THE

NEW ZEALAND GAZETTE.
(SKCOWTB EBITZOW.)
No. I.
a

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1839.
street. ; Brooks, Esq. ; Cummins, Esq. ; JamesJohn Robert

the I, Specimen Number NO.NEWaZEALAND GAZETTE, ofNews- UNION George FifeOld BroadEsq. Robert TO EMIGRANTS and London Office, 38 — BANK OF AUSTRALIA, &c. SHIPPERS— MEDICINE CHESTS, paper for the First and Principal Settlement of Directors Angas,
posed will be at Port Nichulsnn, in Cook's Straits,is nowpresentedto thepublic. Itwill be found to contain various information interesting to the Colony now on the eve of departing, to their friends, and to those who may wish to be acquainted with the principles, objects, and local circumstances of the Colony, andthe actual proceedings of the ColonistspublishedinNew Zealand as soonafter the arrival of the Colony as it may befound possible to print it, which, it is hoped, will be within a fortnight of the disembarkation of the Colonists ;and as ships pass through Cook's Straits almost daily, on their return from Australia to Europe, it is expected Ihat immediate and frequent opportunity will be afforded for transmitting the second and subsequent numbers to England. Price of this specimen number, 9d.; annual subscription, £1 10s., in advance. Orders received by Mr D. Ramsay, at the New Zealand Agency Office and Subscription Reading Rooms, 5 Adam street, Adelphi.
EMIGRANT SHIPS FOR NEW ZEALAND.
to the present time.

ttie New Zealand Land Company, which itis sup-

The Second Number will be

Gardner, Esq., Manchester; John Gore, Esq.; Charles Hindley, Esq., M.P.;BenjaminEphraim Lindo, Esq. ; Charles Edward Mangles, Esq. ; Christopher Rawson, Esq., Halifax; Thomas Sands,Esq.,Liverpool; James Bogle Smith, Esq.; James Ruddell Todd, Esq. 'Trustees— George Carr Glyn, Esq. ;John Gore, Esq. ;James John Cummins, Esq. Bankers Messrs Giyn, Hallifax, Mills, and Co. Solicitors Messrs Bartlettand Bcddome. Secretary Samuel Jackson, Esq.

Settlement, as under mentioned :— pal '

of THE Directorsherebythe New Zealand give Company's Ships for,
Land Company will sail notice that the the First and Princi-

The 550 Tons, The Adelaide, 640 Tons, From London, on Tuesday, the 10th of September next. The Duke of Roxburgh, 417 Tons, From London, on Tuesday, the 10th of Septem ber and from Plymouth, on,Saturday, the14th of September next. The BengalMerchant, 503 Tons, From London, on Tuesday, the 10th of September, and from the Clyde, on Tuesday, the 17th of September next. By order of the Directors, JOHN WARD, Secretary. New Zealand Land Company's Office, 1Adam street, Adelphi, 20th August, 1839.

The" Oriental, 506 Tons, Aurora,

At Sydney, New South Wales. j Local Directors Thomas Gore, Esq. : Rannulph Dacre, Esq. ;Philip Flower, Esq. ;, S. K. Salting, Esq. Manager Mr Maclaren. Accountant Mr James Sea. At Hobart Town, VanDiemen's Land. Local Directors Alfred Garrett, Esq. ;Joseph G. Jennings, Esq.; Atkin Morrison, Esq. Manager Cornelius Driscoll, Esq. Accountant— Mr David Kennedy. At Launceston. „ Local Directors Michael Conolly, Esq. ;William Fletcher, Esq. ; Philip Oakden, Esq. ; Thomas Williams, Esq. Manager— Lewis W. Gilles, Esq. Accountant Mr John Hartridge. At Campbleton Sub-branch. Agent John McLeod, Esq. At Melbourne, Port Philip. Local Directors John Gardner, Esq. ; Rucker, Esq. Manager William Highett, Esq.

laren, Esq.

Medicine Chests, particularly adapted for New Zealand and Australia. Emigrants and Shippers arc suppliedon the Aiost reasonable terms with any quantity of Drugs and Chemicals of the best quality, Patent Medicines, Perfumery,&c. Full directions for theuseand application of the Medicines accompany each Chest. Settlers may remit orders .through Messrs Daniell and Co.,of New Zealand, to whichimmediate attention willbepaid. . COLONIAL ESTABLISHMENTS. SHIPPING AGENT. Colonial Inspector John Cunningham MacFamily

ready a large assortment of well-seasoned Smr and

Messrs NOAKES and Co., Wholesale and Shipping Druggists, 87 Snow hill, have always

—— —

—— — —

apply to

"^MIGRANTS having Merchandize, J—^ Baggage, and Stores to ship, arerequested to
70 Lower Thames street, Agent,by appointment, to the New Zealand Land Company. J. STAYNER,

— —

Capital,100,000£, in 4000 Shares of 251. each. Deposit, lOL'fyer share. Governor The Earlof Durham. Deputy-Governor Joseph Somes, Esq.
Lord Petre. Hon. Francis Baring, M.P. John Ellkrker Boulcott, Esq. John William Bucklk, Esq. Russell Ei.lice, Esq. James Brodie Gordon, Esq. Thomas Alers Hankey, Esq. William Hutt, Esq., M.P. Stewart Marjoribanks, Esq. Sir William Modesworth, Bart,, M.P. Alexander Nairne, Esq. John Pirie, Esq., Alderman. Sir George Sinclair, Bart., M.P. John Abel Smith, Esq., M.P. William Thompson, Esq., Alderman, M.P. Sir Henry Webb, Bart. Arthur Willis, Esq. George Frederick Young, Esq.

NEW ZEALAND LAND COMPANY.

—— —

Directors.

settlement, from Mechanic tiest and Gardeners, and Agricultural Labourers, being married, and not exceeding 30 years of age. Strict inquiry will be made as to qualificationsand character. The Combany's Emigrant Ships will sail from England early in Septembernext. Further particulars and printed forms of application may be obtained at the Company's Offices. By order of the Directors, JOHN WARD, Secretary. No.1 Adamstreet, Adelphi, June 15, 1839.

NEW ZEALAND BRANCH. Local Directors— George Samuel Evans, Esq.; D.C.L.. Edward Betta Hopper, I'sq. Georgre Hunter, Esq. Arrangements having been made for the opening of a Branch in New Zealand, notic eis hereby given that bills on Sydney at thirtydays' night will be issuedat this office to the settlers for such sums as may be required, at a charge of two percent redeemable in New Zealand in the notes of this Bank, with a return of the two per cent., thus enabling the colonists to transmit their funds without deduction. The Directors likewise continue to grant letters of credit payableatsight, forany sum notexceeding300/., and bills, at thirtydays'sight, to any amount, on their FREE PASSAGE. Branches at Sydney, Hobart Town, JJaunceston, and to NEW ZEALAND. Melbourne, Port Philip,at the usual terms. By orderof the Board, The Directors of the New Zealand Land SAMUEL JACKSON, Secretary. Company hereby give notice that they are ready to The Directors of the New Zealand Land Comfpr a Free Passage to their pany hereby give notice that theyhave effected an receive applications principal

-

,

-*-^ IMMIGRATION

D. Ramsay, one of the earliest advocatesin the causeof Emigration,hasbeen induced,attheearnest solicitationof various friends (patrons of the present colony), to open an Office in the immediate neighbourhood of the New Zealand Land Company, where gentlemen who may wish to purchase Lands,and those who think of emigrating, may be supplied with the prospectus, and all the publications of the Company relative to the Colonization ofNew Zealand. D. Ramsay is prepared to contract with Gentlemenfor the supply of Portable Cottages, to be manufactured on his own premisesunder theimmediate inspection of any Gentleman who may 'honour him withhis patronage ;and for the purpose of affording the best practical information, he has engaged a skilful and intelligent mechanic to superintend that department. D. Ramsay having opened accounts upon an extensivescale with the principal manufacturers of Wolverhampton,Birmingham, Manchester, Sheffield, &c. &c, will undertake to supply every description of goods, furniture, and stores, to any "extent requisite for the Colony or Settlement about 4o be formedinNew Zealand,on the lowest possible
%

" Zealand Land Company to the New DRAMSAY, Agent for the Sale of HPIiE Land'

the Company's First and Principal Settlement. The Directors therefore recommend to the Colonists the Union Bank of Australia, as a means of effecting their pecuniary transactions with convenience andsecurity. By orderof the Directors, JOHN WARD, Secretary. New Zealand Land Company's Office, 1Adam street, Adelphi, 20th August, 1839.

arrangement with the Directors ofthe Union Bank of Australia ; inpursuance of which, a Branch of | the Union Bank will be established forthwith on

— Messrs Smith, Payne, —Wright Standing Counsel —John Buckle, Esq. Medical Director Doratt Knight, — Messrs Few, Hamilton, tSolicitors Few. — Secretary John Ward, Esq.
Smiths ;and Messrs

Bankers

and Co.

and

M.D.

Sir John

and

Office, No* 1, Adam Street, Adelphi.

-L (commenced in December 1838, in connexion with the Colonial Society") will infuture be published every WEDNESDAY afternoon at the Office of the Spectator; strengthened by all the resources of thelatter Journal.

COLONIAL

GAZETTE

"TNFORMATION relative to NEW -L ZEALAND, for the use of Colonists. With Maps,price Is. 6d., London: John W. Parker, West Strand.

rpHE BRITISH AND COLONIAL J- EXPORT
havebeen requested by several influential parties, proceeding as Settlers to that country, to act as Commercial Agents for the First Colony of New Zealand. The Export Company, whose Manager has been a good deal in New Zealand and the neighbouring British Colonies in Australia, are ready, therefore, to undertake any commission business which intending Emigrants may require previous to sailing, as well as during their absence from Great Britain, especially purchasing and shipping goods adapted to the Colony ; whilst to such parties as may favour them with their business, the most unreserved information will be affordedas to the nature of the country they are going to,— the employment and prospects of the Settlers, together with the best modes'of investing capital, &c. Sec. Sec. As these valuable Islands eminently possess in their soil and climate, rivers and harbours, flax, fisheries, and forests, thematerials of agreat and powerful people, there is no reason to doubt the immediatesuccess of the First Colony, and, with theusual energies of Englishmen, that New Zealand will become, in process of time, one of the proudest possessionsof the British Crown. Applications to be made to British arid Colonial Export Company, 98, Leadenh'all street. T. HORTON JAMES, ' ' Resident Manager.
street, in addition to their other Colonial Agencies,

NEW ZEALAND AGENCY.

COMPANY, 98 Leadenhall

-terms.

A list ofarticles in general requisition, with the prices affixed, will befurnished ina few days. No.5 Adam street, Adelphi, 15th August, 1839. AGENCY.
:

-This Company has been formed for the purpose of employingcapitalinthe purchase and re-sale oflands inNew Zealand,and the promotion of emigration to that country. A description of these Islands as a field for British colonization, has been rendered unnecessary by the labours of the New Zealand Association of 1837, who collectedand disseminatedvery ample information on the subject. The sole aim of that Society was to induce the legislature to apply to New Zealand the peculiar system of colonization which has proved so eminently successful inSouth Australia, and to make provisionfor guarding thenativeinhabitants from the evils to which they have hitherto been exposedby their intercourse with Europeans of everyclass. Her Majesty's Government, however,objected to alllegislation for -these ends, except on one condition, to which the Society could not assent. The proposed condition was, that the Society, whichhad excluded from its objects all speculation for private gain, should become a joint-stock company and engage in undertakings witb a view to profit. This condition was declined, as being at variance with the declared character of that Society; and theresulthas beenthe formationof thepresent Company, in aform consistent with the condition thus required by her Majesty's

and towns in the most favourable situations and the gradual re-sale of such lands according to the value bestowedupon them by emigration and settlement. It is also proposed that, to facilitate the transmission of capital betweenEngland andNew Zealand, the Company shall act as agents for that purpose only. Such an undertaking affords peculiar advantages to the employers of alarge combined capital, and is further suitable to a Company,inasmuch as it can neither impede individual enterprise, nor is liable to the competition of individuals,andis capable ofbeing managed at little expense for agency, and upon a system of fixed routine. Very extensive tracts of most fertileland in situations highly favourable both for agricultural and commercial settlements, have been already purchased and secured for the purposes of this Company ; and an expeditionhas alsobeen fitted out and despatched for purveying the coasts of New Zealand, making purchases of lands in the most eligible spots, and preparing for the arrival of alargebody of settlers, whom it is proposed to establish on the Company's lands during the present year. These important purchases, and the fitting out ofthe preliminary expedition,(including the purchase and equipment of a fine vessel of 400 tons,) have been effected, at a considerable outlay,by parties, to whom a certain number of paid-up snares, to be determinedby arbitration, are consequently to be assignedfor a transfer of their interests. Upon the remaining- shares, a call of 10/. per share, (in addition to the deposit,) will be made at the discretion of the Directors, with not less than one month's notice; and allfurther calls will, bemade at intervals of not less than three -months between each call,and of which one month'snotice will be given; and no call, at any one time, willexceed 10/. per share. The Directors are to have the entiremanagement and control of the funds, formation,proceedings,andaffairs ofthe Company, andare empoweredto enter intoany arrangements whatever which they may consider conducive to the interests of this undertaking, to prepare a Deed of Settlement for the management ofthe Company, and to take any steps that may be thought proper relative to an Actof Parliament or a charter in aid of their plans, application for which. willbemade with the least possibledelay, and generally to adopt such measures and proceedings with reference to the grants, and disposal of shares, or otherwise, as they shall consider expedient. The shares in the first instance will be issued in scrip receipts,upon which will be indorsed the principal laws and regulations by which the Company is to be governed until a Deed of Settlement shallhave been, enteredinto, or an Act of Parliament have been obtained. Further information on every point connected with the Company may be obtained fromthe Secretary, at the Office. London,June 20, 1839.

[Price 9d.

.

a Co-partnership, purpose proceeding with the First Colony on the 25th of Augustto New Zealand, where they will establish themselves. They take the present opportunity to offer their services to their friends and others as Agents for the Management of Landed Property; the Purchaseand Sale of Merchandise, and the Superintendence of Shipping and other Agency Business. Their Correspondents in London are Messrs Buckle, Bagster, and Buckle. DANIELL and RIDDIFORD. ' London, August 19,

HHHE SUBSCRIBERS having formed -*-

1839.-

pany will be confined to the purchase of tracts ofland, the promotionof emigration to those tracts directly from the United Kingdom, the laying out of settlements

Government. The purchase and improvementof waste lands in New Zealand has been already carried on to a great extent, and with much advantage,by missionaries and others, who have settled in the country, as well as by persons residing in the adjacent Australian Colonies ; and such an operation upon an enlarged scale is the proposed object of the New Zealand Land Company. The attention and business of the Com-

TERMS OF PURCHASE FORRURAL LANDS INTHE COMPANY'S SETTLEMENTS. The company has already acquired very extensive tracts of fand in the NorthIsland of New Zealand, and has despatched two expeditions for the purpose of purchasing other lands, and of selecting the most eligible district for the first and principal settlement. The company, in the first place, offered for sale 99,000 acres of country land, and 990 acres of town land, in their first and principal settlement, after making reserves for the special use of the natives. These lands thus offered haye beendisposed of at 11. per acre, thereby realizing to the company a landfund of 99,990/, and the rights ofthe purchasers thereof to priority of choice in the settlement have been determined by lot. The directors are now ready to receive applications for country lands, to the extentr of 50,000 acres, in sections of 100 acres each, at the price of 100/. per section, or IV per acre, to be paidin full, in,exchange for

2

THE NEW ZEALAND GAZETTE.

he theland orders, which willentitletheholders harness makers, Boot and shoemaker! Dietaryof allbut Cabin Pessengers; the in that channel must inevitably become the yr thereof, or their agents, to select country tailors,, tanners, brickmakers, lime-burneri Passengers to be in .Messes of Six.or most frequented portof colonized New Zeamore, according to the following Scale land. A mere harbour, however, whether le sections accordingly, either at the company's and allpersons .engaged in the erectionc there or elsewhere, might be of but little principal settlement, or at Hokianga, Kai- buildings. for one Adult: value. There is not in the world, perhaps, 4. Persons engaged,in the above occupa para,Manukau, the islandsof Waiheke and a safer or more commodious harbour than Paroa, the borders of the Thames, or any tions who may apply far a free passage t Port Hardy in D'Urville's Island ; but the other partof the present or future territories New-Zealand., must transmit to the offic smallness ofthe island rendersits harbourof of-the company,so soonas the requisite sur- of the company, free of expense, the mos " less importance than several others on the veys thereof shall havebeen completed. The satisfactory testimonials as to their qualifica shores of Cook's Strait. That harbour in holders will therefore select at pleasure, out tions,character, and health. ;. of all the company's territories which shall Cook's Strait is the most -valuable, which 5. They must be labourersgoing out ti combines with ample security and convethen be surveyed as country sections, a sec- work for wages in- the colony, of sounc nience as a resort for ships, the nearest vitionof 100 acres for each land order,in the mind and body, not less than fifteen, noi 1 11 1 1 11 lb. cinity to, or the best natural means of comorder in which the landorders shall be pre- more than thirty years of age, andmarried munication with, the greatest extent of fersented to the company's resident officer in The marriagecertificate must be produced tile' territory. So far as we are at present-New Zealand. 4 lb. The rule as to age will be occasionally de> informed, Port Nicholson appears superior The land orders will be transferable at parted from in favour of persons having * * * * to " other." any the pleasure of the holders ; and a registry large families, whose qualifications are ii Considering the excellentsailing qualilb. will be kept at the company's offices in Lon- other respects satisfactory. i ties of the Tory, and that you are amply don, andin the settlement, as wellof original 6. To the wives of labourers thus seni , supplied with provisions and water, we trust land orders, as of alltransfers thereof. out, the company offers a free passage with lb. that you may reach Cook's Strait, without Of the monies to be paidto the company their husbands. touching anywhere, b)' the endof Augustby purchasers, 25 per cent, only willbe re7. To single womena free"passagewillbe A 4 As soonas you have completed yourbusiserved by the company for local expenses 2 i i lb. ' ness there, which we are in hopes may not and otherpurposes. The remainder, being granted, provided they go out under the relatives, occupy you more than two months, you will 75 per cent., willbe laid out by the company protection of their parents, or near i lb. i proceed to Kaipara, and thoroughly inspect' of the purchasers, or under actual engagements as servants to for the exclusive benefit that harbourand district. You willalso take in giving value to the land sold by defraying ladiesgoing out as cabinpassengers on board I 1 1 thebest means in yourpower of ascertaining j the same vessel. The preference will be the cost of emigration to the settlementsgiven to those accustomed to farm anddairywhether thereis;to the southwardof Kaipara, Originalpurchasersof landorders intend- j work, * to sempstresses, straw-platters, and a spot more suitable than that port to being to emigrate will be entitled to claim, i come the seat of the commercial capital of" from the company, out of the fund set apait domestic servants. 8. The children of parents sent out by i lb. the North Island; andif you shoulddiscover for emigration, an expenditure equal to 60 i 4 such a spot, you will endeavour to make an per cent, of their purchase-money, for a free the company willreceive a free passage, ii * of extensive purchase there. £ passage for themselves, their families, and they are uncle* one, or full fifteen lb. V At Kaipara you will exhibit to the naservants, subject to the company's regula- age. at the ijme of embarkation. For all other, children three pounds each must be tives tlie original contracts of Lieutenanttions. Purchasers to the extent of at least i i i M'Donhell,and willclaim, on behalfof the 800 acres, riot intending to emigrate, will paid, in full, before embarkation by the Company, the lands therein named. Youalso,in special cases, beallowed to nominate parents or friends, or by the parish. It * willalsoinform the natives, that Lieutenant their land agents for a free cabinpassage to willbe useless to apply for a relaxation of M'Donnell,intends to, proceed to New- Zeathe settlements. ! this rule. land ere long; you willdeliver to, the chiefs? The remainder of the fund set apart for 9. Persons not strictly entitled to be conlb. the letter, whereby he informs them of his emigrationwill belaid out by the company veyed out by the emigration fund, if not dishaving transferred his lands there to thein. providing a free passage for young per- j qualified on account of character, will, in 3 3 Company; and you will take whatever steps, sons of the labouring class, and, as far as the discretion ofthe directors, be allowedto you may think most expedient, to obtain emigrants, on paying to possible, of the two sexes in equal propor- accompanythe free possession of this tract in the name of the tions. thecompany the bare contract price of pasi Company. Labourers selected by purchasers for a I sage,for the time being., The charges for free passage must be subject to approvalby |children are as"follows : "-Under, one yearof Supposing you to haveselectedfrom any. purchases that you -may make in Cook's the company, as respects age, sex, and good age, no charge ; one year and under nine, 2 oz. Strait, or theneighbourhoodof'Kaipara, or in character. one-third of the charge for adults; nine the districtofthe Company'slands atKaipara , In the selection of other labouring emi- yearsof age and under fourteen, one-half i that spot whichyou shalldeemthe fittest for grants, the company will give a preference the charge for adults ;but if the parent's be — afirst settlement, that spot,whichshall preto applicants who shall be under engage- of the labouring class, the children will ' " sent the most satisfactory combination of ment to work for capitalists intending to be taken out on *the terms statedin Regula' 3 3 3 3 3 3 3, facility of access, security for shipping, fertion8. emigrate. tile soil, water-communicationwith, districts A scale of the rktesat which cabin and ■10. All emigrants, adults as well as chilsteerage passages will be provided by the dren,must have been'^vaccinated, or have Extract from the Instructions given to abounding in flax and timber, and falls of company in proportion to the purchase- had the small-pox. Colonel Wakefields the Company's water for the purpose,of mills, and where money ofland orders, willbe exhibitedfrom .Principal Agent in command of the the nativeinhabitants shall evince the great11. Emigrants will be for the most part est desire to receive English settlers, and, time to time at the company's office. embarked at the port of London, but the Preliminary Expedition.; appear|most anxious to obtain employment The landorders are to bereceived as suf- directors will occasionally appoint other will constantly bear in thatficient conveyances, and conclusive,evidence portsof embarkation, as circumstancesmay "You of the Company must, mindgreat for wages;there you will makeall such prethe profits in,a parations for thearrival of a body of settlers, of the company's title; and a certificate of require. " measure, depend on the judgment which you as the means at your disposal will allow. an officer of the company in the settlement j 12. The expense of reaching the port of may exercise in selectingplaces of authorized in that behalf, mentioning the embarkation must be borne by the emi-. cation. As all theworld is free tofuture lo- Amongst these it occurs to us that the napurchase tives should be employed at liberal wages, sectionfallen or assigned to the lot of any grants ; but on the day appointed for their lands New Zealand in upon the same terms in felling the best kinds of timber, taking order, is to be accepted as sufficient embarkation they will be received, even land as the Company, it shouldbe your especial the logs to the place which you may have evidence thereof, and as an actualdelivery though the departure of the ship should be business to acquire spots which enjoy some markedout for the site of a town,and alsoof the possession of the sectionmentioned in delayed,and will be put to no further ex- peculiar naturaladvantage ; lands, the pos- in collecting andpreparing flax and spars assuch certificate; and the company are not to pense. session of which wouldbestow on the a return freightfor vessels which may conbeconsidered as guaranteeing the title, ex13. Every adult emigrant is allowed to pany, hereafter on those who maypur- vey settlers to the place. You should also* cept as against their own acts, and the acts take half a ton weight, or twenty cubic feet, chase or Company, some valuable make the natives thoroughly aware of the from of those deriving title under or intrust for of baggage. Extra baggage is liable to superiority the over the owners of ordinary them. charge at the ordinary rate, of freight per lands. Of merely fertile land there exists nature and extent of theintended settlement,, so that theymay notbe surprised at the subForms of the land orders may be seen on ton. so great an abundance,.that its possession, application at the company's office. 14. The emigrantsmust provide the bed- however useful and valuable, would not be sequent arrival of a number of large ships. And at this spot, when you quit it, you will,, By order of the directors, ding for themselves and children, and the fertility of John Ward, Sec. necessary tools of their own. trades; the peculiarly advantageous. Mere overlooked, of course, leave such persons as you may be soil, therefore, though not to be New Zealand LandCompany's Office, otherarticles most useful for emigrants to is a far less important consideration than able to spare,and shallbe willing to remain, for the purpose of July 30th, 1839. take with them, are strongplain clothing,or naturalfacilitiesof communicationandtrans- your return, andof assuring the natives of" pursuing the materials for making clothes upon the- port. There is probably some one part of preparation. On quitting this the labours of spot, you will REGULATIONS FOR LABOURERS passage. In providingclothing, it should be the islands better suited than.any other to proceeddirectly Port to Hardy,inD'Urville's TO EMIGRATE TO remembered that the usual length of the become the centre of their trade, or com- Island, WISHING where you will remain until some of NEW-ZEALAND. voyage is four months. " mercial metropolis, when they shallbe more 15. On the arrivalof the emigrants in fully inhabited by Englishmen; and there the Company's vessel shall arrive fromEngBy the terms of purchase for lands in 1. land. By the first and subsequent vessels, the company's first and principal settlement, the colony, they will be received by an must be many other spots peculiarly eligible you will receive further is instructions. It, dated Ist June, 1839, the jompany has en- officer who will supply their immediate for the sitesof secondary towns. The shores of essential consequencethat you should, if' out 75 per cent, of the monies wants, assist them in reaching the place of' of safe andcommodious harbours, the shel- possible, reach Port gaged to lay Hardy by the 20th of received from purchasers, in defraying the their destination, be ready to advise with teredembouchures of extensive rivers com- January next, or, ifthat should not be poscost of emigration to the settlement. Ac- them in case of difficulty, and at alltimes to municating with a fertile country,the imme- sible, that you find means of transmitting tocording to those terms, purchasers and give them employment-in the service of .the diate neighbourhood of powerful falls of the Company's,vessels, that will be directed others may submit labouring persons, of the company, if fromany cause they should be water which might be expected to become to touch there by that time, a full account of class hereafter described, for a freepassage, unable to obtain it elsewhere. The emi- the seats of manufactures, these are the the spot on which youmay have determined for the approval of the company. In the grants will, however, be at perfect liberty situations in which it is most to be desired as the site ofthe first settlement." selection of labouring emigrants, the com- to engage themselves to any one willing that you should make purchases of land. panyhas undertaken^ to give apreference to to employ them, and will make their own And especially you should endeavour to makean extensive purchase on the shores of Extract from theInstructions oftheBoard applicants who shall be under engagement bargainfor wages. of Directors of the New ZealandLand By orderof the board, to work for capitalists intending to emithat harbour,, which, all things considered, Company, to Lieut. William Mem John Ward, Secretary. shall appear to offer the greatest facilities as grate. Smith, Royal Artillery, the CompanylsThe company therefore offers a free New-Zealand Land Company's Office, a general trading dep6t and port of export 2. General, as contained in- a passage to the colony (including provisions 1Adam st., Adelphi, 29th June, 1839. and import for all parts of the islands, as Sv/rveyorLetter from the Secretary, dated Aug. a centre of commerce for. collecting and exandmedicalattendanceduring the voyage), ] to persons ofthe following description: Mr Swainson, the eminent naturalist, autho- porting the produce, of the islands,and for ■ 1,1839. rizes us to contradict anannouncement inthe adver- the reception and distribution of foreign' Youk surveyingoperationsshould at fiist 3. Agricultural labourers, shepherds, first Colony, bakers, blacksmiths, braziers and tinmen, tisements of the Committee of- theNew Zealand. goods. In making this selection, you will be entirely confined to the- site of the to smiths, shipwrights, boat-builders, wheel- thathe is, to proceed with them proceed till next not forget that Cook's Strait forms part of town. Mr Swainson, does not intend to wrights, sawyers, cabinet-makers, carpen- spring, hy which time he will have fulfilled the. the shortest, route fromt the Australian Co- Inlaying out,the.plan ofithe town, you lonies to-England,andthat the best harbour must as *closely as possible adhere to the ters, coopers, curriers,farriers, millwrights, literary engagementshe has on hand.

Saturdy Friday Thursday Wednsay Tuesday Monday Sunday DAYS.
* *

*

*

*

!

*

*

*

Be f*

Biscut.

Meat. serv dr eFlour.

Pork.*

oz. Pint

Raisn.

oz.

toes Pota-

Suet. Peas. Rice.

.

"

Tea.

*

oz.

i

i

*

Sugar

Cofe.

oz.

Pint.

fabge. Pickled
Salt.

Buter.

"

i

.

-

oz.

tard. Mus-

Quarts.

Water,

-

THE NEW ZEALAKD

GAZETTE.

>

for the Propaga- i establishment of an Infant School for the conditions on which the landorders have Zealand Land Company, and consisting ex- lonization Gospel inForeign Parts*" 1 benefitof the-cbildrenofthe Aborigines, and ' " sold, as expressed, by the enclosed clusively of heads of families and others, tion of the, been " intending to settlepermanentlyinNew Zea-. That society,, which has always conse- "of thepoorer- class of settlers. " " copy of the terms of purchase, providcrated the sources," and hallowed the pro- ; With thisintention, she has purchased one ing, at all events, that every holder of a land onlandspurchasedfromthe Company. : civilization,,by planting a church- in ;of -the- preliminary sections of land, which The object of land order obtains one full acre of land co-operation in this society is tcpromote gress,of the numerous' measures every colony founded by Englishmen, since ; she- gives as a perpetual endowmentfor this -within the town. formation, has been in some |purpose,and has takenupon herself the reThe directors wish that;in' forming the of preparation requisite for establishing a the date of its # degreeapproached,upon the subject ;andthe " sponsibifi-fcy of guaranteeing the salary for town,you should make ample prosperoussettlement. jplan of the that, if the j the first year of a masterand mis-tress, with The Society already numbers a consider- committee are not withouthopes Teseryes for allpublic purposes ; such as a settlers' come forward, boldly andliberally,, ,their daughter,as an assistant,for whom "cemetery, a market-place, wharfage, and able body of gentlemen, who have deter- with subscription,for building and endow- ,has likewise provided freepassages, andshe acbuildings, a botanical mined to emigrate with their families and- ing achurch, and guaranteeing a moderate : probable public a commodatien on arrivinginfNew Zealand. v property. Others, who may entertain simigarden,apark, and extensiveboulevards. lar views, are invitedto join them. j Quali- stipend to the pastor, the society would be I The teacher engaged is Mr Buchanan, * ' It is, indeed, desirable that the whole ; respond', by making some propor- who* during, the last twenty years, has sutown, inland, should be fication of a member of the Society, the- induced to "outside of the would,'in that case,incur perintendedthe first institution of this kind purchase of 100 acres of land; of a member tionategrant,and separated from the country sections by a of- the committee, 500 acres ; including, in the trouble and responsibility, so, satisfactory established inEngland. of land which you will de- both cases, part of the ""'broad belt first town. The to the public, of becoming'the trustees to the It i^intended to placethe contributions in -clare that the company intends to be greater part of the purchase money to be endowment. the-hands-of threetrustees, leaving the mapublic property, on condition that no expendedby the Company the emigration Inmaking this application, the committee nagement, in the first instance, to.the lady on ""buildings be ever erected upon,it. willonly follow the precedent of South Aus- who*is- the originator of'the'plan-, who subThe form of the town must necessarily of the purchasers, their families and ser- tralia ; where a subscription, to the amount scribes- the larger portion of the funds, and vants. Members admittedby ballot only. be left to your own judgment and taste. l The will body during of 800?., was raised for the bunding of a who*, proceeding- tq the colony with her Upon this subject the directors will only AugustColonyso as departin atheir destina- church, under the patronage and superinten- husband, is- willing to give up as much of 1 next, to reach Temark, that you have to provide for the tion about Midsummer (in the southern denceofthe society,anda clergyman selected her time as- may be necessary for the perfuture rather than the present, and that hemisphere), whenthe site of the first town by them sent out,to the universalsatisfaction sonalsuperintendence of the school. ' they wish the public convenience to be of the colony. The* trustees- will make themselves re^ -consulted, and the beautiful appearance will havebeen determinedand prepared for The sanction this wouM give to the reli- sponsiblefoc the- due administration of the their reception by apreliminary expedition of the future city to be secured, so far as now on its way to New Zealand. gious observances ,of the congregation, and funds,,and detailed reports willbe forwarded these objects can be accomplished by the the dignity it would reflect upon the colony periodically; to- the subscribers inEngland-originalplan, rather than the immediate itself,neednot beinsistedon,;anditis hoped, An immediate-outlayisrequiredfor build* -profit of the company. therefore, tTiat the settlers, as well as all ing a school-roomy as well as residence for EPISCOPAL CHURCHIN NEW It is of essential consequence that the ZEALAND. those from various motives interested in the master and; mistress, with other incidental i lands should be made ready for j undertaking, will at once exert "themselves expenses at the commencement. , COMMITTEE. -■allotment as soon as possible. to secure the fulfilment of these expectaIt is-believedthat, if the necessary,buildHon. Francis Baring,M.P. ings can- be erected, the institution:-may You will consult with Colonel Waketions. Sir G. Sinclair, Bart., M.P. field as to the day Tvhen the allotment The emigrant who believes the doctrines, shortlyrely upon, the exertions of the coloBxiscoe,Esq., M.P. J.Ivatt shall take place. It should not take andloves the forms, of the time-honoured nists themselves ;. and it is calculated that Wijliam Hutt, Esq., M.P. however, until a reasonable time institution with which he connects, not the sum- of twoshundred pounds will bevsuf* place, J.Abel Smith, Esq., M.P. - shall have been'allowed after the plan is , Rev.,Samuel Hinds, D.D. merely the tender charities-of life, but the ficient to- lay the foundation of a* system finished, for the settlers to compare the most august recollectionsofhis country, will which may. hereafter extend itself oot-4 G.S.Evans, Esq.,D.C.L. o not consent to desolateand paganize his fu- largeportion of the-infantpopulation; f New map with the ground. Public notice of Rev. W. Selwyn,M.A. turehome by the absence of the consolations Zealand.. the day of allotment should be given; Halswell,Esq.,M.A. E. Donations and annual subscriptions rewhich religion inspires. -and the directors desire me' to impress on H. Moreing, Esq.., F.A.S. concealment, or i Considerations like this will actuate with ceived byDr Evaaas, chairman of the first you that everything like Captain Daniell. " doubleforce those parents or relatives whose colony, at the Office of the New Zealand eventhe appearance of it, should be careHenry St Hill,Esq. children or connexions are about to be sepa- Land Company, No. 1 Adam Street, fully avoided in all the proceedings of E. B.Hopper, Esq. ratedfromthem, "far as.the poles asunder." Adelpfii. your department. The first ships with BANKERS. settlers will convey to youinstructions in Messrs Smith*, Payne,and Smiths. , The mere speculatorwill perceive that the Trustees* andother' officers, including a colony itself will be incomplete,without such committee'of correspondents in England, duplicate, as to the mode in which the .ch'oieeofsections is to takeplace,accord- The members of the church of England, , an institution; and that no decent or well- willbe appointed;afe a General Meeting of connected with the first colony of emigrants conducted family wouldconsent to settlein subscribers before-tihe departure of the first ing to the priority.determined by lot. colony;. . As soonas the survey and plan of the aboutto settle intheislands of New Zealand,, a'country without a church. The subscriptions, will-be confined, in a Should these proposals meet withi any lown are completed, you will proceed to beg respectfully to submit the following pro" posals to theheads of their own church, as great-measure, to the permanent endowment considerable support* the plan will be exjthe survey of country sections.' " -, You will observe by the-'''Terms of well as to christians of every denomination, of the church, by the purchase- of one or tended- so) as t<h include an- Infant Orphan * Purchase," that the company -undertakes who may be willing to support the only at- more sections of landan the -principal town- Asylum* BANKERS. likely to be made, for some that the eleven hundred country-section's tempt that is a Christian congregationin the ship,of.the colony, to:the erection.ofthe neMmsrs- HAN-KEYj Fencburch street.. time,.to found cessary buildings, including a.house for the .shall consist of the most valuableland-at projected settlement at New Zealand. the disposal of the directors in the first \ It is unnecessary to contend for the am clergyman, and to the "providing for him a suitableoutfit. LITERARY,. SCIENTIFIC, AND settlement. PHILANTHROPIC INSTITUTIONS portance of laying, as early as possible^ the The.annual stipend- will be- secured by a The directors trust, at :all events, that foundations of those institutions which will POR THE BENEFIT, OP -THE guarantee onthe part of certain members of ' you will adopt that*mode of proceeding; give the tone and character to future so- the colony, against which they wallindemnify BBSTISH SETTLERS. AND NATIVE INHABITANTS OF THE ISLANDS OP NEW ZEALAND. hj which the holders of the preliminary cieties;and,'above all,of providing for those qf of the themselves COMMITTEE: land orders will most surely obtain"the. moral sanctions ' which true religion aloneI church: by the.pew rents a part ©bohoe Sazhcohl Evans, D.C.L., Chairman. .most valuableland in the first.settlement,: can furnish-for the subjugationof conscience ' The Henry- Petre. Hon. sum of 10.1/,, if contributed immedir - and by which the priority of- choice deCaptain t>ANiEix. to the authority oflaw. ately,will secure- oneacre of building land Dudley Sinclair, Esq. lermined by lot will be most strictly ob- It is hoped that, in thenineteenthcentury in, the first town,, on. which, the,,church and| Francis, Molesworth, Esq. ~ ' served. of the Christian era, the spectacle may not parsonage may be built, and 100, acres of Edward Bbcts, Hopper,JSsq-. George Duppa, Esq. In case any order or orders should not be exhibited of a large body of emigrants,I:contiguous rural, land, wJtrich ;will form a "l)e presented to you at the time when the culled in due proportion from all ranks of, Edek Bowler, Esq. give glebe,and the company will* afree cabin " opportunity for choosing occurs, it will themother country, moving in a social or-,■passage to tha.- clergyman,, if lie proceeds . - your ' Messrs. WrightBANKERS. and Co.,Jfenrietla street, be business to choose for the absent ganization perfect in all other points, save- with the first.colony. Covent garden. 'holder. The directors feel assured that that which,could alone distinguish it from a.' It is believed. -that five- or six hundred* /they need not impress on you the neces- communityofunbelievers or .pagans. pounds beyond this willbe sufficient to raise The Society, w.Mch has been formed under " sity of being careful to select, in such The large majority of the emigrants ace such buildings-as- may answer for the first. the designation, of the First Colony," and ' cases, the very best land then open to attached to the church of England, and they years of an infant society. For the future, which, consists exclusively, as they have .choice. This last instruction applies to are desirous of quitting their native lands; the settlers will cheerfully trustin the bles- already annoaiaced, of heads offamilies and the .town as well as the country acres. under the sanction and benedictionof their 1sing of the Almighty, to protect his own others about to settle in New Zealand, on Waik respect to the town acres, however,- mother church. There are others also*em- church, whichmay,without indulginginany lands purchased from the New Zealand. ■it -seems indispensable that the whole barked in an enterprise which draw men- pictures of imagination,, be the means of Company, are impressed with the beliefthat ■should be surveyed and mapped before together and make many differences, once! spreading the light of the gospel from New a Colony to be prosperous should be comany.choice is allowed, and that the allot- exaggeratedappearinsignificant, who.cheer- Zealand aver the islands of the Pacific. To posed of a portion of an old Society, transanent of tthe whole should take place at fully contributeto theformationof onelarge' do this, wouldbe to. compensate future,gene- ferredcomplete in all its parts, andcontainand united congregation, rather than, split rations for the injuries inflicted on the past, ing at least the rudiments of allthoseinsti'Oneitime. ' vltv lt will he your duty to choose the re- themselves into small and feeblecommuai- -by the pestilential influence exerted by Eng- tutions,"which give the tone and character ties. servedsections according to the priority faith Theyfeel thatthere are occasions,when land, through her penal colonies, over the to. civilization. itself may give place to charily,,, and wholesouthern hemisphere. As the shortness of the timeintervening, W choice which has been determined confess that some of their most formidable As the founders of the proposed, colony* before their departure,in August, precludes %ylot. objections vanish, in a colony, inhere there acting on the principles of William Perm, the possibility of any veryminute separate can be no question of predominance,because have purchased,their lands fromthe natives, arrangements for distinct societies, the Comthere is no uniform system to and whereevery COLONY OF NEW church mustestablishment,the voluntary zeal and have resolved by a .a perfect equality mittee offer themselves to the public as proJEI&&T visional trustees for the administration of secure,, as far as possible, dependupon .ZEALAND. its ownadherents. which ,may be contributed and conjunctionbetween the settlers and the , of Although the colony, as sacb,. can take no aborigines^it.isto be understood in this, and any funds philanthrophic purposes. for COMMITTEE, scientific or ' WITH POWER TO ADI> TO.THEIR NUMBER.; cognizance of these matters, yet, as it is' in all other appeals made to the public by On the all-important subjects of religion George Samu^lEvaJls> D.C.L., Chairman, practically the case-that the majority of its 'the members of the colony, that thenatives and education, they are happy to. observe 'Hon. Henry Te. tre* in that the membersof the Church ofEngland, to, [ church : members are connected with theto the of are participate equally withthemselves Captain JDaniell. n England,they have consulted as connected with,the Colony,have announced best all the benefits ofthe localinstitutions. Dudley Sinclair, L s^' ' I means of securing their religions objects. a plan, and opened a subscription for the v Francis Molesworth, Es£ i After mature deliberation,they are satisfied endowment of a Church in connexion vrith "bsq* ' : that the mos'i safe and orderly way of pro- NEW ZEALAND INFANT SCHOOL. "the Society for,the Propagation of the Edward fietts Hopper, 'George Duppa, Esq. ceeding is /to place themselves and their Gospel in Foreign Parts f and aJs^T'vfbo^ LADIES PATRONESSES. Henry St Hill,Esq. subscriptions at the disposal of thatvenerable s about toproceed with her.4iuiba|td^tQ the ' i' The Countess of Durham. George Hunter, Esq. corporatic/n,' whichthe most perfectly emboColony, is receiving contrigbt^;'^jine Lady Pbtkb. H. Moreing,Esq., F.A.S. dies the doctrine, the discipline, and the auLady Molesworth. maintenance of anInfant Sch^^dj^phan>j £>. Biddiford, Esq. for the native thority ofthe'church of England; and which., Hon.Mrs. Baring. " naturally cares fox A Lady, the wife of one of the earliest AsylumCommittee beg,cWldjfcnP^^^vf 2j|■. -Samuei;Revaws, Esqv Se at tiffi wt of all others, the most The Under the aoove designation a Socie **£** thern^'having been'formed,' for such special members of the first colony intending to call attention to two points,»eMfe^^aw^ purposes, in times the most propitious to co- settle inNew Zealand, has resolved on the the other philanthropic, ing*^^||)^^\; been formed;; in connexion wfth the r v

— " The S.ociety

3

<"

1

1

-

1

""

.

-

.

1

.

-

" °'

1

.

e^M>W .

4
and denominations canperfectly agree;and which may, therefore, with propriety and advantage, be undertaken by the Colonists as a Society, the formation of a Public Library, with a GeneralMuseum and Scientific Institution,and the establishment of a Dispensary, or Hospital, for *the benefit of the settlers, and the Aborigines of the country. It is obvious that without the former of these Institutions, a high standard of civilizationcannot be maintained, and that it is beyondthe power of individual settlers to provide for it, on an adequate scale, in the infancy of the undertaking. It is believed also that Governments and public societies, by communicating their official papersand transactions, and noblemen and gentlemen, by giving duplicates of works, will, without inconvenience to themselves, confer an inestimable boon on the Colony by their joint contributions. Subscriptions in money will be received also, but it is imagined that there are few individuals acquainted with the subject who will not cheerfully present at least one volume, or one specimen of science or art,to be deposited, as a token of their good will,in the Public Library of the New ZealandColony. Separate accounts will be kept, and a strict appropriation of the funds be made, according to the willof the subscribers;and it is understood that the benefit of the Institutions willbe open, without distinctionof rank, to all the inhabitants of the Colony, whether settlers or Aborigines. Contributionsto theLibrary,the Museum, or the Dispensary, either in money or in kind, will be thankfully received by any member of the Committee, at the Office of the New ZealandLand Company. The contributions most valued will be Books, whether in ancient or modernlanguages, Manuscripts, Maps, Charts, Engravings, Paintings and Sculpture, with copies or casts, Models of Inrentionsand of Buildings, specimens of Minerals and of Natural History, Coins, Medals, &c, and whatever may suggest itself as essential to the plans of a Colony which proposes to cherish the refinements of civilization from the beginning of its existence. The Committee will make a public acknowledgement of allcontributions made to them, and a permanent recordof theobligation,in the Colony ; and they holdout' this pledge to the public Institutions, or individuals who may assist them, that they will, as soon as in their power, requite them, by the return of an equivalent amount of specimens, collected in New Zealand and the neighbouring countries.

THE NEW ZEALAND GAZETTE.
TABLE OF DISTANCES. fo Nicholson's Harbour, Cook's Straits, From England ' South Australia PortPhilip Launceston Hobart Towa Sydney To.England, From Nicholson's Harbour Sydney Launceston South Australia From Nicholson's Harbour, Fo New.Caledonia Friendly Islands New Guinea Sandwich Islands Java

claim protection accordingly. Nicholas and other writers, andthe natives Captain Cook "saw that New Zealand themselveshad been frequently employed was an eligible site for a colony, and re- as able seamen on board British vessels, commended it as such5 but no attempt when many abortive schemes were prowas made to follow up his suggestions. pounded for the colonization of the coun14,000 100 „ Benjamin Franklin and Mr Dalrymple try. Among other attempts was one, we 15,350 „ 15,600 nar issued proposals, but without' any success, believe, originally suggested by Col. „ 16,450 116 for raising a sum of \S,OOQL, with a view Nicholls of the Marines, who in vainsubto supply the New Zealanders with those mitted his plans to Lord Bathurst, then 1,500 10 useful animals, vegetables, &c. and arts Secretary of State for the Colonies. Col. 1,500 10 of life, of which they were destitute. Nicholls had collected a great dealof in„ 2,700 18 4,000 35 This paperis dated August29 th, 1771,and formation withrespect to the country and ' 4,200 35 may be found among Franklin's Mis- its inhabitants, which was communicated „ Japan 4,800 50 cellaneous Works/ In the parliamentary to his relative, Col. Tofrens, and led, „ Canton 5,000 40 debates which led to the establishment of through the exertions of the latter gen„ Isle ofFrance 6,000 50 a penal settlement at New South Wales, tleman, to the formation of the company „ Madras 6,300 60 5,600 50 „ Mexico' " New Zealand wasmentionedas a desirable of 1825. That company, under the sanc„Lima 5,800 50 place for the experiment,- and narrowly tion of its enlightened chairman, Mr „ Valparaiso 5,800 50 escaped through the terror 'of,its canni- Lambton, now Earl of Durham, accom„ Cape Horn 6,100 60 " balism. Attention was further drawn to plished all that waspossible under the cirCape of GoodHope 8,300 60 that part of the world by the establish- cumstances. An unfortunate selection ment of missions in the Society Islands, appears to have been made of the comabout the year 1795, by the London Mis- pany's chief agent, who made some valusionary Society; andin the year 1814 the able acquisitions of territory, held sacred Rev. Samuel Marsden, of New South to the usesof thecompany by thenatives to FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1839. Wales, laid the foundation of the Church this day, and nowincorporated, after the of EnglandMission at the Bay ofIslands. lapse of fourteen years, with the other posHISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE Previously to this,however,Col.Foveaux, sessionsofthe presentcompany, yethesudCOLONIZATION OF NEW ZEA- of the New South Wales Corps, had re- denly abandoned theenterprize onmistakLAND. commended New Zealand to the governor ing a war dance performed in honour of As such a recordmayproveinteresting to of Sydney as a penal settlement, on the him for a hostile demonstration. The the future inhabitants of New Zealand, plan afterwards adopted at Norfolk Island; gentlemen composing,this association aband instructive to those who shall engage and suggestions were made by Col. Jack- stained from openingit to the public until insimilar undertakings,wepropose to give son and others to take possession of the some further success had been obtained, a brief history of the colonization of our country by a military force from India. and were discoui-aged also by the wellThe first regular proceedings were taken remembered state of the money market in. adopted country. It is supposed by some that New Zea- in the year-1814, with a view to the pro- the year 1826. They, however,- expended land was visited by Juan Fernandez. He tection of the missionaries and other 20,000/., and received from Mr Husleft memoranda stating that he had sailed Britishsettlers, andunder the same autho- kisson, the promise of a charter of incor" westward from SouthAmericathirty days, rity which enabled the Sydney govern- poration, which has been recognized by ment to take possession of Norfolk Island, subsequent governments, and is consiwhen he reached a country inhabited by a ' namely, the deredin force at the present day. people of alight complexion, clothed in a in the same longitude, priority, of discovery, the consent of the kind of linen, who treated him hospitaTheproceedingsof the company, nearly bly ; andin allparts ofNew Zealand the natives, and the commission of the gover- the whole of whose artizans, when disnativeshave traditions of being visited by nor of Sydneyunder an actof parliament, charged by the agent at Sydney, returned Europeans longbefore the timeof Captain extending his jurisdiction over New and settledin New Zealand so little did Cook. Further information on' sub- Zealand and other islands of thePacific. they share in the panic of their comthis There are diplomatic grounds connected mander the growing prosperity jectmay be found in Burney's History of the of Discovery in the South Seas.f .It is with- certain European.treaties which give missionaries, the increasing resort of shipclear, however,'that Abel Jansen Tasman importance to the date of this proclama- ping, the influx of runaway convicts and first made known the existence of New tion, which is, Nov. 9th,<1814. Among deserters from vessels, " His Exwith the flagrant Zealand to Europeans. He saw it first other things thepaper states, crimes perpetratedin this mixedandlawp on the 13th of September, 1642, whenhe cellencybeing equally solicitous to. rotect less community, drew the attention of the madethenorthern extremity ofthe islands, the natives of New Zealand and the Bay governor Sydney, of who wasinduced to according to his latitudes; and, running of Islands, in all their just rights and appoint, with theconcurrenceof the home down the east coast, passed through privileges, as those of every other depen- government, what he termed a consul dency of the territory ofNeroSouth Wales, " Cook's Strait into aBay, whichhe called First Colony ofNew Zealand, accredited to the missionariesat the Bay 1, Adam Street, Adelphi, July Bth, 1839. Murderer's Bay, from thecircumstance of hereby ordersand directs," &c.&c.; then of Islands." Thoseexcellent men doubtlosing four men in a conflict with the proceeds to appoint Mr Thomas Kendall loss werenot aware that this was, diplo"resident Justice to the Aborigines. This natives, who effectually prevented him or Islands," magistrate at the Bay of matically speaking, a transfer to them of extends the regulations laid phrase has excited the pleasantry of very any of his people from landing. There is " the sovereignty from the crown of Engmany individuals. The conduct of the peo- no evidence of any European having down for New Zealand to the adjacent land;and it may quiet the apprehension, " isles," and names Duaterra, Shunghi, ple of South Australia towards the abori- landed on these islands before Captain jurists who may imagine thatthe gines has associatedtruth with these words. Cook, which he did on the evening of and Korra-korra magistrates" in New of those of those Zealand,for the purposes of the procla- sovereignty with, to islands was indeed TheLandCompany of New Zealandhas com- Sunday the Bthof October, 1769, accomeverparted recollect that, under mation. mencedits operationsbyreserving a quan- panied by Solander and Banks. Such was the first, introduction of these circumstances, it could'only beheld tity equal to one-tenth of the town and It may be satisfactory to those engaged and in trust, or, at the least, as a feudatory country lands recently disposed of. At the in the colonization of New Zealand, or European settlers into New Zealand; the lottery for priority of choice, the native other islands of the Pacific, to know that so far from colonization being then re- principality. That in missionaries rereserves proved greatly to exceed the aver- they are fulfilling the intentions of his garded with suspicion, it was the only garded it somewhat this light, is clear form that missionary labour waspermitted from the manner in which they have age of fortune. If these lands be well ma- Majesty George the Third, naged there i-s littledoubt they willbe worth from the following extract as willappear to assume. It was the deliberate resolu- resisted the encroachments of foreign, from the in- tion of the Church Missionary Society to nations, and the wayin which they have 100,000^. in ten years, and at the Austragiven to Captain of cent, per annum, will structions " Youare also, with the Cook of the give the mission, in the first instance, a modelled the administration the their golian rate of 10 per consent vernment after that of princeyield a revenue of 10,000Z. pledged to be natives, to secular and merely civilizing character. bishops "take possession, in the name No ordained clergyman was sentout ;and sof the middle ages. They,have applied to the use andbenoSt of the natives maintained,the, powersdelegated to them, of New Zealand. This willbe theresult of of the King of Great Britain, of conveni- the missionaries were officially termed ent situations in such countries as you " the society's settlers at the the saleof a single township. The prospect Bay of within their palatinate. Resisting all of a large fund for the civilizati&n "of the maydiscover, that have not already been Islands." We mayindeed venture to say, attempts to mediatize them, they have nativesis truly promising, and willconvince discovered or visited by any other ,Euro- on behalf of those laborious men who upheld their theocracy ; and weknow- not the most sceptical that ho idle mockery or pean power; and to distribute among the made the first successful inroad uponbar- Avhether to compare the converted chiefdishonest purpose is cloakedin the use of inhabitants such things as will remain as barism, that it is unjust in their friends to tains to tenantsincapite, thelesser barons, traces and testimonies ofyour having been turn round this phrase. upon them for too faithfully or to the heads of tribes ministering toExtract from the minutes of a meeting of there ; but if .you find the countries so j adhering to the principle of their institu- that ofLevi. Athome theinfluence of a-. the Committee of the Aborigines Protection discovered are uninhabited, you are to tion, by continuing to be a colony after wealthy and important society was allSociety, held onthe10thof August, 1839: take possession of them for his " Majesty, thesubscribers at home had changedtheir powerful at the colonial office, glad to be= " Resolved That thisCommittee receives by setting up proper marks and inscripminds and resolved to patronize nothing relievedoftrouble andresponsibility whilst with pleasure intelligence respecting the tions as first discoverers and possessors." but missions. The slow but sure success obliging a great party ; and the organ of measures adopted by the New Zealand Land Inpursuance of these instructions,Cap- of what DrLangcalls "the missionary car- that society, its secretary, wieldinganexCompany with reference to portions of land tain Cook having cii'cumnavigated and penter, boat-builder, blacksmith, plough- penditure of fifteen thousand a year in set aside by them for Aborigines in the surveyedbothislands, whichhadformerly man, rope-spinner, &c." madeknown in New Zealand, found !ahnself virtually neighbourhood of their intended settlement; been deemed part of the great Terra Azcs- monthly and weekly reports throughout governor and bishop 'of both islands, of the Committed, however, conceives, that in tralis Incognita, and passed through the England,, drew attention to the* vast re- which that sum mif/ht have bought the order to givecomplete effect to theintention Straits which bear his name, landed on sources of the country; awd the Church fee simple. ofthe Company, it is desirable that the por- various points in both islands, and with Missionary Society so effectually.performThe solemnity however picturesque, of tions of land so reserved should be imme- the usual solemnities- took possession of ed its work in preparing tho way for a convening a £f £Vr savage chieftains in the diately vested in Trustees for the sole them _on behalf of the King of Great colony, that within a very years .after Britain,; and thus, according to the re- the settlement was foundedfew the Bay of neighbourhood o f the. Bay of Islands, ienefit of the natives." making theyfn at their independence,, Public Accommodation-. One of the ceivedlaw of nations, established a claim Islands, the secretary, the Re\ Josiah and giving declareflag, could no more them a emigrantsproceeding to the colony with the to the sovereignty as against all foreign Pratt, declared" that in one of t1 that prevailed through first expedition, goes under an engagement power,— a claim which ths crown itself cial towns of England he knewthe provin- quell Ac disorderscould, of a large i the is\/an than it inconstitutional d.s, to open a house for the accommodation of cannot lightly abandon. s After such an number of families ready to emigrate toIiaw giye away the king's dominions. the colonists of New Zealand. act on the part of a servantn t of the crown New Zealand. The bug-bear of canni- "£ jti^ocjous crimes were perpetratedby En-

„ „ „ „ „

- -- ---

- --

Miles. IDays.
13 200 120 2,450 15 1,700 12 1,600 11 1,600 11 1,350 10

and all the authorities, the commoniand timber, its flax, and other indigenous statute law as his birthright, and might products had been madp known by Mr

carried with him,according to Blackstone the whale fishery. The value of its

as that performed by Captain Cook, any- balism had now 'nearly vanished. NewBritish subject settling on those islands Zealand hadbecome the head quarters of

New Zealand Gazette.

.—

.

,

— ...

T

.

THE NEW ZEALAND GAZETTE.
virulent, diseases were -introduced.

5

glishmen. Ardent spirits, gunpowder, and was in advocating the peculiar principles that both races are to be on a perfect The Hon. Francis Babing, M.P., Ruf- of colonization,of which he was the au- equality. He is confident that the proChairman. fians who had escaped from the chain- thor, ani upon which he had recently posal wjllbe embraced with eagerness by The Right Hon. theEarl of Durham. " Wales, or who from succeededin founding the colony ofSouth his countrymen, and his ambition is l to i gangs of New South The Right Hon.Lord Petre. various causes were ashamedof appearing Australia, that Mr Wakefield drew the see a townin his country, where he can Hon. W.B. Baring, M.P. inconvict society,flocked to New Zealand attention of Mr Baring to the subject, we live like an Englishman." So large a Walter F.Campbell, Esq., M.P. and furnished the natives with corrosive need scarcely add that he proceeded circle in the metropolis received him on Charles Enderby, Esq. sublimates, laudanum and other poisons, throughout on Ms own system. That terms of equality, and knew him inti- Robert Ferguson, Esq., M.P. to destroyeach other with;andthe neigh- system is too well known to all who are mately, that wehave not hesitated tospeak The Rev.Samuel Hinds, D.D. bourhood of the missionary settlements engaged in colonizing operations, to re- in*the strongest terms of the gentleness of Benjamin Hawes, Esq., M.P. soon became the most demoralizedin New quire farther notice here. his disposition, andtheurbanity, wemight Philip Howard, Esq., M.P. Zealand. Having matured his plan, Mr Wake- say elegance, ofhis manners. On parting William Hutt, Esq., M.P. Repeated representations were made field communicated it to some private with his English friends at Gravesend, George Lyall,Esq. to the government in England to do friends, before the close of the year 18.36. he could not control his emotion, but Thomas Mackenzie, Esq., M.P. that which should repress these evils, Early in the following spring, some addi- burst into tears, and went sobbing to the Sir William Molesworth, Bart., M.P. , but without the least effect. The mer- tional co-operators having been obtained, ship, wherehe remained alone inhis cabin Sir George Sinclair, Bart., M.P. chants of London joined in a memo- the NewZealandAssociation was founded, for the rest of the day. Captain Sir William Symonds, R.N. rial, signed by the heads of all the of which, the- first meeting was held on To return from this episode, about the HenryGeorge Ward, Esq., M.P. principal houses engaged in the south- Monday, the 22nd of May,'1837, at No same period W. Wolryche Whitmore, Esq. of which we have been seatrade. A petition, in 1834, was sent 20 Adam street, Adelphi, where rooms speaking (the summer of 1837), pamphWhen parliament assembled, Lord a home by the most respectable of the set- were hired for the use of the association. let was drawn up and published, ex- Melbourne was reminded of what had. tlersin New Zealand, which wasrepeated Mr Wakefield presided as chairman, and passed before; and an interview was in 1836, and signed by all the influential resolutions were passed founding an asso- plaining the principles and objects of requested for the purpose .of obtaining , ; and application was but, members of themissionitself; through ciation,consisting of two classes of mem- the association prime minister for an the final sanction of government to made, to the someinfluence at the Colonial Office, all bers those intending to emigrate, who interview. Lord Melbourne apparently the measure. Lord Melbourne and Lord applications, both public and private, were undertook to pay all the expenses (alGlenelg jointly received the deputation, disregarded;anditseemed the fixed reso though they ultimately fell upon Mr inclined to favour the undertaking, and which, however, had scarcely been adimmediately granted an audience to the lutionof the government,whatever incon- j Wakefield and Dr Evans* alone), and of committee. At thismeeting LordHowick mitted to the presence of the ministers, venience or sufferingmight beoccasioned public men who, without any pecuniary was the only minister presentbesides the when they evinced symptoms of official byit, to leave undisturbed the experiment interest or view to profit, and on public premier,apparently hostility to thescheme. Apowerfuloppoas the organ of training up a native Levitical republic grounds alone, as they clearly and dis- Colonial Office. Thatnoble lord, toof the ' sition to it had evidently grown up durwhom under missionary control, directed pri- tinctly stated in every publication, gave the plan was referredby Lord Melbourne, ing the recess, of parliament. Whatever marily by a lay secretary in England. up theirtime andlabour to the prosecution and who has taken especial pains to con- Lord Melbourne might intend, it was Such was the state of things in New of a very arduous national undertaking. nect his name with the colonization of plain that the Colonial Office badresolved Zealand when an incident gave reality to Thecommittee consisted exclusively of New Zealand, examined the draught of to crush the undertaking. a project which had long been familiar to In order to discover the origin of this latter class, to whom it wasproposed thebill the minds of its author. In a work en- theconfide the execution ,of the plan in in the minutely,professed awarminterest change of feeling in the government, it, to < project, and returned the papers titled England and America,' New Zea- England, andwas at first composed of the with a very full commentary, suggesting would be necessary to go back to an land had been pointed out as one of the following gentlemen: earlier various alterations. Inconversation with ing period, when a deputation,consistfinest fields for colonization. A commitof the Hon;, The Hon. Francis Baring, M.P., various members of the association, he Captain ArthurCaptain Wellesley,R.N.y. Commons, upon the tee ofthe House of Wakefield, R.N., and gave further reason to expect that the Chairman, disposal of wastelands in the British co- The Right Hon. Lord Petre, measure wouldhave the best assistance of Dr (Evans, waited upon Mr Dandeson lonies," was sitting on the 27thof June, the government. Several of them,there- Coates, the secretary of theChurchMisWalter F. Campbell, Esq., M.P., 1 836, when thefollowing answerwas given Society," in the. month of June,.. fore, abandoned professionalengagements, sionaryto Robert Ferguson, Esq., M.P., ijMr Edward Gibbon Wakefield to a 837, present to that society,the first sold property on the faith of the expecta- 1 Hawes, Esq., M.P., question by the chairman, Mr Ward : pamphlet of theassociation,and to request "961 Are there any parts of the world Benjamin tion virtually held oat to them, and made Philip Howard, Esq., M.P., preparations for emigrating. A new bill their advice and co-operation. The anWilliam Hutt, Esq., M.P., subject to our domiuion now, in which was drawn, embodying every one of Lord swer given by Mr Coates to those gentleSir ?m. Molesworth,Bart., M.P., you imagine that new colonies might be Howick's suggestions, to some of which men was, that ," he had no doubt of the , founded advantageously under this pro- Sir Geo. Sinclair,Bart, M.P., — Many. I the associationhad objections, but which respectability of the gentlemencomposing Henry George Ward, Esq., M.P., posed system ? consider that they waived inconsideration ofreceiving the associ.i ion, or of the purity of their inW. Wblryche Whitmore, Esq. in Australia, at present, there areno colotentions, but that he was opposed to the It was during the month of July in this hislordship's powerfulinfluence and sup- colonization of New Zealand upon any nies; look upon the settlements inNew I port. South Wales and Van Diemen's Land as year that two New Zealanders, whose mould thmart them plan, the The deathof his Majesty, William the means and power." Shortly by allthis mere gaols of apeculiar kind. They call namesare familiar to the public, the Ranin his after Te Naiti, and Te Hiakai, visited Fourth,at this juncture,stoppedallfurther the keeper 'his excellency,' and the interview the Rev Dr Hinds, vicar of chaplain 'right reverend;'" but the real ranee,, Mr Wakefield, hearing .they proceedings. Parliament was dissolved, Yardley, a member of the committee of truth is, they are nothing else but gaols. were at Havre, employed a person at his and the committee, with Lord Howick's the association, addressed an official letter Then South Australia is not yet founded. expense to bring them to this metropolis, written communicationbefore them, came to thecommittee ofthe ChurchMissionary There remains alarge extent of country if agreeable to them. The younger one, to the following resolution : Society, expressing the sincere desire of between South Australia and that which Hiakai,resided for about eight months in Resolved " That this committee are the association to adopt, any reasonable is called Western Australia : there is in the family of Dr Evans, until he diedof satisfied with the progress that has been suggestions that might be madeby the soExtra-Tropical Australia a district of consumption, which in this country so made in negociating for the consent of her ciety in London, and to uphold the misgroundopen to colonization,of which the often proves fatal to the natives of the Majesty's governmentfor theintroduction sionaries in the colony. Of this letter, outline touchedby the sea-coast cannot be mild regions of the Pacific. During of billfor giving effect to the views of coming officially from a society of nobleless than 4,000 miles. Very near to Aus- his lifetime, he snowed a disposition of thea they will use menand gentlemen, and writtenby a disassociation ;and tralia there is a country, Avhich all testi- the most" amiable kind, and a capacity of their best endeavoursthat procure an act tinguished clergyman, no manner of noto mony concurs in describing as the fittest the very first order. It was the opinion for that purpose during the nextsession of tice was taken. We have reason to becountry in the worldfor..colonization ; as of thegentleman with whom he resided, parliament. That it is expedient to lieve thatMr Coates did not even think the most beautiful country, with the finest that his abilities would have enabled him strengthen the association by laying their fit to lay it before his own employers ; to climate and the most productive soil; I master any of the abstractsciences, and viewsbefore the public, and adding to and that the great bulk of the members -. mean New Zealand. It willbe said that to ha-ve distinguished himself. He was of the Church Missionary Society have > New Zealanddoesnotbelongto theBritish the brother of Iwi Kau, the chief of their numbers." been kept in the dark with respect not crown, and that is true; but Englishmen Banks's Peninsula. He was buried in From this period to the assembling of merely to the overtures of the Assoare beginning to colonize New Zealand. Brompton churchyard ;and it was to the the new parliament, several members of ciation, but to the proceedings New Zealandis coming under the domi- credit of his companion Naiti that, three the association never relaxed in their dition of the Mission in New and conZealand. nionof the British crown. Adventurers' weeks after the funeral, he was" found attendance or their labours, for a single That, however, is exclusively their own alone, weeping overthe grave. Te Naiti, day. Information relating to New Zeago from New South Wales and Van Dieaffair. The public are only interested men's Land and make a treaty with ana- resided during his two years stay in En- land was collected from all quarters. A in knowing that every possible attention .tive chief— a treaty induplicate, thepoor gland, under the roof of Mr Wakefield, volume was compiled and published, and and respect waspaid to theChurch Mischief not understanding a single word who always treatedhim as a friend. He put into circulation in all parts of tKe sionary Society, and that every about it ", but they make a contract upon is a young man of high feeling and most kingdom. Mr Burford- was induced to was rejected with incivility and overturedisdain. parchment witha great seal, and for a few- gentlemanly deportment. He is nearly paint a panorama of the Bay of Islands, We can state upon authority, that the to the most powerful chieftain in from drawingsprocuredby the association trinkets andalittlegunpowderthey obtain related association were anxious to place among land. After a time in these cases, after New Zealand, the RangatizaTe Raupora, from Mr Augustus Earle, draughtsman the commissionersfor founding the colony somepersons have settled,the government whose dominions happen to include those to her Majesty's ship Beagle, and the' someleadingmembers of the at home begins to receive hints that there territories onboth sides of Cook's Straits, author of an interesting work on New Society, and to revise thebillMissionary with them, is a regular settlement of English people whichit will be' most desirable- for the Zealand. A series of lithographic prints clause by clause, adopting any suggesformed in such aplace; and then the go- company to purchase. Te Naiti, there- from drawings by the same artist, and tions that might be, reasonably made, vernment at home generally has been ac- fore,has accompanied the first expedition, executed in a beautiful style, was begun with a view to tuated by' wish to appoint a governor, as interpreter, for which office he is pre- at the instance and under the auspices of to benefit the protect themissionaries'and a aborigines. Instead of the says, This spot belongs to England; eminently qualified, by his knowledge of the' association. Articles appeared also courtesies and which the demeanour of-the aswe will send out a governor.' The act the English language,his rank among his in Blackwood's Magazine/ and in other sociation seemed to invite, Mr of sending out a governor according to countrymen, the favourable impressions publications, highly favourable to the pro- repliedbypamphlets, in which'theCoates memour constitution,or law, or practice, con made uponhis mind in England, andhis ject. A large accession was made to bers of charged with the association stitutes the place to which a governor is perfect knowledge of the real principles the emigrating members of the society, love of lucre andwilfulwere ' deception These sent a British province. We are, I think, andultimate designs of the company. In and a junction effected with themembers were answeredby Mr Wakefield going to colonize New Zealand, though this wajr there can be no fraud, no snam of the old company of 1825, a most op- Hinds. To analyse the whole of and Dr the conwe are doing so in a most slovenly, and convention of the natives to set up a go- portune event, and owing entirely to the troversy would beimpossible on this ocvernment nominally native, really Euro- good offices of Lord Durham, who has scrambling, and disgraceful manner." The'statement here quotedled to acon- pean. He knows, and is to explain to his never abandoned the public object of casion. altered tone of Lord Melbourne The versation between a member of the com- countrymen, that if they cede their terri- colonizing New Zealand, though he has was, however, mittee, theHon.Francis Baring, and the torysfor the purposes of the colony,they ever been ready to forego his private just mentioned, apparent at the interview when he and Lord- Glewitness, and to the formation of a plan must submit to thelaws of England, but interest in the work,for the sake of agree-" nelg, but especially the latter, objected, ment in the pursuit of a great national not ■which was shortly after embodied in the " merely lo the details,of the plan but The gentleman to whom Mr Wakefield first object. draft of a bill,intituled « A Bill to facilito every principle of,the bill, and even communicated his plan, after maturing itwith Mr tate and regulate the Settlement of BriThe following committee was agreed to all further colonization by "England. Baring tish Subjects in New Zealand." As it R.N. and his brother, Capt, Arthur Wakefield, ; upon after theunion of the societies': "This country hadcolonies enough,-more

"

.

fitira,

.

1

1

-

.

'

6

dependence on the sincerity of his first come lieutenant-governor of the portions colony of New South Wales, and that the legist** than we could protect in case ' "There were diplomatic reasons against friendly professions. We attribute no of the islands so ceded. Meanwhile, the- ilive authority of New South Walesycreated by the Act IV,c. exercise* country is to be abandoned to the scramble over of 9 Geo.subject* 88j may .then be. territory colonizing New Zealandinparticular: the motives : we only state plain facts.. British inhabiting that Russians,the Americans, theFrenchwould The bill being rejected, the absence which DrLang has so powerfully described; and my lords likewise refer to the provision mada» and object to it j and, as to the appointment from England of Lord Durham, and of in which the missionaries " grogshop in the estimate for consular services,now before th* House of Commons, for the salary of a consul at of aspecialauthority for the purpose, such Mr Wakefield, the author of the project, keepers are to vie with the land shaFks'r -New Zealand. , " ," a thing was without precedent an inno- rendered further efforts apparently hope- frbm Sydney, in plundering the natives of My lords also read their minute of the 2lst vation quite uncalled for." The rioble less. It never occurred, however, to the their territory, without any of those provi- ultimo, expressing their concurrence in opinion secretary for the colonies was reminded, adversaries of the colony, that men who sions for their permanent advantage which with her Majesty's secretary of state as to the or rather informed, of what he seemed had embarkedinsuch an enterprise, were a just and paternal government would en- necessity of establishing some competent control British subjects in previously to have known nothing, that not likely to submit to a single defeat. force. We know that "ye speak the senti- over further stating that the New Zealand islands, and this board would be preall the great colonies of America were They soon formed another plan for ments of the New Zealand company, and of pared, upon the contemplated cession insovereignty upon that plan, and that the in- founding a settlement, without asking those whohave purchased land under them, to the British crown of territories within those founded may be acquired by her islands 'which have novation was the other way; that, in fact, the sanction of Lord Howick or the when we affirm that nothing would be so Majesty's subjects, been orgrantsfrom the different under the Swan River was the only colony, ex- colonial office. After various troubles satisfactory to them as the plan laid downin chiefs beingobtained, to concur in the proposed cepting the Penitentiaries of New South and difficulties, during which many new Dr Lang's pamphlet, for a general assump- arrangements for the government of the ceded Wales and Van Diemen's Land, which partisans joined the old body of emi- tionby the crownof the propertyinalllands territory, and for raising a revenue to defray the hadbeenestablished without theinterven- grants, an association termed the tl New in New Zealand; provided only, that the expense of theestablishment it would-be necessary maintain;for tion of a commission or a chartered cor- Zealand Colonization Company" was South Australian system, were rigidly en- to Write to Mr thispurpose. in reply to his further Stephen, and, forced; that the present owners of lands poration. Of course this vacillation on formed at Messrs Wright'sbankinghouse, of the before this wereallowed a reasonable timefor pre-emp- communication he will' 4th inst. now Marquis of the part of the governmentgaverise on the on the 29thof August,,1838, and on the signify to "NewZealand tion; and that a set-off wereallowedto them hoard, request lords' sanction for the advance'by Normanby my the occasion to earnest remonstrances from 2ndofMayfollowing, the the agent-general Wales, from funds the deputation. Itledalso to acorrespon- Land Company," combining all the pre- for what they have expendedinthe purchase appertaining to for.New Southof the government that colony, of fact, dencebetweenLord Melbourne and some ceding societies,, was brought before the and improvement of those lands. In this is not a new proposal. It was a funda- the amount required to defray the expenses x>f the influential members of the association, public, through the powerful exertions of mentalprinciple ofthe billprepared by the officer proceeding to New Zealand, asspecified in whichendedinanotherinterviewwithLord Mr Wakefield, whonow resumed the part New Zealand association last year ; and to the estimate furnished by Captain Hobson, and Stephen's latter, with Glenelg only, on that day week. Lord .which had been sustained by others dur- this, sooneror later, the colonial office must submitted to my lords in Mradvance is to be repaid the understanding thatsuch Durhamagain headed thedeputation, and ing his absencefrom England. The list come, they " if wouldnot abandon the islands from the revenues of the territory it is proposed to it appearedthat a change had come o'er ofdirectors ofthiscompany is perhaps un- to the bold adventurers who may dispute arnex to that government. But Mr Stephen will at the same time state to the Marquis of Normanby, thespirit of" thenoblesecretary's"dream," exampled for weight with the public. In with that as the proceedings about to be adopted for he now spoke as a friend and patron unremitting attention to the business of soil. the missionaries the possession of the regard to New Zealand, in the eventof failure in. of of the scheme. He stated that, in conse- the shareholders,the directors havenever, the anticipated cession of sovereignty and of the despatches which he had re- been surpassed. Their anxiety to provide Lord Howick is unremittingin expres- contemplatedrevenue,mayinvolve further expendiquence of ceived from New South Wales since the for the safety and well-beingof those who sions of hostility to the colony. We know ture from the funds of this country beyond the consul in the estimate last interview, her Majesty's government are about to emigrateunder their auspices that heis in the habitof advising gentlemen salary oftheservicesalready includedyear, my lords for consular for the current direction, merits grateful acknow- in the House of Commons to avoid all con- have considered it necessary that the arrangement had come to theresolution of adopting the and and that he goes principle of the plan, although they held ledgment from this first organ of the nection with it ;bubble scheme, aboutde- should be brought under the cognizance of Parliascribing it as a and Poyais ment;and they have therefore directed that a copy as to details." The colonists. themselves "unfettered project for cheating the public. His in- of their minute, giving the sanction now notified was,that the prime plain Englishof which The property and influence of the fluence in the cabinet on to minister had been remindedof, and had old company of 1825, are thrown into is-known tobe very great. colonial questions of Lord Normanby, shall be laidbefore the House Commons. He will honourably considered,the encouragement the common stock, with other pur- continue to exert it to the injury o£probably The followinganswer wasreturned by the Secretary this in- of State for the Colonies tw a memorial from whichhe at first gave to the project ;that chases and acquisitions made by the fant society, to which'he seems to bear an Glasgow, praying the the hostility of the Colonial Office had directors. Shares to the amount of animosity not less bitter than inexplicable. into a British Colony. erection of New Zealand superior authority ; 100,000/, to be paid up almost immedi- Whatever success,, however, may attend his been overcome by Downing street, 27th June, 1839. andlastly, that the despatches from New ately, have been subscribed for ; and, ungenerous efforts, our consolation is, that Sir, I directed by the Marquis ofNormanby am South Wales most fortunately furnished what is still more remarkable, the sum all things and allmen bide their time; and to acquaint you that the Lords Commissioner's of a pretext to Lord Glenelg for expressing of 100,000/. was paid" within five weeks, that, come what will,Englishmen carry with the i'reasury have referred to this department a his approval of a measure which, but a for as many acres of land, in atownship them, wherever they go, not merely the memorial, addressed to their Lordships by the merchants, ship-owners,- and otner parties "week before,hehad earnestly condemned. the site of which, is not yet determined. right,but the determinationandthe capacity, Glasgow, praying that New Zealand may.in be letter, in which Two vesselshave been despatched to New to manage-their own affairs. With these erected into a British Colony; and 1am to rvquest Thereupon followed a Ms lordship expressed the assent of the Zealand, one (the Tory) with the com- feelings, and with this farewell, three thou- that you will inform the parties who signed' the that measures are government upon certain conditions, the pany's principal agent, CoL Wakefield, sand emigrants take leave of his lordship memoriallead to tJie result, in progress which^will probably. which they express their spirit andintent of which are accurately the other (the Cuba) with' the surveyor- and the Colonial Office. anxiety to see attained. described in Mr Baring's speech, on the general, Lieut. Smith, and a surveying I sir, am, secondreading of the bill, which we have force of thirty'persons. A large body Yourobedient servant, H. Laboucherz. Fleming, printed inanother page. of emigrants are preparing to sail in THE GOVERNMENT of NEW ZEALAND. To JohnGlasgow. Esq., , to an Order The principal condition insisted upon, the beginning of September, carrying ReturnCommons, of the Honourable the House of dated26th July, 1839;— for as thereby appears, was, that the society with them all the elements of civiTreasury Miktjtesanctioning an Advance should resolve itself into a joint-stock lization, achurch, an infant school, for Copt of the Revenues of New South Wales, on ac- Town Acres and the surrounding from Rural Sections. Therehas been a concompany, which was directly at variance the children of natives as well as colocount of the Expensesof the Officer ahout to prowith one of its leading principles, over nists, a public library, a dispensary, a ceed to New Zealandas Consul,&c. F.Baring, siderable degree of speculation in the lands at from ten to eighty per cent advance upon and over again declared. This could bank; together with a large amount of Whitehall, Treasury Chambers, the upsetprice of the company. Certificates' been, intended to produce any capital invested in machinery,' mills, 24th July, 1839. not have other effect than that whichensued. It steam-engines, agricultural implements, Ordered,by the House of Commons, to be printed of choice for town acres havebeensoldfrom10?. to 801. per acre. The real value of could only end in the dissolution of the the frame work of houses, andproperty 29th July, 1839. these lands cannot be ascertained till the society, or in exposing it, with an appear- of various kinds. The first colony will Copt of Treasury Minute, of the 19th July, 1839. in the ance of justice,to thosechurch missionary consist of morethan 160 cabin passengers, Readletter from Mr Stephen, dated 4th instant colonists shall have arrivedlarge colony; number of attacks whichhadbeenlevelled against it and about 3500 of the labouring class; transmitting, by direction of the Marquis of and havebeen joinedby the " wealiLy persons which it is reported are as a joint-stock company," fee. all conveyed to the colony by means of Normanby, for the consideration of this board, preparing to proceedimmediately to settle Theassociation thendetermined to pro- the purchase money of land. Five large with reference to a communication from his lord- at the firstand principle settlement of the ship's department of the 13th ultimo, on the subceed without the aid of government. In vessels, of more than 500 tons each, are ject of the establishment of some British authority New Zealand land company. Port Phillip order to obtain the independent opinion of nearlyready for sea, and willsail early in in New Zealand, aletter from Captain Hobson of some six years. It* parliament, and to procure an inquiry September,. Others willfollow,in regular the royal navy,who is about to proceed to New has been inhabiteddesign is unsupported into the subject, which the state of busi- succession ; and the whole party will Zealand as her Majesty'sconsul, and as eventual was settled without ness in the House of Commons rendered rendezvous at Port Hardy, in JD'Urville lieutenant-governor of such territory as may be by any important English connections is. to the curse of islands, slavery has impossible at that period, the Earl of island, Cooks's straits, it is hoped before cededan her Majesty in the New Zealand will be subject tosome 1000 convict yet the town with -estimate of certain expenses it now but persons, for, and obtained, a com- the endof January. Devon moved necessary toincur in respect of this mission, for bis landshavebeen sellingat 120CM. per acre, mittee in the House of Lords. Every Such an expedition is unprecedented in passage to those islands, construction of aresidence, and the rural lands in the vicinity of the influence was used to disincline the com- modern times; and it was imagined that presents to native chiefs, and other incidental townat 15/. the acre. The Sydney people mittee to the scheme; and theyultimately such a body of her Majesty's subjects, about charges. have again before them theletter from are the purchasers, and the superior advanevaded a decision on the substance "" the to extend her dominionsand thebounds of MrMylords of the 13th ultimo, adverting to cir- tages of the New Zealand colony will not of l Stephen, question, byresolving to the effect, that civilization, at their own cost, would have cumstances whichhadappeared to the Marquis of fail to be immediatelyapparent to them. the extension of our colonies was a queshad' the same' sympathy from the govern- Normanby and to Viscount Palmerston to force The New Zealand Land Companyof tion belonging exclusively to thecrown." ment which they have had from all other upon herMajesty's government the adoption in —The capital is 100,000/., and all. the inmeasures-for establishing-some British authority Notwithstanding this unfavourable classes oftheir countrymen. Thishope has New Zealand for the government of the Queen's stalments willhave beenpaid by the 15thof event, the utility of the inquiry was great. been,disappointed. The colony, so far as it subjects residents in, or resorting to, those islands ;, January next. The proportion of themoney It brought out a mass of authentic infor- hashadany intercoursewiththe government, and, with that view, proposing that a British derivedfromthe sale of land up to the preforthwith to New mation relating to the countiy, and, by has been, treated with cold indifference, to< consul should that, upon be dispatched obtained sent time,whichis reservedfor the expenses; and cession being exciting and satisfying curiosity, most say theleast. Thearrangements whichhave Zealand; native chiefs- of. the sovereignty ofsuch andprofits of the company, exceeds 25,000/. from the usefully seconded the various publications been made for its government, are wholly territories therein as may be possessedby British , First Scotch Colony for Kew subjects, those, territories should be added to the , Zealand. A numerousparty of emigrants, of the association. inefficient, not to say offensive. By a treaNevertheless, under these adverse cir- sury'minute which we haveprinted elsewhere, colony of New South Wales as a dependency of under this title, arenow making the necesthat government;and likewise cumstances, the bill was brought into the it.appearsthat the colony is to be placed un- officer about to proceed.to New proposing thatthe sary arrangements for embarking in The, Zealand as consul House ofCommons by Mr Baring. The der the rule of the governorand councilof should be appointed lieutenant-governor of this Bengal Merchant, to sail from Greenock most conclusive reasoning, and the sup- New South Wales a penal settlement, dependency ;and that the expenses which,must in September. The Committee for the west port of powerful and independent mem- twelve hundred miles from New Zealand, necessarily be incurred for his passage, and for the of Scotland, and their agents, are now embers on both sides of the house, were of and wherethe.new colony must necessarily purchase of* articles which will be required for his ployedinselectingeligiblepersons as settlers,, immediate use in the public service, or for presentsno avail. The bill was thrown out upon be regardedwith the jealousfeeling of rival- to.the native chiefs, should'be defrayed by advances and, judging from the number of applicathe second reading, by a large majority, ry. Applications have been made to the from the funds of the government of New South tions, the Directors will becalled on to send Wales, to be and with an air of scorn, bordering, in colonial office for local administration, but may raisedhereafter repaid from such revenue as a second vessel from the Clyde. A clergybe within the some quarters, on malignity. The most without any effect. The only,reply is a re- of' ordinances to be issued ceded territory by virtue man ofthe Scotch Church, who accompanies for the purposei>y surprising circumstance in the opposition ference to the treasury minute- From this governor and council of New South Wales, the the colony,will officiate as chaplain onboard. i.from Commons, we learn that Captain Hobson, R.N., who which revenue also all other expenses relating. to It is intended that the Clyde shall be made to the measure in the Houseof was the course taken by Lord Howick, sailed a few days ago, is to treat with the the government of this dependency are tobe pro- the principal shipping port of Scotland for who was relied upon as a sure friend, native chiefs for a cession of the sovereignty, videdfor. New Zealand, and that the strictest' regu'My lords bound in honour to support a measure a thing for which.their language did not law officers,also'refer to the opinion ofher Majesty's lations shall be put in force inorder to enZealand, of that any territory in which"hadbeen modified tosuithis views, afford a worduntil- the missionaries coined which the sovereignty may be New acquired by the sure the camforti safety, and convenience of' pursued with great toiland trouble in one for the "occasion and thenhe is to be- British crown, may lawfully be annexed to the the passengers. and
1

— of war."

THE NEW ZEALAND GAZETTEi

.

J

1

.

°

1

'

——

.

1

THE NEW ZEALAND GAZETTE.

islands.. points twenty the degree in which a demand was made Here Mr-Baringshowedthatland to alarge extent look toisolated River,,in the twoexpense Letthem PRELIMINARY SECTIONS. of Church Mis-, Swan. and..the. I upon the labourmarket that modey or had been purchasedbymembers the;and thatone nearly 30,000/.— which that settlement of believe fifteen Advertisements have appeared offering the mode which is the nearest to' it, is sionary Society, on their own account the produce of hundred personsentails upon the country ; the to them, Mr Henry Williams, sold of .sections, for .sale, and stating, as an in- selling the landand devoting its' proceeds his estates to the mission of which*he was thechair- chances of collisions with the natives, which weak only serve to invite ducement <to purchase, that buyers' are in the manner pursued by South Aus- man. AMr Fairburn had bought a tract of land and ill-ordered.communitiesdisposal lands ; ; of and thirty miles in length. find Davis -entitled to free cabin passages to New tralia andthe new colony of New Zealand. had each four or five Messrs Hemp which they to the irregular purchase and to the thousand evils consequent upon, their dissethousand acres, .Zealand. Had the advertisers, read the farmed themselves ;so hadMr Clark andMr Baker, mination. Itmay be objected to us, that the same ier-msairtder which the sales were made and several other members of the missionary body. difficulties will attend our enteiprise; and that small by the company, they must have known DEBATE IN THE COMMONS ON THE Some of Mr Fairburu's land was part of r the tract communities would spring up which we could not sold to an English company in 1825, which the control. Our answer is simple. Such commuthat .the privilege could not be asserted NEW ZEALAND BILL. natives had always held sacred, and against the nities would not be established. In the formation Nor can a party after the 25th July. MrFrancis Baring, on June 19,1838,moved the sale of which to Mr Fairburn some of them pro of agreat Europeansociety,' we should have all the who has asserted the claim transfer the second reading of the bill " for the Provisional Go- tested, in consequence of the previous transfer. It advantages of high wages, increasing value of profree passage on selling the land. This vernment of British Settlements in the Islands of appeared that the Church, Missionary Society was perty, and, above all, protection to those who joined point has been raised, and so decided. New Zealand." He commenced his speech by a by no means so successful in the workofconversion it. Commerce would centreat the point where supand consumption are most certain and there origin of the project, and the bitter as the whole number Were this.,privilegecontinually toattach to statement of theanimosity by which it had been as- nicantsWesleyans.to Theformer was onlyof commu- ply be no inducement to any one to;resign the 180, to the would and interested belonging the the purchase of land, the company would sailed certain advantages of a civilized and growing comthechurch missionaries " Itis now nearly two years since a number of latter 1,000 ;althoughas the Wesleyans, and were munity, to seek a dangerous and precariouslivelitheir not be safe in granting a single free pasfive times as numerous ;gentlemen, encouraged by the increasing interest expenses much greater in proportion .to their num- hood where there could be no security of obtaining sage to any one of the labouring class which the public took in the matter, and by the the commonest necessaries of life. Sir, I appeal to for theymight at any moment be called knowledge of circumstances which had come under bers. Mr Baring continued the house against the decision of her Majesty's expend upon the person of the their observation, formed themselvesinto an associa- ".Is it to be supposedthat the worldly circum- ministers, with a full hope that we shall not appeal upon to influence over the state of things in vain in favour of a project fraught with advanproprietor that fund which is mainly des- tion for the purpose of establishing a British colony stances have no we that the churches are spiritual ? Do New Zealand. They tages so rtined to enable the labourers, mechanics, in oral and documentary had assembled a largemass more deserted, thatnot know are less earnestly large." important and so certain to the empire at the schools evidence upon the subject. wives, to proceed to New Zea- of and their might make statements upon this subevidence of allithose whose supported?> I They had sought the Mr Coates incurred when land. The important principle upon opinion was worth consulting, either from local ject with less hazard thanagainst motives of the he collectedimputations the The Preliminary Expedition, The which the colonization ofSouth Australia knowledge or from connexionin any way with the association with which lam connected ;and I say Tory, a fine ship of400 tons, left the distant countries into' which they were anxious to so and New Zealand is based must never river should not want facts with less hesitation, for I religion, our and belost sight of for a moment. The pur- introduce ourthey arrivedatcustoms, and our laws ;i>or testimony to support them. But, Sir, is there early in May,12th,finally sailed fromPlywas,thatit wasnot only and theresult with Col. Wakefield, pose of selling the land at 11. per acre is expedientas far as theinterest of their own country nothing to alter Mr Coates's views, in the evidence mouth on the to obtain a fund with which to convey the is concernedthat their intention should be persisted; as to the state of the country, which is contained in principal officer of the company, on board, the dispatches received from Mr Busby, the industrious classes there in sufficient num- in, but that they owed it to the natives as a correc- British resident,lately Captain Hobson, who was sent bound to New.Zealand, to takepossessionof and communication with us They cannot get thereunless their tion of the evils which theirthem. They found that by the Governor of New South Wales on a special large tracts of land already purchased,.and bers. had to treat with the natives for an extensionof the passages are provided for them, and the thesealready entailed upon islands, which, according to the principles fol- mission to. report onof spot1 His well-known some land is valueless without the combined lowedby other countries, had been acquired by the connection withleads methepersons employed in the the company's territory. A letter has been Office, to supposeit to be difficult from the Tory, services oflabour andcapital. Theprice British Crown by those forms of taking possession Colonialshould not have been cognizant of some of' received deg/30 north, dated June 3rd,, and long.23 deg. which have ever been allowed to constitute a claim that he m. of 1 is supposed to yield a fund that will against other civilized nations, were situated in a those dispatcheseven before he made his first state- inlat. 5 1. will convey four persons for every hundred temperate latitude, with a soilof remarkable ferti- ment; but I allow him, for the sake of his cha-, 17 m. west, stating all to be well onboard.. acres sold. The fund, though sufficient lity, a climate perfectly suited to the constitutions racter for sincerity, the benefitof ignorance on this As there can belittle doubt the Tory has Butwhatis the state of society which has arrived in Cook's Straits by this date,. des>for that purpose,is not sufficient to per- of English emigrants, and productions not only ef occasion. under themild governmentof the mission1 patches from thence may beexpectedby the grown up value commercially, but of form it and to carry out capitalists or em- great as renderingus independentofespecial import- Are not wars,murders, and every possible excess 15th of December next. other countries ployers j and if they claim free passages ance of for som? of the most important of their produc- rifein all partsend the island ? have they succeeded to the system of slavery which to that extent they diminishthe supply of tions. They found that their position rendered in putting an The Surveying Vessel. The Cuba, everywhere exists ; have they ventured to attempt Capt. Newcombe, labour. If they dissipate the fund be- them of so much importance to our growing settle- it ; are they in a position to counteract the ganahark of270 tons,left the thatthe possession yond a certain extent, then labour may ments in Australia,would endanger the of them by grenous influences of the society of runaway sailors river at the end of July, and passed Deal on foreign power attain to a price which will make the co- any empire in that part of the world ; andstability of andescaped convicts, which is daily augmenting in the 2ndAugust. Capt.Smith,R.A.,surveyour above all, lony a place of unprofitable investment their researches led them to the conviction that a frightful proportion;can they oppose anybarrier or-general to the New Zealand Land Comarisen, from the settlement on the islands to the vicious example against which their pre* pany, with such acorps as thisintelligent and to the capitalist. The evil would cure there had the cepts must struggle in vain, or itself, doubtless but at the expense of of a lawless anddegraded population,an obstacle to profligacy and excesses whichset any bounds todis- energetic officer deemed sufficient toproceed are introducing any moral improvement in the natives, which was ease mortality into all the districts rapidly with the surveys, were the passenprosperity of the colony. the every year assuming a more serious aspect, and with and premature which they There will never be any difficulty in which a very short delaymight make it impossible sir, that all theare in contact? Are we not aware, gers. After landing these gentlemen the religious reformers among securing to the colonies a sufficient num- to remove. They trusted to this latter circumstance barbarous nations great established their creeds by Cuba willbe occupiedin making purchases have " for the obtaining thesanctionof tl.e missionary body ; connecting its ber of the employingclass Thedifficulty and they confided in the anxiety for the material precepts with the material prosperity of landand coast-surveying.' always has been,andmustbe, in'obtaining welfare ofthecountty which governmentis supposed of those whom they wished to influence ;and, in TheDruid,44,Capt.LordJ.Churchill, cases, by faith many of Ha sufficientnumber of the class to be em- to entertain, for the ensuring their support to aplan some regulations making articles of by the habits, willshortlyproceedwithCapt.Hobson,R.N., Tendered necessary those ployed, to cause a state of society mutu- in the success- of which they conceived thatthe sta- prejudices, and even the climate of the country to to New Zealand, to which he is appointed bility of our dominions in those seas ally beneficial. '. The creation and pre- They accordingly brought ina bill." was involved. which they are adapted, and which with our purer consul and lieutenant-governor. Colonial due proportion is the religion and more rational morality weshould leave Gazette. servation of this Here Baringbriefly stated the principal striking feature peculiar to colonies having visions Mrthe bill, with which the readers ofpro- to be providedfor by human institutions ? Can they of ' the a system of land selling, furnishing a Spectator are already acquainted. The names of suppose that thesepoor savages will not cpnnect the evil doings of these supposed adherents of the new with which to grant free passages to the commissioners printedin the bill were those of religion with the tenets of their religion, and that OUTFIT OF EMIGRANT LABOURERS. fund ' " the committee of the New Zealand Association; but in many cases the example will not bemore powerFEMALE. a sufficient extent, and those whichhave Mr Baring would not these names, but 2gowns, 18 yards of printedcotton, s <*it not, or not in a sufficient degree and leave the nomination to insist on and the House in ful thanthe precept? lam not blind to -the sacriministers " no @ 6d. 0" £ 0 to be the great a future stage of the proceedings. Heproceeded to fices and exertionsof themissionary body ; one hereafter it will be found is more ready to acknowledge them. Whatever 2 petticoats, 6 yards of coloured unmask the character of the oppositionto the bill cause of their superior prosperity. in these good is calico, @6d. '" To this bill there arose an opposition.from a been theachieved cause of;islands, they will have 2 ditto, flannel, 6 yards, @ Is. -080 and the best proof I primary fund, the coloInstead of invading this 0 6 O quarter whence we least expectedit. Itcommenced can give of good feeling towards them,is myreadi12 shifts, 80 yards, long cloth, @ 6d. 015 0 nists, if alive to their own interest, will by a series of pamphlets circulated in the dark by ness to separate them from the person who has con- , 6 caps, 3 yards of muslin, @ Is. " 0 3 0 hasten to devise means by which it may the secretary of the Christian Missionary Society, ia stituted himself their organ here, to attribute to them 6 aprons, 6 yards of calico,@ 6d. 0 3 0 heincreased. Were the SouthAustralian which our motives were impugned, and the exist- purer motives and a more disinterested zeal. But 6 handkerchiefs, @ 6d. 0 3 0 people to regardtheir owninterest, they ence questioned of all those feelings by which ho- the time has come whentheir exertions can nolonger 6 neckerchiefs, @ 9d. 0 4 6 should we It was an0 3 0 emigration nourable menwe were be influenced. old pretence singly avail ;and they had hoped that in the plan 6 towels, @ 6d.' would further augment the that we had produced would have found the best recurring to the 1pair of stays, @ ss. -0 50fund by an annual impost of 6d.per head nounced of civilization and advancement of religion, while co-operation with their labours, and the surest cor6 pairs of black worsted stockings, on sheep, and Is. per head upon cattle. there was upon the face of our plan sufficient indi- rective of the evils against which, unaided, they @ Is. 3d 0 7 6' supply labour in a cation of a design to repeat at the expense of the cannot struggle, in the example of a moral and , 2 pairs ofshoes, @ 4s. Whatever is done to -0 80natives that oppression, and those excessesof arbi- well-ordered community." 1 bonnet, (g)Ss. -030 sufficient quantity to the colony, to be trary power, which at all times, and in all other Needles,pins, tapes, -050 done successfully, mustbedone,upon sys- countries, had marked theprogress of the European The nextbranch of Mr Baring's speech was a de- 2lbs of soap, @ 6d.,&c. &c.' starch, 2lbs of tail of the negotiation tem. It must not be voluntary all must invader, and even degraded thename of civilization : interviews with Lords with the government, and @6d 0 2 0 Melbourne, Howick, and that the native tribes, which contribute in alike degree,or theattempt inherentsovereignty ofifthe wantedconfirmation, was Glenelg, during the last twelvemonth. From this in them, had it appeared, that at 'first Lords Melbourne and must be futile. The plan of deriving a been assured aand, it £4 0 0 formal recognition by the British fund of the kind through the first sale resident, wasbyto be called in question:that we Howick had given decided encouragement to the backwards price of land has this as its basis. Some were an association of jobbers, whose only object project ;then thwarted it ;and so on,finding the MAKE. £ s d. at lastLord Glenelg, may state, were the fund required not was tiading in land, which all their accounts re and forwards, tillto act upon every reasonable sug- 2 fustian jackets, @ 7s. 6d. 015 0 ready land, presented as impossible to be obtained ;and that association the government, hit upon a—condition 2 pairs of ditto trousers, (©' 6s. contributed in the nominal price of 012 0 weshould be the means of impeding the great work gestion of ditto, @ 2s. 6d. 05 0 it might be expended in an independent ofreligion, and civilization, which, under the super- winch heknew could not be complied with namely, 2 pairs of duck @ 2s. 2 round frocks, that they should become joint-stock company. Mr 05 0 manner by each proprietor. But if left intendence of the missionary body, was rapidly and Baring showed that theaprinciple on which it was 12 cotton shirts, @ 2s.6d. 3d. 1 7 0 to the sense of justice of the individual, unfailingly going on. We could not but suppose proposed to colonize New Zealand could not be put 6 pairs of worsted stockings,@ Is.6d. 0 9 0 that would this contribution to thelabour fund objectwhen our motives were explained, and the into successful operation by a.trading company, 2 Scotch caps, @ Is. 6d. 0 3 0 of bill fully made known, this opposition 03 0 be made? Would not each hope to de- founded, ourwe then supposedit to be, solely upon whose first object must be the purchase and sale of 6 handkerchiefs, @ 6d. as 6 coarse towels, @ 6d. land with a view to profit. It was curious that 0 3 0 rive labpur at the cost of,his neighbour? motives of sympathy for the natives, and alarm on 1pair of boots, 10s. Beecham, in their while 010 0 Has thaj; not occurred in a thousand cases the part of those who had constituted themselves phlets,Messrs Coates and as a joint-stock pam- 1pair of shoes, @ 6s. @ com0 6 0 vilified the association already in the colonies? If there were their natural guardians, would give way before a pany, the government opposed the bill because it 4 lbs of soap, @ 6d. 02 0 calm examinationof the provisions of the bill. We no system by which all were obliged to were conscious of having given did not constitute a joint-stock company. What every £5 0 0 contribute to the conveyance of labour, our power to the tribes— of having protectionin would the government doof itself? fenced and Female " Having made this statement of what passed 4 0 0 in.the degree in which they became pur- guarded their interest with aminuteness of jealous 1pair of blankets,@ 10s. 10 0 winch in some measme complicated ourbill, between her Majesty's government and the associachasers of land, some would be foolish careencumbered it with 2 pair of sheets, @ ss. 10 0 tion, I/amled to inquire what remedy or what palprovisionswhich 10 0 enough to convey servants,as many have and the only difficulty of execution. constituted liative will this government of expedients be inBut when done, to America and the old Australian almost every overture rejected, we did begin to duced to adopt? I hardly think that the native we found can Sura required to fit out a couple, £10 0 0 colonies, at their individual expense, suspect the existence of some motives beyond those congress, recommended by Mr Busby, with the trusting to the gratitude and sense of jus- which Mr Coates had thought expedientto avow. adoption of collateral measures, suchwhich can be Calicoes, Holland, camlet, — none of as. the estaSir, those of courts, &c. fine canvass, and' tice of those whose condition they,had Upon a suspicions havebeenmore than confirmed. blishmentswithout assuming the sovereignty they otherarticles of the clothing kind, will always be became admitted thereby so much improved. They would convincedclose and searching inquiry, we .expose affect to disclaim can be in their contemplation. found most valuable to those who cantake a little thatit was less from a desire to ihe, as others have been, disappointed. our.motives than to conceal their own ; not so much They must know that no number of Europeans are extra stock. Stephen's South Australia,p. 193. a desire to protect the New Zealander from excess likely to submit to a legislative assembly at WaiHhose whohad not incurred the expense of power CHARGE FOB. PERSONS PAYING THEIB on our part, as and that by PASSAGE. maintain of conveying the labourers to the colony which, from motives whichtoappear the influence mate;thefirst step inthe time the missionaries have their constitutionaleducation, rather lessTthan made £. s. d. "are tifee persons whocould afford to pay spiritual, they had been engaged in founding, that half the population will^have disappeared, and the First class cabin 75 0 0 ne the highest wages. They would make 1 J*fe?d raised an opposition which inits tone and white invader will have increased twenty-fold. If Second class cabin 50 0 0 <offers \wiich would be accepted, and the languageis little inaccordance, with thosedoctrines they mean.toplant factories,at the bottom of,every Steerage 18 15 0 of justice and charity which, they so loudly profess. bay where Europeans resort,,I would aak them, to aresuit-srould be that disgust which would Sir, some curious facts have come out in Allowance of baggage, free of expense,for, each the course estimate the probable consequence ofsmall commumat ariseaf by a system all were obliged of this inquiry. The difficulty of obtainingland has nities: without commerce, without combined labour, passenger— two tons if in the first or second class tte contribute to the labour fund, in been"solved by the missionaries'themselves." arts, institutions,and religion, beinggrouped round cabin, and half a ton inthe' steerage.

7

.

- - - - - - - - --- - -- -- - -- - - ------- ■

--- -

-- . -----

- ...
...

8

THE NEW ZEALAND GAZETTE.
Informationrelative, to New

Zealand, forthe use duced disease, and done its usual destructive work ences of the majority, form the present European into,* and who has thereby kept his testimony, in Parker. 1839. Bvo. ,inspite of the climate."—lnformation, p. 12. population ofNew Zealand. the highestdegree, disinterested : Mr Mathews, a recent writer, discusses the Of the character of this Europeanpopulation, Unquestionable as are the facilities for coloni2. New Zealand in 1839, in four Letters to the effects of the New Zealand climate on female now permanently settled in New Zealand," says Dr zation in Southern Australia, as well as in New Sight Honourable EarlDurham, %c, on the Colo- beauty: Lang, "it inform your Wales, they are nol to be " The rosy tinge of the cheek," he observes, " is Lordship. is scarcely necessary toexceptions, it South which New Zealand affords. compared with, nization of that Island, $c. By John Dunmore With a few honourable those In one word, D.D., Principal of the Australian Col- the direct consequences of moist air, of a fresh consists of the veriest refuse ofcivilized society, of whatever may be the destinies of the Australian Lang, lege, &c. London. Smith and Elder. 1839. stimulating coolness. The British fair may rely runawaysailors, of runaway convicts, of convicts colonies, I confident that, if colonized on right am Bvo. pp. 120. that England's rose will not fail to blossom inNew whohave served out their term of bondage in one principles, New Zealand will one day be" Great the Zealand in all its natural richness, giving the un- or other of the two penal colonies, of fraudulent Britain of the southern hemisphere. The above works differ somewhat in character and Lane. given them birth ; matched tinge ofthe flower beauty and freshness. debtors who have escaped from their creditors in p. 115. in the circumstances which have one respect, they exhibit a remarkable The. danger is that it may even throw that of the Sydney or Hobart Town, and of needy adventurers yet, in agreement; namely, in the evidence they afford of mother country into shade;although its sister, the from the two colonies, almost equally unprincipled. EMIGRATION. the suitableness of New Zealand as a field for colo- vegetable rose, has never been seen indigenous in Inconjunction with the whalers that occasionally nization. Of theprinciples on which thenewcolony the southern hemisphere, whilst it surrounds the visit the coast, the influence of these individuals on The following letter has beenreceived by " the new British globe in the northern with a flowery chaplet the natives is demoralizingin the extreme. Their is about to be established of Mr Stunt, of Southerham, from alabouring system of colonization," a brief exposition will be Inother respects, from its softmoist climate, New usual articles ofbarter are either muskets and gunmore, Zealand, like Sicily, may be expected to be espe- powder, or tobacco and rum. Most of them live man who worked on his farm, and left this foundin another part of this sheet; and as, over, the reader is elsewhere referred to works cially propitious to women. The prospects now in open concubinage or adultery with native country for Sydney in May last year,but ■whence he may obtain more ample knowledge before them must cause tbe bright blood to mantle women, and the scenes of outrageous licentiousness has since removedto New Zealand: and debauchery that are ever and anon occurring thereof, we shall confine ourselvesin this article to on the cheek of the British fair." New Zealand, Dec. 15, 1838. Inshort, both the soil and climate ofNew Zea- on their premises, are often sufficiently revolting the distinguishing feature to which we have above Sir, I hare taken tbe opportunity of sending land are,in thehighest degree, favourable to animal to excite the reprobation and disgust of thenatives the letter by the Coromandel loading with timber alluded. " here, but expect it will be March before shesails. The first of the aboveworks is as well arranged and vegetable existence,— the finest samples of themselves."— -Lang, pp. 7, 8. Oneof the principal evils which have arisen from Sir, we hope please God to find you, friendsand summary of the testimony of many the human race are therp to be found, the largest and faithful and finest timber witnesses respecting the soil, climate, and physical planted thrives." grows, and every vegetable yet the residence of this lawless population, is the relations, in good health as it leaves us perfectly Comparing thelatitude of New extensivecheating ofthe natives out of their land. well. Sir, we are in a beautiful climate, which resources of tbe New Zealand group. The second Zealand with that is the personal narrative of a high-minded perci- Europe, there is noof tbe southern countries of Largo tracts ofland are parted with by the natives agrees uncommonly well;more like England than doubt butthe vine, the olive, for acamp-kettle, or a few trinkets ;and even the Sydney, little warmer, black soil, clay beneath; pient witness, confirming, in all essential par- the ticulars, the accounts of others, and throwing out the mulberry, and other productions of Italy and missionaries,and especially the lay-missionaries, as much before Sydney to my thinking, which you southof France and Germany, will thrive well ; certain non-clerical hangers-on of the missions are may seein the natives. The natives here are strong.some usefulpractical suggestions, to which we shall but they must be introduced by persons well ac- called, have shown themselves not less expert than looking people,brown coloured, and the natives at presently more particularly advert. quainted with their culture. + the rest of the populationin this species of cheat- Sydney are black, thin, hagged people. We have '♥TheNew Zealand Group," says the in telli« Another circumstance which renders-New with, gent authorof the Information, &c,' consists of land a highly eligible field for colonization, Zea- ing. Dr Lang tells Lord Durham that "it is plenty of hogs wild, the natives catch them is the absolutely distressing to observe the effects which dogs ;youmay have a large hog for a blanket ora .two large islands called the Northernand Southern, superior intelligence of the Aborigines, and their this system of unprincipled rapacity is already little tobacco, but we have every thing of our a smaller island called Stewart's, to the extreme peculiar capacity for civilization. The truly unfortunate natives of masters the first year. Pork 4d. per pound, flour south, and several adjacent islets. The group ex- with which they adopt the mechanical facility producing upon theconjunction arts New Zealand, in with the other 4d., sugar 6d., tea 35., potatoes 2s. 100 lbs. Goose* tendsin length fromnorth to south from the 34th Europe,is something quiteremarkable, and of sources their of demoralization Like mere child- berries we gather wild likenettles; the gooseberries to the 48th degrees of south latitude, and in desire forknowledgeis sogreat,that thereis scarcely ren, they will give all they are worth to-day for growin shucks as filberts they are something like breadth from east to west from 'the 160th to the that New .179th degree of east longitude. The extreme a year passes workahis Zealander does not, of his the trinket or gew-gaw which they will sell for the agreen cherry ;we have peaches,oranges, melons, own passage to England for length exceeds 800 miles, and the averagebreadth, mere accord, of gaining knowledge. They are the veriest trifle to-morrow. Pomare, an intelligent lemons, onions, cabbage, all good. If please God purpose conwho speaks tolerably good English, we live another year, we shall go on in a different which is very variable, is about 100 miles. The stantlyemployed on board the whaling ships which native chief already alienated who has the greater part of way. We got land set out for us to sow wheat to surface of theisland is estimated to contain 95,000 frequent the southern seas, and they are described butvaluable land i:i his the neighbourhood of, the Bay keepus, and I shall be for breeding'my own hogs. square miles, or about 60,000,000 acres, being a by Lieutenant Breton as exhibiting of strength, ac- ' Islands, observed to one of our fellow voyagers, Our masters got hogs in 'abundance, and goats, territorynearly as large as Great Britain, of which, tivity, and intelligence. Englishmen give us blankets, powder, and iron ducks, geese, fowls, cows, a bull, two or three after allowing for mountainous districts and water, Dr Lang assures us that the best helmsman on pots 'for our land; built, they we soon itis believed that at least two-thirds are susceptible board a vessel by which be once returned to Eng- powder, the iron potsbut broken, blow away the horses. We have not yetgot our houses get and the blankets are almost cut out and begun to build, so will soon beneficialcultivation." Information, §c. p. I. land, was Toki, a New Zealander. of Nothing," wear out, but the land neverblows away or wears beup. Mary does notlike the cottage we are in, we New Zealandis thus emphatically on the other says Dr Lang, "could divert his attention from out.'" Dr Lang, p. 16. are so thick, three families. I think we shall have side the Ball." Itis the nearest land to England's the compass, or the sails, or the sea; and whenever Itthus becomes, as Dr Lang clearly points out, a verycomfortable house; my mate oneend, we the saw antipodes,and in our voyage thither it is almost a I him at the holm, and especially in tempestu- a bounden duty on the part of every benevolent other. There is no fear of having to buy fire wood, matter of indifference whether we turn to theright ous weather at night, I could not help regarding it Englishman to promote the colonization of New there'is plenty close «o our house. We cut board or the left, the east or the west, for it is withina as a most interesting and hopeful circumstance in for ourselves, we like ofany sort there is: on few miles of where-the longitudes, east and west, the history of man, that a British vessel of four Zealandthe a systematic plan, calculated to neu- we made each fell what pine, and I begun a chair, a table of colonization of the very coincide. If we could push it some sixteen de- hundred tons, containing a valuable cargo and tralise kind. effects of ~a tiie worst Colonized country will be, no but Igot many jobs ; the saw- pit we work in is grees nearer the Pole, a freezing process, by the many souls of Europeans, should be steered across earthly power will prevent the occupation of the 31feet long ; some timber is six feet deep, and it way,against which our fellow colonists wouldhave the boundless Pacific, in the midst of storm and land by Englishmen and their descendants. seem; a pity to burn such good timber as we burn The good reason to protest, our land of promise might darkness, by a poor New Zealander, whose fathers only question which remains is,.— shall the princi- down, counted as worth nothing. well be called Austral Britain ;but we have lived bad, from time immemorial, beeneaters of men.'' Flo. 3rd. We are about 20 miles up the river. ples upon which that colonization is to be contoo long in the world to care much about names; Information, B[c. p. 40. ducted, be those of That The next place to us is Wymath, 12miles, in the land is a good land, and of this the proofs are The bare mention of eaters of men, reminds us the principles upon good or those of evil? Land cultivation^ beautiful for com and flocks of sheep which the New Zealand abundant and irrefragable. that itis necessary to say a few words respecting Company is proceeding are fraught with good belonging to the church missionaries; there are Of the fertility of the soil of New Zealand, no cannibalism. John Bull, we know, is rather pre- only, will appear from this, that in addition to Wesleyans* The next place, the Bay of Islands, is doubt can be entertainedby any one who has at- disposed to be frightened, though we are not quite all that distinguishes the " British system" of a very drunkea blackguard place, 30 miles from. tended, in the smallest degree, to the features in- sure that thechance of affording a meal to another colonization, as explained elsewhere, the rights of us. There is no place in tlie worldscarce with variably exhibitedby mountainous countries. New would alarm him much more than the prospect of the natives are solemnly recognized, and theirpro- such timber for masts for ships and other things Zealand has a bach bone of towering mountains, losing a meal ofhis own. Be that as it may,how- tection and improvement are made an inseparable as here. Our master by theCaromandel will clear, some of which reach the height of 14,000 feet, ever, itmay be well to mention that the New Zea-, part of the company's operations. The earliest by all we can find out, 7,000/. or 8,000/. j the whole their summits being covered with perpetualsnow, land colonist runs no risk of incurring either mis- determination of the company was to acquire land value I told is 24,000/. or 25,000/., and they am and their slopes with forests of enormousgrowth. chance. The natural productiveness of New Zea- by fair purchase. That wise and equitable deter- haveitcut up for almost nothing ;but theybegin No v such features cannot exist apart from fertile land, as we have seen, is such as to furnish meals mination has been, and still continues to be, scru- to get more awake. They will saw no more for to millions ;and as to cannibalism, it is now re- pulously observed; and it is to be hoped that their 4s. a week ; andwell watered valleys, accordingly, they work in this way3or 4pair, The soil is spoken of by all the writers in the duced to a war feast (if not always so), and even, when government and the legislature do interfere so keep a European to sharp and line and look such,is falling intodisuse. A race of cannibals in the concerns of the colony,, some measure will after them. most favourable terms, from Captain Cook down- as lived where thriving Glasgow* now stands, be adopted to render null and void all fraudulent wards. After describing the fertility of many par- once Fob. 10th. The Captain diedlast week, and was ticular spots, Cook sums up his account by saying and in like manner numerous Europeans now live bargains with the natives for land. Dr Lang buried in the chape) yard. I intend sendingnot secure in New Zealand, without the protection suggests that the measure should be retrospective ; one word wrongif I that the bills and mountainsare covered with wood, which a know it: many wouldnot like regular government will afford. The that all previous bargains should be. revised by a the country, as there wouldbe notcompany enough ; thesoil in and every valley has a rivulet of water " But there is another viewof the subject to be properly constituted authority, and where there for them except natives, and no liquor of any kind these valleys, and in the plains, of which there are Reverend Mr White says:— has been undoubted fraud, that the bargains should to bo got at Hukianga but seldom. The only many that are not overgrown with wood, is in general light but fertile ;and, in the opinion ofMr taken, and that view exclusively concerns those who be cancelled. As a means of facilitating this thing that seems venomous is the lizard. Many of them aro about the trees, and you know they are Banks and Dr Solander, as well as of every other contemplate the transplantation of themselves and object, says Dr Lang, mean of New ''Let this company lend their influence and harmlessenough. Thewintersarecoldandrainy,but gentleman on board, every kind of Europeangrain, families to the shoresThis, I Zealand. I think, is satisfactorily support towards the maintenance of her Majesty's little frost and no snow. I plant, and fruit, would flourish here in the utmost their personalsafety. have a beautiful place that luxuriance. From the vegetables we foundhere, answered by the fact, New since the first residents undoubted right of pre-emption in all cases,both my end for a garden, the weather and sun coming took up their abodein Zealand in 1814, up to past and future. The establishment of this prin- in front all open. I began to make a hedge, the there is reason to conclude that the v/inters are the leltthe island to returnto this country, ciple will be of incalculable advantage to the Nuw first ever made, I suppose, in New Zealand,and am. milder than those in England, and we found the not period I one single instance which Ican recollect, or Zealanders ;andnot only to the New Zealanders, going to sow some turnips and plant beans. In summer not hotter, though it was more equally heard of, has occurred of any European,or but to all persons whatsoever in this country who this country almost any time will do. By the "warm; so that if this country should besettled by have any other foreign settler, are about to embark in any way iv tho New next time 1send I shall be able to tell you a little people from Europe, they would, with a little in- Information, $-c. p. 45. having lost his life.'' Zealand colonization sehemo." is here when I have dustry, be very soon supplied not only with the " For this purpose let the company make a vo- 1better about what chance therecame from England We could multiply quotations, but the length to neeei'saries, but the luxuries of lifein great abundseen more about it. A person which our remarks and extracts have already ex- luntary and entire surrender of their native titles with usby thename ofJosh- England, andis living Information, pp. 12, 13. ance." Immediately followingthe above extract, we find tended, warn us that we have yet to notice and to her Majesty's government, to be adjudicated with missionaries at Wymath, gets 12s. a week, * upon individually by a temporary board, like the provisionsfor self, wife, three children, goodhouse a «»reat mass of concurrent testimony as to the glean from Dr Lang's work. We have already said that Dr Lang bears testi- Court of Claims in New South Wales, to be free, water, wood brought by the natives tohis but, as we have richness of the New Zealand soil ; mony to the eligibility of New Zealand as a field appointed for the purpose by the government,on door,only as servant out doors to job about the before said, the geological character of the island for British colonization; but he goesbeyond this, the understanding and upon the condition that the stores. He is a shoemaker by trade. utterly forbids a doubt upon the point. t&M As to climate New Zealand,inreference to the and shows the evilinfluence of the systemless colo- company shall have the right of pre-emption from So no more at present from your humble servant, England ends : nization which ,has long been going on, and the the government at the minimum price of crown equator, may be said to begin where C. SHAW. Britain, as the thatis, the coldest extremity of New Zealand is paramount duty imposed on Great matter into her land to beestablished in the island, deducting the nation, to take the full amount tho company may havealready paid for two degrees nearer the equator than the warmest great colonizing * Since the above was in type we have met with the extremity of England the southernmost (coldest) own hands. settlersin New Zealandare the out- their lands, either to thenatiyesor to individual Eu- following passage, from a letter printedin The present tbe Colonial ropeans. The moralinfluance ofsuch an example Gazette, dated Matukaraka (on the Hokianga River) point of New Zealand being in 48 degrees south latitude, and the coast of Devon being in50 north. casts ofanoutcast population.Escapedconvictsfrom would be 'salutary in the highest degreeinNew New Zealand, lOtlj, March, 1839, which abuadantly We make use of the terms warmest and coldest, the penalsettlements,runaway sailors fromthe whal- Zealand, as far as the actual European population illustrates what we have aboveset down. , bath "Themissionaries are engrossing because our associations are somewhat partial ing ships, needy adventurers whose illconduct mix- are concerned, and would strengthen the hands of the goodland; whatever may be the greater' part of and their estimation at them men of no country, with a small the government exceedingly, at the outset of the home,I safely say that here they show such,agrasprespecting North and South, as well as respecting madeof can June and December ;June and South being cold ture worthyand enorgetic men, such as will find colony, in carrying out the simple but most impor- ing disposition to enrich themselves, andso little interest in time and place, December and North warm, in their way to allv eligible fields, but'who, inNew tant principle of her Majesty's right of pre-emp- in the welfare of either the white manor native,that minority to tion iv all cases as regards the Aborigines." they stand exceedinglylow with me. At one missionary the other hemisphere. The climate is, in fact, Zealand, form too inconsiderable a stationthere are not less than 600 acres of land under '« Downright honesty of this kind," continues most beautiful and salubrious, and health almost curb the evil passions and neutralize the evilinflucultivation of wheat ; the sons of these, missionaries .and Dr Lang, will decidedly be as James's universal is the result. " Inspeaking of the climate we should remark * A valiant tribe of Caledonia, the Attacotti (or Scots),, which the New Zealand Land the best ■policy, also, assume Imuch consequence as your Stand am arisCompany can pur- tocrats. hare no patience -with them, only " the field for surprised that their bountiful subscriptions, at home enemies andafterwards the soldiers of Valentiniau, sue ;" for in such a case that there are no diseases peculiar to the country ; the accused, by an eye-witness, of delighting in the taste should continue. In this river we have onlyWesleyau are infact, none of anyimportance but such as have ofhuman flesh. When they hunted the woods for prey, enterprise willbe found as extensive and inviting missionaries,who certainly are not ao w.orldly,nor will their means admit of tbe andpomp of their attacked the shepherd been introduced by Europeans. Cook says, *As it is saidthat theythey anxiously selectedrather than the as the most ardent supporters ofcolonization could contemporaries the Churchsplendourbut) amongst these, Mission ; flocks ;and that there is no, source of disease, either critical or cate and brawnyparts, bothof males and the most deli- desire ; while the career of the future colony will, there is great room for improvements, and,ithas been females,which chronic, but intemperance and inactivity, these they prepared for their horrid repasts. Ifinthe neigh- in all probability, be unexampled in the history of amatter of surprise tome that the Society at home have not made a point. f sending some liberal and wello people enjoy perfect and uninterruptedhealth we bourhoodof the commercial and literarytown of Glasgow the world." Tlie very reverse is the Dr Lang then concludes his fourth letter with informed men as ministers. as never saw any person amongst them who appeared a race of cannibals has really existed, we may contemgoes, is opposite exany bodily complaint.' Their wounds plate inthis period of Scottish history, tbe reflections the following testimony in favour of New Zea- case. Our Catholic bishop, far as example to have 'a further tremes of savage and civilized life. Such showing:them the way to make converts both amongst healed with an astonishing facility, and ideas, and to encourage land as a field of colonization superior to all Europeans and natives. He has not been here more tend to enlarge the circle of our months ; proof that humannature is here untaintedwith dis- the pleasing hope that New Zealand may produce, in others, a testimony the more gratifying to the than eighteen the white and Iam,sure that upwards of population attend him, and ease, is tha great number of old men that we saw, some future age, the Hume of thesouthern hemisphere. first colonists, coming, as it does, from a man of two.thirds of verymanynatives." —Gibbon, Bto.edit.vol.iv, p?feO7, 1613. many of whom, by the loss of their hair and teeth, ipse adolescentulus in Gallia viderimAttacottos marked intelligence, of unquestionable sincerity Cum appearedto be very ancient, yet none of them were (autScotos), gentemßrittanicamhumanisvescicaraibus; and benevolence of purpose, and who moreover decrepit, and though not equal to the young in et cum per silvas porcorum greges, etetarmentorum has, throughout his useful career, studiously London:Printed by Charles Heyneli, at bit Office* pecudnmque reperiant, pastorum nates the Parish femenarum muscular strength, werenot a whit behind them in papillas golere abscindere, et lias solas ciborum delicias avoided the evil influence of speculation and land 16 Little Pulteneystreet, in by Sam'oelof St James* Westminster, and Published Abvans, at cheerfulness and vivacity.' Unhappily, half a cen- arbitrari. Suchis the evidenceof Jerome (torn.2, p. 75), jobbing, which so many of the clergy of alldenomi- No. 1 Adam street, Adelpbi, inthe County of Atitfdle-find no reason to doubt, nations (except the Catholic) appear to have fallen sex,— Friday,September Bth,1839. tury of irregular European intercourse has intro- whose veracity I 1.

of Colonists. London. pp. BQ.

"

"

*

...

'

"

-

...

"

"

"

.

"

...