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Math: Week 9 Overview

Day 41: Tell time using an analog clock, identify am and pm,
estimate and compare time, and explore the calendar.
Day 42: Tell time using an analog clock, identify am and pm,
estimate and compare time, and explore the calendar.
Day 43: Relate the concepts of impossible and certain events to
the numerical values of 0 (impossible) and 1 (certain).
Day 44: : Investigate experimental probability
Day 45: List and count all possible combinations using one
member from several sets.
Week 9, Day 41
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Tell time using an analog clock, identify am and pm, estimate


and compare time, and explore the calendar.

1. Mental Math: Mental Math: Use your divisibility rules to tell if


these numbers are divisible by 10. Write yes if it is divisible by 10
and no if it is not divisible by 10.
 9,345 = __ No

 299 = No

 100 = Yes

 5,630 = Yes

 764 = No

 65 = No

2. Read the Math Text: Main Focus: Telling Time: The student
will learn how to tell time today. This skill transfers to every day of the
student’s life. It is important that they understand time concepts, not just to
know what the digits on a clock represent. There are two different kinds of
clocks the student may have. One is a digital clock and the other is an
analog clock. A digital clock shows the numbers clearly in minutes and in
hours. 1:25 represents twenty five minutes after one. This type of clock is
the most basic for the student. The analog clock is usually more complicated
because problem solving is left up to the reader. An analog clock shows the
numbers going around in a clockwise circle from 1 to 12. The short arrow
hand shows the hour and the long arrow hand shows the minute. The
student should have practice with both of these in order to show competency
in telling time.

(insert picture of digital clock showing 1:25) (insert picture of


analog clock showing 1:25)

While reading the text with the student, you will observe a few key concepts:

Seconds are the smallest unit of measurement for time.

Minutes are the next largest unit of measurement for time.

Hours are the next largest unit of measurement for time.

Before the student completes the practice exercises, have him visit
the following websites for some interactive activities. These activities will
prepare him for the exercises in the text:

Compare digital clocks to analog clocks:

http://www.apples4theteacher.com/clocks.html

Click and drag the hands on an analog clock for the correct time:

http://www.apples4theteacher.com/java/telling-time/index.html

The student observes calendars to find the day of the week he was born

http://www.apples4theteacher.com/calendar.html

3. Practice Exercises: The student will now complete some practice


exercises to show his learning of time. Here are the answer keys for those
exercises.

Practice 1 
Read these clocks and write on the line what the clock says. The A.M. or P.M. label
has been given for you.
1. _____10:05_______________ A.M. (Insert an analog clock showing 10:05.)

2. _______6:25_____________ P.M. (Insert an analog clock showing 6:25)

3. _______5:45_____________ A.M. (Insert an analog clock showing 5:45.)

4. _______1:08______________P.M. (Insert an analog clock showing 1:08.)

5. _______8:13________________ A.M. (Insert an analog clock showing 8:13)

Practice 2 
Write if the answer is A.M. or P.M. and justify your answer with why you think this is
the case. Refer to the examples provided above to help you.

1. The store opened at 10. Is this A.M. or P.M.? How do you know?

This is most likely A.M. because a store normally opens in the morning.

2. Mrs. Smith dropped her daughter off at daycare at 7:45. Is this A.M. or P.M.?
How do you know?

This is most likely A.M. because she would drop her daughter off before she went to
work in the morning.
3. Our family had lunch at 12:25. Is this A.M. or P.M.? How do you know?

This is most likely P.M. because lunch is normally right around Noon which divides
morning from afternoon.

4. Jesse delivered his papers at 5:30. Is this A.M. or P.M.? How do you know?

Jesse probably delivered that day’s paper which was printed to go out in the early
evening. So this is probably P.M.

5. I brushed my teeth right before bed at 10:20. Is this A.M. or P.M.? How do
you know?

The phrase “before bed” implies that this takes place at night. That would mean
this is P.M.

See the chart below for these and more important time
values in an easy to read format.
60 seconds = 1 minute
60 minutes = 1 hour
24 hours = 1 day
7 days = 1 week
52 weeks = 1 year
12 months = 1 year
365 days (normal year) = 1 year
366 days (leap year) = 1 year
10 years = 1 decade
100 years = 1 century
1,000 years = 1 millennium

Practice 3 

Strategies for the Student: Converting Time:


1. Write it out: The student may not be able to mentally keep track of
minutes in his mind. For time problems, have him write out longer number
sentences to help him keep track of the minutes and hours.

Example: 190 minutes = 60 min + 60 min + 60 min + 10.

2. Find the Hours: Have the student first find all of the 60 minute chunks, as
was done in the above example. He can keep track of the time and what has
been used easier this way.

3. Draw Circle Clocks: Have the student draw circles to represent the minutes
if he is strong with reading an analog clock. Even if he isn’t strong with
reading an analog clock, this type of activity will be good practice for him.
Each filled in circle will represent 1 hour, or 60 minutes.
Convert the following values of time. You can refer to the chart. Explain or show
how you solved it.

1. 130 minutes = 2 hours 10 minutes

2. 71 hours = 2 days 23 hours

3. January = 31 days

4. 78 months = 6 1/2 years

5. 762 minutes = 12 hours 42 minutes

4. Wrap Up Thought: In the next lesson, the student will continue


concepts dealing with time and the calendar. Remember, he can always
look back to previous lessons for help.

(symbol for reteaching / extensions) RETEACHING / EXTENSIONS:

Here is a list of websites for the student to visit if he is desiring more


information or needs more information about telling time:

This site shows the current time in various places all over the world.

http://www.apples4theteacher.com/world-clock.html
The student looks at various analog clocks and needs to put them in order.

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-
fusion/games/game_what_time_is_it.html?g=wtp_ds2

On this link, the student will work on elapsed time activities:

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-
fusion/games/game_what_time_is_it.html?g=wtp_ds2

Elapsed time in quiz format:

http://marg.mhost.com/MathGr5/elapsedtime.htm

5. Open-Ended Practice / Review Problems


Open-Ended Practice 

Use the following bar graph and line plot to solve the problems below.

Insert a
bar graph
similar if
this
doesn’t
work
since I
made it
in

x x x x x x

10 20 30

Lawns Mowed by Nick and John

1. Who mowed the most lawns during the three months? How do you know?
Nick mowed more because he mowed a total of 72 lawns whereas John only mowed 60 law

2. Which graph would help you find the median more easily?

It is easier to find the median in the line plot because the numbers are already in order to
out.____________________________________________________________________

3. What is the mode of lawns mowed? How did you find this answer?

There is no mode because no number appears more than one time._______________________

______________________________________________________________________________

4. From the graphs above, if Nick keeps mowing as he has been, how many lawns can
he will mow in September? How do you know this?
He is going to probably mow 48 lawns because each month he increased his mowing by 1
lawns.____________________________________________________________________

Review of Days 36-40 

Look back and review the last five days before answering these questions.
Use the space provided to solve the problems. Don’t forget to label your
answers.

1. How do you find the median in a set of data?

Put the numbers in order from smallest to largest, then cross out the
smallest, largest, smallest, largest, etc. until you get the number that has
exactly the same amount of values above as it does below.

2. Use the following data sets to answer these questions:

10, 29, 31, 29, 11, 9, 4, 45, 2, 13, 22, 34, 48, 25, 47, 13,
38 21, 32, 30
Data Set 1 Data Set 2

a. Which data set has the larger maximum?

Data Set 2

b. What is the range of the second data set?


45 is the range in numbers

c. Which data set has the smaller mode?

Data Set 2

d. Which graph shows a median of 25?

Data Set 2
Week 9, Day 42
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Tell time using an analog clock, identify am and pm,


estimate and compare time, and explore the calendar.

1. Mental Math: Write the value of the 4 in each number.


 8,450= 4 hundred

 42 = 4 tens

 4,810 = 4 thousand

 5.24 = 4 hundredths

 47,253 = 40 thousand

 6.504 = 4 thousandths

2. Read the Math Text: Main Focus: Telling Time The


student will continue to learn about telling time today. He will have
practice with drawing the hands on an analog clock to show the correct
time. Here are the key concepts about this part of the lesson:

When reading a clock, you can see there are typically three hands that
move around the circle face of the clock.

• The longest = the second hand

• The next to longest = the minute hand

• The shortest = the hour hand

On most analog watches, the second hand is not shown. It is mostly


important that the student understands the hour and minute hands on
a clock. We generally don’t talk about time in hours-minutes-seconds,
but rather just hours-minutes. Here is an example what time may look
like if we started to tell time by the hour-minute-second:
2:13:56 (two hours, thirteen minutes, fifty six seconds)

Ask the student if he can think of any time or place that may need to
extend the time to the seconds. Some possibilities include:

Science experiments, space exploration, news stations, any kind of


racing (horse, cars, marathons)

Click on the following website to observe how well the student will do
with drawing the hands on an analog clock correctly:

http://www.teachingtime.co.uk/clock2/clockwordsres.html
The student will also take some time to explore the calendar today.
Here are some key concepts from the text about the calendar:

*The calendar is made up of 12 months.

*There are many different formats for writing the date. You will use
primarily two in this lesson.

 The format for writing a date formally is Day of week, Month Day
of Month, Year.

 The number or shorthand version is written Month/Day of


Month/Year.

*Example 1:

o The 5th of January 2008 can be written as

 Number and word notation = January 5, 2008

 Number only notation = 01/05/2008

*Example 2:

o The 17th of May 2004 can be written as


 Number and word notation = May 17, 2004

 Number only notation = 05/17/2004

3. Practice Exercises:
Practice 1 

Read the description and draw the hands on the clocks provided.

1. Draw the hands on the clock so the time shows 5:35.


Insert image of numbered
clock face with a dot in the
middle so the students can
draw the other hands for
the time.

2. Draw the hands on the clock so the time shows 2:10.


Insert image of numbered
clock face with a dot in the
middle so the students can
draw the other hands for
the time.

3. Draw the hands on the clock so the time shows 11:48.


Insert image of numbered
clock face with a dot in the
middle so the students can
4. Draw the hands on the clock so the time shows 6:22.
draw the other hands for
the time.
Insert image of numbered
clock face with a dot in the
middle so the students can
draw the other hands for
the time.
5. Draw the hands on the clock so the time shows 8:57.
Insert image of numbered
clock face with a dot in the
middle so the students can
draw the other hands for
the time.

Practice 2 
Answer the following questions relating to writing the dates in either format
shown above. See the examples provided for help.

1. Write the date of the 10th of February 1998 in number only notation.

Answer 02/10/1998

2. Write the date of the 28th of December 2003 in number only notation.

Answer 12/28/2003

3. Write the date of the 16th of September 2005 in number only notation.

Answer 09/16/2005

4. What is this date in the number and word notation? 04/04/2004

Answer April 4, 2004

5. What is this date in the number and word notation? 08/14/2007

Answer August 14, 2007

Practice 3 

Now it’s your turn to find out how much time has elapsed. Don’t forget
a label of hours or minutes.

1.

____3___:__35____P.M. ___6____:___40____P.M.
Insert an
analog
How much time as elapsed? 3 clock
hours and
5 minutes showing
2:10.
2.

____9___:___15___A.M. ___11___:___25____A.M.

How much time as elapsed? 2 hours and 10 minutes

3.

___10___:__55___A.M. ___2___:___10____P.M.

How much time as elapsed? 4 hours and 15 minutes

Practice 4 

Solve the following word problems. Remember, show your work in the space
provided and don’t forget to give a label with your answer.

1. Sarah’s birthday is on May 30th. If today is May 14th, how many more
days does she have until she has her birthday?

Answer 16 days

2. Johnny needs to read 140 minutes a week for school. If he wants to


read the same amount every day, even on the weekend, how many
minutes does he need to read each day?

Answer 20 minutes each day


3. If Janet started making dinner at 5:15 P.M. and finished at 6:30 P.M.,
how long did it take her to make dinner?

Answer 1 hour and 15 minutes

4. The skate party started at 6 P.M. and ended at 8:30 P.M. How long was
the skate party?

Answer 2 hours and 30 minutes or 2 ½


hours

5. The Montgomery family traveled quite a distance for their family


vacation. If they drove from 9:15 A.M. until 4:25 P.M. with only two 30
minute breaks, how long did they actually drive?

Answer 6 hours and 10 minutes

4. Wrap Up Thought: Time is always an important thing to


understand because it is used daily. It is important to be able to read
the time, find out how much time has passed or how much time you
have to do something. Even something as simple as writing the date is
necessary in our lives to keep track of when events occurred.

(symbol for reteaching / extensions) RETEACHING /


EXTENSIONS

Here is an interactive site where the student can practice elapsed time:

http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/elab2002/grade_3/018.html

Click here for more practice on an analog clock:

http://www.teachingtime.co.uk/clock2/clockwordsres.html

Click here for a game: What Time is It?

http://www.primarygames.com/time/question1.htm
Week 9, Day 43
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Relate the concepts of impossible and certain events to


the numerical values of 0 (impossible) and 1 (certain).

1. Mental Math: Write the square number for the given


digit or digits.
 9= 81

 2= 4

 10 = 100

 5 = 25

 6= 36

 4= 16

2. Read the Text: Main Focus: Impossible and Certain


Events
The student will be learning about concepts of probability today.
Traditionally, this will be a difficult concept for the student to grasp. It
is very abstract in nature. Here are the key concepts of the lesson. Be
sure to read the student text with the student carefully.

Probability is a measure of how likely that some event will


occur
 Probability is based on a scale from 0 to 1 determining the
likelihood of something happening.

o The closer the probability is to 0, the least likely it is to


happen.

o The closer the probability is to 1, the most likely it is to


happen.

 Probabilities are given in fractions, decimals, or percents of a


whole since both are less than 1 whole.

Probability is often used with the weather. Many times the weather
forecast talks about the chance of rain.

 If the meteorologist says that there is 50/50 chance of rain, this


means there is the same chance that it may rain than there is
that it may not rain.

o This is not with perfect certainty that it may or may not


rain.

 If the meteorologist says that there is a 90% chance of rain, this


means that there is with almost true certainty a chance of rain.

o Since percents add up to 100%, there is only a 10% chance


that it will not rain.

o The higher the percentage, the greater the chance the


event may happen.

Let’s see a probability chart that can help you understand the
likelihood of an event. Some probabilities are listed below to help you
understand this concept.

Certain 100%
Extremely Likely 95%
Very Likely 75%
Likely 65%
50/50 Chance 50%
Unlikely 35%
Very Unlikely 25%
Extremely 5%
Unlikely
Impossible 0%

Spinners and Probability: The student will most likely understand


probability best through practice with spinners. Probability has
everything to do with fractions and the total amount. The student will
have some practice with visual representations today.

For background knowledge and some basic practice of this skill with
the student before he completes the practice exercises in the text,
click on the link below:

http://www.mathgoodies.com/lessons/vol6/intro_probability.html

3. Practice Exercises: Here are the answers to the practice


exercises:

Practice 1 

Use the chart above to help you write a word for the chance that this
event will take place.

1. The sun will come up tomorrow. Certain

How do you know this? The sun rises each day so there is a 100%
chance that it will come up tomorrow

2. A child that is born will be a boy. 50/50 Chance

How do you know this? Since a child can be born either a boy or a girl,
there is a 50% chance of a girl and a 50% chance of a boy.
3. There is a 94% chance of sunshine tomorrow. Extremely likely

How do you know this? Since the percent is very close to 100%, it is
extremely likely that there will be sunshine tomorrow and only a 6%
chance that there will not be sunshine tomorrow.

4. A house in the country will catch fire in the next year. Very
likely

How do you know this? Since this is talking about any house in the
whole country catching fire, this is a very likely chance of this occurring
since there are millions of houses in the country.

5. An adult can swim. Likely

How do you know this? Most adults know how to swim so this is more
than a 50/50 chance.

Practice 2 

Answer these questions explaining the possibility of an event occurring


using the spinners provided.

1. In the spinner to the right, what is the


probability of landing on green?

Answer 1/3 chance or a 1 out of 3 chance

How do you know? One piece is shaded green


out of 3 pieces.

2. In the spinner to the right, what is the


probability of landing on red?

Answer 2/3 chance or a 2 out of 3 chance

How do you know? The spinner piece for red


is twice the size of the blue piece. Since the blue
piece is 1/3 of the whole, the red piece is 2/3 of the whole.
3. In the spinner to the right, is there an equal
chance of landing on purple as there is on
blue?

Answer No, there is not an equal chance.

How do you know? The purple piece is much


smaller than the other color of pieces. So, there is
not an equal chance.

4. In the spinner to the right, is there an equal


chance of landing on all the colors?

Answer Yes, there is an equal chance for each


color.

How do you know? All the pieces are the same size
so there is an equal chance, 1/6 chance of landing
on any color.

Practice 3 

Convert the following into percents, decimals, or fractions depending


on what the problem asks. See the examples provided above and the
hints below for help.

Here are a few helpful hints:

 For percents to fractions: percents are always out of 100, so


write the percent as a fraction over 100.

 For percents to decimal equivalents: write the percent as a


fraction and then write the fraction how you say it in decimal
form.

 To find a decimal from a fraction: write the number as it is said.


This will give you the decimal equivalent.

 To find a fraction from a decimal: write the decimal as a fraction.


Then, since percents are always out of 100, write the top number
of the fraction and give it the label %.

1. What is 60% as a decimal? 0.60

2. What is 85/100 as a percent? 85%

3. What is 33% as a fraction? 33/100

4. What is 0.24 as a percent? 24%

5. What is 30/100 as a decimal? 0.30

6. What is 0.70 as a fraction? 70/100

4. Wrap-Up Thought:
The student will be working more with probability in the next few
lessons. Just always remember even the word probability sounds
similar to the word possibility. That will help the student remember
what it means when the probability of an event is asked.

(symbol for reteaching / extensions) RETEACHING /


EXTENSIONS

The student may need more practice with fractions. Click on the site
below:
http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/FractionSorter/?version=
1.6.0-oem&browser=MSIE&vendor=Sun_Microsystems_Inc.

This spinner activity will show the results as the student spins the
spinner.

http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/AdjustableSpinner/

Week 9, Day 44
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

Investigate experimental probability.

1. Mental Math: Find the square root of these numbers.


Remember; think “what times itself equals this number
 64 = 8

 144 = 12

 25 = 5

 1= 1

 49 = 7

 121 = 11

2. Read the Text: Main Focus: Experimental Probability


Here are the key concepts to focus on with experimental probability:

Experimental probability is the chance of something happening,


based on repeating testing or observing results.

It is also the ratio of the number of times an event occurred to the


number of times tested.
 Number of times the event occurs /total number of trials.

 A ratio is a comparison between two numbers.

Let’s look at a few examples:

 Example 1:

o Juan rolled a cube 50 times. The number 3 appeared 10


times. What is the experimental probability of rolling a 3?

 The experimental probability is 10 out of 50 since a 3


appeared 10 times out of 50. This can be written as
a fraction as 10/50 or as 10 out of 50.

 Example 2:

o A coin is tossed 60 times. 21 times, heads appeared. Find


the experimental probability of getting heads.

 Total number of heads = 21. This is the number on


the top part of the fraction.

 Total trials = 60. This is the number on the bottom


part of the fraction.

 The answer is 21/60 or it can be written as 21 out of


60.

 Example 3:

o Karen spun a spinner 100 times and 20 times it landed on


yellow. What is the probability for landing on yellow?

 Since 20 times the spinner landed on yellow, this is


out of 100 spins.

 Therefore, this can be written as 20/100 or 20 out of


100.

Before the student works on the practice exercises, visit the


following website to play an interactive game with experimental
probability:

http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/AdvancedMontyHall/
3. Practice Exercises:
Here are the answer keys to the practice exercises:

Practice 1 

Solve the following problems regarding probability. See the two


examples provided above for assistance.

You can give the answers in either format: out of


or the fraction.

1. I rolled a die 20 times. The number 3 was rolled 6 times. What


was the probability for rolling a 3?

Answer 6/20, 3/10 or 30%

2. Mary spun a spinner and the spinner landed on the color blue
30% of the time. If she rolled it 100 total times, how many spins
landed on blue?

Answer 30 spins

3. There are 50 items in a bag. 20 items are pieces of candy, 15


items are paperclips, and the rest are pencils. Mike pulled out a
pencil. What was the probability of Mike pulling out a pencil?

Answer 3/5 or 15/50 or 30/100


or 30%

4. In Rachel’s MP3 player, she has 40 songs. 10 songs are jazz, 10


songs are rap, and 20 songs are pop rock. Rachel presses shuffle
and it selects a rap song. What was the probability of her
playing a rap song on her MP3 player?

Answer 10/40 or ¼ or 25%

5. In a jar of coins, there are 43 pennies, 21 nickels, 12 quarters,


and 9 dimes. If I pull out a quarter, what was the probability of
me pulling out a quarter?

Answer 9/85
Practice 2 

Now, let’s try to use a chart with some information to solve some
probability questions.

In the city of Giro, there are many restaurants. The chart below shows
the number of restaurants in the Giro area.

Restaurant Type Number of


Restaurants of this
Type
Mexican 4

Fast Food 15

Italian 5

Chinese 7

Family Style 3

1. The Lunn family went out to dinner and didn’t really care what
they ate. They ended up eating at a Chinese restaurant. What
was the probability of them eating at a Chinese restaurant?

Answer 7/34

How did you get this answer? Since there are 7 Chinese
restaurants and the Lunn family chose one, this means they could have
chosen any of the 7 out of 34 possible restaurants.

2. The Smith family prefers Mexican food, so they went to eat at El


Paquito. What was the possibility of them eating at a Mexican
restaurant in Giro?

Answer 4/34 or 2/17

How did you get this answer? Since there are 4 Mexican
restaurants in Giro and the Smith family went to one of them, this
means they could have chosen any of the 4 restaurants that serve
Mexican out of the 34. You could also reduce this fraction to 2/17.

3. My family likes to eat fast food at least once a week because we


are very busy. We at fast food yesterday. What was the
probability of us eating at a fast food restaurant?

Answer 15/34
How did you get this answer? Since there are 15 fast food
restaurants in Giro and they chose one of them, this means they could
have chosen any of the 15 out of 34 that serve fast food.

4. The Jones family ate at a family style restaurant. Their


neighbors, the Riggenbachs, ate at an Italian restaurant. Is the
probability of eating at a family style restaurant the same as the
probability for eating at an Italian restaurant?

Answer No

How did you get this answer? The probability is not the same because
there are only 3 family style restaurants while there are 5 Italian
restaurants to pick from in Giro.

5. Which type of restaurant has the highest probability in the city of


Giro?

Answer Fast Food Restaurants

How do you know? There are 14 fast food restaurants which is the
category with the most restaurants in the Giro area so it has the
highest probability.

4. Wrap Up Thought:
Today’s lesson dealt with experimental probability. However,
probability does not just deal with experiments, but it is also
theoretical. This means that sometimes the student will be given a
situation and he have to find all the possible outcomes for a situation
that hasn’t actually occurred. This is what the student will look into
more in the next lesson.

(symbol for reteaching / extensions) RETEACHING /


EXTENSIONS

Here is an interactive game for the advanced learner dealing with


experimental probability:

http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/CrazyChoicesGame/

Here is a dice game relating to today’s topic:


http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/DiceTable/

Another game:

http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/ExpProbability/

Here is a racing game practicing experimental probablility:

http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/ExpProbability/

Week 9, Day 45
TODAY THE STUDENT WILL:

List and count all possible combinations using one


member from several sets.

1. Mental Math: List the factors of each number.


Remember, the best way to do this is with a factor rainbow.

 21 = 1, 3, 7, 21

 12 = 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12

 35 = 1, 5, 7, 35

 9= 1, 3, 9

 13 = 1, 13

 30 = 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 15, 30

2. Read the Math Text: Main Focus: Combinations in


Probability:
Today is the day where the student will take what he has learned about
probability and move it to the next level of thinking. Once the student
understands which choices are probable, he will be able to make a
chart listing all of the possible matches. Read through the student text
with the student. Here is the key concept:
One example:

Barb has 2 pennies. She is could flip each coin once. What
are the possible combinations of coins she could have?

1. Heads Heads
2. Heads Tails
3. Tails Heads
4. Tails Tails

 She has four possible outcome combinations.

 You can fill out a chart like the one above to list all the possible
combinations.

o You can see each line is a separate flip of the coins.

o Each line has a different combination but none of the


combinations are repeated.

A chart is just one way to list all the possible combinations possible.
You will learn about another way to show combinations later in the
lesson.

3. Practice Exercises: Answer Keys:

Practice 1 

Fill in the charts with the information given to show all the possible
combinations.

1. My mom is making dinner. She wants to have a type of meat, a side


dish, and a dessert.

Her options for meat are chicken patties, hamburgers, or hot dogs.

Her options for a side dish are mashed potatoes or corn.

Her options for desserts are cookies or ice cream.

What are all the possible combinations she could make with the food she
has?
You can abbreviate the words or write the whole word out. If you abbreviate
the words, make a key to show what letters you used for the words.

Key (if needed)

Meat Side Dish Dessert

1. Chicken patties Mashed potatoes Cookies

2. Chicken patties Mashed potatoes Ice cream

3. Chicken patties Corn Cookies

4. Chicken patties Corn Ice cream

5. Hamburgers Mashed potatoes Cookies

6. Hamburgers Mashed potatoes Ice cream

7. Hamburgers Corn Cookies

8. Hamburgers Corn Ice cream

9. Hot dogs Mashed potatoes Cookies

10. Hot dogs Mashed potatoes Ice cream

11. Hot dogs Corn Cookies

12. Hot dogs Corn Ice cream

How many possible combinations are there? 12 combinations

2. On the family vacation, Robin can take two things to do in the car. She
isn’t sure what she wants to take. Here are her options: cards, video
game, MP3 player, or a book.

Let’s make a list of all the possible combinations for what she can take on her
trip so she can make a better decision.

Key (if needed)


Item 1 Item 2

1. Cards Video game

2. Cards MP3 player

3. Cards Book

4. Video game MP3 player

5. Video game Book

6. Book MP3 Player

Practice 2 

Make a tree diagram for the following problems. Remember, make a


key if abbreviating.

1. On Friday, Carrie is having a birthday party. She wants her party


to have a theme. She would like a cake. She also wants it
C
somewhere special. R
Let’s see what L
her options are.

Theme options: carnival, retro, or luau.


Ch W
Cake options: S Ch white,
chocolate, W S swirl.
or Ch W S

Location options: skating rink, park, or bowling alley.

Make a tree diagram to show the possible options with each only
having one theme, one cake, and one location. Remember to provide
a Sk
key.P B Sk P B Sk P B Sk P B Sk P B Sk P B Sk P
B Sk P B Sk P B
Key C = carnival R = retro L = luau Ch = chocolate
W = white S = swirl Sk = skating rink P=
park B = bowling alley
How many possible combinations are there? 27 combinations

2. Haley is going putt-putt golfing with her friends. She has a lot of
decisions to make. She has her choice of ball color, a putter of
several different sizes, and play one of the two courses they
have available. Let’s make a tree diagram to show the possible
combinations.

Colors of golf balls: red, pink, blue, or green

Putter sizes: small or medium

Courses Available: circus course or castle course

Key R = red ball P = pink ball B = blue ball G = green ball

S = small putter M = medium putter Ci = circus course Ca =


castle course
R P B G

S M S M S M S M

Ci Ca Ci Ca Ci Ca Ci Ca Ci Ca Ci Ca
Ci Ca Ci Ca

How many possible combinations are there? 16 combinations

4. Wrap Up Thought:
Today the student practiced working with probability using charts and
tree diagrams to help find all the possible combinations using several
sets of information. Just remember to make sure when the student
counts the possibilities when making the tree diagrams, he does not
count ones that repeat in reverse, like Heads1 Heads2 and Heads2
Heads1. This is the same combination just in a different order.