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Exchange Network Port Reference: Exchange 2010 Help

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Exchange Network Port Reference


Applies to: Exchange Server 2010 SP2 Topic Last Modified: 2011-04-28 This topic provides information about ports, authentication, and encryption for all data paths used by Microsoft Exchange Server 2010. The Notes sections following each table clarify or define non-standard authentication or encryption methods.

Transport Servers
Exchange 2010 includes two server roles that perform message transport functionality: Hub Transport server and Edge Transport server. The following table provides information about ports, authentication, and encryption for data paths between these transport servers and other Exchange 2010 servers and services.

Transport server data paths


Default Supported Encryption authentication authentication supported? Yes, using Transport Layer Security (TLS) Encrypted by default?

Data path

Required ports

Hub Transport server to Hub Transport server

25/TCP (SMTP)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes

Hub Transport server to Edge Transport server Edge Transport server to Hub Transport server Edge Transport server to Edge Transport server

25/TCP (SMTP)

Direct trust

Direct trust

Yes, using TLS

Yes

25/TCP (SMTP)

Direct trust

Direct trust

Yes, using TLS

Yes

25/TCP SMTP

Anonymous, Certificate

Anonymous, Certificate

Yes, using TLS

Yes

Mailbox server to Hub Transport server via the 135/TCP (RPC) Microsoft Exchange Mail Submission Service

NTLM. If the Hub Transport and the Mailbox Yes, using server roles are NTLM/Kerberos RPC on the same encryption server, Kerberos is used.

Yes

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Hub Transport to Mailbox server via 135/TCP (RPC) MAPI

NTLM. If the Hub Transport and the Mailbox Yes, using server roles are NTLM/Kerberos RPC on the same encryption server, Kerberos is used.

Yes

Unified Messaging server to Hub 25/TCP (SMTP) Transport server Microsoft Exchange EdgeSync service from Hub 50636/TCP (SSL) Transport server to Edge Transport server

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using TLS

Yes

Basic

Basic

Yes, using LDAP over SSL (LDAPS)

Yes

Active Directory access from Hub Transport server

389/TCP/UDP (LDAP), 3268/TCP (LDAP GC), 88/TCP/UDP (Kerberos), Kerberos 53/TCP/UDP (DNS), 135/TCP (RPC netlogon)

Kerberos

Yes, using Kerberos encryption

Yes

Active Directory Rights Management 443/TCP (HTTPS) Services (AD RMS) access from Hub Transport server SMTP clients to Hub Transport 587 (SMTP) server (for example, end25/TCP (SMTP) users using Windows Live Mail)

NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos

Yes, using SSL

Yes*

NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos

Yes, using TLS

Yes

Notes on Transport Servers


All traffic between Hub Transport servers is encrypted by using TLS with self-signed certificates that are installed by Exchange 2010 Setup. Note: In Exchange 2010, TLS can be disabled on Hub Transport servers for internal SMTP communication with other Hub Transport servers in the same Exchange organization. We don't recommend doing this unless absolutely required. For more information, see 1 Disabling TLS Between Active Directory Sites to Support WAN Optimization .

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All traffic between Edge Transport servers and Hub Transport servers is authenticated and encrypted. Mutual TLS is the underlying mechanism for authentication and encryption. Instead of using X.509 validation, Exchange 2010 uses direct trust to authenticate the certificates. Direct trust means that the presence of the certificate in Active Directory or Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS) acts as validation for the certificate. Active Directory is considered a trusted storage mechanism. When direct trust is used, it doesn't matter if the certificate is self-signed or signed by a certification authority (CA). When you subscribe an Edge Transport server to the Exchange organization, the Edge Subscription publishes the Edge Transport server certificate in Active Directory for the Hub Transport servers to validate. The Microsoft Exchange EdgeSync service updates AD LDS with the set of Hub Transport server certificates for the Edge Transport server to validate. EdgeSync uses a secure LDAP connection from the Hub Transport server to subscribed Edge Transport servers over TCP 50636. AD LDS also listens on TCP 50389. Connections to this port don't use SSL. You can use LDAP utilities to connect to the port and check AD LDS data. By default, traffic between Edge Transport servers in two different organizations is encrypted. Exchange 2010 Setup creates a self-signed certificate, and TLS is enabled by default. This allows any sending system to encrypt the inbound SMTP session to Exchange. By default, Exchange 2010 also tries TLS for all remote connections. Authentication methods for traffic between Hub Transport servers and Mailbox servers differ when the Hub Transport server roles and Mailbox server roles are installed on the same computer. When mail submission is local, Kerberos authentication is used. When mail submission is remote, NTLM authentication is used. Exchange 2010 also supports Domain Security. Domain Security refers to the functionality in Exchange 2010 and Microsoft Outlook 2010 that provides a low-cost alternative to S/MIME or other message-level over-the-Internet, security solutions. Domain Security provides you with a way to manage secure message paths between domains over the Internet. After these secure message paths are configured, messages that have successfully traveled over the secure path from an authenticated sender are displayed to Outlook and Outlook Web Access users as "Domain Secured". For more information, see Understanding Domain Security2. Many agents can run on Hub Transport servers and Edge Transport servers. Generally, antispam agents rely on information that's local to the computer on which the agents run. Therefore, little communication with remote computers is required. Recipient filtering is the exception. Recipient filtering requires calls to either AD LDS or Active Directory. As a best practice, run recipient filtering on the Edge Transport server. In this case, the AD LDS directory is on the same computer as the Edge Transport server and no remote communication is required. When recipient filtering has been installed and configured on the Hub Transport server, recipient filtering accesses Active Directory. The Protocol Analysis agent is used by the Sender Reputation feature in Exchange 2010. This agent also makes various connections to outside proxy servers to determine inbound message paths for suspect connections. All other anti-spam functionality uses data gathered, stored, and accessed only on the local computer. Frequently, the data, such as safelist aggregation or recipient data for recipient filtering, is pushed to the local AD LDS directory by using the Microsoft Exchange EdgeSync service. Information Rights Management (IRM) agents on Hub Transport servers make connections to Active Directory Rights Management Services (AD RMS) servers in the organization. AD RMS is a Web service that's secured by using SSL as a best practice. Communication with AD RMS servers occurs by using HTTPS, and Kerberos or NTLM is used for authentication, depending on the AD RMS server configuration. Journal rules, transport rules, and message classifications are stored in Active Directory and accessed by the Journaling agent and the Transport Rules agent on Hub Transport servers.

Mailbox Servers
Whether NTLM or Kerberos authentication is used for Mailbox servers depends on the user or process context that the Exchange Business Logic layer consumer is running under. In this context, the consumer is any application or process that uses the Exchange Business Logic layer. As a result, many

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entries in the Default Authentication column of the Mailbox server data paths table are listed as NTLM/Kerberos. The Exchange Business Logic layer is used to access and communicate with the Exchange store. The Exchange Business Logic layer is also called from the Exchange store to communicate with external applications and processes. If the Exchange Business Logic layer consumer is running as Local System, the authentication method is always Kerberos from the consumer to the Exchange store. Kerberos is used because the consumer must be authenticated by using the Local System computer account, and a two-way authenticated trust must exist. If the Exchange Business Logic layer consumer isn't running as Local System, the authentication method is NTLM. For example, NTLM is used when you run an Exchange Management Shell cmdlet that uses the Exchange Business Logic layer. The RPC traffic is always encrypted. The following table provides information about ports, authentication, and encryption for data paths to and from Mailbox servers.

Mailbox server data paths


Default Supported Encryption authentication authentication supported? Encrypted by default?

Data path

Required ports

Active Directory access

389/TCP/UDP (LDAP), 3268/TCP (LDAP GC), 88/TCP/UDP (Kerberos), 53/TCP/UDP (DNS), 135/TCP (RPC netlogon)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using Kerberos encryption

Yes

Admin remote access (Remote Registry) Admin remote access (SMB/File) Availability Web service (Client Access to Mailbox)

135/TCP (RPC)

NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos

Yes, using IPsec

No

445/TCP (SMB)

NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos

Yes, using IPsec

No

135/TCP (RPC)

Yes, using NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos RPC encryption

Yes

Clustering

135/TCP (RPC) See Notes on Mailbox Servers after this table.

NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos

Yes, using IPsec

No

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Content indexing

135/TCP (RPC)

Yes, using NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos RPC encryption NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos Yes NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos Yes

Yes

Log shipping 64327 (customizable) Seeding 64327 (customizable)

No No

Volume shadow copy Local Message Block (SMB) NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos No service (VSS) backup Mailbox Assistants

No

135/TCP (RPC)

NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos No

No

MAPI access

135/TCP (RPC)

Yes, using NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos RPC encryption

Yes

Microsoft Exchange Active Directory Topology service access

135/TCP (RPC)

Yes, using NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos RPC encryption

Yes

Microsoft Exchange System Attendant 135/TCP (RPC) service legacy access (Listen to requests) Microsoft Exchange System Attendant service legacy access to Active Directory Microsoft Exchange System Attendant service

NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos No

No

389/TCP/UDP (LDAP), 3268/TCP (LDAP GC), 88/TCP/UDP (Kerberos), 53/TCP/UDP (DNS), 135/TCP (RPC netlogon)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using Kerberos encryption

Yes

135/TCP (RPC)

Yes, using NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos RPC encryption

Yes

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legacy access (As MAPI client) Offline address book (OAB) 135/TCP (RPC) accessing Active Directory Recipient Update Service RPC access

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using RPC encryption

Yes

135/TCP (RPC)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using RPC encryption

Yes

Recipient update to Active Directory

389/TCP/UDP (LDAP), 3268/TCP (LDAP GC), 88/TCP/UDP (Kerberos), 53/TCP/UDP (DNS), 135/TCP (RPC netlogon)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using Kerberos encryption

Yes

Notes on Mailbox Servers


The Clustering data path listed in the preceding table uses dynamic RPC over TCP to communicate cluster status and activity between the different cluster nodes. The Cluster service (ClusSvc.exe) also uses UDP/3343 and randomly allocated high TCP ports to communicate between cluster nodes. For intra-node communications, cluster nodes communicate over User Datagram Protocol (UDP) port 3343. Each node in the cluster periodically exchanges sequenced, unicast UDP datagrams with every other node in the cluster. The purpose of this exchange is to determine whether all nodes are running correctly and to monitor the health of network links. Port 64327/TCP is the default port used for log shipping. Administrators can specify a different port for log shipping. For HTTP authentication where Negotiate is listed, Kerberos is tried first, and then NTLM.

Client Access Servers


Unless noted, client access technologies, such as Outlook Web App, POP3, or IMAP4, are described by the authentication and encryption from the client application to the Client Access server. The following table provides information about port, authentication, and encryption for data paths between Client Access servers and other servers and clients.

Client Access server data paths


Default Supported Encryption authentication authentication supported? Yes, using Kerberos encryption Encrypted by default?

Data path

Required ports

Active Directory access

389/TCP/UDP (LDAP), Kerberos 3268/TCP (LDAP GC), 88/TCP/UDP (Kerberos),

Kerberos

Yes

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53/TCP/UDP (DNS), 135/TCP (RPC netlogon) Basic/Integrated Basic, Digest, Windows NTLM, 80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) authentication Negotiate (Negotiate) (Kerberos)

Autodiscover service

Yes, using HTTPS

Yes

Availability service 80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) NTLM/Kerberos NTLM, Kerberos

Yes, using HTTPS

Yes

Outlook accessing Yes, using 80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) NTLM/Kerberos NTLM/Kerberos OAB HTTPS Basic, Digest, Forms Based Authentication, Yes, using NTLM (v2 only), HTTPS Kerberos, Certificate Yes, using SSL, TLS Yes, using SSL, TLS

No

Forms Based Outlook Web App 80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) Authentication

Yes, using a selfsigned certificate

POP3

110/TCP (TLS), 995/TCP (SSL) 143/TCP (TLS), 993/TCP (SSL)

Basic, Kerberos Basic, Kerberos

Yes

IMAP4

Basic, Kerberos Basic, Kerberos

Yes

Outlook Anywhere (formerly known 80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) Basic as RPC over HTTP ) Exchange ActiveSync application

Basic or NTLM

Yes, using HTTPS

Yes

80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) Basic

Basic, Certificate

Yes, using HTTPS

Yes

Client Access 5060/TCP, 5061/TCP, server to Unified 5062/TCP, a dynamic Messaging server port

By IP address

By IP address

Yes, using Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) over TLS

Yes

Client Access Negotiate server to a (Kerberos with Mailbox server 80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) NTLM/Kerberos fallback to that is running an NTLM or earlier version of optionally Exchange Server Basic,)

Yes, using IPsec

No

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POP/IMAP plain text Client Access server to Exchange 2010 Mailbox server Client Access server to Client Access server (Exchange ActiveSync) Client Access server to Client Access server (Outlook Web Access) Client Access server to Client Access server (Exchange Web Services) Client Access server to Client Access server (POP3) Client Access server to Client Access server (IMAP4)

RPC. See Notes on Client Access Servers.

Kerberos

Yes, using NTLM/Kerberos RPC encryption

Yes

80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL) Kerberos

Kerberos, Certificate

Yes, using HTTPS

Yes, using a selfsigned certificate

80/TCP, 443/TCP (HTTPS)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using SSL

Yes

443/TCP (HTTPS)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using SSL

Yes

995 (SSL)

Basic

Basic

Yes, using SSL

Yes

993 (SSL)

Basic

Basic

Yes, using SSL

Yes

Office Communications Server access to Client Access server (when 5075-5077/TCP (IN), Office 5061/TCP (OUT) Communications Server and Outlook Web App integration is enabled) Note:

mTLS (Required)

mTLS (Required)

Yes, using SSL

Yes

Integrated Windows authentication (NTLM) isn't supported for POP3 or IMAP4 client connectivity. For more information, see the "Client Access Features" sections in Discontinued Features3.

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Notes on Client Access Servers


In Exchange 2010, MAPI clients such as Microsoft Outlook connect to Client Access servers. The Client Access servers use many ports to communicate with Mailbox servers. With some exceptions, those ports are determined by the RPC service and aren't fixed. For HTTP authentication where Negotiate is listed, Kerberos is tried first, and then NTLM. When an Exchange 2010 Client Access server communicates with a Mailbox server running Exchange Server 2003, it's a best practice to use Kerberos and disable NTLM authentication and Basic authentication. Additionally, it's a best practice to configure Outlook Web App to use forms-based authentication with a trusted certificate. For Exchange ActiveSync clients to communicate through the Exchange 2010 Client Access server to the Exchange 2003 back-end server, Windows Integrated Authentication must be enabled on the Microsoft-ServerActiveSync virtual directory on the Exchange 2003 back-end server. To use Exchange System Manager on an Exchange 2003 server to manage authentication on an Exchange 2003 virtual directory, download and install the hot fix referenced in Microsoft Knowledge Base article 937031, Event ID 1036 is logged on an Exchange 2007 server that is running the CAS role when mobile devices connect to the Exchange 2007 server to access mailboxes on an Exchange 2003 back-end server4. Note: Although the Knowledge Base article is specific to Exchange 2007, it's also applicable to Exchange 2010. When a Client Access server proxies POP3 requests to another Client Access server, the communication occurs over port 995/TCP, regardless of whether the connecting client uses POP3 and requests TLS (on port 110/TCP) or connects on port 995/TCP using SSL. Similarly, for IMAP4 connections, port 993/TCP is used to proxy requests regardless of whether the connecting client uses IMAP4 and requests TLS (on port 443/TCP) or connects on port 995 using IMAP4 with SSL encryption

Unified Messaging Servers


IP gateways and IP PBXs support only certificate-based authentication that uses mutual TLS for encrypting SIP traffic and IP-based authentication for Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)/TCP connections. IP gateways don't support either NTLM or Kerberos authentication. Therefore, when you use IP-based authentication, the connecting IP address or addresses are used to provide authentication mechanism for unencrypted (TCP) connections. When IP-based authentication is used in Unified Messaging (UM), the UM server verifies that the IP address is allowed to connect. The IP address is configured on the IP gateway or IP PBX. IP gateways and IP PBXs support mutual TLS for encrypting SIP traffic. After you successfully import and export the required trusted certificates, the IP gateway or IP PBX will request a certificate from the UM server, and then it will request a certificate from the IP gateway or IP PBX. Exchanging the trusted certificate between the IP gateway or IP PBX and the UM server enables the IP gateway or IP PBX and UM server to communicate over an encrypted connection by using mutual TLS. The following table provides information about port, authentication, and encryption for data paths between UM servers and other servers.

Unified Messaging server data paths


Default Supported Encryption authentication authentication supported? Encrypted by default?

Data path

Required ports

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Active Directory access

389/TCP/UDP (LDAP), 3268/TCP (LDAP GC), 88/TCP/UDP (Kerberos), 53/TCP/UDP (DNS), 135/TCP (RPC netlogon)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using Kerberos encryption

Yes

Unified Messaging Phone interaction (IP PBX/VoIP Gateway)

5060/TCP , 5065/TCP, 5067/TCP (unsecured), 5061/TCP, 5066/TCP, 5068/TCP (secured), a dynamic port from the range By IP address 16000-17000/TCP (control), dynamic UDP ports from the range 1024-65535/UDP (RTP) Integrated Windows authentication (Negotiate)

By IP address, MTLS

Yes, using SIP/TLS, SRTP

No

Unified Messaging Web Service Unified Messaging server to Client Access server

80/TCP, 443/TCP (SSL)

Basic, Digest, Yes, using NTLM, Negotiate SSL (Kerberos)

Yes

5075, 5076, 5077 (TCP)

Integrated Windows authentication (Negotiate)

Basic, Digest, Yes, using NTLM, Negotiate SSL (Kerberos)

Yes

Unified Messaging server to Dynamic RPC Client Access server (Play on Phone) Unified Messaging server to Hub Transport server Unified Messaging server to Mailbox server

NTLM/Kerberos

NTLM/Kerberos

Yes, using RPC encryption

Yes

25/TCP (TLS)

Kerberos

Kerberos

Yes, using TLS

Yes

135/TCP (RPC)

NTLM/Kerberos

NTLM/Kerberos

Yes, using RPC encryption

Yes

Notes on Unified Messaging Servers

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When you create a UM IP gateway object in Active Directory, you must define the IP address of the physical IP gateway or IP PBX (Private Branch eXchange). When you define the IP address on the UM IP gateway object, the IP address is added to a list of valid IP gateways or IP PBXs (also called SIP peers) that the UM server is allowed to communicate with. When you create the UM IP gateway, you can associate it with a UM dial plan. Associating the UM IP gateway with a dial plan allows the Unified Messaging servers that are associated with the dial plan to use IP-based authentication to communicate with the IP gateway. If the UM IP gateway has not been created or it isn't configured to use the correct IP address, authentication fails and the UM servers don't accept connections from that IP gateway's IP address. Also, when you implement mutual TLS and IP gateway or IP PBX and UM servers, the UM IP gateway must be configured to use the FQDN. After you configure the UM IP gateway with an FQDN, you must also add a host record to the DNS forward lookup zone for the UM IP gateway. In Exchange 2010, a UM server can either communicate on port 5060/TCP (unsecured) or on port 5061/TCP (secured), and can be configured to use both. For more information, see Understanding Unified Messaging VoIP Security and Understanding 6 Protocols, Ports, and Services in Unified Messaging .
5

Windows Firewall Rules Created by Exchange 2010 Setup


Windows Firewall with Advanced Security is a stateful, host-based firewall that filters inbound and outbound traffic based on firewall rules. Exchange 2010 Setup creates Windows Firewall rules to open the ports required for server and client communication on each server role. Therefore, you no longer need to use the Security Configuration Wizard (SCW) to configure these settings. To learn more about 7 Windows Firewall with Advanced Security, see Windows Firewall with Advanced Security and IPsec . This table lists the Windows Firewall rules created by Exchange Setup, including the ports opened on each server role. You can view these rules using the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC snap-in. Rule name Server roles Port Program

MSExchangeADTopology - RPC (TCP-In)

Client Access, Hub Dynamic Transport, Bin\MSExchangeADTopologyService.exe RPC Mailbox, Unified Messaging Client Access, Hub Transport, Dynamic Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.Management.Monitoring.exe Edge RPC Transport, Unified Messaging Dynamic Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.ServiceHost.exe RPC

MSExchangeMonitoring - RPC (TCP-In)

MSExchangeServiceHost - RPC (TCP-In)

All roles

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MSExchangeServiceHost RPCEPMap (TCP-In) MSExchangeRPCEPMap (GFW) (TCP-In)

All roles

RPCEPMap RPCEPMap

Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.Service.Host

All roles

Any

MSExchangeRPC (GFW) (TCPIn)

Client Access, Hub Dynamic Transport, Any RPC Mailbox, Unified Messaging 143, 993 (TCP) 143, 993 (TCP) 110, 995 (TCP) 110, 995 (TCP) 5075, 5076, 5077 (TCP) 5075, 5076, 5077 (TCP)

MSExchange - IMAP4 (GFW) (TCP-In)

Client Access

All

MSExchangeIMAP4 (TCP-In)

Client Access

ClientAccess\PopImap\Microsoft.Exchange.Imap4Service.exe

MSExchange - POP3 (FGW) (TCP-In)

Client Access

All

MSExchange - POP3 (TCP-In)

Client Access

ClientAccess\PopImap\Microsoft.Exchange.Pop3Service.exe

MSExchange - OWA (GFW) (TCP Client -In) Access

All

MSExchangeOWAAppPool (TCP- Client In) Access

Inetsrv\w3wp.exe

MSExchangeAB-RPC (TCP-In)

Client Access

Dynamic Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.AddressBook.Service.exe RPC RPCEPMap

MSExchangeAB-RPCEPMap (TCP Client -In) Access

Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.AddressBook.Service.exe

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MSExchangeAB-RpcHttp (TCPIn)

Client Access

6002, 6004 (TCP)

Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.AddressBook.Service.exe

RpcHttpLBS (TCP-In)

Client Access

Dynamic System32\Svchost.exe RPC

Client MSExchangeRPC - RPC (TCP-In) Access, Mailbox Client Access, Mailbox Client Access, Mailbox Client Access Client Access

Dynamic Bing\Microsoft.Exchange.RpcClientAccess.Service.exe RPC

MSExchangeRPC - PRCEPMap (TCP-In)

RPCEPMap

Bing\Microsoft.Exchange.RpcClientAccess.Service.exe

MSExchangeRPC (TCP-In)

6001 (TCP)

Bing\Microsoft.Exchange.RpcClientAccess.Service.exe

MSExchangeMailboxReplication (GFW) (TCP-In) MSExchangeMailboxReplication (TCP-In)

808 (TCP) 808 (TCP)

Any

Bin\MSExchangeMailboxReplication.exe

MSExchangeIS - RPC (TCP-In)

Mailbox

Dynamic Bin\Store.exe RPC RPCEPMap 6001, 6002, 6003, 6004 (TCP) 6001 (TCP)

MSExchangeIS RPCEPMap (TCPMailbox In)

Bin\Store.exe

MSExchangeIS (GFW) (TCP-In) Mailbox

Any

MSExchangeIS (TCP-In)

Mailbox

Bin\Store.exe

MSExchangeMailboxAssistants Mailbox RPC (TCP-In) MSExchangeMailboxAssistants Mailbox RPCEPMap (TCP-In)

Dynamic Bin\MSExchangeMailboxAssistants.exe RPC RPCEPMap

Bin\MSExchangeMailboxAssistants.exe

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MSExchangeMailSubmission RPC (TCP-In) MSExchangeMailSubmission RPCEPMap (TCP-In) MSExchangeMigration - RPC (TCP-In) MSExchangeMigration RPCEPMap (TCP-In) MSExchangerepl - Log Copier (TCP-In)

Mailbox

Dynamic Bin\MSExchangeMailSubmission.exe RPC RPCEPMap

Mailbox

Bin\MSExchangeMailSubmission.exe

Mailbox

Dynamic Bin\MSExchangeMigration.exe RPC RPCEPMap 64327 (TCP)

Mailbox

Bin\MSExchangeMigration.exe

Mailbox

Bin\MSExchangeRepl.exe

MSExchangerepl - RPC (TCP-In) Mailbox

Dynamic Bin\MSExchangeRepl.exe RPC RPCEPMap

MSExchangerepl - RPC-EPMap (TCP-In)

Mailbox

Bin\MSExchangeRepl.exe

MSExchangeSearch - RPC (TCPMailbox In) MSExchangeThrottling - RPC (TCP-In) MSExchangeThrottling RPCEPMap (TCP-In)

Dynamic Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.Search.ExSearch.exe RPC Dynamic Bin\MSExchangeThrottling.exe RPC RPCEPMap

Mailbox

Mailbox

Bin\MSExchangeThrottling.exe

MSFTED - RPC (TCP-In)

Mailbox

Dynamic Bin\MSFTED.exe RPC RPCEPMap

MSFTED - RPCEPMap (TCP-In)

Mailbox

Bin\MSFTED.exe

MSExchangeEdgeSync - RPC (TCP-In) MSExchangeEdgeSync RPCEPMap (TCP-In) MSExchangeTransportWorker RPC (TCP-In)

Hub Dynamic Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.EdgeSyncSvc.exe Transport RPC Hub RPCTransport EPMap

Bin\Microsoft.Exchange.EdgeSyncSvc.exe

Hub Dynamic Bin\edgetransport.exe Transport RPC

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MSExchangeTransportWorker RPCEPMap (TCP-In) MSExchangeTransportWorker (GFW) (TCP-In) MSExchangeTransportWorker (TCP-In)

Hub RPCTransport EPMap

Bin\edgetransport.exe

Hub 25, 587 Any Transport (TCP) Hub 25, 587 Bin\edgetransport.exe Transport (TCP)

Hub Transport, MSExchangeTransportLogSearch Dynamic Bin\MSExchangeTransportLogSearch.exe Edge - RPC (TCP-In) RPC Transport, Mailbox Hub Transport, MSExchangeTransportLogSearch RPCEdge - RPCEPMap (TCP-In) EPMap Transport, Mailbox Unified Any Messaging Unified Any Messaging Unified 5060, Messaging 5061 Unified 5060, Messaging 5061

Bin\MSExchangeTransportLogSearch.exe

SESWorker (GFW) (TCP-In)

Any

SESWorker (TCP-In)

UnifiedMessaging\SESWorker.exe

UMService (GFW) (TCP-In)

Any

UMService (TCP-In)

Bin\UMService.exe

5065, UMWorkerProcess (GFW) (TCP- Unified 5066, In) Messaging 5067, 5068 5065, Unified 5066, Messaging 5067, 5068

Any

UMWorkerProcess (TCP-In)

Bin\UMWorkerProcess.exe

UMWorkerProcess - RPC (TCPIn)

Unified Dynamic Bin\UMWorkerProcess.exe Messaging RPC

Notes on Windows Firewall Rules Created by Exchange 2010 Setup

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Exchange Network Port Reference: Exchange 2010 Help

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On servers that have Internet Information Services (IIS) installed, Windows opens the HTTP (port 80, TCP) and HTTPS (port 443, TCP) ports. Exchange 2010 Setup doesn't open these ports. Therefore, these ports don't appear in the preceding table. On Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Firewall with Advanced Security allows you to specify the process or service for which a port is opened. This is more secure because it restricts usage of the port to the process or service specified in the rule. Exchange Setup creates firewall rules with the process name specified. In some cases, an additional rule that isn't restricted to the process is also created for compatibility purposes. You can disable or remove the rules that aren't restricted to the processes and keep the corresponding rules restricted to processes if your deployment supports them. The rules not restricted to processes are distinguished by the word (GFW) in the rule name. A number of Exchange services use remote procedure calls (RPCs) for communication. Server processes that use RPCs contact the RPC Endpoint Mapper to receive dynamic endpoints and register those endpoints in the Endpoint Mapper database. RPC clients contact the RPC Endpoint Mapper to determine the endpoints used by the server process. By default, the RPC Endpoint Mapper listens on port 135 (TCP). When configuring the Windows Firewall for a process that uses RPCs, Exchange 2010 Setup creates two firewall rules for the process. One rule allows communication with the RPC Endpoint Mapper, and the other rule allows communication with the dynamically assigned endpoint. To learn more about RPCs, see How 8 RPC Works . For more information about creating Windows Firewall rules for dynamic RPC, see 9 Allowing Inbound Network Traffic that Uses Dynamic RPC . Note: You can't modify the Windows Firewall rules created by Exchange 2010 Setup. You can create custom rules based on them, and then disable or delete them. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 179442, How to configure a firewall for 10 domains and trusts .

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http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee633456.aspx http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb124392.aspx http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa998911.aspx http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=3052&kbid=937031 http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb124092.aspx http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa998265.aspx http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179177 http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=69495 http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=168278 http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=3052&kbid=179442

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Community Content
Network Ports Diagram Edit

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb331973(d=printer).aspx

1/5/2012

Exchange Network Port Reference: Exchange 2010 Help

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Some time ago I've created a network diagram; the diagram is available in PDF and Visio format. http://eightwone.com/2011/04/05/exchange-2010-sp1-network-ports-diagram-v03/

11/1/2011 Michel de Rooij

2012 Microsoft. All rights reserved.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb331973(d=printer).aspx

1/5/2012