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Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 2

Summer 2006

VO L U N T E E R N E W
SLETTER
Stop the destruction
With over 340 ancient
woods under threat
on the Woodland
Trust’s database
David Goymour
explains what we can
do to help save them

INSIDE

Nick Cobbing
News pages 2 & 16
How you’ve made a million

Ancient trees page 3


Make the oak your icon
Proposals to build more runways at exhausts, and this acts as a fertiliser for
Speaker’s bulletin page 4 Birmingham, Luton and Stansted vigorous plants which will out-compete more
Community Woodland airports have been facing the first stage delicate species and may upset the natural
Network page 5 of public scrutiny in recent months. balance of the habitat.’
Nelson’s playground
Grants up for grabs

In the woods page 6


The airports' owners have revealed their
intentions in airport master plans, which are
subject to consultation – and Woodland Trust
‘ The proposals at all three of
these airports . . . would damage
Keeping it in the family members have been making their views known. ancient woodland, and not just
Good shot! page 8 because land which is wooded
One of the people cheering them on from
Tips for top photos

Out of the woods page 10


the Trust's Grantham headquarters is head
of campaigns Ed Pomfret. The impact of
will be lost to the runways.
Ed has been encouraging

A secret history aviation on the environment, he explains, is supporters to respond to
not just a general one: it poses a particular the airport’s master plans, which are ‘the first
In business page 12
threat to woodland.
stage of the route which the airport owners
Phenology page 13
‘The proposals at all three of these airports have to go down to get approval’.
Frequently asked to build new runways would damage ancient
questions page 14 This stage of the process is now over for
woodland, and not just because land which is
these three airport schemes, but Trust
Volunteer wooded will be lost to the runways.
volunteers will have further opportunities to
opportunities page 15
‘Hatfield Forest, for example, near Stansted, is help, when the airports submit their planning
Getting in touch page 16 an important wildlife habitat. There's a huge applications. Luton's first planning application
amount of nitrogen poured out of aircraft will be submitted in the summer, Stansted's
continued on page 12

red in England No. 1982873 www.woodland-trust.org.uk/getinvolved


Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 3

2 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111

Hello again NEWS


Catch the roadshow
The volunteers team are hitting the road and liaising with local staff to
meet, network and match volunteers to available tasks. Trips to the south

WTPL/James Simpson
east, north west and north east of England and central Scotland are all
planned this year. If you’re in one of these areas look out for your invitation.
We hope to see you soon.

From left to right: Julie Reynolds, Carl Hughes, Merle Dekanski


and Karen Lifford
Dering Group closes
Dear friends
We’ve got lots to inspire you in this
issue.
If, like us, you’re frustrated to see
concrete taking the place of natural
green in our landscapes, you’ll
appreciate our front cover feature
article about campaigning.There are
lots of simple things that anyone can do
to save woods under threat and people
power really does work.There are
countless woods that wouldn’t be here
today had it not been for campaigning
by people like you.
Our other feature (pages 8 & 9) is for
anyone with a good eye for a picture.

Peter Rate
The Trust can use pictures in publicity
to spread the word and can even
directly raise money by placing them
on woodlandpictures.com.There are Dering Woodlanders Group has dissolved following the retirement of key
also a few tips on how to get good
members. They have donated their tools to other groups in the south east
results with a camera.
region, and a bench has been placed in Dering Wood as a thank you for their
All in all this newsletter is packed with a
hard work over many years.
huge variety of ideas and articles to
interest and amuse you. Once again,
we’re really pleased to say that
volunteers have been responsible for a
huge part of its production.We’re
looking to increase this involvement by
Because you’re worth it
recruiting a volunteer editorial assistant. In 2005 volunteers across the Trust gave a
If you’re interested, see page 15.
staggering 252,000 hours of their time, equating to
As always, if you’d like to contribute to a notional worth of just over £1.9 million. Tree for
the next issue in any way, please get in
All and phenology helped push the Volunteer
touch with Sallyanne, our editor (see
page 15). She’d love to hear from you. Investment Value Audit (VIVA) end of year total to
a new high.
Enjoy the summer,
Best wishes The variety of tasks that volunteers participate in
now is so great; from tree planting, wardening and
WTPL/Rebecca Whitley

recording nature’s events to detailed surveying,


providing legal advice, mentoring staff and many more.

We would like to thank everyone for providing the


The volunteers team information that helps us to gather these results.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 4

VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 3

ANCIENT TREES
We have teamed up with the Ancient Tree Forum to celebrate ancient trees and do all
we can to conserve them. Read about what’s happening in this section and, if you
have internet access, please help keep the discussion forum alive by logging onto
www.ancient-tree-forum.org.uk or www.ancient-tree-hunt.org.uk
Page edited by ancient trees volunteer, Phil Marshall

Click on the Icon Mapping the elm


Like the oak, the elm has a long history and
The oak tree is quintessentially English, a symbol of provides important wildlife habitats for
our natural heritage. From ships to shelter and firewood a variety of species. Over recent
to furniture, it’s been a practical provider for hundreds of decades, however, we’ve lost
years. It’s been an inspiration to many a poet and artist. It’s
countless wonderful old elm trees,
been an integral part of our natural landscape.
victims to disease, violent storms and to people’s actions.

The oak’s not our only Now you can help by contributing to the Elm Map. This was
Noël Kingsley, FRPS, www.noelkingsley.com

national treasure of launched during Walking Week in 2003, led by the Ramblers
course, and maybe we all Association and the Natural History Museum in London.
take it too much for Ramblers have taken part in over 90 walks covering some 500
granted. Well, now’s the miles since then, recording hundreds of elms along the way.
time to find out. In a poll
As a result of their efforts, the Elm Map has provided our
it’s up against other
Ancient Tree Hunt with more than 150 mature elms, including
English icons, including
Stonehenge, London’s a smooth-leaved elm in Glemsford, Suffolk with a girth of
Routemaster bus, the red pillar box and even a cup of tea. some 4.75 metres.

Icons: A Portrait of England is a two-year Government- This is an ongoing project, and you can help by entering online
funded project, where the public is invited to nominate at www.ancient-tree-hunt.org.uk the details of any mature
those things that it treasures most about England. The elm tree that
mighty oak was one of the you know
first dozen icons put about or that
forward by leading academic you find when
and cultural figures for you’re out and
consideration by the public. about.
Would you vote for the
mighty oak? To find out
more, visit www.icons.org.uk
and click on your favourite
English icon.

Trees under threat


Elsewhere in this edition you’ll read about ancient
woodland under threat.This applies to ancient trees too.
The Woodland Trust and the Ancient Tree Forum want
to know of any such tree which is under threat.
Investigations can then be made and consideration
given to what action might be possible to save another
Ted Green

wonderful part of our natural heritage. For more


information visit www.woodsunderthreat.info
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 5

4 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111

S P E A K E R S ’ BU L L E T I N
Our network of nearly 100 voluntary speakers all over the UK
plays an invaluable role spreading the word about the Trust’s work.
To find out more about becoming a speaker or if you know of an
organisation or group that might like to book a presentation,
contact Nick Sandford on 01476 581135 or email vs@woodland-trust.org.uk

Happy 15 birthday th
Our Voluntary Speakers’ Scheme was set up in 1991 by Hilary
Allison who is now the Woodland Trust's policy director. In 2006,
the 15th anniversary of the scheme, membership has grown to
nearly 100 and we’ve got most of the UK covered.
Many of the original joiners are still with us. Our longest servers are:
Derek Brown, Malcolm Carrington, Liz Taylor, Bob Macdonald, Derek Bedford,
Ian Hammerton (see page 5), Peter Cox, James Headford, Graham Worrall,
John Searle, David Farrier, Roger Tolman, John Godber
Thank you all for your years of service and for sharing your passion for
Bennet Aldous

woods with so many people. If we have missed anyone off the list, apologies;
please let us know so we can honour you too.

With good reason Summing up


Our annual questionnaire to
We asked our speakers why they do it. Here are a few of the replies
voluntary speakers shows that
‘I spent a working life teaching and lecturing, so it is what I do. I love it to bits; meeting lovely,
during 2005, our speakers gave
caring people who tell me all about their woodland experiences.’ Pam Farley
301 talks to audiences totalling
‘I used to be a professional fundraiser and wanted to offer my skills as a volunteer. Because 10,000. Donations following
I love woods so much and have visited many of ours, I want to communicate that to others talks totalled £6,300 – the
and enthuse them too.’ Lesley Nickell
biggest annual figure we have
‘To help inform more people of the value ever achieved.
of woodland, especially on their doorstep
and to educate them on the work of the The highest deliverers in
Trust. I get a great deal of satisfaction terms of number of talks
when I see how interested many were Pam Farley (21), closely
audiences are, especially when they ask
followed by Peter and Rosemary
questions and want to follow up the talk
with a site visit.’ Ian Retson Dodd (18) (see page 16),
Margaret Anderson (17) and
‘After a lifetime in woodland
Mike Hyde (16). But the total
management, I was made redundant…
figure was very much a
Speaking for the Woodland Trust has
Bennet Aldous

enabled me to use my expertise in a way collective effort so a big thank


that I enjoy.’ Jim Dickinson you to everyone.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 6

VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 5

C O M M U N I T Y WO O D L A N D
N E T WO R K
The Community Woodland Network (CWN) supports community groups that
are managing woodland or creating new woods. It offers advice,
networking opportunities and funding.
To find out more, call 01476 581155 or visit www.yourwoods.org.uk

My patch Ian Hammerton has had a love affair with Joyden’s


Wood spanning a very eventful 45 years

In early 1959 I placed a deposit on a house in came and by the morning fallen
a new estate called Joyden’s Wood near Bexley trees blocked all the entrances to
in Kent. My young family and I watched our the wood. Locals rallied together
home rise up from the clay and we moved in to form the Joyden’s Wood
in time to celebrate fireworks night in the Support Group.
WTPL

muddy garden. At the bottom of this garden

WTPL/Brian Aldrich
I am the secretary and leader of the
Ian Hammerton was a main pathway into the wood. group that still meets weekly today.
As my family grew up, our walks there got longer and my interest Since 1986, as well as helping to keep
in its wildlife deepened. There is so much in the wood and it’s the the paths open, I have given several
perfect spot to find tranquillity. But by 1986, rumours began to hundred talks about the wood, led Joyden’s Wood
circulate that part of it was to be sold to another housing numerous walks and encouraged many children in learning about its
developer. I joined others in suggesting a ‘Save Joyden’s Wood’ wildlife. All members of the group do everything they can to care
Appeal and was elated when in September 1987 the Woodland for the wood and raise awareness of its value.
Trust acquired the wood. Ian Hammerton has an MBE in recognition of his services to
The night before the opening ceremony, the notorious hurricane conservation and is a previous winner of Volunteer of the Year.

Nelson’s playground
Mandy Hillier profiles a group that had more reason than scheme which includes dog waste and litter clearance – a product
most to mark the Trafalgar Bicentenary of their own success as the wood is such a popular place.

A neglected bramble- Their efforts have also been rewarded with The Queen's Golden
infested woodland near Jubilee Award for volunteer groups and the wood being
Lowestoft has been designated a local nature reserve, approved by English Nature.
Gunton Woodland Community Project

transformed by a team of To mark the bicentenary of the Battle of Trafalgar members of


inspired volunteers, but Lowestoft Sea Cadets planted a large oak, particularly fitting as
the wood has already Gunton Wood is reputed to have been a childhood haunt of
repaid its saviours many Horatio Nelson.
times over.
Barry and his dedicated
Grants up for grabs
When Barry Shimmield committee deliver regular
Grants of up to £2,000 are
suggested improving newsletters to 180 families and
now available for voluntary
Gunton Wood at a resident's meeting more than a decade ago as spin-offs from the project
community woodland
he was a retired petroleum engineer who had spent many years there are outings, clothes
groups. Funding can be spent
working abroad and had just moved to a pleasant 500 house merchandising, parties and the
on tools, training or
estate where he knew virtually no-one. especially popular summer fetes.
promotion of the group.The
Today he is chairman of the Gunton Woodland Community Barry acknowledges that over closing date is 31 July 2006.
Project. So he has around 200 friends on his doorstep, has put his the years a great deal of help To find out more, visit
retirement to good use by leading a group that has helped bring has come from the Woodland www.yourwoods.org.uk
social cohesion, purpose, achievement and fun to hundreds of people. Trust's Community Woodland then click on ‘about us’ and
Since its formation the project members have cleared the 21/2 Network in the form of then visit ‘grants’ or call the
hectare wood and planted around 3,500 trees. They have fenced, information and grants both for CWN number above.
laid paths, provided information boards and have a management new tools and training.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 7

6 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111

I N T H E WO O D S
If you go down to the woods today you could find Trust volunteers involved in
all manner of roles ranging from practical tasks, running events, surveying
and generally taking good care of our most special natural places.

Protecting Prehen for posterity

WTPL/Gregor Fulton
Springtime at Prehen Wood
Voluntary warden George McLaughlin Because of a very close bond with his ‘Granda’ he develops a
explains how caring for Prehen has been very love for the freedom of the fields and the countryside. He meets
much a family affair and falls for a young teacher called Aileen. They have three
children Declan, Helen and Roisin and six grandchildren.
It is almost the end of the nineteenth So what has all this got to do with me, George McLaughlin, being
century, the place Prehen Woods near
a woodland warden and conservationist? The answer lies in
Derry. There is a smell of burning.Young
my genealogical connection with the woodland
George Phillips is using the leaves of the
and the emerging generations for which the
tobacco plant, which grows in abundance around the Knox family
future of the woodland has to be secured.
house at Prehen, to try out an old clay pipe.
The duties of a woodland warden can be
The young Phillips boy is taking a well-earned break from his duties
quite varied. The ‘duty’ of just being in the
working as a herds boy for the Knox family. In an estate of many
woodland can be a joy in itself, keeping an
hundreds of acres including woodland, pasture land, kitchen gardens
eye on it, tidying up if need be and looking after
and ornamental gardens, the demands on employees were great.
our woodland animals, especially the red squirrel. All these
Young George looks after the cattle and a small herd of reindeer tasks are vital, but serious campaigning to protect the many
as well as working in the woodland. As the new century dawns, development threats that have faced the wood has perhaps been
he works long hours, learning the ways of the woods, caring for the most important task.
the animals and respecting the countryside.
Recently after a walk in the woods I overheard my two
In his late teens, love blossoms among the Prehen bluebells with grandsons talking. The younger boy said, ‘Don’t trees give oxygen
a girl called Susan Woods. They marry and have a first daughter, and help us to breathe?’ His brother replied, ‘Yes that’s right’. The
Agnes. She grows up and falls in love with a boy called Jim younger brother then asked, ‘Why do the bad men cut down
McLaughlin. They have a son called George. trees’? The older boy said ‘I don’t know but wouldn’t you think
Young George, the son of Jim and Agnes and grandson of George they would know better because by cutting down the trees aren’t
Phillips is reared on mystical, romantic tales about Prehen; the they killing themselves?’.
story of Mary Ann Knox and Half Hanged McNaughton, the old If the future of our woodlands lies in the questioning and thinking
Colonel, the haunted house and strange figures roaming the woods. of these two boys then the future is definitely very bright.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 8

VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 7

Young Wo o d s U n d e r
pride Th r e at C a s e f i l e
Some young people find school life a
struggle. For them, the future can be

erity bleak. They are often tempted by crime,


many leave with no qualifications. This
can make it hard to get a job and
Name: Pencoedtre Wood
Located: Near Barry,

WTPL/Graham Bradley
crushes their self esteem. Vale of Glamorgan

In Swindon and Wiltshire, the Size: 15 hectares/37 acres


Woodland Trust has been working
with BTCV to implement a scheme Pencoedtre Wood

called ‘Positive Activities for Young


Profile:
The Countryside Council for Wales describes this as one of the most
People’. A group of students between
valuable woods in southern Wales. It contains 46 ancient woodland
the ages of 13 and 17 have been
indicator species, far more than is typical for a wood of this size.
visiting woods and working on a range
Examples include greater butterfly orchid, wood sorrel and dogs mercury.
of practical tasks like putting up signs,
coppicing and building bird boxes.
Threat:
‘ At the end of every task, 9 hectares (23 acres) could be
destroyed to make way for a mixed
their pride is palpable.
’ housing and industrial development.
This would be by far the greatest loss
Giles Aspinall of BTCV says, ‘They’re
of ancient woodland in Wales since the
getting a real sense of achievement.
Assembly gave it protection under
WTPL

The job always gets done – unlike at


planning regulations in 2002.
school. They’re learning practical and Another wood is damaged by development
social skills like using tools, how to be
a leader and work in a team. These
Action needed:
Please write to Vale of Glamorgan District Council urgently, objecting to the
are going to stand them in really good
proposal. A sample letter is available from www.woodsunderthreat.info
stead in the future.
then ‘download a letter’ from the ‘latest news’ section or call Mary Wand
‘At the end of every task, their pride on 01476 581102.
is palpable.’

Try this
WTPL/Graham Bradley

Tyrrels Wood visitor’s book


Pencoedtre Wood – one of the most valuable woods in southern Wales
Want to know what visitors think
of your wood? Turn to back page
to find out how. For the latest on woods under threat, visit www.woodsunderthreat.info
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 11:12 am Page 9

8 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111 VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 9

S h o o t i n g t re e s a n d l e ave s
As our new volunteer photographer’s scheme gets underway, expert John Northover
explains why using your talent for photography is rewarding for both you and the Woodland Trust

2
/3
We rely hugely on the enthusiastic support of those with a more
modest digital camera.
turning that on its head. We
are trying to establish how
volunteers to provide a wide variety of images for
All of this is within the climate determines the life
our library.
compass of most keen cycle of our flora and fauna.
Not only do we need the more obvious pictures of woods Known as phenology, this
amateur photographers
and their wildlife, we also need to have a record of the people science is developing very
and should not deter you
involved and associated with our activities such as training rapidly through the UK
from submitting pictures
programmes, site surveying and local fundraising events. 1/
and joining our ranks. Phenology Network at the 3

WTPL/Stuart Cooper
At the other end of the scale Woodland Trust (see page 13).
When taking pictures for

WTPL/David Lund
we have a need for fixed
the Woodland Trust Whilst we are all aware that
point photography. This
consider the probable spring seems to be arriving

WTPL/David Lund
involves the selection of a
end use. Pictures earlier and that the leaves are
particular specimen which is often produces the visually most attractive result.
involving people will almost certainly be used for publicity in turning later in the autumn, we
photographed at regular
literature or on the website to support news features. They need to know by just how Watch your auto focus if you use this technique!
intervals, say daily, over a
need to be clear, evenly lit and as free as possible from much. For example, photograph the first snowdrops, the first Designers will often
period of weeks, or even
WTPL/Michael Calvert

random backgrounds. hawthorn blossom, the first butterflies or the first bluebells. be looking for a full
years, building up a sequence Pictures with large
The use of a telephoto/zoom lens will enable you to throw Photographs with dates, times and locations recorded are the page picture on to
to be viewed as a whole.
perfect way to monitor these changes and build a picture areas of plain
the background into soft focus. Pictures that are intended to which they can
Whilst few of our volunteer tone are ideal
illustrate a feature about woodland need to be in sharp focus – for the whole country. Find out a great deal more on superimpose text.
photographers
it always helps to use a tripod, www.phenology.org.uk and get in touch with the This demands for
are professionals, all provide high quality, vibrant
volunteers team to get the latest on what type of images relatively large areas

WTPL/Pete Holmes
especially if the light is poor. superimposed
images that assist us in our publishing and research
are most needed. of plain tone for
work. The very nature of magazine printing An exciting new part of the text.
legibility; sky and
diminishes the colours of original shots so it’s Trust’s work is involved in If you are of a more artistic tendency,
deep shadows
essential that we start with the very best pictures monitoring the effects of climate then well composed and lit images
provide this perfectly.
WTPL/Pete Holmes

available. This means that we can only accept change. Whereas country lore may be your contribution.

WTPL/Pete Holmes
transparencies (35mm, medium or large format) stated ‘Oak before ash – we’re in Composition is also full of So here’s your chance, don’t hide your lightmeter under the
and digital images ideally of not less than 13/14 for a splash. Ash before oak – opportunities and the artists’ formula of placing proverbial bushel. Hit www.woodland-trust.org.uk/woodpics
Mb as RGB TIFF files, though this is flexible for we’re in for a soak’, we are now a subject in a position of 1/3 : 2/3 for full details, get shooting and join a worthwhile project.
within the frame
All images used in this article were taken by volunteer photographers

d shot!
Goo Use 35mm transparency film.This is less exposure tolerant than negative film so bracket your
Tips for perfecting your technique
If shooting digitally with a zoom lens, always avoid the digital zoom and just use the optical zoom.
shots by 1/2 a stop either side of your meter reading.This will give you three frames to choose Specialised computer software is better at enlarging images than camera software.
from (digital photographers will also find this a good tip but most digital cameras that offer this Record time, place and date, even if you are not shooting images for phenology. Digital cameras
facility work in 1/3 stop increments.). generally do this for you.
If using a digital camera, remember it’s not just the pixels – 5 million is a good basis – but also Get written consent from people in photographs where possible. Model release forms are designed
the quality of the lens. for this purpose.You’ll also need consent from other landowners, and should complete a property
When working on fixed point photography ensure you replicate the tripod position every time. release form if the property is identifiable in the image. Examples of the forms will be in your
Golf tees stuck in the ground are ideal. Alternatively it may be easier to use a camera clamp on welcome pack when you sign up to the voluntary photographers scheme.
a branch, gatepost or fence. Remember, fill-in flash is very useful when working close up in poor light or shaded woodland.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 11:12 am Page 9

8 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111 VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 9

S h o o t i n g t re e s a n d l e ave s
As our new volunteer photographer’s scheme gets underway, expert John Northover
explains why using your talent for photography is rewarding for both you and the Woodland Trust

2
/3
We rely hugely on the enthusiastic support of those with a more
modest digital camera.
turning that on its head. We
are trying to establish how
volunteers to provide a wide variety of images for
All of this is within the climate determines the life
our library.
compass of most keen cycle of our flora and fauna.
Not only do we need the more obvious pictures of woods Known as phenology, this
amateur photographers
and their wildlife, we also need to have a record of the people science is developing very
and should not deter you
involved and associated with our activities such as training rapidly through the UK
from submitting pictures
programmes, site surveying and local fundraising events. 1/
and joining our ranks. Phenology Network at the 3

WTPL/Stuart Cooper
At the other end of the scale Woodland Trust (see page 13).
When taking pictures for

WTPL/David Lund
we have a need for fixed
the Woodland Trust Whilst we are all aware that
point photography. This
consider the probable spring seems to be arriving

WTPL/David Lund
involves the selection of a
end use. Pictures earlier and that the leaves are
particular specimen which is often produces the visually most attractive result.
involving people will almost certainly be used for publicity in turning later in the autumn, we
photographed at regular
literature or on the website to support news features. They need to know by just how Watch your auto focus if you use this technique!
intervals, say daily, over a
need to be clear, evenly lit and as free as possible from much. For example, photograph the first snowdrops, the first Designers will often
period of weeks, or even
WTPL/Michael Calvert

random backgrounds. hawthorn blossom, the first butterflies or the first bluebells. be looking for a full
years, building up a sequence Pictures with large
The use of a telephoto/zoom lens will enable you to throw Photographs with dates, times and locations recorded are the page picture on to
to be viewed as a whole.
perfect way to monitor these changes and build a picture areas of plain
the background into soft focus. Pictures that are intended to which they can
Whilst few of our volunteer tone are ideal
illustrate a feature about woodland need to be in sharp focus – for the whole country. Find out a great deal more on superimpose text.
photographers
it always helps to use a tripod, www.phenology.org.uk and get in touch with the This demands for
are professionals, all provide high quality, vibrant
volunteers team to get the latest on what type of images relatively large areas

WTPL/Pete Holmes
especially if the light is poor. superimposed
images that assist us in our publishing and research
are most needed. of plain tone for
work. The very nature of magazine printing An exciting new part of the text.
legibility; sky and
diminishes the colours of original shots so it’s Trust’s work is involved in If you are of a more artistic tendency,
deep shadows
essential that we start with the very best pictures monitoring the effects of climate then well composed and lit images
provide this perfectly.
WTPL/Pete Holmes

available. This means that we can only accept change. Whereas country lore may be your contribution.

WTPL/Pete Holmes
transparencies (35mm, medium or large format) stated ‘Oak before ash – we’re in Composition is also full of So here’s your chance, don’t hide your lightmeter under the
and digital images ideally of not less than 13/14 for a splash. Ash before oak – opportunities and the artists’ formula of placing proverbial bushel. Hit www.woodland-trust.org.uk/woodpics
Mb as RGB TIFF files, though this is flexible for we’re in for a soak’, we are now a subject in a position of 1/3 : 2/3 for full details, get shooting and join a worthwhile project.
within the frame
All images used in this article were taken by volunteer photographers

d shot!
Goo Use 35mm transparency film.This is less exposure tolerant than negative film so bracket your
Tips for perfecting your technique
If shooting digitally with a zoom lens, always avoid the digital zoom and just use the optical zoom.
shots by 1/2 a stop either side of your meter reading.This will give you three frames to choose Specialised computer software is better at enlarging images than camera software.
from (digital photographers will also find this a good tip but most digital cameras that offer this Record time, place and date, even if you are not shooting images for phenology. Digital cameras
facility work in 1/3 stop increments.). generally do this for you.
If using a digital camera, remember it’s not just the pixels – 5 million is a good basis – but also Get written consent from people in photographs where possible. Model release forms are designed
the quality of the lens. for this purpose.You’ll also need consent from other landowners, and should complete a property
When working on fixed point photography ensure you replicate the tripod position every time. release form if the property is identifiable in the image. Examples of the forms will be in your
Golf tees stuck in the ground are ideal. Alternatively it may be easier to use a camera clamp on welcome pack when you sign up to the voluntary photographers scheme.
a branch, gatepost or fence. Remember, fill-in flash is very useful when working close up in poor light or shaded woodland.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 11

10 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111

O U T O F T H E WO O D S
You don’t have to be in the woods to help the Trust…

The professionals
Do you have training that you could use to help the Woodland Trust?
Here we highlight four very different ways that people are using their
professional skills to benefit the UK’s woods
The mentor The procurement specialist
Peter Vince, 39, is an independent Like Pauline, Dan Ware, 35, helps the
management consultant from Cambridge. Trust’s money go further but his specific
He has provided mentoring for two interest is in buying. He is a procurement
Woodland Trust managers, and has also specialist from Manchester who works full
helped with team problem-solving. time in the financial services sector.
‘Mentoring is rewarding because asking He has helped the Trust to implement a
questions from an independent perspective procurement policy that ensures whatever
can often help to uncover different angles and approaches. we purchase is good value as well as complying with our
And I feel I'm doing something for the Trust that not ethical policy. His experience couldn’t be more relevant as
everyone could do.’ the company he works for is also an ethical employer. Soon
Peter is also a voluntary speaker and gives talks on the they will be donating a day of Dan’s time as he visits the Trust
Woodland Trust to groups around Cambridgeshire. offices to deliver some training.

The accountant The lecturer


Pauline Howells is a retired accountant who Nicky Souter, 55, is senior lecturer in
first became involved with the Trust when they biology at the University of Strathclyde.
acquired a huge area of land near her home In collaboration with the Association for
in Fordham, Essex to create a new wood. Science Education, he is writing a book for
That was two years ago and she’s now schools called Nature in a changing climate.
developed an ‘internal audit framework’
The publication will be offered to teachers
for the Trust.
to use as part of the Trust’s Nature Detectives project (see
This ensures that when the organisation spends money, it is 1580
page 13). a
even more efficiently monitored than before. The framework Janu
also enables other qualified volunteers to carry out an audit. Nicky says, ‘I’ve found the insight into climate change
Such careful housekeeping pleases funders and sees every compelling and it’s kept me off the golf course where I do
penny well spent. most of my field observations!’.

1658
C LO S E U P
Trust’s Council which is responsible for governing and
16
Name: John Lake supervising the Trust. But the chairman is, in some ways,
Volunteer role: chair of trustees also a link between the trustees and the chief executive.
Age: 57 Q: What do you enjoy about it?
Location: North London A: Being part of an organisation that is as successful as
Occupation: retired investment the Woodland Trust and helping to ensure that the
banker, various non-executive posts Trust can continue to achieve its aims. Most important
is the opportunity to work with such committed and
Q: How did you first get involved? interesting people.
A: I became a trustee in 2001, having responded to an Q: What moves you about trees and woods?
advert. It was exactly the kind of thing I wanted to do
after working in the City for 20 years. I became
A: Despite living in the capital, I am very lucky to be near a
piece of ancient woodland full of oaks and hornbeams.
chairman of the Woodland Trust last year.
There is something really peaceful and beautiful about
Q: What’s the role about?
many ancient woods and it is truly inspiring to be
A: The most obvious part is chairing the meetings of the creating new woodland for the future.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 12

VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 11

Historical research:
unlocking the secrets of the past
Peter Bloxham, reveals the pleasures of unraveling the history of your local wood

Whilst enjoying a woodland walk, do you ever wonder what secrets the wood holds?
What of those undulations and earthworks? It’s the old park pale, the boundary
of an ancient deer park. This, in turn, is part of an ancient Royal Forest, once
renowned for vast herds of deer, an abundance of game birds, even golden
eagles: a hunting ground for king and nobility up to the 1700s.

Consider the path you follow. It’s an ancient trackway – a road before 1800,
dating back to Roman times.

What was that overgrown track passing through the wood? It is the route once
taken by funeral parties for burials at a neighbouring village church, known
over the centuries as ‘Procession Way’.

And what do you make of that rocky outcrop, almost hidden at one end of the wood?
It’s an example of the oldest rocks in the British Isles,
formed in the pre-Cambrian period, some
th
700 million years ago.
eo ple wi
p
fe d 400 beef From old manorial estate records (see left)
k it c hen cluding wans, s.
the eries in boar, s ackbird we can learn much about life in and around
e liv i ld b l
1580
y3
rd d
n is o n, w rks and the woods over the centuries.
nua r
v e , l a e r y .
rows ds
Ja v
spar i d for e the woo Old maps and documents could reveal
y p a g i n
penn din the wood existed in the 1600s, making
one [sic] fee e hen
8 h o gg p a id on ght to it an ancient woodland.
16 5
g e r e r i
ch villa d for th These are just a few examples of
e a L o r ls ,
e . a i
167
7 to th ct wood d for r f the the details uncovered by researching
coll e le o
b er fel s part three Woodland Trust woods in
h ti m te s a s.
muc and ga closure e r e d to the Midlands, a truly fascinating
n v .
deli asants
2 s
177
1– 1
77
post ess of I r le y e
activity.
c a p h
pro b
s of feed the cost So why not become an
a d
lo s to t a
u r e d a
fo ood lant historical research volunteer
e w s p
187
5 th
0 0 tree -6d. for woods in your area?
,0 1 5 s
20 78- Those woods will never seem
5 o f £
189 the same again.

Extracts from
manorial estate records
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 13

12 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111

continued from front page

and Birmingham's at the end of 2006 or early next I N BU S I N E S S


year. Ed will be encouraging us to make our views
known to these planning inquiries.
What your company
Aviation is one of the key campaigning issues for Ed
and his colleagues. Others include climate change,
could do for us
ancient trees and individual woods under threat. The value of the support
the Woodland Trust gets
The campaigns team have also been working with from companies is
members to put the record straight on badgers in the immeasurable.
British countryside. Early in 2006 the Government
Involvement with us
consulted experts on how to go about culling badgers,
also gives companies
which Ed sees as ‘a misguided attempt to control
the opportunity to
bovine TB’.
engage with key
The scientific evidence, he says, indicates that the way environmental issues.
Partnerships get results.
cattle are kept and moved is a more significant factor
We have a team dedicated to Sainsbury's Woodland eggs have
in spreading the disease. The Government's raised over £60,000 for our woods.
forging links with organisations.
consultation exercise is now finished, but hundreds of
That’s where you can help. One of
Trust supporters made their voices heard and the
the best ways of making contact with an organisation is through
campaigns team are waiting to hear if DEFRA (the
employees who already have links with the Trust.
Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
takes notice of the overwhelming weight of public If you think the company you work for might be interested in
opinion. exploring opportunities to work with us we’d be delighted if you
Woods under threat could encourage the key decision makers to get in touch. Whether
is a key battleground your company is looking to improve its environmental credentials
for the campaigners, and reduce its carbon emissions or for ways to engage its staff with
and the Trust has just the charity sector, we can tailor make packages to cater for them.
launched an
Nick Cobbing

interactive website to
help volunteers. Payroll giving
Campaigns on this subject tend to be locally focussed
67 per cent of employees believe
and locally driven, but campaigners will have interests and
information needs in common. The Trust has been that employers should offer staff
developing www.woodsunderthreat.info to support the chance to donate to their
volunteers' efforts. New interactive features of the favourite causes directly from
website will enable volunteers to get the information their salary.
they need to submit objections to planning applications,
If you are an employee who would like to
and to link up with others interested in the same issue.
give regularly to charity, or you think your company could offer its
On the issue of climate change, the Trust is developing staff the opportunity to sign up to payroll giving schemes, then now
a personal pledge where supporters can sign up to is the time. Generous incentives are now being offered by the UK
reduce their own carbon emissions and then ask the Government to help set up and support payroll giving.
Government to take action to do the same at a
national scale. Watch this space. Payroll giving is a simple, tax efficient way to donate. Payments are
made directly from employee salaries every pay day, providing the
Take action Woodland Trust with the security of a regular source of income.
Individual action does save woods. By their nature,
campaigns are fast moving so for the very latest ways to
help, see www.woodland-trust.org.uk/campaigns/takeaction.
For more information about corporate partnership
Take a look at Trees under threat on page 3 and the Woods
opportunities and payroll giving
Under Threat case file on page 7.We also need campaign
visit www.woodland-trust.biz or call 01476 581112.
letter writers (see page 15).
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 14

VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 13

PHENOLOGY
The Woodland Trust runs the UK Phenology Network with the Centre for Ecology
and Hydrology. It gathers crucial information about how climate change is
affecting UK wildlife, with the help of over 21,000 recorders.
To become a phenology volunteer, visit www.phenology.org.uk or call 0800 026 9650.

Teaching the teachers


Have you got what it takes to show teachers how
CLOSE UP
Name: Jennifer Wright
to make the most of our assets? Volunteer roles: phenology
Nature Detectives is recorder
the junior arm of the Age: 58
phenology project.
Location: Harlow, Essex
With fantastic
resources available Occupation: retired state
online, it helps young registered nurse
people to develop a
lifelong love of our
Q: How did you first get involved?
natural heritage. They A: I’ve been housebound due to ill health since 1997. In
can use it to improve 2002 I fractured my spine and while I was in hospital
Steven Kind

their wildlife my husband died. It took me two years to recover


identification skills, mentally but by June 2005 I felt well enough to take
enjoy fun learning activities and get involved in hands up new interests. I came across the Woodland Trust
on recording of seasonal events. and now go out on my electric scooter and take note
Most young people hear about of the changing seasons.
Nature Detectives through their Q: What do you get out of it?
school so we’re looking for people
enaturen
otes
who can show teachers how to A: I enjoy it so much! I was a very busy person before I
get the most from the project. became disabled so I was delighted to find something
I can do now.
The new volunteer role of ‘In
school trainer’ will involve running I’ve got a deeper knowledge of nature now and was
training sessions for primary or secondary thrilled to receive the charts, books and posters.
school teachers. Trainers will be asked to recruit I take my seven year old granddaughter out, me on
teachers onto the sessions, organise the events and my electric scooter and her on her toy scooter, and
present the training. hunt for the first snowdrops or leaf buds and record
A typical training session would include explaining the the dates.
Nature Detectives project, exploring the online resources Q: What inspires you about woodland?
and hosting a practical outdoor session helping teachers to
become more familiar with some of the species recorded A: When our kids were growing up we visited a forest in
on the scheme. Norfolk that stretched for miles.You went in and
everyone spoke in hushed tones like in a cathedral.
All you need is some experience of
There’s nothing more beautiful or imposing than a
running events and training sessions,
tree in full bloom, its new leaves a luminous green.
a little knowledge of environmental
The age that trees live to I find fascinating and
education and your own PC with PHENOLOGY
humbling. The sheer variety of landscapes in our small
internet access. PHOTOGRAPHERS
See pages 8 & 9 country is awesome and lovely.
Contact the volunteers team for details.
Our future generations need you!
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 15

14 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111

F R E Q U E N T LY A S K E D
QUESTIONS
Q Why do I
A Our woodland officers manage up to 50 sites each. This involves organising budgets
sometimes have trouble and management plans, liaising with contractors, preparing risk assessments, monitoring the
sites, supporting Trust activities there, consulting with local people and dealing with any day
getting a quick response
to day issues that arise.
from my woodland officer?
All in all this adds up to a very busy job. But they are lucky to have several volunteers
assisting them in different ways and you are entitled to some support. In most cases
woodland officers should be able to meet with you at least annually and also provide you
with an up-to-date risk assessment for the site and your role. Depending on your level of
involvement it may be appropriate to meet more frequently.

Woodland officers are available via phone and email but because they are so busy they may
not be able to respond immediately. They do work from home so please respect their
privacy by not passing on their contact details to anyone unless they have said it’s OK.
Thanks for your patience.

Q What happens A When you first express an interest in volunteering we request information for our
to the registration and database either through a paper form or an electronic version. This ensures we hold
accurate information about you so we can keep you informed and match you with the
update forms I fill out?
most appropriate volunteer roles.

We never pass your personal details onto outside organisations.

Once we have received this form we don’t normally acknowledge receipt to save time and
postage. But we do like to send an acknowledgement email to those people who register
online as they may not have had any personal contact from the Trust until this point.

About once a year, usually to tie in with a mailing of the Volunteer Newsletter, we also send
out an annual update form. This is used to keep your details up-to-date and sometimes we
ask more questions. For example, this year we asked all of our voluntary wardens how many
hours they put in at which woods. We then updated our records with the wood name and
were able to raise our estimates of the time spent volunteering by an average of 2 1/2 hours
a month for each warden. We can now use this information to help us fundraise.

Q Should I let anyone A Yes, please. We ask that you tell either your task manager or the volunteers team
know if I can’t volunteer direct. We can then adjust your record so you are not contacted while you are not
for a while because I’m ill, volunteering and, where necessary, we make sure that your time is not included in the
or if I decide to stop Volunteer Investment Value Audit (VIVA) calculations.
volunteering altogether? We understand there are times you may want to stop volunteering for a while so let us
know if this happens. Equally please let us know if you are ready to start again. That way we
can make sure you are informed of any news, events and opportunities that might arise.
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 16

VOLUNTEER NEWSLETTER 15

VO L U N T E E R
O P P O RT U N I T I E S
If you’re looking for more ways to help the Woodland Trust and develop your talents
here are some vacancies to whet your appetite. There are lots of other ideas throughout
the newsletter. For even more suggestions and information on how to get involved,
contact the volunteers team or visit www.woodland-trust.org.uk/getinvolved

Campaign they have of the Woodland


Trust. So the role of
ordered the production of the
syrup as rosehips were a vital,
Editorial
letter writer receptionist is a very cheap source of vitamin C assistant –
UK-wide important and fulfilling one. for the nation at a time when The Volunteer
Could you add weight to We are looking for a pool of little fruit was being imported.
Newsletter
people who could fill in on an Records of collection dates
our campaigning by writing Grantham, Lincolnshire
ad hoc basis at our offices in will show us when rosehips
letters to appropriate bodies?
Grantham. Full training will were ripening in the 1940s If you are reading this
Our public affairs team will be given. This role will suit and 50s. We can then Newsletter we’re sure you
be able to advise you on the someone who enjoys meeting compare them with today’s will have an appreciation of
hottest topics and who the people and has an excellent dates. This will provide us how worthwhile it is! It
letters should be addressed telephone manner. with important data to keeps volunteers in touch,
to.Your role will be vital in inform our phenology provides inspiration and
bringing concerns about Phenology research (see the encourages new volunteers
to come on board.
environmental destruction to
the attention of decision-
researcher – introduction to page 13 to
find out more about the We are looking for someone
makers and policy specialists. Rosehips phenology project). who can help put together
Preston, Lancashire An internet search has the newsletter by carrying
For more information, read
revealed that two examples out administration such as
the feature article on the
front page, and visit
This is a truly fascinating of these county records are collating the initial ideas,
role for someone interested chasing content, fact checking
www.woodland- still in existence at some
in wildlife and history. and proofreading. If you
trust.org.uk/campaigns/ records offices. We are
Some of our phenology looking for someone near would like to and you have a
takeaction
recorders have discovered the Preston records office talent for it, there is also a
chance to get involved with
Receptionist that, during World War Two
and into the 1950s, the
who can go and sift through
editing and writing.
the records to discover
Grantham, Lincolnshire
Ministry for Food encouraged these dates. We will then The volume of work will
For many people, an mainly schoolchildren to collate the results and find fluctuate but we estimate the
encounter with our reception collect rosehips to make out what they tell us about role will take between 1/2 and
staff is the first experience syrup. The Government climate change. 1 day a week.

We welcome contributions to this newsletter.


Short items or ideas for longer articles can be sent to:

email: newslettereditor@woodland-trust.org.uk

post: Sallyanne Flemons, Editor, the Volunteer Newsletter,


The Woodland Trust, Autumn Park, Grantham, Lincolnshire NG31 6LL
Summer06 Newsletter 23/5/06 10:57 am Page 1

16 email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk tel: 01476 581111

N E W S & C O N TAC T S
Lost
VO
and found CLOSE UP
Paw prints, Christmas Name: Peter and Rosemary
cards, doodles, dog leads, Dodd
wildlife spied, notes to friends…
Volunteer roles: voluntary
These are just some of the things Pam Veale’s found in the box speakers and anything else we
she maintains in Tyrrels Wood in Pulham Market, Norfolk. A are asked to do!
visitor’s book is kept clean and dry inside, attached with cables
to a bench in a clearing deep in the wood.
Location: Newcastle upon
Tyne
Pam’s been taking delight in checking
Occupation: retired
the box for several years now and it’s
industrial chaplain and volunteer
really appreciated by visitors who use
coordinator
it for all manner of things.

‘People use it to say what they


love about the wood, some to
Q: What have you done so far?
give messages to friends visiting A: Since retiring together eight years ago, we’ve given
the spot, others to draw little over 150 talks, help to manage our local woods,
sketches or record wildlife record for phenology (see page 13), provide
sightings. Children especially like it photos and have adopted a school to help them
and even dogs sign it. It’s been used facilitate their environmental education.
as a lost property box too.’
Q: Why did you get involved?
The credits A: We took up the cause of trees, inspired by what
A huge thank you to this issue’s voluntary contributors: we saw in Scotland where only 1 per cent of the
Bennet Aldous, cartoonist Phil Marshall, ancient Caledonian forest is left. But we also saw
Peter Bloxham, ancient tree page editor how much remarkable work was being done to
feature writer George McLaughlin, restore it and wanted to help make a difference.
David Goymour, feature writer
And we love going to woods whatever the weather.
feature writer John Northover,
Tyneside is very urban. We need to enthuse people
Ian Hammerton, feature writer
about trees to meet the overwhelming needs of the
My Patch writer Frances Nichols,
environment in the light of climate change.
Mandy Hillier, feature writer proofreader
... and everyone who provided pictures for free or agreed to be Q: Why the Woodland Trust?
interviewed. If you’d like to help with the next issue, see page 15.
A: We feel that no-one else is speaking out nationally
Getting in touch on this subject with authority. Now the Woodland
Trust’s name is mentioned consistently when
The Woodland Trust woodland issues are raised.
Autumn Park, Grantham, Lincolnshire NG31 6LL
Tel: 01476 581111 Fax: 01476 590808
Q: What inspires you about woods?
BT Textdirect: 18001 01476 581135 A: Their beauty, variety, longevity and movement
email: volunteers@woodland-trust.org.uk inspire awe and wonder. The changing seasons are
www.woodland-trust.org.uk/getinvolved uplifting. Trees provide a wonderful habitat within
the cycle of their lives and beyond.

The Woodland Trust logo is a registered trademark Registered Charity No. 294344 A non-profit making company limited by guarantee Registered in England No. 1982873
Ê Printed on recycled paper

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