)
10. i. Explain t-test for testing the equality of two population means , stating the assumptions. (Jun 07)
ii. In a cityA,25%of a randomsample of 1000 school children had defective eye-sight. In another city B 20%
of random sample of 1600 school children had same defect. Is the difference between the cities with
respect to the proportion of children with defective eye-sight significant ?Test at 1%level of significance.
11. i. State and prove the properties of regression co-efficient
ii. Show how the t-distribution has been found useful in testing whether the mean of small sample is
significantly different from a hypothetical value.
iii.. A random sample of 100 families in twin cities showed the following distribution of home ownership by
familyincome. (Jan 07)
Annual income ( In rupees)
Residential Status
Less than 70,000 70,000-1,20,000 1,20,000 or above
Home
Owner
Renter
10
8
15
17
30
20
Is ownership in twin cities independent of family income?
(The Table value is 5.99)
12. i. What is meant by Regression?State the properties of regression coefcients.
ii. The two regression line of a bivariate data are found to be X+2Y-5=0 and 2X+3Y- 8=0. Find th correlation
coefficient rXY. (Jan 07)
13. i. What is a proportion ? Explain test for difference of two proportions.
ii. In a city X, 25%of a randomsample of 800 school children had defective eye-sight. In another cityY, 20%of
a randomsample of 1500 school children had same defect. Is the difference between the cities with respect
to the proportion of children with defective eye-sight significant? Test at 1% level of significance.
(Jan 07)
81
MCA I Year, I Semester
14. i. Define:
a.Line of regression
b.Regression co-efficient. Derive the equations to the lines of regression
ii. Calculate the coefficient of correlation for the following data:
X 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Y 9 8 10 12 11 13 14 16 15
Also, find the equations to the lines of regression. (May06)
15. i. Explain t-test for difference of means, stating the assumption.
ii. The following data, gives the number of accidents that occurred during a week.
Find whether the accidents are uniformly distributed over the week.
Day SUN M ON TUE W ED THU FRI SAT
No.of
accidents
15 17 10 11 12 7 9
(The Table value is 12.592) (May06)
No objects of value are worth risking the priceless experience of waking up one more day.
- Jack Smith
83
MCA I Year, I Semester
7. SUBJECTDETAILS
7.3 COMPUTERPROGRAMMINGANDPROBLEMSOLVING
5.3.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.3.2 Scope
5.3.3 Prerequisites
5.3.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.3.5 Suggested Books
5.3.6 Websites
5.3.7 Experts Details
5.3.8 Journals
5.3.9 Findings and Developments
5.3.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.3.11 Session Plan
5.3.12 Tutorial Plan
5.3.13 Question Bank
84
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.3.1 OBJECTIVEANDRELEVANCE
The main objective of this subject is to teach students the fundamental concepts in computer programming
using C++. It forms a clear way for programming and problem solving. To understand the programming
concepts, designing programs by using C & C++.
5.3.2 SCOPE
This is the foundation course for learning any object-oriented programming languages. After completion of
this subject students can gain the knowledge in designing programs by themselves. It involves learning
programs to apply each of the object-oriented concepts class, object inheritance, polymorphismGermanic
programming.
5.3.3 PREREQUISITES
Students should have knowledge of computer fundamentals, i.e., using computer system. Although no
previous knowledge and computer fundamental, algorithms and flow chats, is required students should
who have idea about C language then he/she will manage very easily.
5.3.4 SYLLABUS- O.U.
UNIT-I
OBJECTIVE
It describes about introductory concepts of computer environment and languages along with its syntaxes
and semantics. This unit explains the basic concepts of C. It also contains C token set,conditional state-
ments and control Statements are also explained.
SYLLABUS
Introduction to Computers:Computers Systems,Computing Environments,Computer Languages,Creating
and Running programs System development.
Introduction to CLanguage: Cprograms,identifiers,Types,Variables,Constants,Operators,Input/and Output,
Expressions:- expressions, type conversions, statements, selection, making decisions (conditional
statements), repetition (control statements).
UNIT-II
OBJECTIVE
This unit describes the data structured programs on functions in C,arrays,pointers and strings using
communications.
SYLLABUS
Functions : Designing Structured Programs in C, User-defined functions Iter-function communication
(Parameter passing mechanism), Stadars Functios,Scope,Recursion.
Arrays : Concepts,Using Arrays in C,Inter Communication (Passing Arrays to Functions), Two Dimen-
sional arrays,Multidimensional arraya.Application:- selection bubble and insertion sort.
Pointers : Introduction,Pointers for Inter-Function Communication,Pointers to Pointers,Compatibility,Arrays
and Pointers (w.r.t arithmetic,passing arrays to function), memory allocation functions.
Strings : String concepts,CString,String Input/Output Functions,Array of Strings,String Mnipulation func-
tions
In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad
move. - Douglas Adams
85
MCA I Year, I Semester
UNIT-III
OBJECTIVE
This unit describes Structure,enumerated and union types.And it also explains the basic streams and file I/
O.File I/Oincludes streamI/O,tools for I/Oand character I/O, which can be used for performing operations
through files
SYLLABUS
Enumarated,Structure and Union Types : The Type Definition (typedef),Enumerated types,Structure, Unions
,Enumerations,unions,Pre-Processor Directives.
Text Input/Output Files in C: Files, Streams,Standard Library Input/Output functions,Formatting Iput/
Output Functions,Character Input/Output Functions.
Binary Input/Output : Text versus Binary Streams,Standard Library Functions in Files,Converting File
Type.
UNIT-IV
OBJECTIVE
It describes about introductory concepts of C++,programming and problemsolving techniques along with
its syntaxes and sematics. This unit explains the basic concepts of C++. It also cotais a very important
concepts functions,in that the procedures call-by-value and call-by-reference are also explained.
SYLLABUS
Introduction to C++ : Introduction and Basic Elements of C++.
Functions in C++ : User-defined functions, Types of functions, Parameter passing machanisms, Overload-
ing, Inline functions,Function Templates.
UNIT- V
OBJECTIVE
This unit explains the OOPS concepts like Inheritance, Polymorphism. It also contains exception handling.
Inheritance can be used for re-using the code; polymorphism is used for performing more than one opera-
tion by using same function name or same operator. Through exception handling we can easily avoid the
errors that are done manually and systematically.
SYLLABUS
Classes : Introduction to classes,inheritance,Operator Overloading,Dynamic Polymorphsm using Virtual
Functions,Abstract Classes.Templates and Exceptional Handling
5.3.5. SUGGESTEDBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS
T1. Behrouz a. Forouzan,Richard F Grilberg,Computer Science - A Structured Approach using C, 3rd
Edition,Cengage Learning2007(For Unit I,II,III)
T2 . D. S. Malik,C++ Programming Language, Cengage Learning 2009(For Unit IVand V)
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Harry.H. Cheng, C/C++ for Engineers and Scientist - An InterpretiveApproach,McGraw-Hill,International
Edition, 2009
R2. Owens L.Astrachan, Programming with C++, Tata McgrawHill,2007.
R3. Bjarne Stroustrup,The C++ Programming Language, 3rd Eition, Addition Wesley 1998.
You would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend.
- Abraham Lincoln
86
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.3.6 WEBSITES
1. www.cplusplus.com
2. www.cprogramming.com
3. www.cppreference.com
4. www.parashift.com
5. www.cuj.com
5.3.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. AndrewW. Appel
Professor
Dept of Computer Science
Princeton University
Email: appel@princeton.edu
Ph: +1-609-258-4627
2. Mr. Hugh W. MCGuire
School of computing and information systems
Grand Valley State University
Email: mcguire@cis.gvsu.edu
Ph: (616)331-2915
3. Mr. Benjamin John Sapp
Stanford University
Email: bensapp@stanford.edu
Ph: (217)-898-0092
NATIONAL
1. Mr. Harish Karnick,
IIT Kanpur
Ph: 91-512-259-7601
Email: hk@cse.iitk.ac.in
2. Mr. S. Arun Kumar
IITDelhi,
Ph: 91-11-2659-1287
Email: sak@cse.iitd.ernet.in
3. Mr. Sanjiva Prasad
IITDelhi
Ph: 91-11-2659-1294
Email: sanjiva@cse.iitd.ac.in
4. Mr. N.S. Narayana Swamy
IIT Madras
Ph: 91-44-2257-4369
Email: swamy@iitm.ac.in
I am opposed to millionaires, but it would be dangerous to offer me the position.
- Mark Twain
87
MCA I Year, I Semester
REGIONAL
1. Mr. M.Surendra Prasad Babu
Professor in Andhra University
Email : drmsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in
Ph: 0891-2844862
2. Mr. K.Venkata Rao
Professor in Andhra University
Email: professor_venkat@yahoo.com
webmasterau@yahoo.com
Ph: 9985504584
5.3.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Programming Languages ACM Trans on
2. Journals On Object - Oriented Programming
3. Journal of C Language Translation
NATIONAL
1. Dobbs journal
2. Journal of Object-Oriented Programming
3. Journal of Programming Languages
4. C++ Journal
5.3.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS:
1. What have me not learned about teaching programming? David gives, IEEE
Computer Society, Vol.39, No.10, pp: 81-100, October 2006.
2. Scientific Programming, George K. Thiruvathukal, Konstantin lauger,Benjamin Gouzalez, pp: 76-87.
3. Games and Technology: Development synergy, Nahumhon, Ben Sawyer and J.R. Parker, pp: 129-130.
IEEEcomputer, Vol.39, No.12, Dec 2006.
4. C# Vs C++ Vs C++.net on 13
th
April 2007
5.3.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS
1. Significance of Standard Library
2. Container Design
3. Algorithms and Function Objects
4. Strings and I/O streams
5. Is C++Reliable
I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying that I approved of it.
- Mark Twain
88
MCA I Year, I Semester
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU Syllabus Modules and Sub Modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remark
s
UNIT - I
Computer Systems,Computing
Environment
L1 T1-Ch.1.2
Computer Languages L2 T1-Ch.1.2
Introduction to
Computers
Creating & Running
Programs,System Development
L3 T1-Ch.1.3
T1-Ch.2
C Programs L4 T1-
Ch.2.1
R2-Ch.2
Identifiers, Data Types L5 T1-Ch.2.3
T1-Ch.5
Variables, Constants L6 T1-Ch.2.2
Operators, Input/Output L7 T1-Ch.2.4
Expressions:- Precedence and
associativity,Evaulating expressions
L8 T1-Ch.
2.5
Type conversion, Statements L9 T1-Ch.
2.6
Selection :-making decisions
(conditional statements),
L10 T1-Ch.2.7
1.
Introduction to C
Language
Repetition(control statements) L11 T1-Ch.2.8
UNIT-II
Designing Structured
Programs,Functions in C
L12 R1-Ch.3.1
T1-Ch. 3.2
User-defined functions,Inter-
function communication (parameter
passing mechanism)
L13 R1-Ch.3.2
T1-Ch.3.3
Functions
Standard
Functions,Scope,Recursion
L14 T1-ch3.4
Concepts,Using Arrays in C,inter-
Function Communication (Passing
arrays to functions)
L15 T1-Ch.3.5
2D arrays,Multidimensional arrays
Arrays
Application:- Selection,bubble and
isertion sort
L16 T-Ch.3.6
Introduction,Pointers for Inter-
Function Communication
L17 T1-Ch.3.7
Pointer-to-Pointer,Compatibility, L18 T1-Ch.3.8
2.
Pointers
Arrays and pointers(w.r.t
arithmetic,passing arrays to
function),memory allocation
functions
L19,L20 T1-Ch. 3.9
How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.
- Henry David Thoreau
5.3.11 SESSIONPLAN
89
MCA I Year, I Semester
Sl.
No
Topics in OU Syllabus Modules and Sub Modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
String concepts, C Strings
Input/Output Functions
L21 T1-Ch. 4.1 Strings
Array of Strings, String
Manipulation functions
L22 T1-Ch.4.2
UNIT-III
The Type-definition (Typedef),
Enumerated Types
L23 T1-Ch.5.1 Enumerated, Structure,
and Union Types
Structure,Unions,Enumerations,
Pre-processor Directives
L24,L25 R1-Ch.4.2
T1-Ch.5.2
Files, Streams, L26 T1-Ch.5.3
Standard Library Input/Output
functions, Formatting
Input/Output Functions
L27 T1-Ch.5.4
Text Input/Output Files
in C
Character Input/Output Functions L28 T1-Ch. 5.5
3
Binary Input/Output Text versus Binary streams,
Standard Library Functions in
Files,Converting File Type
L29,L30 T1-Ch..5.6
UNIT IV
Introduction to C++ Introduction and Basic elements of
C++
L31 T2-Ch.1.1
T2-Ch. 1.2
R2-Ch.1.1
User-defined Functions L32 T2-Ch.2.1
Types of Functions L33 T2-Ch.2.3
Parameter Passing mechanism L34 T2-Ch.2.4
Overloading L35 T2-Ch.2.5
Inline Functions L36 T2-Ch. 2.6
4
Functions in C++
Function Templates L37,L38 T2-Ch.2.7
Unit-V
Introduction to Classes L39 T2-Ch.5.1
T2-Ch.5.2
Inheritance L40,L41,
L42
T2-Ch.6.1
Operator OverLoading L43,L44 T2-Ch.7.1
Dynamic Polymorphism Using
Virtual functions
L45,L46 T2-ch.7.2
Abstract Classes L47 T2-Ch.7.3
Templates L48,L49 T2-ch. 7.4
Classes
Exeptional Handling L50,L51 T2-ch. 9.1
I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestioned ability of a man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor.
- Henry David Thoreau
90
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.3.12 TUTORIALPLAN
Do thou restrain the haughty spirit in thy breast, for better far is gentle courtesy.
- Homer
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1 Introduction to programming Tokens, expressions, Input & Output
T2 Control Flow Statements Sequence, Condition, Loop & Programs
T3 Functions Testing and Debugging the functions
T4
I
Parameter passing Techniques Call by value, Call by reference
T5 Introduction to Classes & Objects OOPS concepts
T6 Constructors & Destructors Various Types and Programs
T7 Streams & File I/O Tools for I/O, Character I/O
T8
II
Structures & Classes
Def, Declaration & programs on structures
& classes.
T9 Overloading Overloading the function & Operator
T10 Friend Functions Friend Functions, Classes & Programs
T11 Arrays Arrays with functions, Arrays with Classes
T12
III
Strings & Multidimensional
Arrays
Basics & Programs
T13 Pointers Basics & Programs
T14 Dynamic Arrays Syntaxes & programs
T15 Recursion Techniques & Programs
T16
IV
Templates Function Templates & Class Templates
T17 Inheritance Concepts , Types & Programs
T18 Polymorphism Types & Virtual Functions
T19 Overriding Concepts & Programs
T20
V
Exception Handling Basics & Programs
91
MCA I Year, I Semester
5.3.13 QUESTIONBANK
UNITI
1. i. What are the basic datatypes in c?Explain withthe help of examples.
ii. Explain about various bitwise operatorsin c language.
iii. Write a C-programto find whether the given number is polindrome or not. (July 10)
2. i. Discuss about Type Modifiersin C-language.
ii. Discuss about various Logical Operators in C_language.
iii. Write a C-programto find the roots of a quadratic equation. (July 10)
3. i. If a punctuation symbol,like semi colon,is ommmited froma program,what kind of error is produced?
ii. Differentiate between call by value and call by reference in c++ with suitable examples.
iii. Differentiate between a global variable and local variable with the help of an example. (July 10)
4. i. Explain the three main kinds of errors in program.
ii. Discuss the use of membor functions get and put with suitable examples.
iii. Write a simple programusing inline function to generate the cube of an integer. (July 10)
5. i. Explain the features of typedefand enum used in C++ programs.
ii. Distinguish between call by value and call by reference of parameters in functions in C++ language with
suitable examples.
iii. What do you understand by precedence and associativity while evaluating expressions? (Feb 10)
6. i. Describe the data types int,double,char and bool with suitable examples as used in C++ language.
ii. Explain the use of cin and cout in C++ language. (Feb10)
iii. What is the fundamental rule for testing functions?Why is this a good way to test functions?
7. i. What are the three kinds of programerrors? What types of errors are discovered by the commplier? What
is the type of error produced if you omit a punctuation mark semicolon?
ii. Write s simple C++ program that reads two whole numbers into two variables of type integer and then
outputs both the whole number part and remainder if the first number is divided by second number. Show
sample input and output. (June 09)
8. i. Differentiate between call by value and call by reference.
ii. Differentiate between global and local scope of a variable with a programming example.
iii. Explain the concept of procedural abstraction. (June 09)
9. i. Explain the various operators in c++. And also discuss the precedence and order of evaluation of the
operators.
ii. Explain types of errors.
iii. Explain the following terms: i. Enumeration ii. Derived data type. (June 08)
10. i. Differentiate between call-by-value and call-by-reference with examples.
ii. Explain the concept of procedural abstraction.
iii. How can stubs and drives be used? (June 08)
11. i. Compare procedure oriented programming with object oriented programming. (Jan 08)
ii. Explain what do you understand by an alogorithm.
Never hold discussions with the monkey when the organ grinder is in the room.
- Sir Winston Churchill
92
MCA I Year, I Semester
12. i. Write a computer programto calculate the area of a circle. (Jan 08)
ii. Write a program that prompts for and reads seven integer and computes their average.
13. With suitable example differentiate between global and local scope of a variable. (Jun 07)
14. i. What is information hiding in C++? Explain the concepts of procedural abstraction.
ii. What do you understand by over loading a function name? Explain with an example?
iii. Differentiate between the call by value and call by reference mechanisms. (Jun 07)
15. Explain how deliver program and stub program & can be used in testing
i. Discuss the precedence and order of evaluation of the operators in the C++ language.
ii. Explain about these features of C++
(a) enum (b) type costs (c) type def (Jan 07)
16. i. Explain the use of these storage class specifiers - auto, static, extern, register (Jan 07)(
ii. How can stubs and drivers be used Jan 07)
17. i. Write a C++ program to find the sum of squares of given n numbers
ii. Explain the following terms with respect to object oriented programming
(a) Inheritance (b) Polymorphism (Jan 07)
18. Write a short note on object oriented design (May06)
19. i. Explain the following terms with respect to C++ language? (May06)
a. Encapsulation
b. Operator overloading
c. Function overloading
ii. Write a programfor finding whether a given number is a palindrome if the number formed by reversing the
digits of a number is equivalent to the original number
UNITII
1. i. Differentiate between call by value and call by address.
ii. Write a C-programto find the sumof elements in an array of size 10. (July 10)
2. i. Describe about Pointer Arithematic.
ii. Write a C-program to print the elements of the two dimensional array using pointer notation. (July 10)
3. i. The interface and implementation of ADT have different uses.Explain the reasons for this.
ii. Write a C-program to print the elements of the two dimensional array using pointer notation. (July 10)
4. i. Write a program using do while loop to print integers 1 to 20,one per line.
ii. Explain the data type char and bool. (July 10)
5. i. Distinguish between a member function and friend function with an example.
ii. Explain the concept of public and private as applied to a class defination.
iii. What is the output of the following program segment when embedded in a complete program?
int n=1;
do
cout<<n<< ;
while(++n<=10; (Feb10)
As been my experience that folks who have no vices have very few virtues.
- Abraham Lincoln
93
MCA I Year, I Semester
6. i. Write a programloop that will read in a list of odd numbers and compute the total numbers on the list.The
list is ended with a sentinel value to use.
ii. Explain the concept of encapsulation with a suitable example.
iii. What do you understand by nesting of loops?Discuss with examples the rule for nested blocks in C++
programs. (Feb10)
7. i. Write a program using if -else statements that classified the value of an int variable into the following
categories int less than 40, between 40 and 50, between 50 and 60 and more than 60.
ii. The interface and implementation of AD T have different uses. Explain the reasons for this. (June 09)
8. i. Explain the concept of encapsulation with an example.
ii. Write a loop that will read in a list of even numbers and compute the total of the numbers in the list. The
list is ended with a sentinel value to use. (June 09)
9. i. What is stream? Explain c++ stream classes.
ii. Explain about predefined character functions.
iii Write a c++ program to generate Fibbonacci series using recursive functions. (Jun 08)
10. i. Explain the control structures in c++. Distinguish do-while and while control. Give an example for each
ii. Explain the output formatting commands in c++.
iii. Explain the difference between break and continue statements. (Jun 08)
11. i. With the help of a flow chart explain the for loop and if - else control structure. (Jan 08)
ii. Write a program that copies the characters in standard input stream cin to standard output stream cout
except for the alphanumaric characters, which are to be ignored.
12. i. Distinguish between a local and global object. (Jan 08)
ii. Write a recursive function to calculate the factorial of a given integer and explain its operation using
activation records.
13. i. Discuss the use of member functions get and put. Use suitable examples.
ii. With example code explain the steps for writing a file using streams
iii. The interface and implementation of ADT have different uses. Explain why? (Jun 07)
14. i. Using the tools for streamI/O, write a programthat reads three numbers fromthe file specified by the user,
sums the numbers and writes the sum to another file specified by the user.
ii. What is encapsulation? Explain with an example? (Jun 07)
15. i. Write a loop that will read in a list of even numbers and compute the total of the numbers on the list. The
list is ended with an sentinel value to use
ii. Discuss the scope rules for Nested Blocks in C++ programs
iii. What are the uses of these functions?
(a) if stream (b) of stream (c) fail (d) eof (Jan 07)
16. i. Write a program to print 10 Fibonacci numbers without using the concepts of recursion
ii. What is inheritance? Use examples to explain
iii. What is encapsulation? Explain? (Jan 07
17. i. What are the different ways of passing parameters to functions? Explain with examples?
ii. What is short circuit evaluation of logical expressions? Give an example where it can be used? (Jan 07)
It is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.
- Voltaire
94
MCA I Year, I Semester
18. i. Write about
(a) Preprocessing (b) Compiling and (c) Linking steps of a C++ program
ii. Write a C++ programto read a three digit number and display its equivalent English text. For example
input of 141 should give output of one hundred and fourty one. (Jan 07)
19. i. Give the line ax+bx+c=0 and the point (u, v). find the distance between them. Read appropriate variable
values and use the formula distance = (au+bv+c) / sqrt (a
2
+b
2
). Write a C++ programfor this problem.
ii. With example code explain the steps for writing a file using streams. (May06)
UNIT-III
1. i. Briefly explain about Pre-Processor Directives.
ii. Write a C-programto write one character at a time to file. (July 10)
2. Explain about the following:
(a) Array of Structures (b) Nested Structures (c) Structures containg arrays. (July 10)
3. i. Explain what do you understand by function overloading.
ii. Explain what do you understand by operator overloading.
iii. Write a programto add two complex numbers. (July 10)
4. i. Distinguish between a constructor and destructor.
ii. Write a program to find out whether a given string is polyndrome or not. (July 10)
5. i. What do you understand by overloading of a function?Give a program example to demonstrate function
overloading.
ii. Define construct and destruct member functions.Write a program in C++;that prints the factorial of a
given number using constructor and destructor member functions. (Feb10)
6. i. Write a cpp program to read a text of data fromthe keyboard.The programshould identify all the characters
in the text and prints the frequency of all the characters in the text including punctuation marks.
ii. Give a program example to demonstrate passing part of an arrray into a function. (Feb10)
7. i. Explain with the help of a programthe difference between a final function and member function of a class.
ii. What is the output of the following code when embedded in a complete and correct program?
double b [3] = {2, 2, 3.3, 4. 4} ;
cout < < b[0] < < < < b [1] < < < < b[2] < < endl ;
b [1] = b [2] ;
cout < < b [2] < < < < b [1] < < < < b[0] < < endl. (June 09)
8. i. Explain at least four predefined string functions. (June 09)
ii. Write a programthat will fill the array declared as int a [4] [5] ; with numbers typed fromthe keyboard. The
number will be input five per line on four lines. Find also the totals of each row and column.
9. i. What is friend function? Explain with an example program.
ii. What is function overloading? Explain the roles to be followed.
iii. What is the concept of separate compilation. (Jun 08)
10. i. What is operator overloading? Give one example program for overloading unary minus operator.
ii. Explain about constructors and destructors with example program. (Jun 08)
One can survive everything, nowadays, except death, and live down everything except a good reputation.
- Oscar Wilde
95
MCA I Year, I Semester
11. i. Write a programto explain overloading of the operator * and explain the program.
ii. Explain rational abstract data type and write a programto performaddition and multiplication of rational
numbers. Explain the program. (Jan 08)
12. i. Explain the terms mutator, facilitator and constructor as used in C++ language.
ii. Give a C++ class declaration to represent the following objects - degital clocks and cassette player.
(Jan 08)
13. i. How is the concept of separate compilation incorporated into the ADT? Explain
ii. Write a C++ program that sorts numbers for lowest to highest (Jun 07)
14. i. Write a program that will read a line of text and output a list of all the letters that occur in the text
together with the number of times each letter occurs in the line
ii. What are predefined C string functions? Give examples of their usage (Jun 07)
15. i. What is overloading an operator? Where is it useful?
ii. Write a programthat reads in five amounts of money, doubles each amount, and then writes out the doubles
values to the screen. (Jan 07)
16. i. Write a programthat will determine whether a string is a palindrome or not
ii. What are dynamic arrays? (Jan 07)
17. i. Explain with examples about :
(a) Constructor (b) Destructor functions
ii. With an example code explain the steps for reading a file using streams (Jan 07)
18. i. Write a program using recursion to compute the Ackermans function A(m, n). which is defined for non-
negative integers as
A(m, n) = n+1 if mis 0
A(m-1, 1), if m> 0 and n is 0, A(m-1, A(m-1)) if m> 0 and n > 0
ii. What is the difference between assignment operator and copy constructor of a C++ class? Explain with
an example? (Jan 07)
19. Write a C++ class for circle and provide necessary constructors and member functions for computing area
and circumference. (May06)
20. i. Write a program for the following string operations without using library functions (May06)
a. to lower to convert all the characters to lower case
b. to upper to convert all the characters to upper case
ii. Write a c++class complex to represent complex numbers and overload addition and multiplication operators.
UNIT- IV
1. i. Explain the concept of pointer in c++.Account for the fact that objects of different types occupy different
amounts of memory.
ii. Explain the use of new and deleteoperators withprogramexample. (July 10)
2. i. Write a recursive programto performbinary search.
ii. Explain the properties to be performed by a recursive program. (July 10)
3. Explain about the following, with the help of examples.
(a) Data Abstraction (b) Data Encapsulation (c) Polymorphism (d) Inheritance (July 10)
Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.
- George S. Patton, Jr.
96
MCA I Year, I Semester
4. i. Describe about parameter passing mechanism.
ii. Write a c++ programto find the sum of digits in a given integer. (July 10)
5. i. Write a program to perform binary search using recursive techniques.
ii. Explain the pointers in C++ language.What are the operations allowed on poiters?Explain with simple
examples. (Feb10)
6. i. Write a recursive program to calculate the GCD of two given integers.
ii. Develop a C++ programto performmatrix addition and matrixmultiplication of two matrics.Use the concept
of templates. (Feb 10)
7. i. Describe the action of new operator. What does the operator return? What are the indications of errors?
ii. What are the properties to be satisfied by a recursive program? Explain in detail. (June 09)
8. i. Write a recursive programto performbinary search.
ii. Write a program to swap two values using a function template to perform the task. (June 09)
9. i. Explain the memory management operators in c++. (June 08)
ii. Write function template program for sorting elements.
iii. What are dynamic arrays?
10. i. Explain difference between recursion and overloading.
ii. Write a program to swap two values using class template.
iii. What is pointer? Explain the operations can be performed on the pointer variations. (June 08)
11. Write a program that defines constants maxrows equal to 25 and maxcolumns equal to 10. The program
defines an array called data whose base type is integer to represent a table of values with a maximumof 25
rows and 10 columns. The programshould initialize the array elements such that the table entry contains
integer 12 for all rows whose row subscript is odd and 24 for others. (Jan 08)
12. i. Distinguish between / values and r values.
ii. Distinguish between array of pointers and pointer to an array with an example
iii. Explain what do you understand by dynamic objects with an example. (Jan 08)
13. i. Explain the concept of pointer in C++ account for the fact that object of different types occupy different
amounts of memory.
ii. The formula for computing the number of ways choosing r different things from a set of n things is as
follows :
c (n, r) = n! / (r! * (n-r)!). (Jun 07)
14. i. Write a C++ programto implement the generic stack using template classes
ii. What are the properties to be satisfied by a recursive program? (Jun 07)
15. i. Describe the action of the new operator. What does the operator new return? What are the
indications of errors?
ii. Write a sorting programusing dynamic memory allocation (Jan 07)
16. i. Write a recursive programto performbinary search
ii. Write a program to swap two values using a function template to complete the task. (Jan 07)
Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is an absurd one.
- Voltaire
97
MCA I Year, I Semester
17. i. Write a program to find the second smallest & second biggest of a given unsorted sequence of numbers
without storing them.
ii. Write a C++ function for reversing a given string (Jan 07)
18 i. Write a program to multiply and add given two matrices. Use classes
ii. Explain about the usage of the keyword this
iii. Explain about how to pass multi dimensional arrays as parameters to functions (Jan 07)
19. i. Explain about the functions of the vector class
ii. Explain about the equivalence of pointers and array with an example
iii. What are the uses of friend functions? (May06)
20. Using string class provided by C++ library. Write a programto replace all the occurrences of word the in
a given line of text with the word a. (May06)
UNIT- V
1. i. Explain about parameter passing mechanism.
(a) Public (b) Private (c)Protected
ii. Differentiate between Construcors and destructors.
iii. What is Exception Handling?Explain the purpose of it. (July 10)
2. Explain about following:
(a) Operator Overloading (b) Member Function.
(c) Virtual Functions (d) Dynamic Polymorphism. (July 10)
3. Write multiple inheritance and multilevel inheritence with suitable examples. (July 10)
4. i. Explain multiple inheritance and multilevel inheritence with suitable examples.
ii. Explain what do you understand by a virtual function with suitable example. (July 10)
5. i. Explain the concept of virtual functions with a programexample.
ii. Explain howexception handling is enabled in C++ language.Use suitable examples. (Feb10)
6. Describe the different types of inheritence used in C++ programming language.Give a simple programming
example in each case. (Feb10)
7. i. What is the necessity of exception handling? Explain how it is done with suitable examples.
ii. Explain multiple inheritance and multi level inheritance with suitable programexamples. (Jun 09)
8. i. Explain what do you understand by virtual functions with an example.
ii. With a programming example to demonstrate copy constructorn for derived class. (Jun 09)
9. i. What is virtual function? Explain with an example program.
ii. Explain the concept of multiple inheritance with an example program.
iii. What is polymorphism? Explain the types of polymorphism. (Jun 08)
10. i. What is Exception handling? Explain the following terms. i ) try ii ) throwiii ) catch
ii. Explain the concept of hybrid inheritance with an example program. (Jun 08)
You would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend.
- Abraham Lincoln
98
MCA I Year, I Semester
11. i. Write a programto explain multiple inheritance and explain the program.
ii. Write a programto explain multilevel inheritance and explain the program. (Jan 08)
12. i. Explain function templates and class templates.
ii. What are the rules for using virtual functions ? (Jan 08)
13. i. Explain Multiple inheritance and multi level inheritance with examples
ii. What are virtual functions? Explain with examples. (Jun 07)
14. i. Why is the concept of polymorphism very useful? Use example to bring out the importance
ii. Howis exception handling enable in C++? Use suitable examples to explain?
iii. Write a C++ programusing templates for sorting (Jun 07)
15. i. What is the advantage of the concept of inheritance in C++? Explain with suitable examples.
ii. What is the necessity for exception handling? Explain how is it enabled with examples. (Jan 07)
16. Write short notes on
i. Inheritance
ii. Exception handling
iii. Polymorphism
iv. Abstract base classes
v. Virtual functions (Jan 07)
17. i. What is the advantage of template functions over overloaded functions?
ii. Write function template for searching an element in a sorted array using binary search (Jan 07)
18. What is an Abstract Base class? Explain (Jan 07)
19. Write a template function for sorting an array of elements (May06)
20. Using inheritance write code for the following classes : (May06)
i. Employee
ii. Hourly Employee
iii. Regular employee Identify necessary functions of each of the above classes and implement them
How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.
- Henry David Thoreau
99
MCA I Year, I Semester
99
5. SUBJECTDETAILS
5.4 ELEMENTARYINFORMATIONTECHNOLOGY
5.4.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.4.2 Scope
5.4.3 Prerequisites
5.4.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.4.5 Suggested Books
5.4.6 Websites
5.4.7 Experts Details
5.4.8 Journals
5.4.9 Findings and Developments
5.4.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.4.11 Session Plan
5.4.12 Tutorial Plan
5.4.13 Question Bank
100
MCA I Year, I Semester
100
5.4.1 OBJECTIVEANDRELEVANCE
Information technology is the engine used to drive useful information systems. This includes computers,
S/W, Internet, intranet and telecommunication systems. Information technology provides the means for
collecting, storing, encoding, processing, analyzing, transmitting, receiving and printing text, audio and
video information.
5.4.2 SCOPE
The main scope of this subject is to explain a beginner how a computer works. This subject dwells on
fundamentals that one must learn in order to pursue virtually any endeavor in IT field. It trains students
with the concepts needed to lay a solid foundation for joining the exciting computer field.
5.4.3 PREREQUISITES
It requires basic knowledge of the lawof the land and also ethical and moral values. It also requires ability
of the student to analyse what is right and what is wrong while arriving at a conclusion.
5.4.4 SYLLABUS- O.U.
UNIT-I
OBJECTIVE
i. To understand how data is stored inside a computer and what are the system elements.
ii. To know various types of S/W
iii. To study different kinds of computers, programming languages.
iv. To learn about an operating system and their functions.
SYLLABUS
Digital Age: Digital basic of computers, Data information, Hardware, input,output, memory, communication
hardware, software, application software, system software, communications, Five kinds of computers,
development in communication technology, connectivity and interactivity.
Five Generations of programming languages, programming languages used today, object oriented &visual
programming.
Operating Systems: Booting, managing storage, resources, files tasks, common operating systems, windows
95/98, DOS, Windows NT.
UNIT- II
OBJECTIVE
i. To know about CPU, its parts and their functions.
ii. To understand various input devices, output devices, pointing devices and secondary storage devices.
iii. To learn about compression & decompression.
SYLLABUS
Processors: The CPUand main memory, Data representation, microcomputer systemunit, input and output
devices, keyboard, pointing devices, source, data entry devices, softcopy output, hardcopy output more
output devices. Diskettes, hard disks, optical disks, flash memory, magnetic tape, compression and decom-
pression.
101
MCA I Year, I Semester
101
UNIT-III
OBJECTIVE
i. To understand internet, www, networks and communication channels
ii. To know new internet technologies.
SYLLABUS
Telecommunications: Voice, Video / Voice communication, the internet, the world wide web, newinternet
technologies, communication channels, networks, conduits of communication, communication networks,
local networks, factors affecting communications among devices.
UNIT-IV
OBJECTIVE
i. To study file management system and also database management systems.
ii. To learn various applications S/Ws and their uses.
SYLLABUS
Fines and Databases: Data Storage hierarchy, file management, management systems, Database manage-
ment systems, type of database organization, features of a DBMS.
Application Software: Common features of software, word processing spread sheet, software for cyber
space, Internet programming, HTML, XML, VRML, Active x
UNIT- V
OBJECTIVE
i. To know about various organizations, departments, and their tasks.
ii. To learn the phases the system analysis and design.
ii. To under signed various security issues.
SYLLABUS
Information systems: Organizations, departments, tasks, management levels, management information
systems, Six phases of system analysis and design.
Software Development: Programming as a five step procedures.
Security Issues: Threats to computers and communication systems. Safeguarding computers and
communications.
5.4.5. SUGGESTEDBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS
T1. Using Information Technology, Williams and Sawyer, Tata McGraw-Hill
T2. Information Technology ,Dennis P. Curtin, KimFoley, Kunal Sen, Cathleen Morin, Tata McGraw-Hill
T3. Introduction to Information Technology :-ITL ESL, Pearson
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. DBMS, Ramakrishnan, Gehrke
R2. Computer Network, AndrewS. Tanenbaum
R3. Introduction to information technology, V. Rajaraman
R4. Fundamentals of Information Technology, Deepak Bharihoke
The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining.
- John F. Kennedy
102
MCA I Year, I Semester
102
5.4.6 WEBSITES
1. www.mit.gov.in
2. www.ciol.com
3. www.iiit.net
4. www.itub.org
5. www.developers.net
5.4.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. Elizabeth lane lawley, Ph.d,
Associate Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, Newyork
Email: ell.@mail.rit.edu
Ph: 5854756896.
2. Mr. Henrylucas, Prof.of information systems,
Robert M. Smith School of Business,
University of Maryland, USA.
Emial: hlucas@rhsmith.umd.edu.
Ph: (301) 405- 0100
NATIONAL
1. Mr. Subhashis Banerjee
Ph: 91-11-26591288
Email: suban@cse.iitd.ernet.in
2. Mr. Hemangee Kapoor
Ph: 91-361-2582363
Email: hemangee@iitg.ernet.in
3. Mr. Sreenivasa Kumar P
Ph: 91-44-2257-4366
Email: psk@iitm.ac.in
4. Mr. Sukhendu Das
Ph: 91-44-2257-4367
Email: sdas@iitd.ac.in
.
REGIONAL
1. Mr. Jayanthi Sivaswamy
Associate Professor
IIIT, Gachibowli
Hyderabad.
Ph: 91-40-23001967 Ext: 134
Email: Jsivaswamy@iiit.ac.in
If you wish to be brothers, let the arms fall from your hands. One cannot love while holding offensive arms.
- Pope Paul VI
103
MCA I Year, I Semester
103
2. N. Sudhakar
Lecturer (Dept. of CSE)
Kakatiya Institute of Technology and Science
Email: nuthisudhakar@yahoo.com
5.4.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Computer Science and Information Science
2. Foundation of Computer Science
3. Journal of Information Technology Education
4. Journal of Research and Practice I information Technology
NATIONAL
1. Journal of Computer Society of India
2. CSI Communications
3. Indian Journal of Computing Technology
4. Journal of Computer Science
5. Journal on Universal Computer Science
5.4.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS
1. IEEEcomputer society, 32 &16 years ago, Neville Holmes, Volume 39, Number 9, PP(12-14) October 2006.
2. Critical links is outsourced IT projects the intractable and the foreseen Hazel Taylor, (PP: 74-79),
Communications of theACM, Vol-49, issue 12, - December 2006.
3. Digital village fungible credentials and the next-generation fraud, Hal Berghel, (PP:15-19), Communications
of theACM, Vol.49, issue 12, - December 2006.
4. Current trends in web data Analysis, Arun Sen, Peter a Dacin, Christos, Pattichis, (PP: 85-91)
communications of theACM, Vol.49, issue 12, - December 2006.
5.4.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS
1. Information Technology, constantly in movement.
2. Value of Information Technology in the Commercial Environment.
3. Increasing the influence of IT in Health Care.
4. Business and Video Conferencing.
5. Computer Crime.
6. Three Network Operating Systems
I met a hundred men going to Delhi and everyone is my brother.
- Indian Saying
104
MCA I Year, I Semester
104
Sl.
No.
Topics in O.U
Syllabus
Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT I
Digital basis of Computer L1 T1-Ch.7.1
Data / Information L1 T2-Ch.2.1
T2-Ch.2.3
R3-Ch.1
Hardware input, output L2 T1-Ch.6,6.3
Memory L2 T2-Ch.3.10
T3 -Ch.3
R3-Ch.6
Communication hardware, software L3 T1-Ch.1.3
Application Software
System Software
L4, l5 T1-Ch.3.1
T1-Ch.4.1
T3-Ch.10
Communications L6 T3-Ch.14
Five kinds of Computers L7 T2-Ch.3.1
R4-Ch.1
Development in
Communication Technology
L8 T1-Ch.7.2
Connectivity and Inter Activity L8 T1-Ch.1.4
Five generators of programming
Languages
L9, 10 T1-Apendix
A-A7
R4-Ch.1
Programming languages used
Today: Object oriented and
visual programming
L11
L12
T1-A-A8
1 Digital Age
Operating Systems
Booting, managing storage,
resources, Files, tasks, common
operating systems, Windows
95/98, Dos and Windows NT
L13
L14
L15
T1-Ch.4.2
UNIT II
The CPU, main memory L16
L17
T3-Ch.2.2
T3-Ch.3.1
R3-Ch.7
Data representation L18 T3-Ch.5.2
Micro computer system unit L19 T1 -Ch.1.2
Input and output devices L20 T2 -Ch. 4
Keyboard
Pointing devices
L21 T1-Ch.6.2
T2-Ch.4.6
Source data entry devices L22 T1-Ch. 6.2
Softcopy output, Hardcopy output L23 T1-Ch. 6.3
More output devices L23 T1-Ch. 1.3
2 Processors
Diskettes, Hard disks, Optical
Disks, Flash memory, Magnetic
tape, compression and
decompression.
L24,
L 25
T1-Ch. 5.3
T1-Ch. 7.3
5.4.11 SESSIONPLAN
To express the most difficult matters clearly and intelligently, is to strike coins out of pure gold.
- Geibel
105
MCA I Year, I Semester
105
Sl.
No.
Topics in O.U Syllabus Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT III
Voice, Video Voice
Communication
L 26, 27 T1-Ch.7.2
The Internet
The www
L 28,
29,30
T1-Ch.2
T1-Ch.2.4
New Internet Technologies L 31, 32 T3-Ch.15.5
R3-Ch.15
Communication Channels L 33 T1-Ch.7.3
R4-Ch.13
Networks L 34 R2-Ch.1
Conduits of communication L 35 T1-Ch.7.3
Communication n/w, local n/w L36 T1-Ch. 7.5
3 Tele-Communication
Factors affecting
Communication among devices
L 37, 38 T1-Ch. 7.4
UNIT IV
Data storage hierarchy L39 T1-Ch.8.1
File management L40 T1-Ch.8.1
File management systems L41, 42 T1-Ch.8.1
Database management systems L43 T1-Ch.8.2
R1-Ch.1
Types of database organization L 44 T1-Ch.8.3
4 Files and data bases
Features of a DBMS L45, 46 T1-Ch.8.4
R1-Ch.1.4
UNIT V
Organizations, departments,
tasks, management levels
L 47 T1-Ch.11.1
MIS L 48 T1-Ch.11.2
Phases of System Analysis and
Design
L 49 T1-Ch. 11.3
Software development :
Programming as a five step
procedures
L50,51 T1-
Appendix
A.1
Security Issues :
Threats to computers and
Communication Systems
L52 T1-Ch.9.1
5 Information Systems
Safe guarding computers and
communications
L 53, 54 T1-Ch .9.2
No one would talk much in society if they knew how often they misunderstood others.
- Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
106
MCA I Year, I Semester
106
5.4.12 TUTORIALPLAN
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1 Digital basics of computer Basic operations of computing
T2 Operating System Functions of operating system
T3 Operating System Oops concepts
T4
I
Technological
convergence
Significance of technological convergence
T5
Computer Organization
and Architecture
Instruction Cycle
T6 Multi media Essentials Compression, Decompression
T7 Main Memory RAM, ROM
T8
II
Computer memory and
Storage
Data organization on hard disk
T9 Computer Network Types of networks
T10 Internet Tools Internet concepts
T11 Data Communication Voice, Voice/Vedio Communication
T12
III
Data Communication Topology and Protocols
T13 Internet programming XML, HTML
T14 DBMS Database, Administrator
T15 File Management System Types of files
T16
IV
Word processing Editing and Formatting Documents
T17 MIS Five functions of management
T18 Phases of SAD Six phases
T19 Safe guarding computers Components of Security
T20
V
Software Development Programming
107
MCA I Year, I Semester
107
5.4.12 QUESTIONBANK
UNIT-I
1. i. Define the following terms with examples:
(a) Hardware (b) Application Software (c) SystemSoftware
(d) Communication Hardware (e)Files (f) Tasks (July 10)
ii. What is a Booting? Why is it required?
iii. Differentiate the features of DOS and Windows NT.
2. i. Differentiate the terms:
(a) Data and Information (b) Files and Resources
(c) Processor technology and Communication technology (d) Connectivity and Interactivity
ii. Explain the basic organization of Digital Computers. (July 10)
3. i. Distinguish between application software and system software.
ii. Explain the five categories of application software in detail. (July, Old 10)
4. i. Define the term booting. List the differences between multitasking and time sharing.
ii. Explain the prinicpal functions of operating system using DOS operating system. (July, Old 10)
5. i. Explain the Hardware components for communication, Memory Unit. (Feb10)
ii. Explain the different kinds of generations in processor developments.
6. i. What are the applications of object oriented and visual programming languages?
ii. Explain the features of operating systems. (Feb 10)
7. i. Explain systemelements: Communication Hardware, Software, Application Software and SystemSoftware.
ii. Explain Five Generations of Programming Languages. (Jun 09)
8. i. What is Operating system? What are the functions of operating systems? Explain in detail.
ii. Compare window98 /95, Dos, windowNT operating systems. (Jun 09)
9. i. Explain the five kinds of computers.
ii. Give the difference between application software and system software. (June 08)
10. i. Explain the termBooting. Differentiate multitasking and timesharing
ii. Give the five generations of programming languages. (June 08)
11. i. What are the functions of Operating System? Distinguish between single user and multi-user Operating
System.
ii. What is the difference between System Software and application Software? (Jan 08)
12. i. What is the difference between data & information?
ii. What are the principal measurements of data?
iii. Explain Hardware &Software components. (Jan 08)
13. Write brief notes on connectivity and interactivity. (Jun 07)
14. Explain five generations of Programming Languages. (Jun 07)
"What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul."
- Joseph Addison
108
MCA I Year, I Semester
108
15. What is Operating System? What is its need in a computer system? Explain different operating systems.
(June 07)
16. What is the difference between system software and Application Software? (June 07)
17. What is meant by information? How it is different fromdata and what are the principal measurements
of data? Describe with suitable example. (June 07)
18. What are the elements of a computer system? (June 07)
19. Explain the functions of operating system. (June 07)
20. Discuss about the difference of high level language and low level language with respect to machine
dependency and user friendliness (June 07)
21. List out the five types of application software. Explain each one briefly. (Jan 07)
22. Explain the relevant features of windows 95/98 operation system. (Jan 07)
23. What are the five basic operations of computing? Explain by means of neat sketch. What are the
corresponding categories of hardware devices? (Jan 07)
24. Listing the five kinds of computers, explain the features of each of these categories of computers.
(Jan 07)
25. It is said that a computer with more main memory is a better performer than a computer with lesser main
memory. Justify this statement. (Jan 07)
26. Distinguish between single user and multi user operating systems. (Jan 07)
27. What are the connectivity and interactivity between computer and communication technology. (May06)
28. What are the elements of communication system? (May 06)
29. What are the three basic components of system software? (May 06)
30. What are principal operating systems and operating environments for personal computers, and what are
their principal characteristics. (May 06)
UNIT- II
1. i. Illustrate with examples to convert the decimal representation to Binary, Octal, Hexadecimal
ii. What are auxilliary devices? Explain one in detail. (July 10)
2. i. Write the procedure to access the data frommain memory.
ii. Explain in detail about the necessity of compression and decompression techniques. (July 10)
3. i. Write brief notes on the units of storage measurement and data access methods.
ii. Discuss sin factors which are used to distinguish secondary storage devices with particular reference to
optical disks. (July, Old 10)
4. i. Write a brief note on the differences between transistors, integrated circuits and microprocessors.
ii. How is data capacity represented in a computer and how do coding schemes, parity bits and machine
language work? (July, Old 10)
"You are rewarding a teacher poorly if you remain always a pupil."
- Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
109
MCA I Year, I Semester
109
5. i. Explain the processor organization. (Feb10)
ii. Represent the following in binary, octal, hexadecimal.
a) 102 b) 1024
6. i. Explain the terms Data latency time, Seek time, Rotational latency time. (Feb10)
ii. Explain Compression and Decompression method.
7. i. Explain different types of secondary storage devices.
ii. Explain all Input / Otput devices. (Jun 09)
8. i. Write short notes on softcopy output and Hardcopy output.
ii. Write short notes on: (Jun 09)
(i) Micro computer systems
(ii) Source Data entry devices
(iii) Data representation
9. i. What are pointing devices? Give examples and explain howthey work.
ii. Explain the characteristics that determine the clarity of display screen. (June 08)
10. i. What are the deferent classes of printers ? Compare their advantages and disadvantages.
ii. What is Compression? Differentiate compression and decompression (June 08)
11. i. Briefly explain different types of storage devices. (Jan 08)
ii. Explain 4 types of printers.
12. i. Differentiate between the following:
(i) Static RAM Dynamic Ram
(ii) EPROM EEPROM
ii. Explain the different mechanisms of measuring the processing speeds of computers. (Jan 08)
13. Distinguish between RAM and ROM. (Jan 07)
14. Explain the different mechanisms of measuring the processing speeds of computers. (Jan 07)
15. Explain howthe data is organized on a Hard Disk. (Jan 07)
16. Write detailed notes on computer keyboards. (Jan 07)
17. Distinguish between magnetic storage techniques and optical storage techniques. (Jan 07)
18. What is compression? Differentiate compression and decompression. (Jun 07)
19. Differentiate between the following:- (Jun 07)
i. Static RAM-Dynamic RAM
ii. EPROM-EEPROM
20. Explain how data capacity is represented in a computer system, and how do coding schemes, parity bits,
and machine languages work. (May06)
21. With suitable example write the difference between softcopy output and hard copy output. (May06)
It isn't the mountain ahead that wears you out; it's the grain of sand in your shoe.
- Robert W. Service
110
MCA I Year, I Semester
110
22. Write about the main uses of magnetic tapes with appropriate examples. (May06)
UNIT-III
1. i. Explain how the communication takes place across the devices and issues.
ii. What are the features of Internet Technologies? (July 10)
2. i. Explain the terms
(a) Local Networks (b) Communication Networks (c) Data Communication (d) Audio Communication
ii. Explain the resource utility in communication channels. (July 10)
3. i. What is a Local Area Network (LAN) ? Give different types, components and topologies of Local Area
Networks.
ii. Discuss about new internet technologies. (July, Old 10)
4. i. How do analog and digital signals work and what are the alternatives to modems?
ii. Write brief notes on the wired channels of communication like twisted pairs, coaxial cable and fibre optic
cable. (July, Old 10)
5. i. Define :
(a) World Wide Web (b) Local Area Network (c) Communication Channel (d) Bandwidth
ii. Explain the internet organization.
iii. Differentiate between the synchronous and asynchronous communication. (Feb10)
6. i. Differentiate between the LAN and WAN. (Feb10)
ii. Explain the procedure to transfer the video and audio data across communication channel.
7. i. Discuss about the new Internet Technologies. (Jun 09)
ii. Explain the factors affecting communication among devices.
8. i. Explain different types of communications Networks. (Jun 09)
ii. Differentiate circuit switched Network and packet switched Network.
9. i. What are the different channels of communication?
ii. Write about
(i) LAN (ii) MAN (iii) WAN (Jun 08)
10. i. What is Internet? Howit differs fromInternet? Explain the main features of www.
ii. List there ways of connecting your microcomputer to the internet. (Jun 08)
11. i. What is the difference between Internet & Intranet?
ii. Write briefly about the world wide web. (Jan 08)
12. i. Explain Different types of network topologies.
ii. Explain the need for computer communication networks. (Jan 08)
13. Write briefly about the World Wide Web. (Jun 07)
14. Distinguish between a Circuit switched network and Packet switched network. (Jun 07)
15. Write about twisted pair, coaxial cable, fibre optic cable and satellite systems as a method of sending
messages and compare their performance. (Jun 07)
To be tested is good. The challenged life may be the best therapist.
- Gail Sheehy
111
MCA I Year, I Semester
111
16. What is the difference between Internet and Intranet? (Jun 07)
17. Discuss about voice, voice/video communication. (Jun 07)
18. Explain various types of communication channels. (Jun 07)
19. What are the new internet technologies? (Jun 07)
20. What is LAN? Distinguish between LAN, WAN and MAN. (Jun 07)
21. Write about message switching. (Jun 07)
22. Explain what do you understand by video conferencing and how it is established. (Jan 07)
23. List out eight internet domains and briefly explain the purpose for which they are used. (Jan 07)
24. Briefly explain the different types of networks and their features. (Jan 07)
25. What is a modem? What are the factors to be taken into account in choosing a modem? (Jan 07)
26. Explain with the help of diagram how computers are connected in star, ring and bus topology. (Jan 07)
27. List three ways of connecting your microcomputer to the internet. (May 06)
28. Howanalog and digital signals and modemwork, and what are alternatives to modems? (May 06)
29. What is meant by the term protocol as it relates to communicating between two computers? (May06)
UNIT- IV
1. i. Explain the data storage necessity in detail and how the data storage takes place.
ii. Explain the features of HTML and XML. (July 10)
2. i. Explain the features of Active X, Spread Sheet.
ii. What are the file access methods? Explain. (July 10)
3. i. What do you understand by Database Management system? And explain its advantages and disadvantages.
ii. Explain briefly four types of database organization : hierarchical data base; network database, relational
database and object oriented database. (July, Old 10)
4. i. Explain the features of a word processing software that are useful to create documents.
ii. What is Application Software? What are the features of spread Sheet? (July, Old 10)
5. i. What is a directory structure? Explain. (Feb10)
ii. Explain the word-documentation procedure for Report writing.
6. i. Explain the various types of database organization. (Feb 10)
ii. Explain the four features in detail in spreadsheet.
7. i. What are the advantages of file management systems over database management systems? (Jun 09)
ii. What is DBMS? Explain the features of spread sheet.
What it comes down to is that anybody can win with the best horse. What makes you good is if you can take the
second or third-best horse and win. - Vicky Aragon
112
MCA I Year, I Semester
112
8. i. Differentiate between HTML and XML. (Jun 09)
ii. What is Application software? What are the features of spread sheet.
9. i. What are the common fractures of graphical software environment?
ii. What are the deferent types of application software? (Jun 08)
10. i. Discuss the different types of database organisations.
ii. What is data storage hierarchy? Why is key field important? (Jun 08)
11. i. In a spread sheet how to enter a data in cell. Give syntax for a simple if condition. (Jan 08)
ii. Write the sequence of steps to sort data in a spread sheet.
12. Differentiate between the following (Jan 08)
(a) File Management System Database Management System
(b) Word Processing Spread Sheet
(c) HTML XML
13. Explain the features of word processing. (Jun 07)
14. Differentiate between (Jun 07)
i Word processing-spread sheet
ii. Cut-Paste
iii. Copy-Paste
15. Explain the concept of Mail Merge with an example in word processing (Jun 07)
16. Write notes on creating a document, editing document, formatting a document, printing a document and
saving a document using word processing techniques. (Jan 07)
17. Write notes on internet programming. (Jan 07)
18. What are the common features of the graphical software environment. (May 06)
UNIT- V
1. i. Explain the Management levels and Organization.
ii. What are the issues in security of communication systems? (July 10)
2. Write short notes on:
(a) Five phases in software development (b) Six phases in system design. (July 10)
3. What are the securiyt threats to computers and communication system? Explain each one in detail.
(July, Old 10)
4. i. Explain different phases of system analysis and design.
ii. Write brief note on Total Quality Management. (July, Old 10)
5. i. Explain the development procedure for application software. (Feb 10)
ii. What are the methods of protection used in computers?
6. i. What are the phases of system design? Explain. (Feb 10)
ii. Explain the major drawbacks in a communication system.
To express the most difficult matters clearly and intelligently, is to strike coins out of pure gold.
- Geibel
113
MCA I Year, I Semester
113
7. i. Explain different phases of system analysis and design. (Jun 09)
ii. Explain five step procedures in software development.
8. What are the security threats to computers and communication systems? Explain each of them in detail.
(Jun 09)
9. i. What is programming and what are the five steps in accomplishing it ?
ii. What is Management information System? Explain (Jun 08)
10. i. What are the threats to computers and communication systems?
ii. Discuss the various mechanisms for safeguarding computers and communication systems. (Jun 08)
11. List out six security threats to computers and communication systems and expalain the details of each one
of them. (Jan 08)
12. Explain six phases of system analysis and design. (Jan 07 / Jan 08)
13. Explain the differences between structured, semi structured and unstructured information. Howdo they
affect decision making? (Jun 07)
14. List out six security threats to computers and communication systems and explain thedetails of each one
of them. (Jun 07)
15. What is a system? Explain typical information systems. (Jun 07)
16. Explain various threats to Computers and Communication Systems. (Jun 07)
17. How do you safeguard the computers against threats? (Jun 07)
18. Explain the following two steps of software development-Clarifying program needs and designing the
program. (Jan 07)
19. Write brief notes on worms and viruses. (Jan 07)
20. What are steps in system design? Explain each step in detail. (Jan 07)
21. Identify five functions of management and explain each one of the clearly. (Jan 07)
22. What is programming, and what ate the five steps in accomplishing it? (May 06)
23. Explain why documentation important during programdevelopment. (May 06)
To express the most difficult matters clearly and intelligently, is to strike coins out of pure gold.
- Geibel
115
MCA I Year, I Semester
5. SUBJECTDETAILS
5.5 MODERNECONOMICANALYSIS
5.5.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.5.2 Scope
5.5.3 Prerequisites
5.5.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.5.5 Suggested Books
5.5.6 Websites
5.5.7 Experts Details
5.5.8 Journals
5.5.9 Findings and Developments
5.5.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.5.11 Session Plan
5.5.12 Tutorial Plan
5.5.13 Question Bank
117
MCA I Year, I Semester
SYLLABUS
Production and cost analysis and principles: Production function, single outputis quantum, average cost
curve, Laws of returns, Laws of supply, Price determination under prefect competition.
UNIT-IV
OBJECTIVE
The students can apprehend the meaning, relevance and implications of any movement in these aggre-
gates.
SYLLABUS
National Income: Concepts, measurement and determinants. Planning: The machinery for planning in India,
Salient features of Indias Five year plans.
UNIT- V
OBJECTIVE
The students can understand the working system of various Financial Institutions, their role and func-
tions.
SYLLABUS
Indian Financial Systems, Functions and role of Reserve Bank of India. Conventional banks and Institutional
Finance. Term lending Financial Institutions role and functions.
5.5.5. SUGGESTEDBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS
T1. D.M.Mithani , Managerial Economics, Himalaya Publishing House 2006.
T2. Managerial Economics, P.L.Mehta Sultan Chand &Sons 2007.
T3. Managerial Economics, G.S.Gupta, Tata McGrawHill 2002.
T4. Indian Economy, S.K.Misra &Puri, Himalaya Pulishing House 2007.
T5. Macro Economic Policy, D.N.Dwivedi, Tata McGrawHill 2004.
T6. Principles of Economics, Rangarajan &Dholakia, Tata McGrawHill 2004.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Managerial Economics, Paul, Mote &Gupta, Tata McGrawHill 12002.
R2. Economic Environment of Business, Bhattacharya &Chakrabarti,2004.
R3. The Indian Economy, S.K. Ray, Prentice Hall 2006.
5.5.6 WEBSITES
1. www.economicsurvey.com
2. www.macroscan.com
3. www.epw.org.in
4. www.rbi.org
5. www.cmie.com
Higher education must lead the march back to the fundamentals of human relationships, to the old discovery that is ever
new, that man does not live by bread alone. - John A. Hannah
119
MCA I Year, I Semester
MAGAZINES
1. Business week
2. Economics &political weekly
3. Fortune
4. Business world
5.5.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS
1. Rural credit in 20
th
century India, an overview of history and perspectives, Mihir Shah, Ranga Rao, P.S.
VijayShakar, Economic and Political weeklyVol.No.15, April 2007.
2. Budget without a difference, the union budget for 2007-08, EPW, March 2007
3. Non-Inclusive Growth, Important credits &Export cover (Editorials., Vol.No.9, March, 2007.
4. Dangers in the DarkAlley Doha Round, Bhagirath. Lal Das Vol.8, March 2007
5. Special Economic Zonex (SEZs. in India, Mr. Madhavan, The Economic Challenger, issue 35, Apr /Jun 2007.
6. Beyond the IMF Editorial EPWVol.5 February 2007
7. Corus Acquisition, An Analysis of Tota Steels acquisition of corus, byA.S. Firoz. Vol.11, March 2007.
5.5.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS
1. Union Budget: 2007-2008 (Broad Contours)
2. AnAppraisal of Indias I.T.Exports.
3. Rural development, employment generation through SGSYand PMRYschemes.
4. ValueAdded Tax: Experiences in India.
5. Understanding WTO from Indian perspective.
6. Inflation targeting in Emerging Economies: The case of India
7. AShift in Profile of Bank Lending.
We didn't get great goals. We just scored no-fear goals. Heart goals.
- Rich Pilon
121
MCA I Year, I Semester
My philosophy of life is that if we make up our mind what we are going to make of our lives, then work hard toward that
goal, we never lose -- somehow we win out - Ronald Reagan
S.
No
Topics in O.U.
Syllabus
Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
short run/company demand
joint/composite demand
price demand
income demand
cross demand
L14 T1-Ch.4
T2-Ch5
Problem solving on price,
income & cross
demands
L15 T1-Ch4
T2-Ch5
Law of Diminishing Marginal
Utility
Tabular & graphical
representation
L16 T1-Ch.4
T2-Ch.5
Law of equimarginal utility
Tabular & graphical
representation
L17 T1-Ch6
T2-Ch6
Elasticity of Demand
Price elasticity
Income elasticity
Cross elasticity
L18 T1-Ch6
T2-Ch6
Types & measurement of PED
Point Elasticity & Arc
elasticity
L19 T1-Ch.5
T2-Ch.6
T1-Ch.6
T2-Ch.6
Problem solving on price,
income & cross
elasticities
Factors influencing elasticity
of demand
L20,
L21
T1-Ch.6
T2-Ch.6
Application of Economics to
Business
Significance & decision
making
L22 T-2 Ch.6
T2-Ch.6
UNIT-III
Law of variable
proportions/diminishing
returns (Short run.
L23 T1-Ch.8
T2-Ch.10
Law of returns to scale (two
variables.
Isoquants-types, properties,
ridge lines
L24 T1-Ch.8
T1-Ch.9
T3-Ch.4
Economic region of
production-
isocost/budget line
L25 T1-Ch10
T2-Ch10
T3-Ch.4
3 Production and
Cost Analysis and
Principles
Supply Analysis
Supply Function
Law of supply
L26 T1-Ch9
T2-Ch.11
123
MCA I Year, I Semester
S.
No
Topics in O.U.
Syllabus
Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT V
Indian Financial
Systems
L42 T3-Ch.5, 6
Functions & role of Financial
Intuitions
Functions
L43 T3-Ch.5,6
Role of RBI L44 T6-Ch.49, 50
Conventional Banks L45 T6-Ch.49, 50
Industrial Finance
Institutional Finance
L46 T3-Ch.6
T4-Ch.8
Term lending Financial
Intuitions
L47 T4-Ch.8
Monetary Policy of RBI L48 T3-Ch.6
Regulation of Money Market L49 T3-Ch.6
T6-Ch.49,50
5 Indian Financial
System
Methods of Credit Control
Promotional Role of Monetary
& Fiscal Policies
L50 T3-Ch.6
T6-Ch.49,50
R3-Ch.6
No one is wise or safe, but they that are honest.
- Sir Walter Raleigh
5.5.12 TUTORIALPLAN
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1 Contribution of ME to managerial functions
T2 Application of micro macro theories to business firms
T3 Mathematical tools used in economics
T4
I Need of Managerial
Economics
Mathematical tools used in economics
T5 Characteristics of Demand
T6 Substitutes and complementary goods
T7 Changes in demand
T8
II Demand Analysis
Elasticity of Demand - Problems
T9 Problems on production function
T10 Transport Firms cost function
T11 Various measures of short run costs
T12
III Production function
Behaviour of Long run cost curves
T13 Methodology of estimating NI
T14 A study on latest NI estimates
T15 Trends in N1 Growth rate
T16
IV National Income
Methods of NI Estimates in developing countries
T17 Latest report on changes in RBI polices
T18 Latest emerging Financial institutions
T19 Growth of FIIs in India
T20
V Reserve bank of
India
Role of RBI in monetary policy
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MCA I Year, I Semester
UNIT-II
1. What is elasticity of demand and explain different methods of measuring it? (July 10)
2. Explain howlawof diminishing marginal utility is used to derive demand curve (July 10)
3. Define elasticity of demand and explain its importance in decision making. (July Old 10)
4. State Lawof demand. Explain why the demand curve slopes fromleft to right. (July Old 10)
5. State the Law of Demand. What are the exceptions to it ? (Feb10)
6. What do you understand by elasticity of demand ? State various types of elasticity of demand. (Feb10)
7. Define the price elasticity of demand. What are the various methods to measure the price elasticity of
demand? (June 09)
8. i. State the Law of demand. What are its assumptions and exceptions to it? (June 09)
ii. Given the demand function Qd= 100+0.80Y, find the coefficient of income elasticity whenYis Rs. 1000 and
state that the nature of commodity. Under observation (Qd is quantity demanded and Y is the level of
Income)
9. What is Demand? What factors determine it? (June 08)
10. Define Elasticity of Demand and explan its significance. (June 08)
11. i. State the Law of Demand. What are the exceptions to it?
ii. Distinguish between Derived Demand and Autonomous Demand. (Jan 08)
12 Define Elasticity of Demand ad state its effects. Howare the prioce elasticity cross elasticyand advertising
elasticity measured? (Jan 08)
13. Which demand analysis essential for successful production, planning and capital expansion.(June 07) 09
14. Define demand &explain the factors influencing demand (June 07 old)
15. What is cross elasticity of demand? Explain cross elasticity of demand for substituteand
complementarygoods with examples. (June 07)
16. State & explain the law of diminishing marginal utility. How it is useful in explaining the demand for a
product (Jan 07)
17. Define and explain: (June 07, Jan 07)
i. Price Elasticity of Demand.
ii. Cross Elasticity of Demand.
iii. Income Elasticity of Demand.
UNIT-III
1. Define production function and explain its importance in the analysis of production. (July 10)
2. Define Iso-quant and explain the returns to scale using isco-quant curves. (July 10, July 10 Old)
The jealous are possessed by a mad devil and a dull spirit at the same time.
- Johann Kaspar Lavater
127
MCA I Year, I Semester
Without the aid of the divine, man cannot walk even an inch.
- Chinese proverb
9. i. What are the trends in NI growth and structure ?
ii. Explain the salient features of Indias five year plans. (June 07)
10. Given the following information regarding on economy (June 07)
Rs. In crore
Net National Product at Market Price 4000
Depreciation 300
Mixed Income 1500
Net Indirect taxes 600
Net factor income fromabroad 400
Calculate:
i. NDP at factor cost. ii. NDP at market price
iii. GDP at factor cost. iv. GDP at market price
v. GNP at market prices vi. GNP at factor cost
vii. NNP at factor cost
11. Explain different methods of measuring national income. (June 07 old)
12. What is planning? Explain the role of five year plans in Indias development (June 07 old)
13. Critically explain the role of planning in Indias Economic Development (Jan 07)
14. Given the following information regarding on economy (Jan 07)
Rs. in Crores
Net National Product at Market Price 3000
Depreciation 200
Mixed Income 1000
Net Indirect taxes 500
Net factor income fromabroad 300
Calculate:
i GNP at Market Prices ii. NDP at Factor-cost
iii GDP at factor cost iv. GDP at market price
v. NNP at factor cost vi. NDP at market price
vii. GNP at factor cost
UNIT- V
1. Explain the recent developments in the financial system after economic recession. (July 10)
2. Explain the traditional and modern functions of Reserve Bank of India. (July 10)
3. Explain the main developments in the financial systemafter economic reforms. (July Old 10)
4. What are the traditional functions of Reserve Bank of India? And, what stepts it has taken to control of
inflation in recent years? (July Old 10)
129
MCA I Year, I Semester
6. LABDETAILS
6. 1 COMPUTERPROGRAMMINGUSINGC++LAB
6.1.1 Objectives and Relevance
6.1.2 Prerequisites
6.1.3 Syllabus - O.U.
6.1.4 Suggested Books
6.1.5 Websites
6.1.6 Experts Details
130
MCA I Year, I Semester
6.1.1 OBJECTIVEANDRELEVANCE
The main aim of this lab course is to give practical knowledge of C++ by exposing the students to
different types of programs describing different applications. The student will gain good understanding
of the different constructs involved in C++ like identifiers, operators, control structures and functions,
pointers etc, after undergoing this course.
6.1.2 PREREQUISITES
The student is assumed to have studied the c++ programming constructs well before attempting to
implement the program . Also he should be able to correlate the logical solution to that of C++
implementation.
6.1.3 SYLLABUS OU
EXPERIMENT1
FINDINGMAXIMUM, MINIMUMANDSUMOFGIVENSETOFNUMBERS.
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the programis to implement maximum, minimumand sumfunction and thereby getting an
understanding of doing the same with other functions.
PREREQUISITE
The student should know control structure, and operators as well as logic of implementing maximum,
minimumand sumfunctions.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, a set of numbers are given, out of which the max and min is found out by using some logic
involving comparison. Later sum is found out.
APPLICATION
In database where the maximum of some data like salary etc. is to be found, these programs are useful.
TEXTBOOKS
T1. The complete reference C++
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
EXPERIMENT2
SORTINGPROGRAMS
OBJECTIVE
To gain practical experience of different sorting techniques and the way each is implemented.
PREREQUISITE
Should have knowledge of different sorting techniques.
No one would talk much in society if they knew how often they misunderstood others.
- Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
131
MCA I Year, I Semester
DESCRIPTION
The program takes a set of numbers and then tries to sort the numbers in ascending or descending order
basing on the logic of the algorithm.
APPLICATION
It can be useful for sorting the tables, databases etc.
TEXTBOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference C++
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
EXPERIMENT3
PROGRAMFORFINDINGTHENUMBEROFWORDS, SENTENCESINTHEGIVENTEXTASINPUT.
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to number of words, sentences in the given text.
PREREQUISITE
The student should know control structure in that specially if.
DESCRIPTION
In this program some text is given in that text we can find the total number of words, sentences and
characters etc.
APPLICATION
It can be useful for counting number of words, characters and blank spaces in the given text.
TEXTBOOKS
T2. Problems Solving with C++, Walter Savitch
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
EXPERIMENT4
FUNCTIONSFORMATRIXOPERATIONS.
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this programis to performmatrix operations like addition, subtraction and multiplication
etc.
PREREQUISITE
The students should know multi dimensional arrays.
DESCRIPTION
In this program we have to read two multi-dimensional matrix and performall operations on that.
"What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul."
- Joseph Addison
132
MCA I Year, I Semester
APPLICATION
It can be useful for performing mathematical operations by using matrices and the matrices are multi
dimensional arrays.
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
R2. Programming with C++ by B. Ravi Chandran
EXPERIMENT5
RECURSIVEFUNCTIONSFORGREATESTCOMMONDIVISOR.
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to find g.c.d. for 2 numbers.
PREREQUISITE
The student should know control structure.
DESCRIPTION
In this programfirst we have to read two numbers and find out the biggest number the calculate the g.c.d.
APPLICATION
It can be useful to performsimple mathematical calculations.
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
R2. Programming with C++ by B. Ravi Chandran
EXPERIMENT6
RECURSIVEIMPLEMENTATIONFORTOWEROFHANOI.
OBJECTIVE
This program is used to solve the problem of towers of honai by using the technique recursion.
PREREQUISITE
The student should know control structure.
DESCRIPTION
In this program first we have to read number of disks, number of towers then by transferring disks from
one tower to another tower we do this problem.
APPLICATION
Towers of Hanoi can be useful in the applications of stacks.
TEXTBOOKS
T1. The complete reference C++
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
R2. Programming with C++ by B. Ravi Chandran
"You are rewarding a teacher poorly if you remain always a pupil."
- Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
133
MCA I Year, I Semester
EXPERIMENT7
CLASSESFORBANKACCOUNT, STUDENTINFORMATION, LIBRARYCATALOGUE.
OBJECTIVE
This program can be used to create the classes for bank, student and library.
PREREQUISITE
The students should know the concepts of OOPs and how to generate a class.
DESCRIPTION
In this program first we read the data and then create individual classes for bank, student and library.
APPLICATION
Creation of classes includes the concepts OOPs, by creating classes only we can implement the concepts
like inheritance and polymorphismetc.
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
R2: Programming with C++ by B. Ravi Chandran
EXPERIMENT8
CREATIONOFCOMPLEXCLASSWITHOPERATOROVERLOADING.
OBJECTIVE
This program can be used to create a class that is used to perform operator overloading.
PREREQUISITE
The students should know class concepts along with operator overloading.
DESCRIPTION
Here we can create a class and perform overloading for the operator like +.
APPLICATION
It can be useful for performing the operations on complex numbers.
TEXTBOOKS
T1. The complete reference C++
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
R2: Programming with C++ by B. Ravi Chandran
EXPERIMENT9
CREATIONOFINHERITANCEHIERARCHYFORGRAPHICSHAPE.
OBJECTIVE
This program can be used to perform various types of inheritance by using the object shape.
It isn't the mountain ahead that wears you out; it's the grain of sand in your shoe.
- Robert W. Service
134
MCA I Year, I Semester
PREREQUISITE
The students should know the OOPs concepts along with various types of inheritance.
DESCRIPTION
Here we can create classes for shape object, and apply all types of inheritances.
APPLICATION
It can be useful for creating different types of inheritance through shape object.
TEXTBOOKS
T2. Problems solving with C++, Walter Savitch
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
EXPERIMENT10
TEMPLATEFUNCTIONSFORMIN()ANDMAX() FORFINDINGMINIMUMANDMAXIMUMINA
LIST.
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement maximum and minimum function and thereby getting an
understanding of doing the same with other functions.
PREREQUISITE
The student should knowcontrol structure, and operators as well as logic of implementing maximumand
minimum, templates concepts.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, a set of numbers are given, out of which the max and min is found out by using some logic
involving comparison. And implement this program by using either class template or function templates.
APPLICATION
In database where the maximumof some data like salary etc. is to be found, these programs are useful. and
these programs are implemented by either class templates or function templates.
REFERENCEBOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
R2. Programming with C++ by B. Ravi Chandran
EXPERIMENT11:
PROGRAMSDEMONSTRATINGPUREVIRTUALFUNCTIONS, MULTIPLEINHERITANCESAND
EXCEPTIONHANDLING.
OBJECTIVE
It includes three programs one for pure virtual functions and another for multiple inheritance and another
for exception handling.
PREREQUISITE
The students should know the concepts like polymorphism, inheritance and exception handling.
DESCRIPTION
In first program create a class and in that create a pure virtual function, which doesnt contains any thing.
In second programcreate more than two classes and make a relation with one class to another by applying
To be tested is good. The challenged life may be the best therapist.
- Gail Sheehy
135
MCA I Year, I Semester
What it comes down to is that anybody can win with the best horse. What makes you good is if you can take the second
or third-best horse and win. - Vicky Aragon
multiple inheritance.
Third programfor exception handling, by using try, catch and throwkeywords we can eliminate the errors.
APPLICATION
The first program can be used for implementing the runtime polymorphism, second program can be used
to create more than two classes and inherit themand perform operatons on that the third programis used
to handle the manual as well as system defined exceptions.
TEXTBOOKS
T3. Mastering C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Object-Oriented programming by Balaguru Swamy
6.1.4. SUGGESTEDBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS
T1. Walter Savitch, ProblemSolving with C++, Second Edition, Pearson Education Publishing, 2003.
T2 . Al Stevens, C++ Programming, Seventh Edition, Wiley DreamTech, 2003.
T3. Bjarne Stroustrup, The C++ Programming Language, 3
rd
Edition, Addison-Weisley 998
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Mastering C++ , K.R. Venugopal, Rajkumar, T. Ravishankar
R2. Programming in C++, 3
rd
Edition , James P Cohoon and Jack W Davidson
6.1.5 WEBSITES
1. www.cplusplus.com
2. www.cprogramming.com
3. www.cppreference.com
4. www.parashift.com
5. www.cuj.com
6.1.6 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. AndrewW. Appel
Professor
Dept of Computer Science
Princeton University
Ph: +1-609-258-4627
Email: appel@princeton.edu
2. Mr. Hugh W. MCGuire
School of computing and information systems
Grand Valley State University
Ph: (616)331-2915
Email: mcguire@cis.gvsu.edu
3. Mr. Benjamin John Sapp
Stanford University
Ph: (217)-898-0092
Email: bensapp@stanford.edu
136
MCA I Year, I Semester
If you make every game a life and death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot.
- Dean Smith
NATIONAL
1. Mr. Harish Karnick,
IIT Kanpur
Ph: 91-512-259-7601
Email: hk@cse.iitk.ac.in
2. Mr. S. Arun Kumar
IITDelhi,
Ph: 91-11-2659-1287
Email: sak@cse.iitd.ernet.in
3. Mr. Sanjiva Prasad
IITDelhi
Ph: 91-11-2659-1294
Email: sanjiva@cse.iitd.ac.in
4. Mr. N.S. Narayana Swamy
IIT Madras
Ph: 91-44-2257-4369
Email: swamy@iitm.ac.in
REGIONAL
1. Mr. M.Surendra Prasad Babu
Professor in Andhra University
Ph: 0891-2844862
Email : drmsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in
2. Mr. K.Venkata Rao
Professor in Andhra University
Email: professor_venkat@yahoo.com
Ph: 9985504584
webmasterau@yahoo.com
MCA I Year, Semester I
137
MCA I Year, I Semester
6. LABDETAILS
6. 2 ELEMENTSOFINFORMATIONTECHNOLOGYLAB
6.2.1 Objectives and Relevance
6.2.2 Prerequisites
6.2.3 Syllabus - O.U.
6.2.4 Suggested Books
6.2.5 Websites
6.2.6 Expert Details
138
MCA I Year, I Semester
6.2.1 OBJECTIVEANDRELEVANCE
The main objective of this lab course is to gain practical knowledge in hardware, software and MSOffice.
By doing these practical we can install and uninstall hardware, software. We can also get knowledge
about how to create a document, a worksheet a web page and all operations associated with it.
6.2.2 PREREQUISITES
Knowledge of basic computer components. i.e., both hardware and software.
PREAMBLE
This lab covers experiments in elements of information technology subject. The University (O.U) has
included 12 experiments for this laboratory course. The students are advised to go through the theory
part in the mentioned reference books before doing the experiment.
6.2.3 SYLLABUSOU
EXPERIMENTNO.1
IDENTIFICATIONOFCOMPUTERCOMPONENTS
OBJECTIVE
Identify and describe the relationships and role of the components of the logical diagramof the computer.
(E.g. processor, RAM, ROM, BIOS, input, output, storage)
PREREQUISITES
Knowledge of basic components of computer
DESCRIPTION
In this experiment the description about the components of computer will done first and also tell what are
their functions.
APPLICATION
The students will get complete knowledge about RAM,ROM and BIOS
REFERENCE
Using Information Technology, Brian K.Williams, Stacey CSawyer
EXPERIMENTNO.2
IDENTIFICATIONOFPHYSICALCOMPONENTS OFCOMPUTERANDDESCRIBINGTHEIR
PURPOSE.
OBJECTIVE
Relate the logical diagram of a computer system to the physical system by identifying physical
components of a computer and describing their purpose. (E.g. the processor, memory chips, motherboard,
disk drives, and controller cards such as AGP board, network cards, sound card, as well as parallel and
serial ports etc.)
PREREQUISITE
Knowledge of basic components of computer
How can they beat me? I've been struck by lightning, had two back operations, and been divorced twice.
- Lee Trevino
139
MCA I Year, I Semester
DESCRIPTION
In this experiment the description of physical components and their purpose will be done.
APPLICATION
The students will get complete knowledge about memory chips, processor, motherboard, disk drives and
controller cards.
REFERENCE
Using Information Technology, Brian K.Williams, Stacey CSawyer
EXPERIMENTNO.3
ASSEMBLINGCOMPUTER
OBJECTIVE
Assemble the computer, which they will use and load the OS with partitions for Windows and Linux,
configure for network connection
PREREQUISITE
Knowledge about components of a computer system, operating system.
DESCRIPTION
Assembling means how to build a computer. Assembling includes installing the motherboard, processor,
ram, cpu cooler, ram, hard drives etc. Operating system is an interface between the user and hardware of
a system.
APPLICATION
The students themselves can assemble the computer
REFERENCE
PC Hardware &A+ Hand Book, Chase, Kate J
EXPERIMENTNO.4
TROUBLESHOOTINGAPC
OBJECTIVE
To troubleshoot a Pc from time to time.
PREREQUISITES
Basic knowledge about trouble shoot
DESCRIPTION
Trouble shoot is a process used to isolate the source of a problem in a program, computer system or
network and remedy it.
APPLICATION
The students will get knowledge about troubleshoot
REFERENCE
Trouble Shooting your PC
EXPERIMENTNO.5
INSTALLINGANDUNINSTALLINGSOFTWAREANDHARDWARE
OBJECTIVE
To install/Uninstall software/Hardware on a PC fromtime to time.
Higher education must lead the march back to the fundamentals of human relationships, to the old discovery that is ever
new, that man does not live by bread alone. - John A. Hannah
140
MCA I Year, I Semester
PREREQUISITIES
Knowledge of software and hardware.
DESCRIPTION
Installation means storing a software or connecting a hardware into the computer system. After installation
only we can use the hardware and software.
APPLICATION
The students can perform installation and uninstallation of both software and hardware
REFERENCEREFERENCE
Working in MS-Office, Manfield, Row
EXPERIMENTNo.6
IDENTIFICATIONOFAPPLICATIONSOFTWARE
PREREQUISITIES
Knowledge of application software
OBJECTIVE
To identify and distinguish between various types of application software, by describing and using them.
(E.g. word processor, spreadsheets, database, browser, mailers etc.)
DESCRIPTION
An application programis designed to assist in the performance of a specific task, such as word processing,
accounting or inventory management.
APPLICATION
The students will understand what is application software
REFERENCE
Using Information Technology, Brian K.Williams, Stacey CSawyer
EXPERIMENTNO.7
MSWORD: Create documents withstandardformatting commands, single/multi column, insert pictures/
objects, drawing, hyperlinks, header/footer, tables. No macros.
OBJECTIVE
To understand the basic operations of MSWord
PREREQUISITIES
Basic knowledge about How to open MS Word program.
DESCRIPTION
By understanding MS word we can create documents and letters easily.By using a word processor we
also have the following advantages.
1. Text on screen is easy to redraft and recognize
2. Shared writing is facilitated by the shared screen
3. Mistakes can be edited without spoiling the appearance of the text.
4. Multiple printed copies can be created as required.
5. Writing can be supported by spell-checkers, speech and other helps such as writing frames.
Education is the ability to meet life's situations.
- Dr. John G. Hibben
141
MCA I Year, I Semester
APPLICATION
The students will get idea about all the options in MS Word
REFERENCE
Introduction to Information Technology, ITL education Solutions Ltd
EXPERIMENTNo.8
MSPOWERPOINT: Create presentations withpresent animations, usingdifferent layouts, backgrounds,
slide master, insert pictures/objects, drawings, hyperlinks, header/footer, tables.
OBJECTIVE
To understand the basic operations of MS PowerPoint
PREREQUISITIES
Basic knowledge about How to open MS Power Point program.
DESCRIPTION
By learning Microsoft PowerPoint, the student will get everything they need to organize, design, and
deliver powerful presentations.
APPLICATION
The students are able to create PowerPoint presentation
REFERENCE
Introduction to Information Technology, ITL education Solutions Ltd
EXPERIMENTNO.9
MS EXCEL: Creating worksheets with various kinds of data, making charts, conditional formatting,
awareness of the various functions statistical, date/time, math/trig etc, ability to explore (help) and use
these functions if need be, demonstration though some common functions like sum, average, standard
deviation, logical andinformation.
OBJECTIVE
To understand the basic operations of MS Excel.
PREREQUISITIES
Basic knowledge about How to open MS Excel.
DESCRIPTION
By learning Microsoft Excel, the students are familiar with all the features of MS Excel. Its main advantages
are ease of use and its calculation speed.
APPLICATION
The students will get knowledge about all the options in Excel
REFERENCE
Introduction to Information Technology, ITL education Solutions Ltd
EXPERIMENTNo.10
HTML: Shouldbe able to create their web-page (title, text, frames, hyperlinks to some sites, pictures,
lists, tables, fonts and colors) without using any web authoring tools.
OBJECTIVE
To understand the basics of HTML
We didn't get great goals. We just scored no-fear goals. Heart goals.
- Rich Pilon
142
MCA I Year, I Semester
PREREQUISITIES
Basic knowledge about what HTML means.
DESCRIPTION
HTML is the only approach to delivering a web application. So after learning HTML student are able to
create home pages by using their own ideas.
APPLICATION
The students will get knowledge about how to create a web home page.
REFERENCE
HTML: The Complete Reference, Powell, Thomas A
EXPERIMENTNO.11
Distinguish between various commercially available systems by relating the cost to features available
on each system.
OBJECTIVE
To understand various commercially available systems.
PREREQUISITIES
Basic knowledge about what is a commercially available system.
DESCRIPTION
Commercially available systems are the systems in which all parts of the systems are from the same
company.
APPLICATION
The students will get knowledge about commercially available systems.
REFERENCE
Using Information Technology, Brian K.Williams, Stacey CSawyer
EXPERIMENTNo.12
Exercise following list of commands in Linux
alias cp ftp man talk
Banner date gv mkdir telnet
Bc diff gunzip more unzip
bg dir head mv vi
cal display history passwd vim
cat df id pine vimtutor
cc du indent ps wall
cd echo kill pwd wait
chgrp exit last reboot whereis
chmod fg login rm who
clear file logname rmdir whoami
chfn finger In shutdown write
chown find logout tail zip
cmp gzip Is tar ands
mail
Who walks the fastest, but walks astray, is only furthest from his way.
- Matthew Prior
143
MCA I Year, I Semester
OBJECTIVE
To understand the basics operations of Linux
PREREQUISITIES
Basic knowledge about operating system
DESCRIPTION
Linux is a free open-source operating system based on Unix.
APPLICATION
The students are familiar with Linux commands
REFERENCE
Linux Bible, Negus, Christopher
6.2.4. SUGGESTEDBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS
T1. Using Information Technology, Williams and Sawyer, Tata McGraw-Hill
T2. Information Technology ,Dennis P. Curtin, KimFoley, Kunal Sen, Cathleen Morin, Tata McGraw-Hill
T3. Introduction to Information Technology :-ITL ESL, Pearson
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. DBMS, Ramakrishnan, Gehrke
R2. Computer Network, AndrewS. Tanenbaum
R3. Introduction to information technology, V. Rajaraman
R4. Fundamentals of Information Technology, Deepak Bharihoke
6.2.5 WEBSITES
1. www.mit.gov.in
2. www.ciol.com
3. www.iiit.net
4. www.itub.org
5. www.developers.net
6. www.itmweb.com
6.2.6 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. Elizabeth lane lawley, Ph.d,
Associate Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, Newyork
Email: ell.@mail.rit.edu
Ph: 5854756896.
2. Mr. Henrylucas, Prof.of information systems,
Robert M. Smith School of Business,
University of Maryland, USA.
Emial: hlucas@rhsmith.umd.edu.
Ph: (301) 405- 0100
My philosophy of life is that if we make up our mind what we are going to make of our lives, then work hard toward that
goal, we never lose -- somehow we win out - Ronald Reagan
144
MCA I Year, I Semester
NATIONAL
1. Mr. Subhashis Banerjee
Ph: 91-11-26591288
Email: suban@cse.iitd.ernet.in
2. Mr. Hemangee Kapoor
Ph: 91-361-2582363
Email: hemangee@iitg.ernet.in
3. Mr. Sreenivasa Kumar P
Ph: 91-44-2257-4366
Email: psk@iitm.ac.in
4. Mr. Sukhendu Das
Ph: 91-44-2257-4367
Email: sdas@iitd.ac.in
.
REGIONAL
1. Mr. Jayanthi Sivaswamy
Associate Professor
IIIT, Gachibowli
Hyderabad.
Ph: 91-40-23001967 Ext: 134
Email: Jsivaswamy@iiit.ac.in
2. N. Sudhakar
Lecturer (Dept. of CSE)
Kakatiya Institute of Technology and Science
Email: nuthisudhakar@yahoo.com
Honesty is for the most par less profitable than dishonesty.
- Plato
145
MCA I Year, I Semester
7 COMMUNICATIONSKILLS
7.1 Syllabus
7.2 Session Plan
146
MCA I Year, I Semester
SUGGESTEDBOOKS
REFERENCEBOOKS
1. Plain English Guide, Martin Cutts (OUP: 1995)
2. Business Vocabulary in Use, Bill Mascull (CUP: 2002)
3. English Vocabulary in Use, Michael McCarthy and Felicity ODell (CUP: 1994)
4. English Phrasal Verbs in Use, Michael McCarthy and Felicity ODell (CUP: 2004)
7 COMMUNICATIONSKILLS
7.1 SYLLABUS
Some of you would have made a formal study of English Grammar at some stage of your education. On the
other hand there may be many among you who have not undergone any course in Grammar. Abasic knowl-
edge of English Grammar is quite necessary to speak good English. The Syllabus is divided into two units.
Unit -I attempts to provide the form as well as the functions of the various structures in English. Unit - II
includes Vocabulary.
7.2 SESSIONPLAN
Organizing is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up.
- A. A. Milne
S.No. Topics Contents Lecture No.
Orientation L1
Word Classes L2
Tenses L3, L4, L5, L6
Auxillaries L7, L8
Modals L9, L10
Passive Voice L11, L12
Reported Speech L13, L14
`IF Conditions L15, 16
Subject-Verb Agreement L17
1 Grammar
Written tasks for the above mentioned topics L18, L19
UNIT - II
Synonyms / Antonyms L20
Homonyms L21
Affixes L22
One Word substitutes L23
Collocations L24
Idioms L25
Phrases L26
2 Vocabulary
Class Assignments L27, L28, L29, L30
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