PID A/D

U
F

RAM

GLOBAL SUPPLIERS OF TURBINE

ID

AND COMPRESSOR CONTROL SYSTEMS

UM3300/H

Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual

#
Hardware Reference
Installation, Maintenance and General Operation
Publication UM3300/H (1.1.0)
Product Version: #61-001 August 2007

Documentation Feedback Form
4725 121st Street Des Moines, Iowa 50323, U.S.A. Phone: (515) 270-0857 Fax: (515) 270-1331 Web: www.cccglobal.com

For a list of certifications, see the Agency Certifications for Series 3++ Controllers technical note [TN41] at the back of this manual. For environmental and safety recommendations, see page 14

© 1987-2007, Compressor Controls Corporation. All rights reserved. This manual is for the use of Compressor Controls Corporation and is not to be reproduced without written permission. Air Miser, Guardian, Recycle Trip, Reliant, Safety On, SureLink, TTC, Total Train Control, TrainTools, TrainView, TrainWare, Vanguard, Vantage, WOIS, and the TTC and impeller logos are registered trademarks; and COMMAND, TrainPanel, and the Series 3++ and Series 5 logos are trademarks of Compressor Controls Corporation. Other company and product names used in this manual are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. The control methods and products discussed in this manual may be covered by one or more of the following patents, which have been granted to Compressor Controls Corporation by the United States Patent and Trademark Office: 4,949,276 5,622,042 5,879,133 6,116,258 6,494,672 5,347,467 5,699,267 5,908,462 6,217,288 6,503,048 5,508,943 5,743,715 5,951,240 6,317,655 5,609,465 5,752,378 5,967,742 6,332,336

Many of these methods have also been patented in other countries, and additional patent applications are pending. The purpose of this manual is only to describe the configuration and use of the described products. It is not sufficiently detailed to enable outside parties to duplicate or simulate their operation. The completeness and accuracy of this document is not guaranteed, and nothing herein should be construed as a warranty or guarantee, expressed or implied, regarding the use or applicability of the described products. CCC reserves the right to alter the designs or specifications of its products at any time and without notice.

Series 3++ Hardware Reference

3

Document Scope
This manual provides the information you will need to physically install and maintain Series 3++ Controllers. However, it does not tell how to configure or tune them, nor how to program a host computer or DCS to utilize their Modbus communication interface (see the Series 3++ Modbus Reference manual [UM3300/M]). Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Appendix A Appendix B describes the components of and provides safety and environmental recommendations for Series 3++ Controllers. describes the parameter memory and tells how to view or alter parameter values or run tests from the engineering panel. tells how to mount Series 3++ Controllers and connect their field I/O and communication cables. describes the general operation of the controller and tells how to configure the field I/O circuits. tells how to set up and operate redundant controllers. discusses controller maintenance and troubleshooting. describes each configuration or tuning parameter discussed in the body of this manual. describes the controller test procedures that can be executed from the engineering panel of a Series 3++ Controller. lists the replaceable components of the Series 3++ Controller. specifies the physical and electrical characteristics of Series 3++ Compressor Controllers. specifies the physical and electrical characteristics of Series 3++ Turbine Controllers. describes the built-in Modbus TCP to RTU converter options. describes the Series 3++ Redundant Control Selector documents controller hardware revisions. lists the agency certifications for Series 3++ Controllers.

The following supporting documents are included at the back of this manual: DS3300/P DS3300/C DS3300/T DS3300/N DS3300/R DS3301/V TN41

The configuration and operation of each turbomachinery control application is described in its user manual: UM3301 UM3302 UM3303 UM3307 UM3308
August 2007

Series 3++ Antisurge Controller Series 3++ Performance Controller Series 3++ Dual-Loop A/P Controller Series 3++ Speed Controller Series 3++ Extraction Controller
UM3300/H (1.1.0)

Cross-references to other documents specify a section and chapter. and index are also hot-linked but are not green. while the chapter or appendix title appears in the header of even-numbered pages. follow all procedures or steps as instructed. Warnings contain instructions that. Attention may be drawn to information of special importance by using this text styling or one of the following structures: Note: Caution: Warning! Notes contain important information that needs to be emphasized. could lead to personal injury. Entries in the tables of contents. In computerized versions of this manual. while cross-references between chapters of this document specify a page number. if not followed.0) . Cautions contain instructions that. by placing them in parentheses following the spelled-out terms they represent.1. Odd-page footers list the document number and revision level [UM3300/H (1. do not open the enclosure or attempt to access areas where you are not instructed to do so. The appearance of this user caution symbol on CCC equipment or the word Caution appearing in this manual indicates damage to the equipment or injury to the operator could occur if operational procedures are not followed. The appearance of this electrical hazard warning symbol on CCC equipment or the word Warning appearing in this manual indicates dangerously-high voltages are present inside its enclosure.1. Most are also listed under Symbols and Acronyms on page 10. As an example. could lead to irreversible damage to equipment or loss of data. To reduce such risks.0)]. all such references are hot-linked to their target locations and appear in green.4 Contents Document Conventions The document title appears in the header of each odd-numbered page. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. References that do not specify a location are internal to the chapter in which they appear. Acronyms are defined in the sections of this manual that discuss the corresponding subjects. while even-page footers provide the publication date (August 2007). To reduce the risk of fire or electrical shock. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. if not followed. a three-letter acronym (TLA) is a way to represent a three-word subject by combining and capitalizing the initial letters of those three words. illustration and table lists.

Configuration Forms. 13 14 15 16 17 18 18 18 18 18 19 19 20 20 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 28 29 30 30 30 31 32 34 34 34 37 39 40 43 Chapter 2 Engineering Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameter Memory . . CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . 5 List of Figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alternate Parameter Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Termination Assemblies . Label Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Panel Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Key Sequence Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Discrete Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . Parameter Checksum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . Engineering Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table of Contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Serial Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing and Changing Parameter Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Components and Configurations . List Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Discrete Output Control Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary PCB Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Front Panel Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Support Software Packages. . . . . . . . . . . Position Inputs . Discrete Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Document Conventions . . . . . Power Supply Assembly. . . Numeric Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference 5 Table of Contents Document Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frequency Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Chapter 1 Hardware Description . . . . . . . Environmental and Safety Considerations . . . . . . Analog Input Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Groups and Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Symbols and Acronyms . . . . Enabling Parameters . Engineering Panel Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Key Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameter Memory Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Key Sequence Illustrations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Introduction . . . . . . . High-Current Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . .67 Ethernet Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 FIM Position Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Cable Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 FOM Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 FIM Discrete Input Circuits . . . . .47 Disassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Inductive Load Jumper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Analog Input Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Ports 3 and 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 CS= XXXX . . . . . . . . . . . .61 FOM 24Vdc Bus . . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Internal Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Port 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 FIM Analog Input Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . .44 Com# POF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Back-Panel Connections . . . . . . . . .64 Termination Resistors .44 Bad CRC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Serial Connections. . . . . . . . . .51 Reassembly . . . . . . . . . .57 FIM 24Vdc Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 FIM Speed Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Power Cable . .6 Contents Diagnostic Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Analog I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Error! . . . . . . . . .62 FOM Control Relay Circuits . . .49 Analog Output Switches . . . . . . . . . . . .44 No Store. . . . . . . . . . . .66 RS-232 Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Port 1 . . . . . . . .64 Surge Suppression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Ports 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Auxiliary PCB Jumper Settings . . . . . . . .45 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Speed Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Daughter Board Jumper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Chapter 3 Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Discrete I/O . . . . .66 Port 3 and 4 Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 FTA Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Maximum Output Jumpers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Communication Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Fault Relay Jumper . . . . .47 CPU/IO Control Relay Switches . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speed Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Serial Communication . . Output Circuit Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MPU Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Serial Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPU/IO Board Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unswitched Connections . . Chapter 6 Maintenance and Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Output Switching . . . . . . . . . Discrete I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ethernet Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Output Connections . . . . . . . . . . Machine Control Program . . . . High-Current Analog Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loopback Circuit Calibration. Position Inputs . . Reloading the Control Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Output Loopback Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speed Board Discrete I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Discrete Input Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Internal Conditions . . . . . . . . . . 99 Overview . Speed Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redundant Control Selector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPU Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . RCS Power Failure. . . Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference 7 Chapter 4 Configuration and Operation . . . . . . Tracking Input Circuits . . . . . . . . . Status Screen and Menu System Buttons . . . . . . . . Analog Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Monitoring Controller Health . Engineering and Front Panel Operation. . . . . Bipolar Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . Speed Board Operation . . . . . . . . . . Tracking Input Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fault Relay Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Outputs. . . . . . . . . . . Switching Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . User Preferences and LED Tests. . . . . . . . . . . 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 78 79 79 80 81 82 83 85 87 88 89 90 90 91 92 92 92 94 94 95 95 96 96 97 97 97 97 98 98 Chapter 5 Redundant Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Overview . . . . . . . . . Analog Input Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126 Appendix A Appendix B Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . .105 Speed Board Fault Relay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Controller Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Discrete Input Problems . . . . . . .123 Component Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 Spare Parts . .108 Relay Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 Analog In Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Contents Field I/O Screens .112 Power Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 Analog Input Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Front and Test Panel Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 Discrete Output Problems . . . . . . . . . .103 Problem Indicators. . . .123 Return Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Engineering Panel . . . . . . .106 External Alarms . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Replacement Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Fault LED . . . .127 Controller Test Sequences . . . . . . . . .121 Positioning Problems . . . . . . . .125 Programming and Configuration .108 General Failure . . . . . . . .105 Alarm System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Fault Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 Front Panel Replacement . . . . . . . . .114 Communication Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 CPU/IO Board Problems . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Shutdown Log . . . . . . .121 Speed Input Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Tracking Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Speed Board Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Modbus/OPC Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Troubleshooting. .101 Compressor Controller I/O Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Analog Output Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Turbine Controller I/O Signals . . . . .105 CPU/IO Fault Relay . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 Glossary/Index. . . . . . . . . . . .

Series 3++ Hardware Reference

9

List of Figures
Figure 1-1 Figure 1-2 Figure 1-3 Figure 1-4 Figure 1-5 Figure 1-6 Figure 1-7 Figure 1-8 Figure 1-9 Figure 1-10 Figure 1-11 Figure 1-12 Figure 2-1 Figure 2-2 Figure 3-1 Figure 3-2 Figure 3-3 Figure 3-4 Figure 3-5 Figure 3-6 Figure 3-7 Figure 3-8 Figure 3-9 Figure 3-10 Figure 3-11 Figure 3-12 Figure 3-13 Figure 3-14 Figure 3-15 Figure 3-16 Figure 3-17 Figure 3-18 Figure 3-19 Figure 3-20 Figure 3-21 Figure 3-22 Figure 3-23 Figure 3-24 Figure 4-1 Figure 4-2 Figure 4-3 Figure 4-4 Figure 4-5 Figure 4-6
August 2007

Series 3++ Compressor and Steam Turbine Controllers . . . . . . . . . . Major Components of Series 3++ Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Series 3++ Panel-Mounting Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary PCB Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antisurge and Performance Controller Front Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Engineering Panel Mounts Behind the Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . Compressor Controller Back Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turbine Controller Back Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Input Module (FIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Output Module (FOM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AC Power Supply Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13 15 16 17 19 21 22 23 24 25 25 26

Alternate Parameter Set Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Series 3++ Engineering Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Mounting a Series 3++ Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPU/IO PCB Configuration Switches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPU/IO PCB Control Relay Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Input Resistors and Mode Switches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Output Switches and Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jumper Locations on the Auxiliary PCB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-Panel Discrete I/O Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-Panel Discrete Input Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-Panel Control Relay Wiring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-Panel Analog I/O Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-Panel Analog I/O Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-Panel Speed Input Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIM Discrete Input Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIM Analog Input Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIM Speed and Position Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FOM Analog Output Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FOM Control Relay Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Communication Port Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wiring Diagrams for Ports 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting to an RS-422/485 Host Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting to an RS-232 Host Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ethernet Communication Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Cable Connector Configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Position of Loader Switch on Front of CPU/IO PCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Input Signal Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MPU Signal Varies With Speed, Shaft Ratio, and Tooth Count. . . . . High-Current Output Functional Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operation of Bipolar Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Layout of Series 3++ Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 54 54 55 56 56 58 59 61 62 63 64 65 66 66 67 68 68 71 75 80 82 83 89

UM3300/H (1.1.0)

10

Contents
Figure 5-1 Figure 5-2 Figure 5-3 Figure 5-4 Figure 6-1 Figure 6-2 Redundant Controller Data Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Typical Redundant Switching Circuitry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Typical Redundant Control Selector Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Connecting Current-Loop Outputs to an RCS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Controller Status Screen and Menu Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Front-Panel Status LEDs and Alarm Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104

List of Tables
Table 2-1 Table 4-1 Table 4-2 Table 6-1 Data Groups and Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Expected Output Readings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Expected Output Readings for Common Actuators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Acceptable Voltages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100

Symbols and Acronyms
Ω % # AC AD ADC C# CCC CFTA CH COND CPC CPU CPU/IO CRC CR D or DI DAC DC DCS
August 2007

ohm (electrical resistance measurement) percent (parts or divisions per hundred) generic symbol for any number or numeric key Alternating Current Analog-to-Digital variable Analog-to-Digital Converter Capacitor (for example, C9) Compressor Controls Corporation Communications Field Termination Assembly analog input CHannel signal CONDitioning Circular Plastic Connector Central Processing Unit PCB providing the main CPU and Input/Output Circuitry Cyclic Redundancy Checksum Control Relay (discrete/digital output) Discrete/Digital Input signal or circuit Digital-to-Analog Converter Direct Current Distributed Control System
UM3300/H (1.1.0)

Series 3++ Hardware Reference
DEV DIP EIA EEPROM F# FIM FOM FPGA FREQ FTA G or GRD H HDIC HMI Hz I/H I/O I/P IRG IVP J# JB# LCD LED LVDT mA MPU N NEMA NO/NC OUT PC PCB
August 2007

11

antisurge control DEViation Dual Inline Package Electronic Industries Alliance Electrically-Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory Fuse (for example, F1) Field Input Module Field Output Module Field Programmable Gate Array Frequency (speed) input Field Termination Assembly electrical ground terminal electrical hot terminal High-Density Interconnect Cable Human-Machine Interface Hertz (frequency in cycles per second) Current-to-Hydraulic signal converter Input and Output (circuits or signals) Current-to-Pneumatic signal converter Instrument Reference Ground Intended Valve Position Jumper (for example, J3) Jumper Block (for example, JB10) Liquid Crystal Display Light Emitting Diode Linear Variable Differential Transformer (position input) milli-Ampere Magnetic PickUp electrical neutral terminal also speed (Number of revolutions per minute) National Equipment Manufacturer’s Association Normally-Open or Normally-Closed OUTput (IBM-PC compatible) Personal Computer Printed Circuit Board
UM3300/H (1.1.0)

TX3) Voltage alternating-current Voltage direct-current Voltage Watt (electrical power measurement) transmitter August 2007 UM3300/H (1.0) .12 Contents PI PID PLC PSA PV R# RAM RCS RMA RTU RVDT RX S SCADA SP SPEC SV TB TCP TTC TX V Vac Vdc W Xmtr Proportional-Integral control Proportional-Integral-Derivative control Programmable Logic Controller Power Supply Assembly Process Variable readout Resistor (for example.1. RX3) Solenoid Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition Set Point readout SPECial response Signal Variable Terminal Block Transmission Control Protocol Total Train Control® serial port transmission terminals (for example. R33) Random Access Memory Redundant Control Selector Returned Material Authorization (Modbus) Remote Terminal Unit Rotary Variable Differential Transformer (position input) serial port reception terminals (for example.

• If you want to know how controllers are adapted to particular applications. see Chapter 5. • If you want to know how to mount controllers and connect their field I/O circuits. This manual describes the general operation of and tells how to install and maintain Series 3++ Controllers: • For environmental and safety recommendations and descriptions of the controller components.or dual-loop devices that are optimized and factory-programmed to regulate and protect turbocompressors and steam turbines. see Chapter 6. single. • If you want to understand the operation of such controllers and know how to configure their field I/O features.0) . see Chapter 3. • If you want to know how to maintain. troubleshoot and repair such controllers. DEV SP OUT SP PV OUT SP PV OUT SP RPM OUT SP PV OUT ALT LIMIT 2 LIMIT 3 ALT LIMIT 2 LIMIT 3 AS/PF ALT LIMIT CASC LIMIT POWER ALT LIMIT 2 LIMIT 3 Antisurge Controller Performance Controller Dual-Loop A/P Controller Speed Controller Extraction Controller Fault Alarm Fault Alarm Fault Alarm Fault Alarm Fault Alarm ACK MENU SCROLL ACK MENU SCROLL ACK MENU SCROLL ACK MENU SCROLL ACK MENU SCROLL AUTO MAN SURGE RESET AUTO MAN PERF AUTO A/S AUTO SURGE RESET AUTO MAN ESD RESET AUTO MAN ESD ∆ TEST ENTER REMT SP LOCAL SP ∆ ∇ PERF MAN A/S MAN ∆ ∇ OP MODE SP MODE ∆ ∇ OP MODE SP MODE ∆ ∇ ∇ TEST ENTER TEST ENTER TEST ENTER TEST ENTER A # A # A # A # A # Figure 1-1 Series 3++ Compressor and Steam Turbine Controllers Series 3++ Controllers are traditional.Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 13 Chapter 1 Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual Hardware Description This chapter describes the components of and provides safety and environmental recommendations for Series 3++ Controllers.1. Introduction August 2007 UM3300/H (1. • If you want to know how to set up and operate controllers in redundant pairs. see Chapter 4. see Chapter 2. Each can be configured to a specific application and operated without using an engineering or operator workstation. read the rest of this chapter. although Modbus communication is built in and an OPC server and client software is an available option.

Conformal coating is available as an added-cost option for corrosion resistance. its final control element should be immediately transferred to an alternate control device. all circuit boards should be stored and transported in static-resistant. The ground pin of the power connector must be connected to an earth ground. that connector is not designed to assure its ground is the first connection made and the last broken. Most test and maintenance procedures should be performed only while the process is shut down or under another means of control. there is a slight risk of electric shock while connecting or disconnecting that cable to the controller. they can offer no protection against settings and actions that might be ineffective or even hazardous in one application but appropriate in another. an alternate means of disconnection should be provided.0) .1. All wiring and maintenance must be performed by qualified personnel in conformance with all applicable safety codes. Due to the nature of industrial processes and controllers. Because the power connector is not designed to assure its ground is the first connection made and last broken.14 Chapter 1: Hardware Description Series 3++ Controllers are intended to be permanently mounted in a dry environment that minimizes static electrical discharges and conforms to the temperature and humidity restrictions stated on the Series 3++ Compressor Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/C] and the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]. UM3300/H (1. Environmental and Safety Considerations Caution: Warning! Caution: Disconnect the power cable before disassembling the controller or disconnecting any internal component. To prevent damage. If that is a concern. Failing to comply with the installation and use instructions in this or any other Series 3++ Controller manual might create unforeseen safety hazards. Never disassemble a controller or handle its components without protecting them from static discharge and excessive moisture. Warning! Caution: Warning! August 2007 If a controller’s Fault relay de-energizes. However. These devices should only be configured and operated by personnel familiar with all applicable instructions and documentation. water-resistant pouches. Conformance with the safety requirements of various government agencies and industry groups is tabulated in the Agency Certifications for Series 3++ Controllers technical note [TN41].

1. serial communication. all of these components are usually housed in an extruded aluminum case for mounting in a control panel cutout (see Figure 1-3): • The optional auxiliary PCB assembly plugs into a connector on the face of (and is bolted to) the CPU/IO PCB. externally-mounted FTAs. • The Engineering Panel Assembly provides the controller’s configuration and tuning functions. With the exception of the optional.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Front Panel Assembly Engineering Panel Assembly Back Panel Assembly Power Supply Assembly 15 CPU/IO PCB Assembly Auxiliary PCB Assembly (optional) Figure 1-2 Major Components of Series 3++ Controller All Series 3++ Controllers use a common hardware platform that consists of the following major components: • The CPU/IO PCB Assembly provides the controller’s primary computational. • The front panel plugs in and attaches to the engineering panel. • The power supply assembly plugs into a 120-pin connector on the inside of the back panel. • The Auxiliary PCB Assembly provides the added I/O and computational capabilities needed for turbine control applications. • The Front Panel Assembly provides the controller’s operator display and input functions. • The Power Supply Assembly generates regulated 24 Vdc power for the internal and I/O circuits from either an AC or DC source. • The CPU/IO PCB plugs into a 120-pin connector along the front edge of the power supply assembly. • The engineering panel plugs into a 20-pin connector along the front edge of the CPU/IO PCB. Components and Configurations August 2007 UM3300/H (1. • The Back Panel Assemblies and optional Field Termination Assemblies (FTAs) provide wiring terminals for the controller’s field I/O circuits and communication ports.0) . and I/O capabilities.

depending on whether the controller is equipped for AC or a DC power. controllers that do not include it are referred to as Compressor Controllers (see the Series 3++ Compressor Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/C]).1.16 Chapter 1: Hardware Description Case Mounting Slide Slide Adjuster Figure 1-3 Series 3++ Panel-Mounting Case All but the back panel can be replaced from the front of the case without removing it from the panel. Several different Back Panel Assemblies (see page 23) are available for each of these basic configurations. depending on whether or not they are equipped with an auxiliary PCB assembly: • Because that board is needed for some (but not all) turbine control applications. Component Configuration Series 3++ Controllers can be divided into two basic hardware configurations. controllers that do include it are referred to as Turbine Controllers (see the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]). while the engineering and attached front panel are mounted on the control panel door and connected to the CPU/IO PCB using a cable. Such “plate-mounted” configurations are especially useful when the back of the control panel/rack is inaccessible. and the entire controller can be replaced without disturbing any of its field wiring. • Because it is rarely (if ever) required for compressor control applications. and back-panel or FTA field wiring terminals.0) . August 2007 UM3300/H (1. The back panel and internal components can also be attached to a plate that can be mounted in a control panel.

The major components of this assembly (see Figure 1-4) are: • the central processing unit (CPU) with built-in discrete I/O and serial communication circuits. and watchdog timer. • eight electro-mechanical relays triggered by the CPU’s discrete outputs. Similarly. Storing configuration parameters in EEPROMs protects them from being lost or corrupted during power failures (see page 28). memory. • two isolated analog output circuits. • a random access memory (RAM) chip with a backup battery. • eight internal analog input circuits for voltage.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Power Supply Connector 17 CPU Engineering Panel Connector Auxiliary PCB Connector Figure 1-4 CPU/IO PCB Assembly The CPU/IO PCB provides the controller’s central processor. • direct current 24 to 1. 5. and analog output monitoring. storing the control program in the EEPROMs means it can also be updated from such a computer. real-time clock.3.0 and ±15 Vdc power converters.0) . while still allowing them to be easily changed from either the Engineering Panel keyboard or via Modbus communication from a computer workstation running WOIS or TrainTools field engineering programs. and field I/O capabilities. and • a speaker for audible feedback. • eight field analog input circuits. with switches that configure each for voltage or current-loop operation. temperature. • two electrically-erasable programmable read-only memory chips (EEPROM) that store the control program and parameters. CPU/IO PCB Assembly August 2007 UM3300/H (1. with NO/NC configuration switches. with switches that configure each for voltage or current-loop operation.2. 3.1. serial communication.

• All other controller configurations support all eight. Discrete Output Control Relays The CPU/IO board’s boolean outputs are referred to as control relays (CR) 1 through 8: • All compressor controllers have terminals for and thus support only the first five of these circuits (CR1 through CR5). plus one (D9) or all eight of those provided by the Auxiliary PCB Assembly (see page 19). • Turbine controllers with terminal-block Back Panel Assemblies (see page 23) support seven of these circuits (CR1 through CR7). • For turbine controllers. CR1 is of particular interest.18 Chapter 1: Hardware Description Analog Input Channels The CPU/IO board’s analog input circuits are referred to as channels (CH) 1 through 8: • Turbine controllers with terminal-block Back Panel Assemblies (see page 23) support only four of these circuits (CH1 to CH4). Each of these channels can be switch-configured for either currentloop or voltage operation and internally measures its own value.0) . output 1 is the high-current output of the Auxiliary PCB Assembly (see page 19). Serial Ports The CPU/IO board’s four serial communication circuits (Ports 1 to 4) are compatible with the EIA RS-485 standard: • Ports 1 and 2 are used for communications with Series 3++ and other CCC controllers. Analog Outputs Each of the CPU/IO board’s isolated analog output circuits can be switch-configured for either current-loop or voltage operation: • For compressor controllers. CR2 can be switch-configured to do the same. plus the auxiliary PCB’s fault relay (CR9). This provides an automatic indication of hardware failure or power loss. because it is normally energized and thus fails off. Discrete Inputs The CPU/IO board’s boolean inputs are referred to as discrete inputs (DI) 1 through 8: • Compressor controllers have terminals for and thus support only seven of these inputs (labeled D1 through D7). The CPU/IO PCB’s analog outputs are then referred to as OUT 2 and 3. • Ports 3 and 4 are used for Modbus RTU communication with host computers or control systems. Those with FTAs support all output relays provided by both boards. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.1. the CPU/IO board’s analog outputs are referred to as OUT 1 and 2. • Turbine controllers support all eight.

1. • Those with FTAs support all eight. It also provides a single control relay (CR9) that signals auxiliary board faults. and the jumpers to configure it. Auxiliary PCB Assembly Discrete Inputs and Outputs The auxiliary PCB provides eight boolean input circuits (in addition to the eight provided by the CPU/IO PCB) that are referred to as discrete inputs 9 through 16: • Turbine controllers with terminal-block Back Panels support only one of these inputs (labeled D9). Its major components (see Figure 1-5) are: • the Motorola 68332 central processing unit (CPU). • a super-capacitor that powers the RAM when the controller is unplugged and during power outages. • two random access memory (RAM) chips. • the EPROM chip (erasable programmable read-only memory) that stores the control program for this board. • an analog output that can provide a bipolar current-modulated signal of up to 200 mA.0) . and • a daughter board that provides six frequency (rotational speed) input circuit. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. • a universal asynchronous transmitter and receiver (UART) chip that provides eight additional discrete inputs.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 19 CPU Daughter Board CPU/IO PCB Connection Figure 1-5 Auxiliary PCB Assembly The auxiliary PCB (speed board) provides the added computational and I/O capacity needed for speed control and valve positioning. and one LVDT and one current-loop position input. • one electro-mechanical relay and a jumper to configure it as a normally-open or closed indicator of auxiliary PCB malfunctions. in which the results of internal calculations are stored (the board’s working memory).

They are available only through the Field Input Module.0) . this circuit is usually called the high-current output. For example. • a phase inverter that can be turned on by the auxiliary PCB’s CPU when reverse current flow is needed. 60.1. Because this greatly exceeds the usual 4 to 20 mA range. a 60-tooth gear mounted on the main shaft would generate a 5 Hertz signal at 5 rpm. the controller can read any speed that produces at least a 5 Hz signal. It includes: • a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) that generates an intermediate 0 to 5 Vdc signal. • circuitry that converts that voltage into a current signal with a jumper-selectable maximum magnitude of 20. Frequency Inputs The daughter board provides six inputs for reading the rotational speed signals from a turbine’s magnetic pickups (MPUs): • Turbine controllers with terminal-block Back Panels support only three of these inputs (FREQ 1 to 3).20 Chapter 1: Hardware Description High-Current Output The auxiliary PCB includes an analog output circuit that can provide virtually any current-modulated signal from –200 to +200 mA. either of which can be used to measure the position of a control element. This can be determined from the electrical specifications for your MPUs. The corresponding minimum speed depends on the number of teeth on the exciter and shaft ratio. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Position Inputs The daughter board provides one five-wire linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and one bipolar 20 mA analog input. • Those with FTAs have terminals for all six. and • an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) that measures the loopback value of this signal. • circuitry that measures the frequency of any transducer feedback signal modulated onto this output signal. the minimum detectable speed is that at which the voltage of the MPU signal meets the minimum listed on the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]. or 200 mA. • If passive pickups are used. Each such input can read the frequency signals from either active or passive magnetic pickups: • If active pickups are used. and referred to as LVDT 1 and the Auxiliary Input (see the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]).

01 9. two five-digit controlled variable and set point readouts. and key status LEDs are all built into the front panel overlay. plus a TEST key that activates front panel test features. Front Panel Assembly August 2007 UM3300/H (1. and Alarm. • The middle section has a four-by-ten character LCD status screen.3 LIMIT 3 OUT SP 9. The keys. which is unique to each model. As shown in Figure 1-6. buttons. three buttons for its menu system.3 SrgCnt=001 ACK MENU SCROLL Mode Fault Alarm RUN ACK Remote MENU SCROLL RT AUTO MAN SURGE RESET Local Alt PV AUTO MAN Control LEDs and Keys POC Tracking Limit Balance Fallback Stop ∆ TEST ENTER Tracking Limit CV Open Fallback Stop REMT SP LOCAL SP ∆ ∇ ∇ TEST ENTER A # A # Figure 1-6 Antisurge and Performance Controller Front Panels The front panel assembly provides the primary operator interface for the Series 3++ Controller.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 21 Control Loop Readouts and Buttons .1. Screen and Buttons Fault Alarm Mode RUN TotlB=10. three of which are embedded in associated keys.000 SP ALT LIMIT 2 DEV 9. and three buttons that select the displayed loop. Regardless of which model you purchase.0) .4 LIMIT 3 OUT Antisurge Controller Performance Controller Status LEDs.00 ALT LIMIT 2 PV 50. each has: • The upper section has a three-digit control response readout. It is attached to the engineering panel by a swing-out hinge and a ribbon cable. Detailed information about each controller’s front-panel operation can be found in its operator interface data sheet [DS330#/O]. Fault. • The lower section has eight control keys and twelve LEDs. and the Fault and Alarm LEDs. the general features of this panel are always the same. That overlay also identifies the type of controller you have and labels its readouts and LEDs.

the engineering panel is equipped with an embedded microprocessor that controls not only its readout and keyboard. pulling its right side (your left) forward about an inch. It is accessed by loosening the screw at the bottom of the front panel. but also the front panel. The engineering panel is mounted on the front of the controller. and • display diagnostic information.1. Engineering Panel Assembly August 2007 UM3300/H (1. In Series 3++ Controllers.22 Chapter 1: Hardware Description Figure 1-7 The Engineering Panel Mounts Behind the Front Panel The chief feature of the engineering panel is the engineering keyboard (see Figure 2-2). Off-loading these functions from the main CPU allows the controller to run more demanding control algorithms while still providing a responsive user interface.0) . and then swinging the entire assembly forward and to your left. which can be used to: • enter and change the configuration and tuning parameters that adapt each controller to its specific application. immediately behind the front panel (see Figure 1-7).

0) .1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 23 Modbus RTU CH 1 + – CH 2 + – CH 3 + – CH 4 + – OUT 1 + OUT 2 + CH 1 + – Modbus TCP CH 2 + – CH 3 + – CH 4 + – OUT 1 + OUT 2 + FTA-Connector MADE IN USA 1 CH 5 + – CH 6 + – CH 7 + – CH 8 + – CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CH 5 + – CH 6 + – CH 7 + – CH 8 + – CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 4 INPUTS/ OUTPUTS (J1) 60 63 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 PORT 1 TX/RX 1 + – PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 PORT 1 1 TX/RX – + PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 PORT 3 TX3 RX3 3 + – + – NOT USED PORT 4 TX4 RX4 4 + – + – PORT 3 TX5 + – PORT 5 RX5 + – 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC PORT 4 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC 21-32 VDC N N GRD H 35 W max G H 96-264 VAC MADE IN USA N GRD H 35 W max MADE IN USA 35 W max Figure 1-8 Compressor Controller Back Panels All I/O wiring and the input power cable connect to the controller’s back panel assembly. they are referred to as extended I/O turbine controllers. Each controller is equipped with one of five basic versions of this panel: • New compressor controllers use either Modbus RTU or TCP back panels. are called standard turbine controllers. Series 3++ circuit boards can also be used to upgrade Series 3 Plus Controllers that use the discontinued field input / output module (FIOM) and its single FTA-connector back panel (see Figure 1-8). Back Panel Assemblies August 2007 UM3300/H (1. which support fewer I/O circuits. • Those with back-panel terminal blocks. which have serial port terminal blocks or RJ-45 ethernet connectors. • Turbine controllers use either the FTA-Connector or TerminalBlock Back Panel (see Figure 1-9): • Those equipped with the FTA back panel connect to external Field Termination Assemblies (see page 24) via high-density interconnect cables (HDICs). Because they provide terminals for all CPU/IO and auxiliary PCB I/O circuits. respectively.

Field Termination Assemblies Because there is not enough room on the back panel to provide terminals for all I/O circuits provided by the CPU/IO and auxiliary PCBs. the non-FTA versions feature two-part terminal blocks. The specifications for these modules are provided by the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]. the back panel is bolted to the case and the power supply plugs into it. • The field output module (or FOM.24 Chapter 1: Hardware Description Terminal-Block + CH 1 – + CH 2 – + CH 3 – + CH 4 – + OUT 1 OUT 2 + FTA-Connector MADE IN USA 1 OUT 3 + CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 4 INPUTS (J1) 60 63 CR6 1 2 CR7 1 2 CR9 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 PORT 1 1 TX/RX – + PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 1 4 DISCRETE PORT 4 PORT 3 D8 D9 TX3 RX3 TX4 RX4 3 4 + – + – + – + – 60 OUTPUTS (J2) 63 FREQ1 + – FREQ2 + – FREQ3 + – 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC 21-32 VDC N N GRD H 35 W max G H 96-264 VAC MADE IN USA 35 W max Figure 1-9 Turbine Controller Back Panels For panel-mounted controllers. see Figure 1-10) has terminals for all input signals. see Figure 1-11) handles all output and serial communication connections. turbine controllers are usually equipped with two external field termination assemblies (FTAs): • The field input module (or FIM. In order to facilitate controller replacement.1. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. the removable halves of which can be unplugged and reconnected to a replacement controller without disturbing the field wiring.0) . the power supply is bolted to the plate and the back panel plugs into it using a right-angle connector. For plate-mounted applications.

they should never fail or need replacement. Other FTA design features facilitate connecting the controller’s I/O signals to a DCS or other supervisory control system. Because the FTAs have no active components. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. the use of FTAs can reduce panel design and wiring costs. Outputs Figure 1-11 Field Output Module (FOM) In addition to supporting additional I/O circuits. In the remote event one does. Blocks and Config. Blocks 25 Terminals for Discrete Inputs Terminal Block for Valve Position Inputs Terminals for Frequency Inputs Terminal Blocks for Analog Inputs Figure 1-10 Field Input Module (FIM) Discrete Output Fuses and Config.1. the terminal blocks can be disconnected and reinstalled on a replacement FTA without disturbing the field wiring. They also include fusing and dropping resistor options that would otherwise be quite difficult to install. Block CPC Connector for Controller Data Cable Analog Input Fuses and Config. Blocks CPC Connector for Controller Data Cable Terminal Blocks for Serial Ports 1 to 4 Terminal Block for Analog Outputs Terminal Block for 24 Vdc Terminal Blocks for Discrete & Misc.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Discrete Input Fuses and 24 Vdc Fuses Config.0) .

26 Chapter 1: Hardware Description Power Supply 2 CPU/IO PCB Connector Power Supply 1 Figure 1-12 AC Power Supply Assembly Each controller has either a DC or an AC power supply assembly (PSA) with dual 24 Vdc power circuits: • the DC assembly’s soldered-on voltage regulation circuits accept a wide range of direct current inputs (nominally 24 Vdc). The two power circuits share a single power cord and back-panel power connector: • one provides 24 Vdc power directly to the CPU/IO PCB’s 1. and are clearly labeled to indicate their required supply voltages. 5. • the AC assembly’s voltage conversion daughter boards accept a range of alternating current inputs (nominally 110 to 240 Vac).1.2.3. while • the other powers the analog outputs and external transmitter power terminals.0) . This design prevents faulty field devices from affecting the controller’s internal voltages. The AC and DC back panels connect the power supply to different pins of their power connectors (see Figure 3-24).0 and ±15 Vdc power converters. Power Supply Assembly August 2007 Back Panel Connector UM3300/H (1. 3.

1. Support Software Packages Series 3++ Controllers can be configured and updated from a PC running the Series 3 Plus Configurator program. This chapter describes the parameter memory and tells how to view or alter parameter values or run tests from the engineering panel. Each controller model also offers diagnostic tests that are run from the engineering panel. and replace a controller’s configuration parameter set and update or change its control program via either of its Modbus communication ports. These can be viewed or changed from the engineering panel or from a computer running our Series 3 Plus Configurator program. The Series 3 Engineering Utilities user manual [UM5513] tells how to use it in that fashion. On the other hand. which then communicates with controllers via the TrainTools Series 3 OPC Server program. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. which can read. edit.0) . using it to convert one type of controller to another (see Programming and Configuration on page 126) can change the serial port settings.Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 27 Chapter 2 Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual Engineering Procedures Each Series 3++ Controller is adapted to its specific application by setting the configuration and tuning parameters that govern its operation. Using the Configurator program to modify a controller’s parameter set or update its control program will not change the parameters that govern the communication between them. The Platform Engineering Utilities package includes the Series 3 Plus Configurator program. It is included in the following software packages: • The TrainTools Software Packages are collections of programs developed for the 32-bit Windows 2000 and XP Professional operating systems. which could then be restored only from the engineering panel. Detailed test procedure descriptions can be found in Appendix B. • The Workstation Operator Interface Software (WOIS) is an older group of Series 4 and 3 Plus software packages developed for 16-bit Windows 95/98/ME operating systems.

The controller usually keeps both parameter sets identical by continuously comparing the values in the present set to their long-term counterparts. Special Parameter Memory Procedures (see page 43) are provided for defining these parameter sets. it is disabled and re-enabled by special Parameter Memory Procedures (see page 43). Any changes. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. The present set is stored in a battery-backed up random access memory (RAM) that would retain them even if the controller was powered down for a year or more.0) . the Configurator program automatically disables and re-enables that mechanism. Parameter Memory Alternate Parameter Sets Most Series 3++ Controllers allow you to define three alternate parameter sets. Some controllers also allow you to select an alternate parameter set by clearing or asserting a discrete input.1. and correcting any that differ.28 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures Stored In RAM Stored in EEPROM Store 3 Store 2 Store 1 automatic Download Present Set Long-Term Alternate Set Set 1 Alternate Set 2 Alternate Set 3 Keyboard Recall 1 Recall 2 Recall 3 Figure 2-1 Alternate Parameter Set Memory All Series 3++ Controllers store two copies of their configuration parameter values. and switching to a different one. Changes can be made only by disabling that mechanism: • When making changes from a PC. • When using the engineering panel. which are also stored in the EEPROM. determining which one (if any) is in use. are made to both the present and long-term parameter sets. The long-term set is stored in an electrically erasable programmable read only memory (EEPROM) that retains them even if the controller is powered down for years. however entered.

1. the abbreviation for PID parameters on the device page is PID:D.0) .Series 3++ Hardware Reference 29 Data Groups and Pages Each controller’s parameters are divided into data groups and pages to facilitate their entry from the engineering panel. As shown in Table 2-1. For example. Table 2-1 Data Groups and Pages Data Group Key Color Data Pages Antisurge Cascade Device Extraction Gas Turbine Performance Speed Antisurge Cascade Device Extraction Gas Turbine Performance Speed Antisurge Cascade Device Extraction Gas Turbine Performance Speed Antisurge Gas Turbine Speed Abbreviation PID:A PID:C PID:D PID:E PID:G PID:P PID:S MODE:A MODE:C MODE:D MODE:E MODE:G MODE:P MODE:S COND:A COND:C COND:D COND:E COND:G COND:P COND:S SPEC:A SPEC:G SPEC:S PID Blue MODE Red CONDitioning Green SPECial RESPonse Yellow August 2007 UM3300/H (1. each data group has an associated key and key color. the key sequence used to view or enter a parameter or execute a test begins with the abbreviation for its data group and page (for example. In all Series 3++ documents. Reset Controller [MODE COMM]). and each group/page combination has a unique abbreviation (the last character of which indicates the data page). Procedures that are not assigned to a specific data page indicate only the data group key (for example. Transmitter Status Test [MODE:D ANIN –]).

in which each digit can have any one of sixteen values. • and sixteen data keys in the middle. you should record the new values and the resulting checksum on one of these worksheets. If you do not complete a key sequence. Configuration Worksheets [FM33##/C] group the parameters by Data Groups and Pages. • four data group keys across the bottom. Both the engineering panel and Configurator program provide easy ways to determine these checksums. This allows simultaneous access to both the operator and configuration interfaces. Two forms are available for planning and recording the configuration of each controller. If you permanently change any parameters from the engineering panel. Those greater than nine are represented by the letters A (10) through F (15). Determining whether or not the controller’s configuration has been changed then becomes a simple matter of comparing the current checksum to that on the worksheet. loosen the screw at the bottom of the front panel and swing the bezel out and to the left.0) . The controller beeps and displays a confirming message as each key is pressed. Certain Diagnostic Messages (see page 44) may also be displayed by this panel’s readout. the controller will beep and clear this display after 45 seconds of keyboard inactivity. while the Configuration Planners [FM33##/L] list them according to the associated feature.1. Changing any parameter will produce a new checksum. You can tell if two parameter sets are identical by comparing their checksums. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. It consists of three main sections: • an eight-character alphanumeric readout across the top. To expose this panel. Note: Configuration Forms Engineering Panel The engineering panel not only allows you to display or change parameter values but also provides the only method of executing the process and controller test procedures described in Appendix B. Parameter checksums are displayed as hexadecimal numbers (for example. F10C).30 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures Parameter Checksum Each parameter set has an associated cyclic redundancy checksum (CRC) that is calculated by applying a standard algebraic function to all of its parameter values.

One is gray.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 31 ENGINEERING PANEL ∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞ PB – fA Q G HIGH fC M TL LOW fE IN CLEAR Kr 1 fB CONST r fD β RT 7 MVAR LVL d • AN IN f (X) 4 Td 2 SS GAIN K 5 REV ALARM SO 8 TEST OUT A 0 COMM X Tf 3 MOR BIAS b 6 LOCK DISPLAY C 9 RA SP ENTER PID SPEC RESP MODE COND Figure 2-2 Series 3++ Engineering Panel The data group keys are used only to initiate a new key sequence. • Pressing ENTER at the end of a parameter entry sequence records the new value. at which point one of them is pressed one or more times to select the desired data page and group. it has the value labeled in the matching-colored area. Although pressing it at any other point usually causes an error.0) . each of the others is the same color as a data group key. Key Descriptions August 2007 UM3300/H (1. when entering a numeric value. If pressed immediately after a data group key. some multi-parameter sequences allow you to press ENTER to display the value of the second parameter without first defining a new value for the first. clears the digits you have entered so you can start over. The other fourteen multi-colored data keys are divided into four sections. Pressing a data group key at any other point in a sequence causes an error that aborts the procedure. it enters the value shown in the gray area. Otherwise. The function of each such key depends on when it is pressed in a key sequence. The two gray data keys are used primarily to end key sequences: • Pressing CLEAR either aborts a sequence without entering any changes or.1.

1. consider the key in the upper right hand corner: • Pressing the blue PID key defines this as the Tf key: PID Tf PID: Tf MODE: MOR COND: BIAS • Pressing the red MODE key defines it as the MOR key: MODE MOR • Pressing the green COND key defines it as the BIAS key: COND BIAS • If pressed at any other point in a sequence.0) . “OFF/HIGH/LOW”.0).0 is 100. High. The position of any decimal point is fixed. the precision of which is indicated by the number of “#” symbols used to represent its digits. Low. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. which consists of a prompt followed by the current value: • Enabling parameters can have the value Off and one or more others such as On. it is the three key: COND COND: OUT OUT 3 OT3 Viewing and Changing Parameter Values The parameter listings in the appendix of each instruction manual include each parameter’s engineering panel key sequence and confirming display. or “Off/#”. A hexadecimal ten leading digit shows as “A” (A0. The space before a negative value is replaced by a “–”. These ranges are indicated as “OFF/ON”. Pressing the indicated keys will elicit the listed display. • Numeric parameters can have any value within the listed range. • List parameters have a limited number of possible values that are generically indicated as “Value” or “Valu”. or single digits.32 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures For example.

including any leading or trailing zeroes. Note: Caution: To prevent process upsets. then ENTER. You may examine the value of any configuration parameter while the controller is on line without affecting the controller output or your process. the No Store diagnostic message will be displayed and the new value will be discarded. If you make a mistake prior to pressing ENTER.1. 1 for On. A negative value is defined by pressing the minus (–) key before the first digit. you can terminate the procedure and clear the display by pressing the gray CLEAR key. Until you do press ENTER.0 is entered as HIGH 0 0). A hexadecimal ten leading digit is defined by pressing the HIGH key (100. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.0) . you can enter a new value. or a digit) followed by the ENTER key. if you have entered the Enable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 1] procedural key sequence. The required procedure depends on the parameter type: • Enabling parameters are changed by pressing the corresponding key (0 for Off. Any decimal point is placed automatically. and without entering the configuration password.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 33 For parameter arrays. • Numeric parameters are changed by pressing the indicated number of numeric keys. you can press CLEAR to start over. pressing ENTER to finalize a value change also clears the confirming display. LOW. HIGH. the prompt also includes a digit corresponding to the element index and represented by the character “#”. If you attempt to change a parameter without enabling reconfiguration. For any parameter. After a parameter’s current value or status has been displayed. you can change your mind and press as many of the allowed value keys as you need. parameters should only be changed with the controller in manual or off-line. • List parameters are changed by pressing the decimal key until the desired value is displayed and then pressing ENTER. Or.

the Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4]) would be shown as: 4 MODE TEST Inputs Key Sequence Examples The following examples illustrate the procedures for viewing and changing the various types of parameters. key sequence illustrations (such as those shown in Appendix B) usually show only the most important of these messages (to save space). the initial steps of a sequence that might require you to press the data group key more than once (for example. Thus. they are device page parameters that are common to most if not all models of the controller. pressing those keys displays the current status of that option as follows: repeat MODE Enabling Parameters until you see 2 MODE: D LOCK LOC2 OFF LOC2 ON or August 2007 UM3300/H (1. The listing for this parameter gives its sequence as MODE:D LOCK 2 and its display as “LOC2 OFF/ON”.34 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures Key Sequence Illustrations Although a confirming message is displayed as each key is pressed. For clarity’s sake. A good example is Modbus Write Inhibit. Most enabling parameters are assigned to the MODE data groups and simply enable or disable a controller feature. the initial steps of a sequence that is not assigned to a specific page (for example. On prevents them). the Transmitter Status Test [MODE:D ANIN –]) would be shown as: repeat MODE until you see – MODE: D AN IN AN1 GOOD In contrast.0) .1. Thus. they also show only the effective value of the data keys at each point in the sequence. which determines whether or not Modbus hosts can change coils and holding registers (Off allows changes. When possible.

or 0 to select the desired new configuration: HIGH SS3 HIGH SS3 LOW SS3 OFF LOW or 0 or ENTER August 2007 UM3300/H (1. pressing those keys displays the current status of this option as follows: repeat SS MODE until you see 3 MODE: S SS3 HIGH SS3 LOW SS3 OFF or or You can then press CLEAR to leave it unchanged. The listing for this parameter gives its sequence as MODE:S SS 3 and its display as “SS3 OFF/HIGH/LOW”. Low selects the lowest). Thus. LOW. An example would be the Speed Controller’s Alternate MW Input (Off) disables the redundant MW input. or enter 1 to enable it: 0 LOC2 OFF LOC2 ON 1 or ENTER Other enabling parameters either disable the associated feature (Off) or select one of two possible modes of operation (High or Low). High configures the controller to use the highest of the two inputs. enter 0 to disable that feature.0) . or enter HIGH.1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 35 You can then press CLEAR to retain that status.

An example is the Measured Variable Decimal parameter arrays. it follows the second digit): repeat COND 0 DISPLAY until you see # • COND: D 0#. any digit from 1 to 8 configures it to use that analog input).1. which selects the input for its mass flow rate calculation (Off disables that calculation. 4321 (selected digit is replaced by •)”. enter 0 to disable it. pressing those keys displays the current decimal position (in this example. or enter the desired input number: 0 fD1 fD1 OFF # # or ENTER where the digit key used to enter the new value is represented as #. The listing for this parameter gives its sequence as MODE:D fD 1 and its display as “fD1 OFF/#”.1 where the fourth key you press is the digit corresponding to the analog input. pressing those keys displays the current status of this option as follows: repeat fD MODE until you see 1 MODE: fD1 fD1 D OFF # or You can then press CLEAR to leave this feature unchanged. of which each element defines the position of the decimal point in the corresponding measured variable display (Off means no decimal). August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Thus. An example is the Performance Controller’s Mass Flow Input.36 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures A few enabling parameters allow you to select from options that are intuitively numeric by pressing the corresponding decimal key. as is the number (#) in the resulting display. Parameters that define the decimal point positions for front panel display variables are a variant of this type of parameter. The listings for these parameters gives their sequence as COND:D DISPLAY 0 # • and their display as “0#.0) . 43. Thus. They usually either disable a feature or select the companion controller or analog input from which a given signal is to be obtained.

or change it by pressing the numeric key (0 to 4) corresponding to the desired decimal position: 0 0#. 432. or 9600 bits per second. list parameters are usually assigned to the MODE data groups and also have a limited number of values. so they are selected by repeatedly pressing the decimal (•) key until the desired value is displayed. Thus.1 0#. 4. However. which appear to be numeric values but are in fact selected from a list).Series 3++ Hardware Reference 37 You can then press CLEAR to leave that variable’s decimal position unchanged. press CLEAR to exit the procedure without changing the parameter.0) . Finally. 4321 0#. 0#. pressing those keys displays the current value (2400 baud in this example): repeat MODE until you see 2 MODE: D COMM PT2 2400 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. or press ENTER to accept the displayed position: ENTER List Parameters Like enabling parameters. A universal example is the Port 2 Baud Rate. . 43. 4800. The listing for this parameter gives its sequence as MODE:D COMM 2 and its display as “PT2 Valu”. few if any of those values intuitively correspond to data keys.21 0#.1.321 1 or 2 or 3 or 4 or You can continue pressing numeric keys in any order until the desired decimal point position is displayed. which defines the data transmission rate for serial Port 2 (2400.

the relay will be energized when the associated condition exists.0) .1. pressing those keys displays the current value as follows: repeat RA MODE until you see # MODE: D RA#±AAAA where the third key you press is the digit corresponding to the discrete output number. The listing for these parameters gives their sequence as MODE:D RA # and their display as “RA#±Valu (press HIGH or LOW to select sign. Thus. if the value is negative. as is the digit (RA#) in the resulting display. To change the normally energized/de-energized circuit configuration. press HIGH or LOW: HIGH RA#+AAAA RA#-AAAA LOW or Pressing the decimal key will advance the display to the next available function (BBBB): • RA#±BBBB August 2007 UM3300/H (1. then press • to select function)”.38 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures You can then press CLEAR to leave this baud rate unchanged. the relay will de-energize). or press the decimal key (•) until the desired new rate is displayed and then press ENTER: • PT2 4800 PT2 9600 PT2 2400 • • ENTER Some list parameters have both a sign (+ or –) and a list value. each element of which sets the conditions under which the corresponding discrete output is triggered (if the assigned function is positive. An example is the Relay Assigned Function parameter array.

then ENTER for each”.0) ENTER August 2007 . The listing for these parameters gives their sequence as COND:D DISPLAY 0 # – and their display as “AAAAAAAA then EU:AAAAA”. You can then press CLEAR to leave the name and units unchanged. or change the flashing character by pressing the decimal (•) key to advance it to the next possible symbol or the minus (–) key to back up to the previous possible symbol: AAAAAAAA • BAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA – You can also hold either key down to scroll rapidly through the available symbols. pressing those keys displays the current value as follows: repeat COND 0 DISPLAY until you see # – COND: D AAAAAAAA where the fourth key you press is the digit corresponding to the variable’s analog input and the first character (shown in blue above) would be flashing. press ENTER to accept it and edit the next: • PAAAAAAA PAAAAAAA UM3300/H (1.1. An example are the Measured Variable Name and Units parameters. When the desired symbol appears (P in this example). Thus. each of which defines the name displayed above and units displayed after a measured variable’s value when it is viewed via the status screen’s Analog In menu.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 39 You can press any of these keys as many times as necessary to display the desired configuration. Pressing ENTER accepts the displayed relay configuration: ENTER Label Parameters Label parameters are entered as a series of characters individually selected from a list. press • to select. followed by the instruction “selected symbol (A) flashes.

pressing those keys displays the current value as follows: repeat MODE until you see LOW MODE: D AN IN ANL ##. Once you have accepted a character.0) . ANL ##.0 to 99. Thus. The listing for this parameter gives its sequence as MODE:D ANIN LOW and its display as “ANL ##. For this parameter. A good example is the Dual-Loop Controller’s Transmitter Failure Limit.#”. or edit each displayed symbol as described above.# # # ENTER August 2007 UM3300/H (1.# You can then press CLEAR to leave that value unchanged. entering the eighth character accepts the name and displays the units: Psuction ENTER EU:AAAAA Press clear to leave the engineering units unchanged.1. their desired values must be defined by pressing the corresponding digit keys. you cannot return to it without entering the rest of the label and starting over. which defines the minimum valid value (00. Entering the fifth character accepts the new units: • EU: psig ENTER Numeric Parameters Because numeric parameters have virtually continuous ranges.9 percent) for any offset zero inputs. or enter the desired new value: # ANL # .40 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures Repeat this procedure to edit each succeeding character. ANL ##.

Thus. 11. the second is the element index).00. 41 The precision of such a parameter is indicated by the number of “#” symbols in its listed display. The eight intermediate steps (which must have increasing values) are defined by an array entered using a COND X # # key sequence (the first digit is the function number. A negative value is defined by pressing the minus (–) key before the first digit key. 9. If you make a mistake prior to pressing ENTER. such parameters can be given a maximum value of one. the parameter listing will show the maximum value as .A00. 100.0 is entered as HIGH 0 0 and displays as “A0.0). you must press that many digit keys. The listing for this parameter gives its sequences as COND:A f(X) 2 # and X 2 # and its displays as “X2# #.##”.00. When changing its value..0) .Series 3++ Hardware Reference where each key used to define the new value is represented as # and the decimal point is placed automatically. However. ten. A hexadecimal ten leading digit is entered by pressing the HIGH key and is displayed as “A” (100. you can press CLEAR to start over. however.999. or 99. the independent variable (X) values are predefined in even steps from zero to one.99..1. . 10.8.1. 22.0”). 10. 00.0) from a computer workstation and the engineering panel will consequently display them as such (. 88.00. or A0. Note: August 2007 UM3300/H (1.0). only the first and last X values are fixed (0 and 1. A.000. An example is the Antisurge Controller’s Reported Flow Characterizer.0. Most numeric parameters can range from zero to some power of ten. ten. When the routines for entering them from the keyboard do not permit you to enter a hexadecimal leading ten by pressing HIGH.0). even if they correspond to leading or trailing zeroes. or one hundred (1. you must define both arrays for this particular characterizer. or 100. which defines how it calculates the flow rate it reports to its companion controllers from the flow rate used in its own proximityto-surge calculation. In either case..000. or one hundred (for example. the values of the dependent variable (Y) are defined by the corresponding elements of an array entered using a MODE f(X) # # sequence. • For others.2. Characterizing functions are arrays that define the values of one variable that correspond to ten specific values of another: • For some functions.##” and “Y2# #. or 100.9.

Press these keys to view point N’s result (Y2.## where the fourth key you press is the digit corresponding to the characterizer point.##): repeat COND 2 X until you see # COND: A X2# #.##): repeat COND 2 f(X) until you see # COND: A Y2# #. or enter the desired new value: # # # X2# #.0) .## ENTER where each numeric key used to enter the new value is represented as # and the decimal point is positioned automatically. each numeric key used to enter the new value is represented as # and the decimal point is positioned automatically.N = #. Press CLEAR to leave it unchanged. or enter the desired new value: # # # Y2# #.## ENTER again.## where the fourth key you press is the digit corresponding to the characterizer point. as is the first digit (Y2#) in the resulting display.N = #.42 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures Press these keys to view point N’s argument (X2. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Press CLEAR to leave it unchanged. as is the first digit (X2#) in the resulting display.1.

this feature must be disabled by entering the Enable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 1] key sequence. Before you can change any parameters from the engineering panel. the controller will not automatically correct any errors that might develop in its present parameter set. the controller will automatically disable reconfiguration after 30 minutes of keyboard inactivity. you should enter the Disable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 0] sequence when you finish configuring the controller. You can also determine which of these parameter sets (if any) agree with those recorded on your configuration forms by comparing these checksums to those recorded on those worksheets. • You can determine which (if any) of the alternate sets is in use by using the Parameter Checksum [MODE LOCK 4] procedure to compare their Parameter Checksums with that for the present and long-term sets. or switch to a different one: • Each alternate set is defined by assigning the desired values to the present and long-term parameters and using the Store Alternate Parameters [MODE LOCK 3 •] procedure to copy them to an Alternate Set. the controller continuously compares them to their long-term counterparts and corrects any errors. If you do not. To restore this protection.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 43 Parameter Memory Procedures Because the present parameter values stored in the controller’s working memory (RAM) are subject to random (albeit extremely rare) changes. For controllers with Alternate Parameter Sets (see page 28). You can also determine if any of these sets agree with those recorded on your configuration forms by comparing these checksums to those on those worksheets. The Parameter Checksum [MODE LOCK 4] procedure displays the checksum values of the controller’s various parameter sets. determine which one (if any) is in use. • You can switch to one of the alternate sets by using the Recall Alternate Parameters [MODE LOCK 3 • •] procedure to copy it back to the present and long-term sets. Otherwise. any attempt to enter a new parameter value will only elicit a No Store message on the panel’s alphanumeric readout.0) .1. While reconfiguration is enabled. the following procedures can be used to define these parameter sets. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.

• pressing the wrong number of data keys. This message indicates an unreasonable parameter setting was detected and changed during a CPU Reset (see page 77). This message indicates a CPU Reset (see page 77).1. This message indicates you have entered an unrecognized key sequence. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. If the controller repetitively beeps and flashes this message.0) . • pressing the decimal key in sequences that automatically place the decimal point. or • entering an out-of-range value for a numeric parameter. If the controller repetitively beeps and flashes this message. This is typically caused by: • pressing a parameter (multi-colored) key without first pressing the correct data group (solid-colored) key. Note: CS= XXXX Error! No Store Reset This message indicates you tried to change a parameter without first entering the Enable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 1] sequence. the controller will only beep. the parameter memory is probably damaged (see CPU/IO Board Problems on page 117).44 Chapter 2: Engineering Procedures Diagnostic Messages Bad CRC Com# POF The following paragraphs explain the various messages that can appear on the engineering panel’s eight-character display. which can be manually triggered by changing critical parameters. This message indicates a low-level serial communication error (see Communication Problems on page 115). Repetitive beeping and flashing of this message indicates the control program is restarting but failing to reset the watchdog timer (see CPU/IO Board Problems on page 117). or using the Configurator program to change parameter values. recalling an alternate parameter set. one of the engineering panel keys is probably stuck down (see Front and Test Panel Problems on page 114). This message indicates the controller has found and corrected a difference between the present and long-term Parameter Memory. • failing to press the data group key enough times to access the correct data page. downloading a new control program. If a communication error occurs while you are entering parameter values. It usually appears only after installing a new EEPROM. which in turn changed the parameter checksum to the indicated new value (XXXX). or invoking the Reset Controller [MODE COMM] procedure.

Step 8: Use the Set Clock [MODE TEST 9] key sequence to set the internal date and time (Speed Controllers only).Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 45 Chapter 3 Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual Installation This chapter tells how to mount Series 3++ Controllers and connect their field I/O and communication cables. If not. which are described in its user manual. Refer to Chapter 2 and Appendix B for more information on the remaining steps: Step 6: Use the Program Version [MODE TEST 2] procedure to identify the installed control program. If needed. Refer to page 110 if the controller starts beeping repeatedly. Step 7: If the controller was not preconfigured. and connect your field wiring to the appropriate terminals (see FTA Connections on page 57). Be sure to keep a record of these values and the resulting parameter checksum.0) . Step 5: Configure and connect the power cable to the controller and an appropriate power supply (see page 68). Step 3: Connect your field elements to the appropriate back-panel terminals (see Back-Panel Connections on page 53). Step 2: Remove the internal PCBs. Additional considerations apply when installing Redundant Controllers (see Chapter 5). set their switches and jumpers. or Mount the field termination assemblies (FTAs). use the Configurator utility or engineering panel to enter appropriate values for all configuration and tuning parameters. Step 4: Connect your communication cables to the back-panel or field output module (see Communication Ports on page 64). Overview The installation of a panel-mounted Series 3++ Controller entails the following general procedures: Step 1: Mount the controller in a properly-sized panel cutout (see Mounting on page 46). use the Configurator utility or Parameter Checksum [MODE LOCK 4] procedure to verify that the current and recorded parameter checksums match. If your controller was preconfigured. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. use the Series 3 Plus Configurator to load the correct one (see page 71). reload the supplied parameter set or identify and correct any changed parameters using either the Configurator program or the engineering panel.1. then reinstall them (see Internal Settings on page 47). connect them to the controller back panel.

Use the following procedure to mount a Series 3++ Controller in a properly-sized panel cutout: Step 1: Loosen the slide clamp pressure screws. Panel cutouts must have specified dimensions after painting. Step 3: Slide the controller case back into the panel cutout until the flanges contact the panel.1. Step 2: Remove the mounting slides from the case by sliding them off the back.0) . Mounting Note: August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Step 4: Reinstall the slides and slide clamps from behind the panel. Step 5: Tighten the pressure screws until the slides are tight against the panel. DS3300/T also discusses the dimensions and mounting options for turbine controller FTAs.46 Chapter 3: Installation Mounting Slide Slide Clamp 1 2 Pressure Screw 3 Figure 3-1 Mounting a Series 3++ Controller Refer to Figure 3-1 for an illustration of the slide clamps (located on the top and bottom of the case) and to the Series 3++ Compressor Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/C] or the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T] for panel cutout dimensions. then remove the clamps from the case.

Step 4: Pull the internal components from the case (considerable force may be required). Internal Settings Warning! Caution: Disassembly August 2007 UM3300/H (1. and reassemble the controller. To do so.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 47 Control Relays CPU Analog Outputs Analog Inputs Figure 3-2 CPU/IO PCB Configuration Switches The CPU/IO PCB. pull its left side forward about an inch. and some back panel assemblies have configuration switches and/or jumpers whose settings might need to be changed for a specified application.0) . Step 3: Remove the engineering panel assembly from the case by removing the four screws at its corners and pulling the entire assembly forward to disengage it from the CPU/IO PCB. you must remove the internal components from the controller case.1. verify or change the appropriate settings. Use the following procedure to access the internal components of a newly-mounted Series 3++ Controller: Step 1: Make sure the power cable is not connected to the rear of the controller. then swing it out and to the left. Step 5: Separate the auxiliary PCB (if present) by removing the four screws that attach it to the CPU/IO PCB. Disconnect the power cable before disassembling the controller or disconnecting any internal component. Step 2: Loosen the screw at the bottom of the front panel. Never disassemble a controller or handle its components without taking steps to prevent static discharge. auxiliary PCB. then disengage the pins on its rear side from their CPU/IO PCB connector.

48 Chapter 3: Installation DO2 Mode Switch NORM DO2 FAULT NO NO CR6 CR7 CR8 DO6 NC NO DO7 NC NO DO8 NC NO CR1 CR4 CR5 DO4 NC NO DO5 NC DO1 NC NO CR2 CR3 DO2 NC NO DO3 NC Normal Position Switches Figure 3-3 CPU/IO PCB Control Relay Switches CR1 is normally-energized for use as a fault relay. each relay must be configured for normally-open (NO) or normally-closed (NC) operation by setting the normal position switch (DO#) located to its right: • Setting that switch to the lower NC position connects that relay’s field terminals to its normally-closed contacts. so the external circuit will be complete when no fault exists. The operation of CR2 is set by its mode switch. CR2 will be a normally de-energized relay that is programmatically or parametrically set to indicate some process or internal condition. which is located to the left of CR6 on the CPU/IO PCB: • If it is set to its upper NORM position. A relay’s NO contacts are open and its NC contacts are closed when it is de-energized. • Setting that switch to the upper NO position connects them to the normally-open contacts. CR2 will be a second fault relay that only de-energizes when CR1 does. CPU/IO Control Relay Switches Note: August 2007 UM3300/H (1. In addition. • If it is set to its lower FAULT position.1.0) . The NO contacts of normally-energized fault relay are usually selected. while CR3 to CR8 must be energized by the control program (see Discrete I/O on page 74).

which are mounted halfway up on the right side of the CPU/IO PCB (see Figure 3-4): • Setting a switch to the upper (1/V) position configures its circuit as a voltage input. Unlike Series 3 Plus Controllers. • Setting a switch to the lower (2/I) position configures its circuit as a current-loop input.1. Analog Input Switches Note: August 2007 UM3300/H (1. The appropriate settings for FTA-equipped turbine controllers are discussed on page 59.0) . The scaling and testing of these inputs is discussed on page 75. Series 3++ Controllers can be set up for any desired combination of voltage and current-loop inputs.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 49 V AIN I AIN1 1 2 SW11 AIN2 1 2 SW12 AIN3 1 2 SW13 AIN4 1 2 SW14 AIN5 1 2 SW15 AIN6 1 2 SW16 AIN7 1 2 SW17 AIN8 1 2 SW18 Figure 3-4 Analog Input Resistors and Mode Switches The eight analog inputs are individually configured to accept either current-loop (20 mA) or voltage (5 Vdc) signals by setting switches SW11/AIN1 through SW18/AIN8. which had to be equipped with all 5 Vdc or all 20 mA analog inputs. It is also not necessary to install resistors across unused voltage inputs.

• Setting a switch to the upper (2/V) position configures its circuit as a voltage output.1. Terminal-block back panel assemblies have jumpers on the inner side of their circuit boards that can be set to either an I (current loop) or V (voltage) position. either position connects the back-panel terminals to the switch-selected signal. Because these are connected in parallel to the switch-selected signal. Analog Output Switches August 2007 UM3300/H (1.50 Chapter 3: Installation On CPU/IO PCB V AO1 I V AO2 I 2 SW22 1 2 SW21 V2 I2 V1 I1 Inside Back Panel 1 V2 I2 V1 I1 Figure 3-5 Analog Output Switches and Jumpers The CPU/IO PCB analog outputs are individually configured to provide either current-loop (20 mA) or voltage (5 Vdc) signals by setting switches SW21/AO1 and SW22/A02.0) . both can be used only if voltage operation is selected (although the second set of terminals could be connected to a high-impedance voltmeter even if the circuit was configured for current-loop operation. For Series 3++ Controllers. The turbine controller FOM provides two sets of terminals for each of these outputs. so you never need to change them when installing Series 3++ boards into a case that formerly housed a Series 3 Plus Controller (but the jumper positions would indicate how the switches should be set). which are mounted near the top of the auxiliary PCB connector on the upper-right side of the CPU/IO PCB (see Figure 3-5): • Setting a switch to the lower (1/I) position configures its circuit as a current-loop output.

Jumper JP1 configures the auxiliary PCB fault relay (CR9). The auxiliary PCB includes special circuitry to deal with inductive loads on the high-current output. The high-current output’s maximum current is set to any of three values by setting jumpers JP4 and JP5: • to select a 200 mA maximum output.0) .1. you must verify the correct setting of several jumpers on that board. Connect the center and right pins for normally-open (NO) operation. Auxiliary PCB Jumper Settings Fault Relay Jumper Inductive Load Jumper Maximum Output Jumpers Daughter Board Jumper In order to use the LVDT position input. or • to select a 20 mA maximum output. you must connect the center and left pins of jumper JP1 on the auxiliary PCB daughter board. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. or short the center and left pins for normally-closed (NC) operation. • to select a 60 mA maximum output. If that output is connected to an electronic I/P transducer. short the two bottom pins of both jumpers (labeled 20 mA).Series 3++ Hardware Reference JP5 JP3 JP4 JP1 51 JP6 Daughter Card JP1 Figure 3-6 Jumper Locations on the Auxiliary PCB When installing a turbine controller or replacing its auxiliary PCB. (jumper JP6 is not used). The selected range can be further restricted by setting the high-current output and loopback calibration parameters (see page 82). you might need to bypass this circuitry by removing jumper JP3. short the two center pins of both jumpers (labeled 60 mA). short the two top pins of both jumpers (labeled 200 mA).

until you can engage the tab on its right rear side into the slot in the right side of the case. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Step 2: Slide the resulting assembly into the case as a unit. Secure this assembly by reinstalling the four screws at its corners. then secure it by tightening the retaining screw at the bottom of the panel.1. The CPU/IO PCB and PSA fit into the left-most set of grooves in the top and bottom of the case. align the pins on its rear side with the corresponding connectors on the CPU/IO PCB. Step 5: Reconnect the power cable and FTA data cables or backpanel terminal strips. Step 3: Align the tabs on the sides of the engineering panel’s mounting brackets with the grooves in the sides of the case. Reinstall the four machine screws that attach the auxiliary PCB to the CPU/IO board. you basically reverse the Disassembly procedure: Step 1: To reinstall the auxiliary PCB. Press fairly hard until you feel the PSA “pop” back into its connector on the front of the back panel. then press them together.52 Chapter 3: Installation Reassembly To reassemble a Series 3++ Controller. Step 4: Swing the front panel back and to the right until it contacts the front of the case. Pull its left edge forward about an inch.0) . then slide it back until the front of those brackets is flush with the front of the mounting flange (thus engaging it into the connector on the front edge of the CPU/IO PCB). Push the left side back until the panel is parallel to the front of the case.

All discrete inputs are optically isolated from the connected signals and share a common return terminal labeled by a D in a triangle. The locations of those terminals are shown in Figure 3-7.1. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Compressor Controllers Turbine Controllers 53 CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 CR6 1 2 CR7 1 2 CR9 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 DISCRETE DISCRETE D6 D7 D6 D7 D8 D9 Figure 3-7 Back-Panel Discrete I/O Terminals This section tells how to connect field devices to a controller’s backpanel field input and output terminals. The discrete outputs are dry contacts that are galvanically isolated from all other controller circuits. as well as the fault relay (CR9) and one discrete input (D9) from the auxiliary PCB. • Compressor controllers provide back-panel terminals for seven of those inputs (D1 through D7) and five relays (CR1 to CR5). The controller’s 24 Vdc transmitter power output could be included in their external circuitry but usually does not provide enough power for all of them.0) . • Turbine controllers without FTAs provide terminals for all eight of those inputs (D1 to D8) and seven relays (CR1 to CR7). Back-Panel Connections Discrete I/O Every Series 3++ Controller’s CPU/IO PCB provides eight discrete inputs and eight control relays.

Load Figure 3-9 Back-Panel Control Relay Wiring Figure 3-9 shows how to connect field devices to a controller’s drycontact. Caution: The controller’s transmitter power output does not have sufficient capacity to drive the control relay circuits. CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 30 Vdc. 1.1.0 A. • The right panel shows how to incorporate the controller’s 24 Vdc transmitter power output. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. back-panel control relay terminals.0) .) DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 24VDC DISCRETE 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 + – D6 D7 Figure 3-8 Back-Panel Discrete Input Wiring Figure 3-8 shows how to connect the discrete inputs to external devices: • The left panel shows how to include external power sources. max. non-directional.54 Chapter 3: Installation Externally Powered Internally Powered DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 30 Vdc (max.

as shown for OUT1 in the left panel of Figure 3-11. as shown for CH1 in the left panel of Figure 3-11.1. with the cable shields tied to an earth ground at that point. The negative terminal of the last load should be connected to the negative (–) output terminal. and so on. as shown on the right side of Figure 3-11. Thus. • Turbine controllers without FTAs have terminals for both of these outputs (OUT2 and OUT3) but only four of these inputs (CH1 to CH4). Analog I/O August 2007 UM3300/H (1. the positive (+) output terminal should be connected to the positive terminal of the first load. Voltage outputs are wired in parallel with all connected devices. Back-panel current-loop outputs are connected in series with their control elements (and any other load) as if they were batteries. Current-loop inputs are wired in series with all connected devices.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Compressor Controllers CH 1 + – CH 2 + – CH 3 + – CH 4 + – OUT 1 + OUT 2 + CH 1 – 55 Turbine Controllers CH 2 CH 3 CH 4 OUT 1 OUT 2 + + – + – + – + + CH 5 + – CH 6 + – CH 7 + – CH 8 + – + OUT 3 24VDC + – 24VDC + – Figure 3-10 Back-Panel Analog I/O Terminals Every Series 3++ Controller’s CPU/IO PCB provides eight analog inputs and two analog outputs: • Compressor controllers have terminals for both of these outputs (OUT1 and OUT2) and all of these inputs (CH1 to CH8). OUT1 is provided by the auxiliary PCB. The negative terminal of the first should be connected to the positive of the second. Voltage inputs are wired in parallel with all connected devices. as shown in the right panel of Figure 3-11. The terminals for these circuits (see Figure 3-10) are usually connected to an intermediate terminal block.0) .

0) . These terminals (see Figure 3-12) should be connected to MPUs using twisted-pair cables whose shields are tied to an earth ground.1. However. Speed Inputs Note: Twisted-pair cables are recommended for speed input signals. FREQ1 FREQ2 FREQ3 + – + – + – TB6 Figure 3-12 August 2007 Back-Panel Speed Input Terminals UM3300/H (1. the black lead of each magnetic pickup (MPU) is connected to the positive terminal and its white lead is connected to the negative terminal.56 Chapter 3: Installation Current Loops Voltage Circuits FT FY G FT +5 FY CH 1 + – OUT 1 + CH 1 + – OUT 1 + 24VDC + – Figure 3-11 Back-Panel Analog I/O Connections Turbine controllers without FTAs provide terminals for three of the auxiliary PCB’s speed inputs (FREQ1 through FREQ3). By convention. the inputs are non-polar and will function correctly even if you do not follow this convention. located to the left of the power connector at the bottom of the back panel.

0 Amp 1 (in controller) C D E F G H A B C D E F 1. In order to safely comply with CE electromagnetic requirements. • If the FTAs are located in the same cabinet as the controller. a turbine controller must be equipped with the optional field input and output modules (FIM and FOM). only the controller ends of the HDICs should be grounded (grounding both ends can create an electric shock hazard if the ground potentials differ). Warning! FIM 24Vdc Bus Independently grounding both ends of a long HDIC can create a hazardous ground loop. Specifications and terminal lists for those modules can be found in the back of the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]. The FIM includes a 24 Vdc bus that can be used to power discrete and analog input circuits.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 57 FTA Connections In order to use all of the input and output circuits provided by the CPU/IO and auxiliary PCB assemblies. it is simpler to install the diodes and jumpers for both sources and either leave terminals 1 and 2 disconnected or remove the fuse for the internal power circuit: 24 VDC (to I/O circuits) 24 VDC (to I/O circuits) A C E G A B 1.1.0 Amp G H B D F H 2 (in controller) 1 2 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. connect both ends of each HDIC to equal-potential grounds. It can be configured to draw that power from either the controller’s transmitter power supply or any source connected to terminals 1 and 2. Otherwise. Although this choice could be made by selectively installing diodes and jumpers in the 24 Vdc jumper block. ground both of each HDIC’s shield pigtails. Snap each FTA onto a DIN mounting rail and connect it to the controller back panel using a high-density interconnect cable (HDIC): • Connect the field input module to the back-panel J1 connector and the field output module to the J2 connector.0) . which are collectively called field termination assemblies (FTAs).

0 Amp 14 16 .0) 1.58 Chapter 3: Installation Discrete Input Fuses and Configuration Blocks DI1/DI3 DI5/DI7 DI9/DI11 DI13/DI15 DI2/DI4 DI6/DI8 DI10/DI12 DI14/DI16 1. and install a dry contact device across the field terminals: A B C DI A B C 24 Vdc D E F 50 mA FIM Discrete Input Circuits D E F • If a circuit is externally powered.1. B and E. install jumpers between pins A and D. configure it to bypass the onboard bus by installing jumpers between pins A and E and pins B and F (note that this reverses the polarity of the terminals from that listed by DS3300/T): A B C DI A B C 24 Vdc D E F 50 mA D E F August 2007 UM3300/H (1.0 Amp DI1 to DI6 DI7 to DI13 DI14 to DI16 Figure 3-13 FIM Discrete Input Features Each of the FIM’s discrete input circuits has a jumper block that can configure it to draw power from the FIM 24Vdc Bus: • To configure one of these circuits to use the onboard 24 Vdc. and C and F.

the S (shield) terminal is connected to the FIM’s earth ground. The CPU/IO PCB is switch configured (see page 49) to read the voltage drop across or current flowing between terminals C and D. and 6 Figure 3-14 FIM Analog Input Features Each of the FIM’s analog inputs has an jumper block and five wiring terminals (B. and 3 AI-3 AI-4 AI-5 AI-6 AI-7 AI-8 Analog Inputs 7 and 8 Analog Inputs 4. 5. C. 2. and S). Terminals B. The simplest application is to connect a 5 Vdc transmitter to the C and D terminals (62 and 63.1. the preferred configuration is to connect it to the C and D terminals and set the CPU/IO PCB switch for 20 mA operation (this uses the CPU/IO PCB’s precision dropping resistor): A C E G 24 Vdc B A E C 50 mA 66 67 68 69 70 Xmtr – + CH G F D – + B D F H H Shield August 2007 UM3300/H (1. H.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 59 Fuses and Configuration Blocks AI-1 AI-2 Analog Inputs 1. C. D. and H are directly connected to the corresponding pins of the configuration block. for example) and set the CPU/IO PCB switch for 5 Vdc operation: A C E G 24 Vdc B A E C 50 mA 61 62 63 64 65 + – FIM Analog Input Circuits Xmtr CH G F D B D F H H Shield When a 4-to-20 mA transmitter is used in a simplex application. D.0) .

jumper pin A to B and G to F. uncalibrated measurements unless a precision potentiometer was installed and precisely adjusted): A C E G 24 Vdc B A E C 50 mA 66 67 68 69 70 Xmtr – + CH G F D – + B D F H H Shield To use the FIM 24Vdc Bus to power a 4-to-20 mA transmitter.1.60 Chapter 3: Installation Alternately. jumper pin G to H and connect the DCS input across the D and H terminals: A C E G 24 Vdc B A E C 50 mA 81 82 83 84 85 + Xmtr – + CH G F D DCS – B D F H H Shield August 2007 UM3300/H (1.0) . then connect the transmitter across the B and C terminals: A C E G 24 Vdc B A E C 50 mA 81 82 83 84 85 + Xmtr – CH G F D B D F H H Shield To include a DCS current-loop input in a 4-to-20 mA circuit. a 250 ohm dropping resistor can be installed between the C and D terminals and the CPU/IO PCB switch can be set for 5 Vdc operation (however. this would provide less-precise.

The speed input circuits are capacitively isolated from the MPUs within the controller. By convention. These terminals (see Figure 3-12) should be connected to MPUs using twisted-pair cables. connect it to the auxiliary input terminals (71. However. FIM Speed Inputs Note: Twisted-pair cables are recommended for speed input signals. two for the return coil (53 & 55). August 2007 UM3300/H (1. with the exception of the negative terminal for the rarely used sixth MPU. connect the cable shield to the FIM shield terminal and leave it ungrounded at the pickup end. 6+ LVDT1 Figure 3-15 FIM Speed and Position Inputs Turbine controllers with FTAs provide terminals for all six of the auxiliary PCB’s speed inputs (frequency inputs 1 through 6). Connect the shield to any convenient shield terminal and make sure the left and center pins of the Daughter Board Jumper (see page 51) are connected. plus a common (74).Series 3++ Hardware Reference 61 MPU 1 to 3 Auxiliary Input MPU 4. 5. all of them are located on the FIM. the inputs are non-polar and will function correctly even if you do not follow this convention. FIM Position Inputs The FIM also provides terminals for the auxiliary PCB’s LVDT and analog position inputs: • LVDT leads have five-conductors that should be connected to the corresponding FIM terminals — two for the excitation coil (51 & 52). to prevent ground loops. 72) and any convenient shield terminal.0) . the black lead of each magnetic pickup (MPU) is connected to the input’s positive terminal and its white lead is connected to the negative terminal. • If your controller uses the bipolar 20 mA position input.1.

OUT2 and 3. If there is more than one load. connect all loads in parallel using either or both sets of terminals.62 Chapter 3: Installation OUT: 2 3 1 2 3 Figure 3-16 FOM Analog Output Terminals If any relay circuits are configured to use the onboard power bus. which can be independently set for either current-loop or voltage operation (see page 50). connect all loads in series to one set of terminals.1. have two sets of terminals each: • If 20 mAdc operation is selected. Current-loop OUT1. • If 5 Vdc operation is selected. the negative terminal of the first should be connected to the positive of the second. Its positive terminal should be connected to the positive terminal of its first load. which is configured as described on page 51. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. a 24 Vdc source must be connected to terminals 29 and 30: 24 VDC (from controller) FOM 24Vdc Bus 24 VDC (to I/O circuits) 26 27 28 29 30 Caution: FOM Analog Outputs The controller’s transmitter power output does not have sufficient capacity to drive the control relay circuits and thus should not be connected to FOM terminals 29 and 30. should be connected in series with all loads. and so on. The negative output terminal should be connected to the negative terminal of the last (or only) load.0) . The second set should be connected (if at all) only to a high-impedance voltmeter.

bypass the onboard source by installing a jumper between pins C and H: A C E G B 1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 63 Fuses and Configuration Blocks CR1 CR2 CR4 CR6 CR8 CR3 CR5 CR7 CR9 24 Vdc In CR8 and CR9 CR1 to CR7 Figure 3-17 FOM Control Relay Features Each of the FOM’s control relay circuits has a jumper block that can configure it to draw power from the FOM 24Vdc Bus (which draws power from terminals 29 and 30) and include the provided fuse: • To configure a relay circuit to use the FTA’s onboard 24 Vdc.0) .0 A CR C D H G – 24 Vdc A FOM Control Relay Circuits Field Element B D F H • For circuits using external 24 Vdc power sources.1.0 A CR C D H G 24 Vdc A Field Element B D F H August 2007 UM3300/H (1. install jumpers between pins C and D and pins G and H: A C E G B 1.0 A CR C D H G – 24 Vdc A Field Element B D F H • Each circuit includes an onboard fuse that can be bypassed by installing a jumper between pins A and B of the jumper block: A C E G B 1.

1. For compressor controllers. and all other I/O circuits. Always use shielded.0) Note: Surge Suppression Termination Resistors August 2007 . so external surge suppression devices are usually not needed. In either case. Communication Ports Serial Connections Cable Length Because each serial port supports communication among several devices connected to a single cable. The controller back panel or field output module (FOM) provides compression terminals for all of them (see Figure 3-18). 3 and 4 must be configured as discussed under Serial Communication on page 72. twisted-pair serial communication cables. UM3300/H (1. are designed to withstand electrical surges of 4000 volts or more. each other. The serial port transceivers used in Series 3++ Controllers do not require termination resistors at any of the available baud rates. the back-panel terminals for Ports 3 and 4 can be replaced by built-in Modbus RTU-to-TCP converters (see page 23). Unless RS-485 repeaters are installed. including the serial ports. the total length of the cables in each network can be no more than 4000 feet (1200 meters). All Series 3++ I/O circuits.64 Chapter 3: Installation PORT 1 1 TX/RX + – PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – PORT 3 TX3 RX3 3 + – + – PORT 4 TX4 RX4 4 + – + – Port 1 Port 2 Port 3 TB6 Port 4 Figure 3-18 Communication Port Terminals The CPU chip provides four EIA RS-485 serial ports (Ports 1 to 4). Ports 2. which in either case are galvanically isolated from the instrument ground. The connection of those ethernet ports to other controllers or computers is discussed on page 67. certain RS-485 networking considerations apply. The connection of those ports to other controllers or computers is discussed below.

1. Only one secondary controller can transmit at any given time. Thus. and all negative terminals in a second). these ports are connected in parallel by a single pair of wires (all positive terminals together in one group.0) . Under the Port 1 protocol. Figure 3-19 shows how to wire such networks. In installations where several trains are operated in parallel. and then only to the master. They should not be grounded at any other point. each device transmits in turn to all of the others. Ports 1 and 2 Port 1 Port 2 Port 2 is used primarily for load-sharing and performance override control. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Port 2 networks are installed as shown in the right panel of Figure 3-19.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 65 Port 1 Tx/Rx+ Tx/Rx– Ground Tx/Rx+ Tx/Rx– Ground Tx/Rx+ Tx/Rx– Ground 100 Ω Master Rx – Rx + Gnd Tx – Tx + Port 2 Slaves Tx + Tx – Gnd Rx + Rx – Tx + Tx – Gnd Rx + Rx – 100 Ω Figure 3-19 Wiring Diagrams for Ports 1 and 2 Ports 1 and 2 are used to communicate with other Series 3++ Controllers using proprietary protocols. whose ground terminals should be interconnected using the cable shields and collectively grounded through a single small resistor (100 ohms generally works well). there will usually be a separate Port 1 network for each train. The secondary controllers transmit only in response to such queries. The secondary controllers’ receivers are wired in parallel with the master’s transmitter and the secondary controllers’ transmitters are similarly wired in parallel to the master’s receiver. The protocol it uses designates a single primary controller (the master) that can either broadcast to the other controllers on the network or query a single secondary controller for specific information. Serial Port 1 communication is used to coordinate the actions of Series 3++ Controllers regulating a single turbomachinery train.

and ground the shield at one end only.1.0) . These ports can be directly connected to a host’s RS-422 or RS-485 serial port using either a two-wire or four-wire connection (as shown in Figure 3-20). such as a DCS or a PC running one of our Support Software Packages (see page 27). Controller + – + – G Rx + Rx – Tx + Tx – Gnd 9 25 pin pin 3 2 7 8 6 5 1 4 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 20 9 25 pin pin 3 2 7 8 6 5 1 4 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 20 Host TxD RxD RTS CTS DSR GND DCD DTR 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 20 Converter Host TxD RxD RTS CTS DSR GND DCD DTR Controller Rx + Rx – Tx + Tx – Gnd Figure 3-21 Connecting to an RS-232 Host Port August 2007 UM3300/H (1. as it would then “hear” the responses of its peers to requests the master directs to them. Ports 3 and 4 Note: Port 3 and 4 Grounding Using a two-wire connection will increase the communication load on each controller. The ground pins of interconnected Modbus serial ports must not be connected and grounded unless none of them are grounded at any other point. we generally advise against grounding their networks (as indicated by the lack of ground pin connections in Figure 3-20). That protocol allows a single master device and multiple slaves to be connected to each network (Series 3++ Controllers are always slaves).66 Chapter 3: Installation Host Controllers Tx + Tx – Gnd Rx + Rx – Tx + Tx – Gnd Rx + Rx – Host Rx + Rx – Ground Tx + Tx – Controllers Tx + Tx – Gnd Rx + Rx – Tx + Tx – Gnd Rx + Rx – Tx/Rx + Tx/Rx – Ground Figure 3-20 Connecting to an RS-422/485 Host Port Ports 3 and 4 are used to communicate with external devices using the Modbus RTU protocol. You should use Belden 8723 twisted-pair cable (or its equivalent). Although Ports 3 and 4 are isolated from all grounds.

they must be configured from a PC connected to their ethernet jacks. One or more Modbus TCP clients can then communicate with each of those ports via the associated TCP/IP networks. Because Series 3++ Controllers do not support handshaking signals (such as request-to-send/clear-to-send). Alternately. the controller can communicate with them only as a Modbus slave that cannot send configuration instructions. you can directly connect a controller’s RS-485 port to a computer’s RS-232 port as shown in the right panel of Figure 3-21. as described in Chapter 4 of the Series 3++ Modbus Reference manual [UM3300/M] or Appendix B of the Series 3 OPC Server user manual [UM5503]. you should connect them to the controllers using an RS-485/232 converter with isolated grounds (for example. So. you can not connect very many controllers at a time.Series 3++ Hardware Reference RS-232 Converter 67 If your host is equipped with serial ports conforming to the more common RS-232C standard.1. A typical wiring diagram for this application is shown in the left panel of Figure 3-21. Its upper. Their RJ-45 jacks can be connected to the same or separate ethernet switches or hubs using standard category 5 patch cables. PORT 1 1 TX/RX – + PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 PORT 3 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC PORT 4 MADE IN USA N GRD H 35 W max Figure 3-22 Ethernet Communication Ports Compressor controllers can be equipped with Modbus TCP back panel assemblies that feature built-in Modbus RTU/TCP converters for serial Ports 3 and 4 (see Figure 3-22). a single client can be connected to each jack using an ethernet cross-over cable. In an emergency (say your converter fails and you can not wait for a replacement). However. yellow LED will light.0) . nor use very long cables. the AEG OIC-422). green LED will flash when it is sending or receiving ethernet packets Although the converters are built into the back panel. Ethernet Connections August 2007 UM3300/H (1. its lower. you might need to crossconnect those of the host. When a converter port is connected using the appropriate cable.

each pair of panel-mounted controllers is supplied with a 14-foot (4. and serves as a sink for any transient voltages and high-frequency components of the analog input signals. provides the reference potential for internal power supply voltages and analog outputs.68 Chapter 3: Installation M630 Figure 3-23 Power Cable As shown in Figure 3-23. as shown in Figure 3-24.1. This grounds the case (for electrical safety). there is a risk of electric shock while connecting or disconnecting the cable to the controller.3 meter) power cable. This cable can be cut at any point to provide maximum flexibility in choosing the length of the two resulting cables. The configuration of the power cable connectors depends on which power supply (AC or DC) is installed. Because the power cable connector is not designed to assure the ground conductor is the first connection made and the last broken. AC Cable Cable Controller – (Black) Ground (White) Power Cable Warning! DC Cable Line (Black) Ground (Green) Neutral (White) + (Red) Cable Controller Figure 3-24 Power Cable Connector Configurations The ground conductor of the power cable should be connected to a suitable earth ground. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. both ends of which have connectors that plug into the back-panel power receptacle.0) .

then initiates normal operation and communication with the others. and keys. indicators. Each controller can be operated from any combination of: • its front panel readouts. Overview The operation of a compressor controller is orchestrated by two microprocessors (one each on the CPU/IO and engineering panel PCBs). which communicates with the CPU via another parallel link.Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 69 Chapter 4 Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual Configuration and Operation This chapter describes the general operation of the controller and tells how to configure the field I/O circuits. which communicate via an internal parallel port. • readouts. Turbine controllers have a third microprocessor (on the auxiliary PCB. and switches connected to its analog and discrete I/O channels. potentiometers. either directly or via a Series 3 OPC server. and/or • operator workstations connected to its Modbus serial ports. When the controller is first powered up.1. External I/O and serial communication signals pass between the back panel and CPU/IO PCB via the power supply PCB. initializes its associated components.0) . each processor loads its own firmware. LEDs. Chapter 6 describes the general operation and maintenance uses of the front panel. where they are either read/written or connected to the appropriate auxiliary PCB circuits (which are read and set by its CPU). buttons. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.

it loads the stored programming and interconnections for its internal logic units from an associated flash memory chip. • the analog and discrete I/O interface. CPU/IO Board Operation Machine Control Program The actions of the main CPU (within the FPGA) are specified by a machine control program stored in the EEPROM chips. and • the four serial communication ports. Each such program (for example. and serial communication features of the Series 3 Plus Controller’s CPU and analog PCB assemblies. and • a process control scan initiated by every eighth I/O scan (in other words. I/O logic. • a main loop that runs repeatedly (subject to various interrupts). version 761-001 of the antisurge control program) defines: • a startup sequence (see page 77). the only changes required to run the field-proven Series 3 Plus control programs on these controllers were adaptations to the new internal PCB and front panel features. • the parallel ports used to communicate with the front panel and optional auxiliary PCB assembly. every 40 milliseconds). To identify the installed FPGA firmware. This has two implications: • powering down and restarting a controller can potentially correct some CPU malfunctions. which primarily handles communication tasks and checks for differences between the present and long-term parameter sets (see page 28).70 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation The microprocessor on the CPU/IO PCB is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) that has been programmed to duplicate the computational. enter the Program Version [MODE TEST 2] engineering keyboard sequence and then press the decimal key until the FPGA display appears. • an input/output scan (see page 75) triggered by a clocked five millisecond interrupt. enter the Program Version [MODE TEST 2] engineering keyboard sequence. To identify the installed control program. The FPGA program configures some of its circuits to emulate: • a microprocessor that runs the machine control program stored in the EEPROM chips. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.1. and • the operation of the FPGA can potentially be improved by downloading a new program to the flash memory chip.0) . which can be updated by the Configurator program via serial Port 4 (see page 71). Thus. When the FPGA powers up.

Step 6: Power up the controller. Port 4 must be set for 19.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 71 Loader Switch NORM Figure 4-1 Reloading the Control Program Position of Loader Switch on Front of CPU/IO PCB The machine control program can be updated via serial Port 4 from a PC running the Series 3 Plus Configurator program (see Chapter 2 of the Series 3 Engineering Utilities user manual [UM5513]). pull its left side forward about an inch.200 baud and odd parity in order to replace the machine control program. However.1.0) . A controller is usually prepared for that process simply by initiating manual operation. Step 3: Remove the engineering panel assembly from the case by removing the four screws at its corners and pulling the entire assembly forward to disengage it from the CPU/IO PCB. Step 4: Move the loader switch at the front of the CPU/IO PCB (see Figure 4-1) to its FORCE (down) position. then swing it out and to the left. The SP readout will indicate “Addr. as discussed in the user manual for its currentlyloaded control program. Note: August 2007 FORCE UM3300/H (1. Step 7: Connect the controller to a PC running the Series 3 Plus Configurator program. Temporarily reinstall one of the four screws that normally secure that assembly. Step 2: Loosen the screw at the bottom of the front panel. Step 5: Align the tabs on the sides of the engineering panel’s mounting brackets with the grooves in the sides of the case.” and the OUT readout will display the controller’s computer ID. a Series 3++ Controller can be forced into its program loader mode using the following procedure: Step 1: Power down the controller. then slide it back until the front of those brackets is flush with the front of the mounting flange (thus engaging it into the connector on the front edge of the CPU/IO PCB).

The problematic port can then be identified by displaying the status screen alarms menu. All four are protected against transients by the power supply PCB. The thirteen progress bars along the left side of the dialog will indicate the progress of the program download. and replace the engineering panel. power down the controller.bhf) file from the resulting dialog. There are no internal termination resistors.1. The occurrence of low-level (parity. then select the PC port the controller is connected to from the Port Number menu and the computer ID displayed in the OUT readout from the Controller Number menu. If a controller is not receiving expected Port 1 or 2 transmissions. such errors are not generally serious. move the loader switch back to the NORM (up) position. framing. Step 12: When the download is finished. This procedure is normally used only after a failed or interrupted program download has left a controller otherwise inoperable. which are not usually needed at the supported baud rates. Step 9: Click the Load BHF File button and select the desired control program (. Step 10: Click the Select From Port and Controller Number option. then use the Program Version [MODE TEST 2] engineering keyboard procedure to verify that the controller is now running the desired control program. Step 13: Reconnect the power cable. then close and secure the front panel. • Ports 3 and 4 are used for Modbus RTU communication with host computers or control systems. however. Serial Communication The FPGA provides four EIA RS-485 serial ports: • Ports 1 and 2 are used for communications with Series 3++ and other CCC Controllers. using two-byte registers with a configurable significant range (as discussed in the Series 3++ Modbus Reference manual [UM3300/M]). Unless frequent or continuous. If that happened with a Series 3 Plus Controller.72 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Step 8: Start that program and invoke its Download command.0) . it will light the Alarm LED. Step 11: Click the Start button to download the new program. remove the engineering panel. controller operation could be restored only by installing pre-programmed EEPROM chips. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. and overrun) errors is indicated by beeping and displaying a “Com# POF” message on the Engineering Panel (see page 110). and optically-isolated (from the instrument ground and each other) by the CPU/IO PCB. Step 14: Secure the engineering panel by reinstalling the four screws at its corners. The corresponding Modbus bit and possibly a control relay will also be set.

9600. and 2 stop bits. while the Port 2 protocol and Modbus use the Computer ID Number [MODE:D COMM 0 •]. Each of those parameters specifies the Modbus register value that port would report for most real variables when they equal their normal maximum values (generally 100 percent): • The 4000 setting reports 100% as 0x0FA0.4k baud.2 kbaud and odd parity. This port also uses even parity. 1 start. you must set the Port 2 baud rate to the 2400 bps rate used by the older controllers. that port must be configured to use the same baud rate and parity as the converter’s serial port. which operates at 38. or 9600. The key sequences that set these ports’ baud rates and parities also allow you to select the Port 3 Scaling and Port 4 Scaling. or none. It is normally set to 9600. number of bits per character): • There are no parameters for Port 1. eight data bits. When a Modbus RTU-to-TCP converter is connected (internally or externally) to Port 3 or 4. while the Port 3 Parity can be odd. and 2 stop bits. 8 data. 8 data.2k. however. 19. • The Port 3 Baud Rate [MODE:D COMM 3] can be 4800. the built-in converters available for compressor controllers are set for 19. 4800. both must be set up to send and receive information at the same speed and in the same basic format (for example. its control program can be updated when that parameter is set. • The 64k setting reports 100% as 0xFA00. a controller can be configured to prevent Modbus hosts from setting coil and holding register values by setting the Modbus Write Inhibit [MODE:D LOCK 2] parameter to On. However. If you wish to mix Series 3 and Series 3++ Controllers.1. Finally. By default. The Enable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 1] key sequence must be entered before changing settings from the engineering panel. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Both of these ports use one start bit. multidropped ports require a unique identifying number for each controller.4k baud with even parity. • The Port 2 Baud Rate [MODE:D COMM 2] can be 2400. 1 start. The same options are available for the Port 4 Baud Rate [MODE:D COMM 4] and the Port 4 Parity. and one stop bit. or 38. you must clear the Modbus Write Inhibit [MODE:D LOCK 2] parameter. In addition. even.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Configuring Communications 73 In order for two devices to successfully communicate.0) . • The 4095 setting reports 100% as 0x0FFF. The Port 1 protocol uses the Controller ID Number [MODE:D COMM 0]. Note: To alter a controller’s operation from a PC workstation.

Compressor controllers have back-panel terminals only for CR1 through CR5. Turbine controllers have terminals for all eight. Conversely. The monitored discrete input and intended discrete output states can be displayed by the front-panel status screen. whose outputs in turn energize or de-energize the coils of the corresponding control relays (thus. • CR2 can be switch-configured (see page 48) to be energized by its own assigned function or to de-energize when CR1 does (in which case it should usually be assigned the same function as CR1 so its state indicators will echo those for CR1). • For turbine control programs. those associations are set by the Discrete Input Assigned Function [COND:D IN ##] parameters.0) . • CR1 is a normally-energized fault relay (see Fault Indicators on page 104). Those signals are routed to a clocked-latching chip. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. each scan sets or clears the FPGA’s discrete outputs to indicate whether or not the conditions assigned by the corresponding Relay Assigned Function [MODE:D RA #] parameters exist.1.74 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Discrete I/O The D1 through D8 input signals are routed directly to the FPGA and read by each process control scan: • Compressor control programs associate each of those signals with a predefined controller feature. and provide another fault relay and eight more discrete inputs that are connected to the auxiliary PCB. those outputs will freeze rather than clear if the CPU faults or restarts): • CR3 through CR8 energize and de-energize as their assigned functions set and clear the corresponding discrete outputs.

0) . or • via a precision dropping resistor (if it is connected to a currentloop transmitter). In either case.. Analog Inputs August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Each process control scan then: • averages the last eight values of each signal. 4 to 20 mA) CH (mA) Sampling Hardware Failed if: < AN IN LOW or > AN IN HIGH Failed if: < AN IN LOW or > AN IN HIGH Sampling Hardware AD (%) AD (%) SV = AD SV = 1. • compares the result to the 21. The Analog Input Switches (see page 49) route each such signal to a multiplexed 14-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) either: • directly (if it is connected to voltage transmitter). then triggers a logic circuit that sequences the reading of new values for the next I/O scan. there is no need and no provision for calibrating any such circuit. and filtered and isolated (from the instrument ground and each other) by the CPU/IO PCB.g.0 mA smart-transmitter fail level specified by the Namur NE 43 recommendation and a configurable testing range set by that input’s Analog Input Low Alarm Limit [MODE:D ANIN # LOW] and Analog Input High Alarm Limit [MODE:D ANIN # HIGH] or the Dual-Loop A/P Controller’s common Transmitter Failure Limit [MODE:D ANIN LOW]. 0 to 10 V) CH (V) 75 AN IN ON (e.1. whose signals are protected against transients by the power supply PCB.20%) MODE TEST 4 SV (%) MODE TEST 4 SV (%) MV = Min + (Span · SV) MV = Min + (Span · SV) MV MV Figure 4-2 Analog Input Signal Processing The CPU/IO PCB provides eight analog field input circuits (CH1 to CH8).. Each five millisecond input scan retrieves the digital values of these signals.25 • (AD .Series 3++ Hardware Reference AN IN OFF (e. either before shipment or in the field.g.

Measured Variable Minimum [COND:D DISPLAY 0 # LOW].1. Analog Outputs The CPU/IO PCB provides two analog outputs that are powered by the isolated 24 Vdc field power circuit and internally protected against electrostatic discharge and other voltage transients. and the internal temperature. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. an output failure alarm would be indicated and any output failure relays would be set. which usually can be clamped and/or nonlinearly scaled as appropriate for the connected field device. If its Measured Variable Display [COND:D DISPLAY 0 #] is enabled. Each process control scan specifies a new normalized value for each of these outputs. any discrepancy between the actual and intended values is not considered a fault. Compressor controllers label these circuits OUT1 and OUT2. which are used to monitor the analog output signals.0) . The generated voltages are monitored by internal analog inputs.0 and 100. These output circuits are calibrated prior to shipment and cannot be adjusted in the field. and • calculates its measured variable engineering units value by linearly scaling that signal variable within the range defined by its Measured Variable Maximum [COND:D DISPLAY 0 # HIGH]. an input’s measured variable value and alarm limits status can be displayed by the front panel status screen. The intended values are latched. The Transmitter Status Test [MODE:D ANIN –] and the Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4] can be used to view any input’s alarm limits status and signal variable value from the engineering panel. and the intended and measured value of each can be displayed by the front-panel status screen. The 16-channel ADC also reads eight internal analog inputs. Because PID control algorithms automatically adjust to inaccurately calibrated output circuits. The front panel status screen can also display all of these variables (see Monitoring Controller Health on page 100). Measured Variable Decimal [COND:D DISPLAY 0 # •]. and Measured Variable Name and Units [COND:D DISPLAY 0 # –]. However. the five componentpower voltages.0 percent of the span selected by that input’s Offset Zero Input [MODE:D ANIN #] parameter. while turbine controllers label them OUT2 and OUT3 (OUT1 is the speed board’s High-Current Analog Output). so the generated voltages freeze if the CPU faults or restarts.76 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation • calculates its signal variable value by scaling it to between 00. It then triggers a logic circuit that sequences the conversion of those values to voltage signals by the 16-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC).

Resets its serial ports and analog input circuitry. the Speed Controller will execute a hard reset (which initiates an emergency shutdown) when it is powered up or detects a fault. and instructs the engineering panel to display the resulting parameter checksum (“CS=####”). It then resets the emulated CPU. 4. Assigns default values to any configuration parameters that have unreasonable values. Writes the “Reset” message to the engineering panel readout. the controller is reconfigured from a workstation. Initiates a new scan of the machine control program. A CPU reset is also initiated when the watchdog timer triggers the CPU/IO Fault Relay (see page 105). which stores the most recent values of all control program internal variables. 5. Note that the battery-backed RAM. is not initialized. Thus. Initializes the I/O circuitry and serial ports. which does not change the operating state or analog output.1. critical parameters are changed or an alternate parameter set is recalled. However.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 77 CPU Reset When a controller is first powered up. 2. those programs can and generally do resume control of the process from its last known state.0) . Sends a restart instruction to the engineering panel. 3. 6. which: 1. Most controllers always execute a soft reset. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. the FPGA loads the stored programming and interconnections for its internal logic units. or the Reset Controller [MODE COMM] key sequence is entered from the engineering panel.

that loop is supported only by the speed controller and is used primarily for upgraded Series 3 Plus systems that implemented it prior to the development of our external Digital Positioning Module (see the Valve Positioning section in Chapter 3 of UM3307). which is controlled by that board’s watchdog timer (see Speed Board Fault Relay on page 105 and cannot be assigned any additional function. the Auxiliary PCB Error Count [MODE TEST HIGH] key sequence will dynamically display the number of times this board’s CPU has failed to respond to the main CPU since this count was last zeroed. All of them are supported by controllers equipped with FTAs. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. An Extraction Controller that does not use any of its speed board’s I/O signals can be configured to ignore or operate without it by enabling the Auxiliary PCB Lockout [MODE:E LOCK 6] parameter. Speed Board Discrete I/O The auxiliary PCB provides discrete inputs D9 through D16. However. In addition. enter the Program Version [MODE TEST 2] engineering keyboard sequence and then press the decimal key until the SPBD display appears. It also provides a high-speed valve positioning loop that varies the high-current output in response to deviations of the LVDT input from an intended position received from the main CPU. The speed board provides no additional discrete outputs other than its normally-energized fault relay (CR9).78 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Speed Board Operation The Auxiliary PCB and its daughter board provide: • eight additional discrete input circuits and its own fault relay (see below). • The associated controller features are set by the corresponding Discrete Input Assigned Function [COND:D IN ##] parameters. and • a configurably bipolar High-Current Analog Output (see page 82) that includes loopback circuitry for measuring its own value. • linear variable displacement transformer (LVDT) and bipolar 20 mA current-loop valve Position Inputs (see page 79). To identify the installed auxiliary PCB firmware.0) .1. while those with terminal-block back panels can use only D9: • Their states are read by the speed board microprocessor and then communicated to the main CPU. • six Speed Inputs (see page 79) for magnetic pickup frequency signals.

0) . the controller can read any speed that produces at least a 5 Hz signal. a 60-tooth gear mounted on the main shaft would generate a 5 Hertz signal at 5 rpm. None of the standard control programs supports the Auxiliary input. • If all MPUs fail. LVDT1 is for linear variable differential transformer measurements. the controller uses the following rules to decide which one to use as the speed control variable: • If there are three good input signals. the median speed is selected. To use it. You enable the speed input for each installed MPU by setting its selection parameter to On: MPU 1: Speed Input 1 [MODE:S ANIN 1] MPU 2: Speed Input 2 [MODE:S ANIN 2] MPU 3: Speed Input 3 [MODE:S ANIN 3] If more than one MPU is enabled. the higher of those two speeds is selected. The corresponding minimum speed depends on the number of teeth on the exciter and shaft ratio.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 79 Position Inputs This assembly provides two inputs for valve position measurements. Speed Inputs Three of the six auxiliary PCB speed inputs are supported by the Series 3++ Speed Controller.1. while the Auxiliary Input supports bipolar 20 mA position signals. and only the Speed Controller supports LVDT1. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. They can read the frequency signals from either active or passive magnetic pickups: • If active pickups are used. • If there is only one good input signal. the minimum detectable speed is that at which the voltage of the MPU signal meets the minimum listed on the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]. an emergency shutdown (ESD) is initiated. the Daughter Board Jumper (see page 51) must configure it for an LVDT rather than a transducer feedback signal. For example. • If passive pickups are used. these inputs must also be enabled (see below) and configured to compensate for both the number of teeth on the MPU gear and its shaft ratio (see Speed Scaling on page 80). • If there are two good input signals. that speed is selected. This can be determined from the electrical specifications for your MPUs. In addition to physically connecting them to the MPUs. none of the other control programs support any.

AN IN 6 should be 2. Note: It is important to properly match the pickups to the design of the gear that excites them.0) . AN IN 6 should be 1. the measured speed would suddenly fall to zero and the controller would shut down the turbine! August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Thus.000 if the gear is on the turbine’s main shaft. For example.80 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Turbine Shaft Auxiliary Shaft Speed Gear Magnetic Pickup Figure 4-3 Speed Scaling MPU Signal Varies With Speed. If a sufficiently high speed was then reached. but also on the number of teeth on the speed gear and the ratio of the auxiliary and turbine shaft speeds. the speed gear should be mounted on the turbine’s main shaft. Otherwise. If it’s on an auxiliary shaft that turns half as fast as the turbine. each MPU is positioned near a balanced gear on the turbine’s main or auxiliary shaft. The frequency of the MPU signals depends not only on the speed of the turbine. high-speed operation may not allow enough time for their signals to decay between the passage of adjacent teeth. Shaft Ratio. If at all possible. and transmits a pulse to the controller each time a gear tooth rotates past. and Tooth Count As shown in Figure 4-3.000.1. the following function is used to calculate the turbine speed from the number of pulses received during each scan: N = (C ⋅ P ⋅ Rs ) ⁄ T where C= N= P= Rs = T= scan rate (scans per minute) rotational speed (in rpm) pulse count (pulses/scan) Shaft Speed Ratio [MODE:S ANIN 6] Gear Tooth Count [MODE:S ANIN 5] Set the Gear Tooth Count equal to the number of teeth on the speed measuring gear and the Shaft Speed Ratio equal to the number of turbine revolutions required to rotate that gear once.

Series 3++ Hardware Reference MPU Tests 81 Two factors affect the minimum speed that can be read by the controller’s frequency / magnetic pickup (MPU) inputs: • An MPU signal frequency below 5 Hertz can not be read. For example. This can be determined by comparing the electrical specifications of your MPUs to those listed on the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]. the acceptable speed range is 3650 ± 91 (3559 to 3741) rpm.1. the highest and/or lowest will also be considered to have failed if it has differed from the median speed by more than a user-defined tolerance for at least eight consecutive scan cycles: Median – Tol < N < Median + Tol where Median = median of the speeds calculated from the three inputs Tol = MPU Tolerance [MODE:S ANIN 4] A failure of either type generates an “MPU# Fail” alarm.0) . This is normally an issue only for passive pickups (for which the voltage is a rising function of the speed). August 2007 UM3300/H (1. a 60-tooth gear mounted on the main shaft would generate a 5 Hertz signal at 5 rpm. all three are judged to be valid. If all three speed inputs are enabled. If MPU 1 indicates 3600 rpm. MPU failures are determined by comparing the speed from each input to the Control Threshold [COND:S ALARM 1]. An input fails this test if it is below that level. if the MPU 3 signal was greater than 3741 rpm. However. Note: The Control Threshold is stored as a percentage of and thus must be set after the Maximum Control Speed [COND:S DISPLAY HIGH]. assume all three inputs are enabled and the tolerance is 91 rpm. MPU 2 indicates 3650 rpm. the controller can measure any speed above that corresponding to a 5 Hertz signal. The corresponding minimum speed depends on the gear tooth count and shaft ratio. and MPU 3 indicates 3700 rpm. For example. the turbine is shut down. an “MPU3 Fail” alarm would be indicated. If all of the enabled speed inputs fail. • An MPU signal voltage below the minimum required by the speed inputs can not be read. If active (constant voltage) pickups are used. Because all three signals are in this range.

• a phase inverter that can be turned on by the auxiliary PCB’s CPU when reverse current flow is needed. As shown in Figure 4-4. Because this greatly exceeds the usual 4 to 20 mA range. this circuit is usually called the high-current output. which can also restrict this signal to a portion of the range selected by the Maximum Output Jumpers (see page 51): • The output signal’s range is specified by setting its calibration gain and bias (see Output Circuit Calibration on page 85). It includes: • a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) that generates an intermediate 0 to 5 Vdc signal. • The loopback measurement is scaled to match by setting its gain and bias (see Loopback Circuit Calibration on page 87).0) . those procedures are not meant as routine maintenance tasks—the usual practice is to set the calibration parameters only when the controller is first installed. OUT1 is provided by an auxiliary PCB circuit that can generate almost any current-loop signal from –200 to +200 mA. and • an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) that measures the loopback value of this signal. High-Current Analog Output August 2007 UM3300/H (1.82 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Actuator Control Signal Yes | Act – Outt | > 5%? OutF Outt Signal Scaling Loopback Scaling Out1 Output Circuitry Outa Loopback Input I1 To Valve Actuator I1 Figure 4-4 High-Current Output Functional Diagram For turbine controllers. 60. However. • circuitry that converts that voltage into a current signal with a jumper-selectable maximum magnitude of 20. or 200 mA.1. the high-current output signal and its loopback measurement are calibrated by setting their scaling gains and biases.

and turns the phase inverter on when a negative current flow is needed. Table 4-2 gives the recommended ranges for several of the most commonly used actuators. and 95 percent of span and record them in a table similar to Table 4-1. and maximum acceptable values at 5. you should calculate its ideal.25 percent of the maximum output (for example.15 mA for a 60 mA output). August 2007 UM3300/H (1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Unipolar Output 100% Output to DAC 0% 0% On Phase Inverter Off 200 mA Output to Valve –200 mA Control Signal 100% 100% Output to DAC 0% 0% On Phase Inverter Off 200 mA Output to Valve –200 mA Control Signal 83 Bipolar Output 100% Figure 4-5 Operation of Bipolar Output Once you have determined the range of the actuator control signal. ±0. The speed board’s CPU then calculates the magnitude of that signal as shown in the top right panel of Figure 4-5. minimum.0) .1. displayed as AD5). 50. record any parameter changes you make and restore the original values of all but the scaling parameters when you are done. –200 to +200 mA) by enabling its Bipolar Output [COND:D OUT 1 –] parameter. The recommended tolerance is ±0. Note: Caution: Bipolar Operation When checking or changing the calibration of the output or loopback circuits. The Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4] can be used to view the raw loopback measurement (Outa in the figure. The high-current output of a Speed Controller can be configured for bi-directional operation (for example. Calibrate this circuit only while the turbine is shut down or under some alternate form of control. displayed as AD3) and its calibrated value (Outt in the figure.

00 2.95 1.95 9.0 % 50.0 % 50.05 Actuator Range: –60 to +60 mA 5.75 11.05 19.05 Actuator Range: –35 to +35 mA 5.0 % Ideal Minimum Maximum Table 4-2 Expected Output Readings for Common Actuators Measured Current (mA) OUT Display Ideal Minimum Maximum Actuator Range: 4 to 20 mA 5.0 % 95.0 % 95.15 August 2007 UM3300/H (1.85 3.0) .1.05 10.0 % 95.60 152.05 19.40 90.0 % 95.00 19.00 19.85 29.0 % 50.6 27.95 9.0 % 95.60 89.00 30.95 1.3 Actuator Range: –20 to +20 mA 5.80 12.0 % 50.2 4.00 10.85 12.95 18.0 % 1.40 153.0 % 3.15 57.0 % 27.00 153.0 % 50.95 19.00 10.00 57.85 56.0 % 4.95 18.00 19.25 Actuator Range: 20 to 160 mA 5.84 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Table 4-1 Expected Output Readings Actuator Range (mA): Measured Current (mA) OUT Display 5.0 % 1.15 30.0 % 95.00 90.00 0.0 26.05 19.05 10.00 0.0 % 50.15 4.

in mA maximum high-current output (20. If Ilow is not zero. Its range is then matched to that of the actuator by calculating the final output as a percentage of twice that maximum (see Figure 4-4): I 1 = Ou t 1 ⋅ ( I max ⋅ 2 ) Act ⋅ Gai n 1 Ou t 1 =  -----------------------------. Thus. in percent the Output Scaling Bias the Output Scaling Gain high-current output.1.0) .5 ⋅ 4 ⁄ 20 = 0. The nominal values of this gain and bias should be calculated as: I high – I low Gai n 1 = 0. so Ihigh = Imax = 20. This circuit is set up to generate a maximum current (Imax ) of 20. set JP4 and JP5 for a 20 mA maximum signal. 60. and then adjust them to precisely calibrate this signal. Ilow (and thus the nominal bias) must be zero. Negative signals are generated as positive currents which are then reversed by the phase inverter. 60. nor more than [Imax · 2 · (Gain1 + Bias1)]. the sum of Gain1 and Bias1 should not exceed 0. the actual output can never be less than (Imax · 2 · Bias1). and the nominal Bias1 to 0. Ilow = 4.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Output Circuit Calibration 85 The Output Scaling Gain [COND:D GAIN 1] and Output Scaling Bias [COND:D BIAS 1] both calibrate and restrict the range of the high-current output signal.5 ⋅ ( 20 – 4 ) ⁄ 20 = 0.4 Bias 1 = 0. or 200 mA by setting the Maximum Output Jumpers (see page 51). for example.1 and the nominal Gain1 to 0.5 ⋅ ---------I max Ihigh = 100 percent value of actual high-current output (mA) Ilow = 0 percent value of actual high-current output (mA) For bipolar outputs. Because I1 can not exceed Imax . there will be a gap around the zero point of the output! To configure a 4 to 20 mA signal. + Bias 1   100 where: Act = Bias1 = Gain1 = I1 = Imax = Out1 = actuator control signal.1 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. or 200 mA) calculated output signal (decimal) Because the actuator control signal must be between zero and 100 percent.5 ⋅ -------------------------I max where: and I low Bias 1 = 0. you should first enter nominal (ideal) values for those parameters based only on the desired range restriction.50.4: Gai n 1 = 0.

1.0) . and Span is the span of the output range (for example. Set the Output Scaling Gain [COND:D GAIN 1] equal to this new value. Positioning Loop [MODE:D fC 1].5 ⋅ Span Gain 1 = Gai n p ⋅  --------------------------------------. Step 8: Recheck the accuracy of the signal at 5 and 95 percent and repeat steps 4 to 7 until satisfactory results are obtained. Gainp is the previous value. Compare the resulting ammeter readings to the ranges recorded in your Expected Outputs Table (see Table 4-1). and restore the original values of any parameters you changed. 16 for a 4 to 20 mA output). Step 6: Use the following formula to calculate a new gain value: 0. Note: If the controller reverts to automatic operation during this test.86 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Use the following procedure to fine-tune the nominal gain and bias or to recalibrate this output signal: Step 1: Disconnect the control element from the OUT1 terminals on the FOM or back panel and connect an ammeter in its place. Determine which feature is responsible and disable it. If all of them are acceptable. reconnect the control element. If that signal is zero. Step 4: Manually set the output to 25 percent and record the ammeter reading as OUTlow. Step 5: Manually set the output to 75 percent and record the ammeter reading as OUThi.  Out hi – Ou t low  where Gain1 is the new value. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. it is probably because a limiting loop or manual override was triggered. Step 9: Manually adjust the output to 50 percent. the Auxiliary PCB should be replaced. add the error divided by twice Imax to the bias). Step 7: Set the output to zero (0) percent and adjust the Output Scaling Bias [COND:D BIAS 1] until the meter reading agrees with the desired minimum output signal (generally. 50. and 95 percent. and Output Reverse [MODE:S REV 1] features (if they exist and are enabled). Step 2: Disable the Bipolar Output [COND:D OUT 1 –]. Step 3: Manually adjust the controller output to 5. Step 10: Disconnect the ammeter. make sure it rises with even a slight increase of the intended output. If the resulting meter reading is not in the acceptable range. skip to step 10.

= 1.0 percent and record the displayed value of AD5 as Inlow . Although they can differ by up to 5 percent without triggering a loopback failure. Step 3: Observe the AD5 value while you manually vary the displayed output from zero to 100 percent. consider an ideal 4 to 20 mA output: I low = 4 –4 Bias 2 = ----. they scale the internal measurement of the actual high-current output for comparison to its intended value (see Figure 4-4): Ou t t = 100 ⋅ ( Ou t a + Bias 2 ) ⋅ Gai n 2 where: Outa = raw loopback measurement. this gain and bias are not used and need not be set. If the calibration is satisfactory. If valve positioning is supported and enabled. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.20 20 I high = I max = 20 20 Gai n 2 = --------------. For example. As with the output scaling parameters. Step 4: Set the displayed output to 25. skip to step 11. you should first enter nominal (ideal) values for these parameters based only on the desired range restriction and then adjust them to precisely calibrate this measurement.25 20 – 4 If the high-current output is accurately calibrated.= – 0.0) . Step 2: Use the Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4] to display the scaled loopback signal (AD 5) on the Engineering Panel.1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Loopback Circuit Calibration 87 The Loopback Scaling Gain [COND:D GAIN 2] and Loopback Scaling Bias [COND:D BIAS 2] calibrate and adjust that measurement to the actual range of the high-current output signal. expressed as a decimal fraction of the maximum high-current output (Imax ) Outt = scaled measurement for loopback test (in percent) Bias2 = the Loopback Scaling Bias Gain2 = the Loopback Scaling Gain The nominal values of this gain and bias can be calculated as: – I low Bias 2 = -----------I max and I max Gai n 2 = -------------------------I high – I low where Ilow and Ihigh define the intended range of the output signal. Otherwise. you can use the following procedure to fine-tune the nominal loopback scaling or to recalibrate this measurement: Step 1: Make sure the First Output Assigned Variable [COND:D OUT 1] is set to OUTL and the Bipolar Output [COND:D OUT 1 –] and Positioning Loop [MODE:D fC 1] are disabled. they should match as closely as possible.

Step 10: Press CLEAR to again terminate the Signal Values Test. If necessary.1. Step 7: Calculate and enter a new Loopback Scaling Gain [COND:D GAIN 2] using the following formula: Gain 2 = Gai n p ⋅ 50 ⁄ ( In high – In low ) where Gain2 is the new value and Gainp is the previous value.0 percent of span for a minimum time defined by the Output Failure Delay [COND:D CONST 2].88 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Step 5: Set the displayed output to 75.00 and redisplay AD5. Step 12: Set the displayed output to 0. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Step 9: Subtract the new value of AD5 from the displayed output and record that error. Step 13: Repeat until satisfactory results are obtained. Step 8: Press MODE TEST 4 8 and then the decimal key (several times) to again display AD5 on the Engineering Panel. slightly lower the Gain. Step 6: Press CLEAR to terminate the Signal Values Test.0 percent and record the displayed value of AD5 as Inhigh . adjust the output so AD5 is not zero. make the Bias slightly less negative. increase the bias enough to give AD5 a slight positive value (zero or less is always treated as a loopback failure). If the First Output Assigned Variable [COND:D OUT 1] is set to ActL or ActP. an output failure is indicated if its readback and intended values differ by more than 5. If it is zero.0) . then restore the original values of any parameters you changed. Step 11: Calculate and enter a new Loopback Scaling Bias [COND:D BIAS 2] using the following formula: error Bias 2 = Bias p + -----------------------------100 ⋅ Gain 2 where Bias2 is the new value and Biasp is the previous value. If it comes on at maximum output. Note: Output Loopback Test It the loopback alarm activates unnecessarily when the output is at its minimum value.

which (as shown in Figure 4-6) have three main sections: • The upper section has a three-digit control response readout. and Alarm LED (see page 106). plus a Test key that displays the engineering panel firmware revision and activates the front-panel User Preferences and LED Tests. • The middle section provides the Status Screen and Menu System Buttons (see page 90). Screen and Buttons AUTO MAN Tracking Limit ∆ TEST ENTER Control LEDs and Keys ∇ A # Figure 4-6 General Layout of Series 3++ Front Panel The microprocessor on the engineering panel PCB runs an embedded program that displays information from the main CPU on the front panel and its own readout and sends back codes identifying the currently-pressed front and engineering panel keys and buttons. and three buttons that select the feature whose data is displayed.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 89 PV SP OUT Control Loop Readouts and Buttons ALT LIMIT 2 LIMIT 3 Controller Type Fault Alarm Mode RUN Tran OutF Alarms Com1&2 24V ACK MENU SCROLL Status LEDs. five-digit controlled variable and set point readouts.1. • The lower section has eight control keys and twelve LEDs. Engineering and Front Panel Operation August 2007 UM3300/H (1. three of which are embedded in associated keys. Chapter 6 describes the maintenance features of the front panels. Chapter 2 provided an operational description of the engineering panel. Fault LED (see page 105).0) .

• Pressing SCROLL again would display a prompt (third screen above) indicating that the brightness of the control loop readouts could be adjusted by pressing the Raise or Lower key. #. You can then display that menu’s first and subsequent data screens by repeatedly pressing the SCROLL key. The internal clock of a Speed Controller can be reset using the Set Clock [MODE TEST 9] engineering panel procedure.1. Turbine controllers also provide Menu and Scroll discrete input functions that can be used to remotely select the active menu and screen.90 Chapter 4: Configuration and Operation Status Screen and Menu System Buttons The various information screens that can be displayed by the 4-line by 10-character status screen are organized into menu groups and selected by pressing the MENU and SCROLL buttons. it also displays the date and time).## LCD Contrast Adjustment Use ¨Î LED Brightness Adjustment Use ¨Î LED Test • Pressing the SCROLL button while continuing to press TEST would then display a prompt (second screen above) indicating that the contrast of the LCD status screen could be adjusted by pressing the Raise or Lower key. Pressing the MENU key displays the first screen from the next group.0) . the operation of the compressor and turbine controller menu systems differ somewhat: • The top line of each compressor controller screen displays the current operating state. User Preferences and LED Tests Holding down the TEST key displays the installed front-panel firmware version (left-most screen): Display Testing & Options Ver. • Pressing SCROLL a third time would display the right-most screen above and light every readout and indicator LED on both the front and engineering panels. • The top line of each turbine controller screen identifies the selected menu. Holding down the SCROLL button and pressing the Raise or Lower key will ramp the beep frequency higher or lower. Pressing the MENU key displays the most recently viewed screen from the next menu / group. However. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. which only displays the menu name (for Speed Controllers. You can then cycle through the screens in that group by repeatedly pressing the SCROLL key.

3 LIMIT 3 OUT Controller Outputs Controller Outputs 9. and • asserts the Tracking discrete input of the redundant controller and excludes the final control elements from its output circuits.3 SrgCnt=001 ACK MENU SCROLL Fault Alarm Mode RUN TotlB=10. Switching is triggered by the main controller’s fault relay.000 SP ALT LIMIT 2 Selected Outputs Controller Inputs Controller Inputs REDUNDANT CONTROL SELECTOR MAIN Backup Controller . Each controller is configured to track the operating state and outputs of the other only when its own tracking input is asserted by setting its Redundant Tracking [MODE:D fE 1] parameter to true. Each controller pair is connected by a Redundant Control Selector (see page 94) or other switching device that: • clears the Tracking discrete input of the active controller and connects the final control elements to its outputs.000 SP ALT LIMIT 2 DEV DEV 9. Each of the application manuals listed at the bottom of page 3 describes its available relay functions. The main controller in each pair will normally regulate your process while its “hot” backup monitors it via serial Port 1 so it can instantly take over if the main controller should fail.3 LIMIT 3 OUT Antisurge Controller Antisurge Controller Fault Alarm Mode RUN TotlB=10.Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 91 Chapter 5 Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual Redundant Controllers Controlled Process This chapter tells how to set up and operate redundant controllers. paired configuration.3 SrgCnt=001 ACK MENU SCROLL Fault Relays Tracking Input GREEN ACTIVE Switch to Back-Up Fault Relays Tracking Input AUTO MAN SURGE RESET AUTO MAN SURGE RESET ∆ TEST ENTER BACK-UP Switch to Main RED TRACK ∆ TEST ENTER ∇ ∇ A # A # Serial Port 1 Application Tracking Communications Figure 5-1 Redundant Controller Data Flow Series 3++ Controllers can be installed in a dual-redundant.1.0) . possibly wired in series with additional relays set up to be de-energized by other switching conditions. Main Controller . Overview August 2007 UM3300/H (1.

which selects the backup controller when the SR relay is energized: • If both controllers are healthy and neither button is pressed. • If the backup controller was unhealthy.1. the M and B relays would both be energized while S and R would both be de-energized: • Failure of the main controller or pressing the Backup button would energize S. • Pressing the Main button would energize the R relay. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. that is always discrete input D1. thus selecting the backup controller by completing and latching the SR circuit. however.0) . the switching circuitry for redundant Series 3++ Controllers provides Main and Backup buttons for manually activating either controller (provided it is healthy) and relay logic that automatically activates the backup controller if it is healthy and its main counterpart fails.92 Chapter 5: Redundant Controllers Switching Logic Typically. For compressor controllers. Figure 5-2 shows a hardware implementation of this logic. Figure 5-2 shows how the tracking inputs of redundant controllers should be connected to their own 24 volt transmitter power terminals through normally-open and -closed switching relay contacts. • If the main controller was unhealthy. • Failure of the backup controller while active would not break the SR circuit even if the main controller was healthy. it could not be activated because pressing its button would not energize S. Once the backup has been activated. Current-loop outputs must also be connected in a way that maintains their continuity when not connected to the field device: • Figure 5-2 shows how this can be done using normally-open (NO) and -closed (NC) contacts of the switching relay (SR). thus selecting the main controller by de-energizing S and SR. it could not be activated because pressing its button would not energize R. • Figure 5-4 shows the corresponding RCS terminal connections. control is not automatically returned to the main controller (that must be done by pressing the Main button while that controller is healthy). but never to an auxiliary PCB input (DI-9 through DI-16). Tracking Input Circuits One function of the redundant switching device is to energize the tracking input of the tracking controller. If the main controller then failed. For turbine controllers. Analog Output Switching Another function of the redundant switching device is to connect control elements to the output signals of only the active controller. SR would remain de-energized. it must be assigned to an input provided by the CPU/IO PCB (DI-1 through DI8).

0) .Series 3++ Hardware Reference Main Controller CR1 1 2 93 Backup Controller CR1 1 2 S M Backup M R SR M B B Main S R OUT 1 + SR + SR OUT 1 + SR SR FY – SR SR Main Controller DISCRETE IN D1 D Current-Loop Outputs SR SR Backup Controller DISCRETE IN D1 D 24VDC – + 24VDC – + Main Controller Tracking Discretes Backup Controller R SR B Backup Active Both Healthy Main Active Both Healthy S M Backup M S M Backup M Main R SR B Main S R S R Main Active Backup Unhealthy S M Backup M Backup Active Main Unhealthy S M Backup M R SR B Main R SR B Main S R S R Figure 5-2 Typical Redundant Switching Circuitry August 2007 UM3300/H (1.1.

• sixteen isolated relay contacts that connect field devices to the main or backup controller’s analog outputs and control relays based on the states of the fault relay circuits. Hardware specifications for the RCS can be found on the Series 3++ Redundant Control Selector data sheet [DS3300/R]. Once control has been passed to the backup controller. the switching relays will be de-energized. Only the backup controller lights its green Tracking LED.1. they connect the main controller to the field and energize the TB6 Main Active discrete output. If that circuit opens or the Switch to Backup button is pressed. The Main LED is green and the Backup LED is red. • When energized. Our Redundant Control Selector (RCS) fills that need by providing: • two fault-sensing circuits that connect to the fault and/or other appropriate control relays of the main and backup controllers. Control of the process can never be transferred to a failed controller and is never automatically transferred to the main controller. they connect the backup controller to the field and energize the TB6 Backup Active discrete output. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Operation Each RCS consists of an Operator Panel that is usually mounted between the front panels of the redundant controllers and a Switching Unit mounted in a less accessible location. and • buttons for manually selecting that controller.94 Chapter 5: Redundant Controllers Redundant Control Selector Redundant controllers require an independent device to sense main controller failures and automatically transfer control to its backup. • LEDs and discrete outputs that indicate which controller’s outputs are connected to the process. Only the main controller lights its green Tracking LED. the relays will remain energized until the Switch to Main button is pressed while the main controller’s fault relay circuit is closed. those relays will energize if the backup controller’s fault relay circuit is closed. even if it is healthy and the backup is not.The switching unit contains a latched master relay that controls four slave relays: • When de-energized. The switching unit routes 24 Vdc power through the fault relay of the main controller at all times. The Main LED is red and the Backup LED is green.0) . As long as that circuit is closed and control has not been manually transferred to the backup controller.

Fault Relay Connections Note: Tracking Input Connections Field Output Module fault relay circuits connected to an RCS must be set up as dry contacts. • Connect the backup controller input to the Run terminal. Each controller’s tracking input will then be asserted only when its peer is selected/active.1. • Connect the main controller input to the Track terminal.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Main Controller RCS Switching Unit To Transducer: – + 95 Backup Controller OUT 1 + OUT 1 + CR1 1 2 CR1 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D DISCRETE IN D1 D 24VDC – + 24VDC – TB6 TB6 Figure 5-3 Typical Redundant Control Selector Connections Connect the TB6 main and backup controller Fault terminals to the CR1 fault relays of the corresponding controllers. other relays that would open to indicate additional switching conditions can be connected in series with the fault relay: • For turbine controllers.0) . Connect each controller’s tracking input (D1 for compressor and assignable for turbine controllers) to the 24 Vdc transmitter power outputs of both via a single switching relay contact (see Figure 5-3): • Connect the 24 Vdc of each controller to its own discrete return terminal and through a diode to the RCS Common terminal. the auxiliary PCB fault relay (CR9) should be set for normally-open operation and wired in series with CR1. These circuits are powered by the RCS. If desired. so its terminals indicate a polarity while the dry-contact controller relays do not. so an automatic switch to the backup controller will occur if either of them de-energizes. • All controllers offer a General Failure relay function that is primarily for redundant switching. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.

1.0) . Power will be drawn from the batteries if the power converter fails. Analog Output Connections Power Connections The RCS switching unit provides connectors for two independent external power supplies and automatically powers its circuits from the highest-voltage source. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. • When the backup controller is selected (lower panel). but they will not be recharged when that source is restored. Connect one to a regulated 24 Vdc power converter and the other to a battery pack. The other panels show how the signals are routed when each controller is selected: • When the main controller is selected (middle panel). its OUT1 circuit includes the transducer (red lines) while the main controller’s circuit is closed by the relay (gray lines). its OUT1 circuit includes the transducer (red lines) while the backup controller’s circuit is closed by the relay (gray lines). The upper panel of Figure 5-4 shows how to do so using normally-open (NO) and closed (NC) contacts controlled by a single RCS switching relay.96 Chapter 5: Redundant Controllers Backup OUT 1 + Main OUT 1 + RUN TRACK COMMON A B C D A B C D A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 FY OUT 1 + OUT 1 + Main Selected FY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 OUT 1 + OUT 1 + Backup Selected FY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Figure 5-4 Connecting Current-Loop Outputs to an RCS The current-loop output circuits of redundant controllers must be connected to the switching device in a manner that maintains the continuity of both circuits while including the transducer in only one (so neither controller will indicate an output failure). with the converter adjusted to provide a voltage slightly above that of the batteries.

each controller can be set up to alarm the failure of one of them by wiring a discrete input assigned the -RS24 function in parallel with the RCS and one of its power supplies. all redundant controller discrete inputs should be connected in parallel (rather than through the switching relay). Both controllers can then read them and the removal of either will not affect the other’s inputs. If the RCS was without power. Unswitched Connections Discrete Input Connections Input and communication signals must be connected to both controllers in such a way that both can monitor the process and either can be disconnected without affecting the signals to the other. They can then be connected in parallel to 5 Vdc transmitters or across 250 ohm dropping resistors connected in series with 20 mA transmitters. the slave relays would de-energize and connect the main controller to the field. However. the latched master would remember which controller had been selected: • If the main controller was in control. it would resume control when power was restored (even if it had faulted or the main controller had been repaired in the meantime). so disconnecting either controller would not affect the input of the other. For redundant turbine controllers equipped with FTAs. this can be done by installing the dropping resistors across pins C and D of the FIM jumper blocks (see FIM Analog Input Circuits on page 59): A C E G 24 VDC B A E C 50 mA 66 67 68 69 Analog Input Connections Xmtr – + 68 D CH G F D – + 67 CH 50 mA C B D F H H August 2007 UM3300/H (1. generally indicating a total failure of the corresponding power supply. it would remain so when power was restored (unless it had faulted in the meantime).1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference RCS Power Failure 97 If power to the RCS failed. With the exception of the tracking input signals (see page 92). • If the backup controller was in control. When a Speed or Extraction Controller RCS is connected to two power supplies. The analog inputs of redundant controllers should be configured to accept voltage signals (see Analog Input Switches on page 49). both controllers would indicate an RS24V failure.0) . That controller would then energize any +RS24 relays and signal an “RS24V Fail” alarm if that input was cleared.

Because that port’s address is set by the Computer ID Number. Similarly. Modbus TCP clients can tell which of the controllers is active by monitoring their Tracking discrete inputs. but the resistors would have to be installed across their FIM terminals because no configuration block is provided for that circuit. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Write requests will then be implemented by both but only the active controller will respond to read requests. Redundant controllers with Modbus While Tracking enabled must either be connected to different Modbus master serial ports or be assigned unique Computer ID Numbers so both can be remotely accessed via the same master port. but does use it to track its active counterpart. The corresponding discrete input bit or variable will then be cleared only when the backup unit is active.0) .98 Chapter 5: Redundant Controllers If the FIMs are configured to obtain their onboard 24 Vdc power from a source other than the controllers (see page 57). hard wire one of the main controller’s otherwise unused discrete inputs so that it is always asserted. Both controllers in each redundant pair must be connected to the same inter-controller serial communication networks. the main and backup controllers can be given the same Computer ID Number [MODE:D COMM 0 •]. only the active controller responds to Port 2 requests. If your hosts need to know which controller is active. there is no way they can communicate as a duplex pair because each port has to have a unique IP address. and • jumpering its pin G to H and connecting its H terminal to the other controller’s D terminal: A C E G 24 VDC B A E C 50 mA 91 92 93 94 + Xmtr – 92 93 50 mA C CH G F D CH D B D F H H The same approach should be taken for the auxiliary current-loop input. such a circuit can be powered from either FIM by: • jumpering its pin A to B and connecting its B terminal to the transmitter’s positive terminal.1. you must disable Modbus While Tracking or connect the controllers to separate host ports. Ethernet Ports If Modbus RTU/TCP converters are used. The backup controller does not transmit over Port 1. Serial Ports If Modbus While Tracking [MODE:D LOCK 0] is Off. Each pair of controllers should be identified by giving them a common Computer ID Number and Modbus While Tracking should enabled even in load-sharing applications. Thus. redundant controllers will also have the same Modbus RTU ID.

• Most internal problems are resolved by replacing the controller or one or more of its main components (see Replacement Procedures on page 123). • The controller will indicate internal and field element problems as discussed in the sections on Problem Indicators on page 104 and Troubleshooting on page 112. parameter set checksum. provided you have ready access to that program and: • the downloadable file for the currently-installed version of each controller’s application software. hardware problems will occasionally be encountered: • Some developing problems can be detected by routinely reviewing various controller health variables (see Monitoring Controller Health on page 100). These can be determined using the following engineering keyboard sequences: • • • • • • Program Version [MODE TEST 2] Program Checksum [MODE TEST 8] Parameter Checksum [MODE LOCK 4] Port 3 Baud Rate [MODE:D COMM 3] Port 4 Baud Rate [MODE:D COMM 4] Computer ID Number [MODE:D COMM 0 •] UM3300/H (1. there is usually no reason to do so. you should keep records of each controller’s installed program version and checksum.0) August 2007 . Those files are discussed in the Configurator documentation. No other field calibration is possible. and Modbus port settings and ID number. Note: Port 4 must be set for 19. the original CPU’s control program and configuration parameters must be restored. and • an up-to-date configuration parameter set file. Although the turbine controller High-Current Analog Output (see page 82) could be routinely recalibrated.Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 99 Chapter 6 Overview Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual Maintenance and Repair This chapter discusses controller maintenance and troubleshooting.1. Whenever a malfunctioning controller or CPU/IO PCB is replaced. In addition.200 baud and odd parity in order to replace the machine control program. Both can be downloaded from a PC running the Configurator program (see Support Software Packages on page 27). Although Series 3++ Controllers are designed to run continuously for years without requiring any maintenance.

That table also lists the acceptable input voltage ranges and the minimum 24 Vdc output voltage required by the analog outputs (any field devices connected to those terminals might require a higher voltage). If the input power is acceptable but the transmitter 24 Vdc output is not.2V = 1.15 3. correct the input voltage or replace the power supply assembly.100 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Fault Alarm Mode RUN Power: AB 24V = 24. replace the CPU/IO PCB.0 Vdc min.0V = 5.7 MENU SCROLL Figure 6-1 Controller Status Screen and Menu Buttons The CPU/IO PCB temperature and power supply voltages and most field I/O signals can be monitored via the front-panel status screen and/or computer communications.3 1.00 4.1.0) August 2007 . If the internal 24 Vdc falls below its limits.32 Vdc 19. Minimum 1. Monitoring Controller Health Internal Conditions Each compressor controller’s main menu includes two screens that display the CPU/IO PCB component power voltages.0 Vdc 15 Vdc 24 Vdc Range 96 .0 then Diagnostic 5. Turbine controllers provide those screens via a separate Diagnostic menu: Diagnostic Power: AB 24V = 24.3 Vdc 5. Auxiliary PCB power converters for above voltages UM3300/H (1.0 3.0 Used By CPU core RAM/clock chip discrete I/O.3V = 3. serial ports.25 22.50 14. If any converted voltage deteriorates. front panel analog I/O. Table 6-1 PSA AC Input DC Input Xmtr Out Acceptable Voltages CPU/IO PCB 1.264 Vac 21 .0 15V = 15.2 Vdc 3.0 15V = 14.2 Table 6-1 lists the minimum CPU/IO PCB voltages needed for the controller to operate. replace the power supply assembly.

# then Mode RUN OutReadbck Out1= ##. the Main menus of all three compressor controllers include the following I/O screens: Mode RUN Digitals In:_2___6_ Out:1__4_ The above screen displays the states of all seven digital inputs and all five digital outputs (digits indicate inputs and outputs that are set). bad input voltages. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. In addition to any application specific screens. or excessive transmitter power demands).1. additional ambient cooling should be provided if it routinely exceeds 80°C. the controller or its CPU/IO PCB should be replaced (these outputs cannot be field calibrated). The 1 for fault relay CR1 will appear unless it (and possibly CR2) are de-energized by CR1’s assigned function.# Out2= ##. measure the voltage of the transmitter power circuit (which can indicate PSA malfunctions.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 101 Scrolling past the second voltage screen displays the CPU/IO PCB’s temperature (measured near the hottest part of that board).# If their accuracy deteriorates significantly. The next two presses of the SCROLL button would then display the intended and measured values of the analog outputs: Mode RUN Analog Out Out1 =##. degC Although temperature-related problems should not occur unless that temperature exceeds 90°C. which will generally be 20 to 25 degrees Celsius higher than that outside of the controller sleeve (controllers that have an auxiliary PCB run about five degrees hotter than those that do not): Diagnostic Board Temp 050. An output failure alarm would be indicated if any output used to drive a valve or other control element deviated from its intended value by more than five percent. If it is okay. Field I/O Screens Compressor Controller I/O Signals Most field I/O signals can be monitored via the Main menu of a compressor controller or In/Out menu of a turbine controller. The above example indicates that only the D2 and D6 inputs are set and only the fault relays and CR4 should be energized.0) .# Out2 =##.

try recalibrating the HighCurrent Analog Output (see page 82) and its loopback.0) .# RdBk3=##.# then RdBk2=##. The label for the selected input is displayed in all uppercase letters (SPD3 below).0%) of span for a configured minimum time. the labels for the others are capitalized (Spd#): In/Out Spd1 4969 Spd2 5001 SPD3 4983 SCROLLing that menu then displays the digital inputs and outputs: In/Out Digital In Î:1_34___8 ¨:9_BC_E_G then In/Out DigitalOut Î:_23__67_ Each digit or letter (A for input 10.102 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Turbine Controller I/O Signals The first In/Out menu screen of a Speed Controller lists the enabled speed readings. • Out2 and 3 cannot be recalibrated. the controller or its CPU/IO PCB should be replaced. The digits for fault relays appear only if they are de-energized by the assigned relay function. in rpm (Extraction Controllers skip this screen). the displayed value will be the complement of the variable it represents: • If Out1 and RdBk1 differ significantly.# LVDT1=##. If their accuracy deteriorates significantly. bad input voltages. otherwise it is replaced by an underscore. G for 16) appears if that circuit is asserted or energized.# Out2 =##.1. the OUT1 readback is replaced by the LVDT1 valve position measurement): In/Out In/Out In/Out Out1 =##. replace the auxiliary PCB.# If reverse action is enabled for an output.# Out3 =##. If that fails.# RdBk3=##.# or RdBk2=##. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. An output failure would be indicated only if the high-current output’s loopback test was enabled and RdBk1 differed from Out1 by more than five percent (5. The next two presses of the SCROLL button display the intended and read-back values of the analog outputs (if the optional positioning loop is enabled. If it is okay.# RdBk1=##. you should measure the voltage of the transmitter power circuit (which can indicate PSA malfunctions. or excessive transmitter power demands).

whose screens display the scaled.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Analog In Menu 103 Each controller provides an Analog In menu. in which case a transmitter failure is indicated (see Analog Input Problems on page 118). measured variable values and testing status of userspecified Analog Inputs (see page 75): • For compressor controllers. The percent-of-range signal variable value of each analog input can be viewed using the engineering panel Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4] key sequence. To determine if a specific input is being read correctly. psig or Mode RUN Analog In 2:D Press 0. Fail • Their turbine controller counterparts do not: Analog In 1:V1 Press 250. disable its Offset Zero Input [MODE:D ANIN #] parameter and compare the TEST 4 value to a volt or ammeter measurement of the corresponding input signal.1. psig or Analog In 1:V1 Press 0.0) . August 2007 UM3300/H (1. these screens also identify the current operating state: Mode RUN Analog In 2:D Press 250. Fail The word “Fail” is displayed after the value if the input’s unscaled value is not within its acceptable range.

• Problems that are indicated by beeping can be investigated using the Engineering Panel (see page 110).0) . they do not convey the same information. Microprocessor and some power problems are indicated by the front-panel Fault LED. • Speed Controller problems that trigger emergency shutdowns are recorded in the Shutdown Log (see page 111). a total loss of power to the controller or failure of the internal 24Vdc power would only de-energize the fault relays (the LED obviously could not light under those circumstances). Because each is controlled by a different PCB. Problem Indicators Fault Indicators August 2007 UM3300/H (1.104 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Compressor Controllers Turbine Controllers Fault Alarm Mode RUN Alarms Tran OutF Com1&2 24V MENU SCROLL Fault Alarm Alarms Com1 Error ACK MENU SCROLL Figure 6-2 Front-Panel Status LEDs and Alarm Menu Series 3++ Controllers provide various indications of internal and some external control system hardware problems: • Microprocessor and some power problems are indicated by the Fault Indicators (see below).1. • A redundant controller pair’s Tracking Indicators (see page 110) will signal the activation of the backup peer. the CPU/IO Fault Relay. Although various main CPU and RAM/clock chip problems would de-energize the PCB/IO fault relay and also light the fault LED. You can then identify and correct the cause of that action. each controller’s fault relays are connected to external logic circuits that will automatically shut down or transfer control of the compressor or turbine to a backup device when any such relay de-energizes. • More specific problems are indicated by the Alarm System (see page 106) and optional External Alarms (see page 108). In most systems. and/or the Speed Board Fault Relay.

and CR2 can be set to only de-energize when CR1 does (see CPU/IO Control Relay Switches on page 48). it is almost always indicative of a failed power converter or other component on the CPU/IO PCB. • Some problems allow the CPU to restart but eventually prevent it from resetting the watchdog timer. This relay will also de-energize if the trigger condition for its relay assigned function is detected (see Relay Functions on page 108). It/they will de-energize if the 3. in which case the CPU is not reset. In either case. the main CPU is also reset (see page 77): • If the CPU is able to restart. and status screen will continue to operate.3 Vdc power falls below its fault threshold or the control program does not periodically reset the watchdog timer. it will reset the watchdog timer and re-energize the fault relays.Series 3++ Hardware Reference Fault LED 105 The front-panel Fault LED is lit if the engineering panel is receiving 5Vdc power and: • it is unable to communicate with the main CPU. The fault relay(s) will then toggle off and back on and the controller will beep repeatedly.0) . In either case. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. control loop readouts. The speaker will beep and the engineering panel will display “Reset”. in which case the status screen will display “No Comms with Main CPU” and all other LEDs and readouts will be blank/off. A Speed Controller will then light its Fault LED and initiate an emergency shutdown of the turbine.1. in which case the other LEDs. Speed Board Fault Relay The auxiliary PCB’s fault relay is controlled by its watchdog timer: • If that timer is not regularly reset by that board’s CPU. • CR9 will also de-energize if the 15 Vdc power converter on the CPU/IO PCB fails. or • the CPU is unable to communicate with the Auxiliary PCB. CR9 will not re-energize unless that restart succeeds. it will de-energize CR9 and reset that CPU. the main CPU will be unable to communicate with its counterpart on the speed board. CPU/IO Fault Relay CR1 is hard-wired as a normally-energized fault relay. Although there is a slight chance that powering the controller down and back up would correct this condition. Board” alarm. while an Extraction Controller will only indicate an “Aux.

or “3V” means the corresponding CPU/IO PCB voltage is unacceptably low (see Power Problems on page 113).106 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Alarm System Alarm Relays Alarm Discrete and OPC Variable Alarm LED Alarms Menu ACK Button The meaning of the front-panel Alarms LED. “15V”. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. “Comm2”. They do not automatically display the Alarms menu when new problems are detected. or “Com1&2” indicates expected transmissions are not being received from companion controllers via the corresponding serial ports (see Communication Problems on page 115). • “OutF” indicates the loopback reading for an analog output that is being used to drive a control element differs from its intended value by more than five percent (see Analog Output Problems on page 118).0) . • “Comm1”. Modbus and OPC Alarm variables. All current alarm conditions are indicated via the third and fourth lines of a single Alarms screen that you should manually display (by repeatedly pressing the MENU button) whenever the Alarm indicators are set: Mode RUN Alarms Tran OutF Com1&2 24V • “Tran” indicates one or more analog inputs are beyond their testing ranges (see Analog Input Problems on page 118). and set their Modbus/OPC Alarm variables when there are uncorrected controller hardware problems.1. • “24V”. “5V”. and provide no way to acknowledge uncorrected alarms (the ACK button is not used). and any relays given the Alarm function depends on the type of controller: • Compressor controllers light their Alarm LEDs. energize any Alarm relays. The Alarm LED remains lit and Alarm relays remain energized until all such problems have been corrected.

the Alarm menu screen displays automatically (thus causing the LED to flash). • “Pwr Supply” indicates an internal power supply problem (see Power Problems on page 113). August 2007 UM3300/H (1. • “OutputFail” indicates the high-current output loopback reading differs from its intended value by more than five percent (see Analog Output Problems on page 118). • “FD24V Fail” indicates a field device power supply failure (see Power Problems on page 113).0) . but it would remain lit as long as any alarms were uncorrected and would resume flashing if you scrolled to one that had not been acknowledged. but they energize relays assigned the Alarm function and set the Modbus/OPC Alarm variables only if there are unacknowledged problems (corrected or not). • “RS24V Fail” indicates a redundant control selector power supply failure (see RCS Power Failure on page 97).Series 3++ Hardware Reference 107 • Turbine controllers light or flash their Alarm LEDs whenever there are unacknowledged and/or uncorrected alarm conditions. Each screen of their Alarms menus list one of up to eight such conditions: Alarms Com1 Error The Alarm LED will flash if the currently-displayed alarm has not been acknowledged. If a new problem is detected. which can be done either by pressing the ACK button or asserting a Reset discrete input. • “Com1 Error” or “Com2 Error” indicates the corresponding serial port is not receiving expected companion controller data (see Communication Problems on page 115). • “Tran# Fail” indicates the corresponding (#) analog input is beyond its transmitter testing range (see Analog Input Problems on page 118). Acknowledging that alarm or scrolling to a previously-acknowledged one would cause the LED to stop flashing.1. Those indicators are used to signal both process and controller problems (only the latter will be covered here): • “Aux. • “MPU# Fail” indicates a failure of the corresponding (#) speed input (see Speed Input Problems on page 121). • “PosFeedbck” indicates an unacceptable deviation of a hydraulic control element’s actuator positioning pressure (see Positioning Problems on page 122). Board” means the main CPU cannot communicate with the auxiliary PCB (see Speed Board Problems on page 121).

This turbine controller function indicates a redundant control selector power problem (see RCS Power Failure on page 97). All Series 3++ Controllers provide a general failure relay function and Modbus/OPC variables that can be triggered by any of several conditions that would warrant switching to a backup controller: All Controllers: output loopback or internal voltage failure Speed Controllers: valve positioning failure. The Tran function indicates at least one analog input signal is not within its valid range (see Analog Input Problems on page 118). This turbine controller function indicates a transmitter power test failure (see Power Problems on page 113). For compressor controllers. The turbine controller OutF function indicates either an excessive readback deviation of the high-current analog output (see Analog Output Problems on page 118) or an excessive deviation of the position feedback signal (see Positioning Problems on page 122). This turbine controller function indicates a low CPU/IO PCB voltage. General Failure Relay Functions FD24 OutF PosF Each controller’s relay outputs can operate external indicators (lights. All relays will de-energize if the 5 Vdc power to their coils fails. or the failure of all speed inputs Extraction Controllers: auxiliary PCB failure Each of these problems is also indicated by other relays and variables.1. each controller also provides relay functions and Modbus variables that indicate individual or collective hardware problems. This function indicates the controller has failed to detect an expected transmission on its Port 1 or 2 communication network (see Communication Problems on page 115). Compressor Controllers have separate OutF and PosF functions for indicating those problems.0) . PSF RS24 SerC Tran August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Redundant controller fault relays are often assigned this Fail function (see Fault Relay Connections on page 95 and Tracking Indicators on page 110).108 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair External Alarms In addition to its front-panel Alarms menu.) for or communicate various problems to a DCS. such problems are indicated by a Fail not accompanied by an OutF (see Power Problems on page 113). etc. horns.

This discrete indicates a low CPU/IO PCB voltage (see Power Problems on page 113). Compressor Controllers test that signal only if a relay has been assigned the PosF function. in which case the corresponding TranFail # discretes would also be set (see Analog Input Problems on page 118). Board Fail 109 A TrainTools or other operator workstation can indicate the following problems when the corresponding Modbus/OPC variables are set. Each of these discretes indicates the controller has failed to detect an expected transmission on the corresponding serial communication network (see Communication Problems on page 115). in which case this problem would be indicated by the corresponding CR State discrete.1. This turbine controller discrete indicates the main CPU is unable to communicate with its counterpart on the Auxiliary PCB (see Speed Board Problems on page 121). This turbine controller discrete indicates a transmitter power test failure (see Power Problems on page 113).Series 3++ Hardware Reference Modbus/OPC Variables Aux.0) . This turbine controller discrete indicates an excessive deviation of the position feedback signal (see Positioning Problems on page 122). This discrete indicates an excessive readback deviation for the analog output used to manipulate the control element (see Analog Output Problems on page 118). The Tran discrete indicates one or more analog input signals are out of their valid ranges. FD 24V Fail Low Voltage MPU # Fail Output Fail Port # Fail Position Fail RS 24V Fail TranFail TranFail# August 2007 UM3300/H (1. This turbine controller discrete indicates a redundant control selector power problem (see RCS Power Failure on page 97). Each of these Speed Controller discretes indicates the corresponding MPU has failed (see Speed Input Problems on page 121).

CS= XXXX: indicates an unreasonable parameter value has been detected and changed. those of its peer will be set. see the section on Front and Test Panel Problems on page 114. Overrun. This might indicate a power cord or connector problem (see Power Problems on page 113). If not. The engineering panel readout will then display one of the following: Com# POF: indicates a low-level (Parity. the operator panel of our Redundant Control Selector (see page 94) will indicate which controller’s outputs are connected to your field elements: • When the main controller is active. the cause is usually a failed keypad (see Front and Test Panel Problems on page 114). the front-panel Tracking LED of the active peer will be off. the Main LED is red and the Backup LED is green. the CPU reboots or a low-level serial communication error is detected. If this message is accompanied by repeated beeping. Error! indicates an invalid engineering key sequence. • When the backup controller is active.110 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Engineering Panel Each time an engineering panel key is pressed. The controller will also beep if any key is “stuck”. Although occasional errors will not affect control of your compressor or turbine. Reset: indicates a CPU Reset (see page 77). Tracking Indicators Tracking LED Redundant Control Selector LEDs When a redundant pair of controllers is installed. However. the Main LED is green and the Backup LED is red. frequent or repeated beeping should be investigated. If accompanied by repeated beeping. Thus. it usually means an internal hardware or software problem is aborting the controller reset sequence (see CPU/IO Board Problems on page 117). any problem that triggers an automatic switch to the backup controller will be indicated by the lighting of the main controller’s Tracking LED and the RCS Main LED turning red. In addition. that of the inactive peer will be continuously lit.1. To diagnose such a switchover.0) . August 2007 UM3300/H (1. you need to know which controller relays trigger them and the functions assigned to them (see Fault Indicators on page 104 and Relay Functions on page 108). the controller will beep and (unless you pressed the CLEAR key) the engineering readout will display a message. The active controller’s Modbus/OPC Tracking discretes will also be cleared. or Framing) error was detected by the serial port identified by the fourth character (see Communication Problems on page 115). the parameter memory is probably defective (see CPU/IO Board Problems on page 117).

August 2007 UM3300/H (1. • FailsafeSD indicates a start-up aborted when the turbine failed to reach a configured minimum speed quickly enough. • Shutdown indicates the auxiliary PCB failed (see Speed Board Problems on page 121) or that this controller took control after a shutdown and cannot determine its cause.1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 111 Shutdown Log Speed Controller problems that trigger emergency shutdowns of the turbine are recorded and can be viewed by repeatedly pressing the Menu key until the status screen’s shutdown log menu appears. • WatchdogSD indicates a power loss or controller failure caused a hard reset of the CPU. • DGI SD ## indicates the shutdown was initiated by Stop or ESD input number ##. • Breaker SD indicates a turbine-driven generator was shut down when the generator breaker unexpectedly opened. • MPULoss SD indicates the turbine was shut down because all of its speed inputs failed (see Speed Input Problems on page 121). the second line of the as-yet-unused log screens will display a line of dashes. SD Log 14:12:39 12/25/06 then SD Log 1 WatchDogSD 13:52:11 12/25/06 Pressing SCROLL once displays the cause of the most recent turbine shutdown and the time and date at which it occurred: • Overspd SD indicates the turbine was shut down because it exceeded a configured trip speed. • OperatorSD indicates the shutdown was initiated from the front panel or via computer communications. or the last three by reading the corresponding OPC Last ESD# OPC variables. Each subsequent press of the SCROLL key displays the same information for the next older of the last eight shutdowns: SD Log 8 OperatorSD 19:43:52 01/02/05 If the controller has shut down the turbine fewer than eight times.0) . thus tripping the turbine (see CPU/IO Board Problems on page 117). You can also determine the reasons for the most recent shutdown by reading the Modbus Last ESD register.

Additional information or assistance can be obtained by contacting the Technical Service Department at Compressor Controls. it is usually easiest to replace suspect components one at a time until the malfunctioning one becomes obvious.0) .112 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair This section suggests appropriate responses to various hardware problems (whose indicators were discussed in the previous section): • • • • • • • • • • • Power Problems (see page 113) Front and Test Panel Problems (see page 114) Communication Problems (see page 115) CPU/IO Board Problems (see page 117) Analog Input Problems (see page 118) Analog Output Problems (see page 118) Discrete Input Problems (see page 119) Discrete Output Problems (see page 120) Speed Board Problems (see page 121) Speed Input Problems (see page 121) Positioning Problems (see page 122) Troubleshooting Unless the problem is clearly external to the controller. If you have removed a controller from service. or isolate and return only the failed components. You can then return all replaced hardware to CCC for repair.1. you should replace it or its internal circuit boards and/or front-panel (see Replacement Procedures on page 123) to return it to service as quickly as possible. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.

0) . one of the power cord connections might be loose or worn (or the controller reset sequence is being aborted by a hardwired or software problem. either the power supply assembly or the back panel has failed and must be replaced. disconnect the power cord from the back panel and test the voltage (see Table 6-1) across the pins for the installed power supply (see Figure 3-24). In addition. all control relays are de-energized. or • the power supply is not providing 24 Vdc power to that board. Either replace both assemblies. figure out why not. replace the back panel or power cord. all analog outputs are 0. or the CPU/IO board if any of its power converters is failing (see Internal Conditions on page 100 and Alarm System on page 106). see CPU Reset on page 77 and CPU/IO Board Problems on page 117). either: • one of the CPU/IO board’s power converters has failed. and all serial communication has ceased). If it is not zero. You should also check the field power voltage if the standard analog outputs fail but the controller otherwise seems to be okay (a turbine controller might also indicate a “FD24V Fail” alarm and energize any FD24 control relays). You can check the power-cord and backpanel connectors by connecting a different cord to the problematic controller and/or the same cord to a different controller. Depending on the result. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. If the controller appears to be dead and there is no voltage across the field power terminals.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 113 Power Problems If the controller appears to be “dead” (all display elements are off. If the engineering panel intermittently beeps and displays a “Reset” message. the power supply assembly is not providing 24 Vdc field power and must be replaced. If it is not zero. If that cable is “live”.0.1. or replace one at a time so you can identify and replace only the one that actually failed. you should replace the power supply if the controller indicates the 24 Vdc to the CPU/IO board is failing. check the voltage across the field power output. If the cable is not live.

The controller should beep and display the corresponding message. If all front panel display elements are unlit/blank but the fault relay is not de-energized or you otherwise know the controller is running: 1. If any LED or readout segment does not light. That would necessitate replacement of the CPU/IO PCB assembly. pressing the CLEAR key will neither elicit a beep nor clear the corresponding confirming message. However. If you suspect an engineering panel key is not working. Make sure the ribbon cable between the front and engineering panels is connected and undamaged. invoke the engineering panel Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4]. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. 2. Caution: Pressing a key to verify it is working might affect the operation of the controller. the beeping will be accompanied by a blank readout. replace it and reinstall the front panel. press it. if the CLEAR key is stuck. If the PID. replace the corresponding (front or engineering) panel. replace the front panel.4 second intervals and display “Error!” on the engineering panel readout. or want to verify that all of them are. the CPU/IO circuit that powers the engineering panel is probably bad. Open the front panel and determine whether the engineering panel is working (pressing any key should elicit a beep). If possible.0) .114 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Front and Test Panel Problems Front and engineering panel problems will not prevent a controller from continuing to control and protect your process equipment. Doing so will display “LED Test” on the top row of the status screen and light every readout and indicator LED on both the front and engineering panels. If you suspect a front panel key or button is not working. If not. replace that panel. you might decide to delay correcting it. MODE. If the new engineering panel does not work. Replace the front panel assembly if it is still unlit. If any engineering panel key is faulty. 3. If you suspect an LED or readout is not working. press the minus (–) key. If an engineering panel key is stuck on. reseat or replace it. if you suspect such a problem but are able to monitor and operate the controller from a computer workstation or remote operator panel.1. If not. and then press the key you want to test to verify that its code is being sent (see page 147). or SPEC RESP key is stuck. hold down the TEST key and press the SCROLL button three times (see User Preferences and LED Tests on page 90). COND. you should first switch to an alternate method of controlling your process. the controller will usually beep at 0. So. If not.

This indicates that the number of set bits (ones) in a received character did not agree with the defined parity for the serial port it arrived on. make sure only one Modbus master is connected and is configured to use one start. If such errors are occurring continuously. might experience frequent synchronization errors at high baud rates. one stop. This indicates the controller was unable to decode an incoming character due to a synchronization error. • The F will appear if a framing error was detected. isolated reception errors rarely affect the operation of the controller. and eight data bits. For Port 3 or 4. 3 and 4) ID numbers.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 115 Communication Problems If the controller beeps and the engineering panel shows a message of the following form: Com4 POF the port indicated by the number in the fourth field (1 through 4) is detecting serial data it is unable to decode. and/or F will appear only when the corresponding type of error occurs: • The P will appear if a parity error was detected. make sure all devices on the problem network are set for the same baud rate and parity and have unique Controller (Port 1) and Computer (Ports 2. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. This means that the controller failed to read an incoming character before the next one arrived. Downloading a different control program (for example. particularly older PLCs. changing a Performance into an Antisurge Controller) will frequently produce misconfigurations that trigger continuous reception errors. O.1. Some Modbus hosts.0) . Because the communication protocols employed by the controller reject faulty messages (and often provide for their re-transmission). Continuous framing errors usually indicate the baud rates of the host and slave disagree. The P. Continuous parity errors usually indicate that the parity settings of the transmitting and receiving devices are different. Frequent but not continuous errors can indicate poor connections or electromagnetic interference. • The O will appear if an overrun error occurred. Such problems can thus be solved by reducing that setting in both the host and the controllers.

or indicate a “Com1 Error” and/or “Com2 Error” alarm (turbine controllers). or other network problems. Port 2 is receiving but not transmitting: A lack of communication activity on ports that are connected to active networks usually indicates a serial port failure. Similarly. otherwise an underscore. Several controller features can prove useful when troubleshooting such problems: • Any controller’s Port 1 Test [MODE COMM – 3] will identify the companion controllers it is receiving data from via Port 1. “Comm2”. a transmission or line problem will cause several controllers to indicate such problems.1. • The Serial Port Activity Test [MODE TEST 3] elicits a dynamic display that reveals whether a specified serial port is transmitting or receiving data (Port 3 in this example): 3 MODE TEST 2 PT2 R-T_ The R will be followed by a hyphen if the port is receiving a transmission. • the failure of the receiving controller’s serial port circuit. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. or “Com1&2” in the lower left corner of its alarms screen while energizing any SerC relays (compressor controllers).116 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair If a controller fails to receive expected information from another via Port 1 or Port 2. In general. Antisurge. the T will be followed by a hyphen only when that port is transmitting. Either problem requires replacement of the CPU/IO PCB. while reception failures are indicated only by the problem controller. noise. Such failures (which are rare) usually result from extreme voltage surges or the failure of the 24-to-5 volt power converter.0) . • The Port 2 Slave Test [MODE COMM – 2] of any load-sharing Performance. it will set its Port 1 or Port 2 Fail Modbus discrete input and OPC variable. or Extraction Controller will indicate whether it is detecting any communication on the Port 2 load-sharing network. In the above example. Such indications can result from: • the failure of a controller to transmit information expected by its companions. • A Station Performance Controller’s Port 2 Master Test [MODE COMM – 1] will identify the load-sharing slaves that it is communicating with. or • line breaks. display “Comm1”. or a more general fault. failure of its serial port circuit. due to misconfiguration. Dual-Loop A/P.

or 1.3.2). provided external causes have been ruled out Note: I/O circuit failures are often caused by voltage transients that can also damage power supply PCB circuit traces (especially those for analog inputs. • cycling the controller off and back on re-energizes CR1. which provide their over-voltage protection). • repeated beeping accompanied by a “CS=” message on the engineering panel readout (this usually indicates the parameter memory is defective).1. • any unacceptable power converter voltage (15. • failure of any analog input or discrete I/O circuit. 5. unless: • the controller is powered down. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. provided external causes have been ruled out and the transmitter power supply has not failed. • periodic beeping accompanied by a “Reset” engineering panel message (see CPU/IO Fault Relay on page 105). • failure of the standard analog output circuits. or an excessive or unusually high difference between the internal and ambient temperatures (see Internal Conditions on page 100). or • the digital I/O status screen shows an underscore in the first relay position.0. provided the 24 Vdc is good. 3. which does not indicate a CPU/IO PCB failure (see External Alarms on page 108): Mode RUN Digitals In:_2___6_ Out:_2__5 or In/Out DigitalOut Î:_23__67_ • a lit Fault LED or non-functional engineering and front panels that remain so even after those panels have been replaced.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 117 CPU/IO Board Problems Any of the following symptoms can indicate that the CPU/IO PCB should be replaced: • a de-energized main fault relay (CR1). thus indicating it was de-energized by that assigned condition.0) . provided the power cord is securely connected at both ends and its backpanel connector is not loose or otherwise failing.

They. Analog Output Problems An output loopback deviation or alarm indicates that the controller is unable to maintain the intended voltage or current in a final control element’s analog output circuit. see FIM Analog Input Circuits on page 59) • induced currents • failed or miscalibrated transmitters • damaged analog input circuit components • failure of the CPU/IO PCB’s 24-to-15 volt power converter • misconfigured circuits (see Analog Input Switches on page 49) The problematic input(s) can be identified using the status screen’s Analog In Menu (see page 103). the simplest thing to do is replace the CPU/IO PCB and power supply assemblies (damage to the CPU/IO PCB analog input circuitry is often caused by extreme voltage surges that would also damage the protective circuits on the power supply PCB). If that parameter is enabled. connect a test signal in place of the transmitter and use the Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4] to compare the supplied signal and resulting reading. check to make sure none of its Input Lockout (MODE LOCK 6) parameters have been enabled.0) . Keep in mind that an input value reported by that procedure is in percent of span (rather than range).1. as discussed under Analog Inputs on page 75.0 for 12 mA. If you suspect the problems are internal. provided their measured variable displays are enabled (see page 75). usually indicate: • externally open or shorted circuits • blown fuses (such as those on a turbine controller field input module. If the controller is reading an input correctly but seemingly ignoring it.0 for 20 mA or higher). This can be caused by: • field element problems • poor connections or open circuits • blown fuses (such as those on a turbine controller field output module.0 for 4 mA or less. see FOM Analog Outputs on page 62) • CPU/IO or auxiliary PCB component failures • excessive loads on or failure of the transmitter power circuit (which also powers the CPU/IO PCB analog outputs) • miscalibration of the high-current output or its loopback circuit August 2007 UM3300/H (1. To determine if such a problem is internal. or any obvious analog input failures. as specified by its Offset Zero Input [MODE:D ANIN #] setting. A0. the TEST 4 value is determined using a 20 percent offset zero (00. 50.118 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Analog Input Problems Transmitter fail alarms indicate that at least one analog input is below its configured low (or above its specified high) alarm limit.

If you use solid-state relays to control such inputs.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 119 You can determine the magnitude of the problem by using the status screen to view the intended and measured output values (see Compressor Controller I/O Signals on page 101 or Turbine Controller I/O Signals on page 102). replace the auxiliary PCB. To isolate the problem further. or less than 2 Vdc if it is cleared. Discrete Input Problems If you suspect a discrete input circuit is malfunctioning. Unless the deviation indicates an open circuit or is too large for the control loop to adjust to. If the controller is reading an input correctly but seemingly ignoring it.1. check to make sure none of its Input Lockout (MODE LOCK 6) parameters have been enabled. the problem is probably external to the controller. To determine if the cause is internal or external: • transfer control to another device—if it is unable to maintain the intended current or voltage. connect a test load and then replace those components one at a time. You should also compare that voltage to the state of the connected signal source to determine whether it is malfunctioning or if there might be a line break or blown fuse—especially for FIM Discrete Input Circuits (see page 58). Internal standard output problems should be addressed by replacing the power supply and CPU/IO PCB assembly. An internal high-current output problem should be addressed by first trying to recalibrate it. you can determine whether the input signal is being properly read by comparing its displayed state (see Field I/O Screens on page 101) to the voltage between its back-panel or FIM terminals (see page 53 or page 58).0) . keep in mind that they can be problematic. or • connect a test load in place of the field element and disconnect the transmitter power output—if the controller is still unable to maintain the intended current or voltage. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. The signal should be greater than 10 Vdc if the input is asserted. such problems rarely require immediate correction. Ground-loop problems can also alter the effective voltages in such inputs. If that fails. the problem is most likely internal.

1. set MODE:D RA 1 (and RA 9. check any fuse included in the suspect circuit (such as those on a turbine controller field output module. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. it is easiest to connect a spare FOM or FIOM. the CPU/IO PCB will need to be replaced. Step 2: For basic I/O controllers. Step 3: For compressor controllers. if present) to +ON and all other RA parameters to +OFF. For turbine controllers. Step 4: The resistance measured across each relay’s field terminals should be nearly zero for each normally-open relay and nearly infinite for each normally-closed relay. This should energize all five relays. see FOM Control Relay Circuits on page 63) To directly test a relay’s operation. set MODE:D RA 1 to OFF and RA 2 through 5 to ON (be sure to note their original settings). you could disconnect the field wiring from the FTA or temporarily replace the top half of the connectors (which are secured with screws). Step 6: The resistance measured across each relay’s field terminals should be nearly zero for each normally-closed relay and nearly infinite for each normally-open relay. Step 5: For compressor controllers. that relay is probably not energizing or deenergizing. or else its contacts are not opening or closing properly. If the resistance measured across a given relay was the same in both step 4 and step 6. set MODE:D RA 1 to ON and RA 2 through 5 to OFF. If it does not. you can temporarily alternate the assigned function between On and Off to determine if the connected device responds accordingly. This should de-energize all five relays.0) . Step 8: Restore the original field wiring connections. compare its intended coil state (energized or de-energized. For FTA-equipped controllers. see page 101) to the resistance across its back-panel or FOM terminals (see page 53 or page 63): Step 1: Note the position of its NO/NC switch (see page 48). disconnect the field devices from the CR# circuits by unplugging their terminal blocks from the back panel. Step 7: Restore the original values of any MODE:D RA parameters you changed in step 3 or 5. For turbine controllers. Alternately. set MODE:D RA 1 (and RA 9.120 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Discrete Output Problems If you suspect a discrete output/control relay malfunction. if present) to +OFF and all other RA parameters to +ON. In either case.

any of the following symptoms generally indicates that the auxiliary PCB assembly (speed board) should be replaced: • the speed board fault relay (CR9) de-energizes • the Fault LED lights while other LEDs and readouts are lit • an excessive deviation of the high-current analog output loopback test. When operating with only one healthy MPU.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 121 Speed Board Problems Unless the CPU/IO PCB’s 24-to-15 volt power converter has failed. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. such a shutdown could also occur if: • passive MPU’s are used and the speed falls below the minimum needed to generate a measurable signal. or • the pickups are not properly matched to the gear that excites them and the speed exceeds the maximum above which their signals cannot decay between the passage of adjacent teeth. However. check the configuration parameters to make sure you have correctly entered the number of teeth on the exciter gear and the speed ratio between the gear and turbine shafts. all of the MPUs would appear to have failed. As an aid to troubleshooting. Speed Input Problems MPU failure alarms are usually caused by the loss of a frequency signal due to misaligned magnetic pickups. the immediacy of the problem depends on which auxiliary I/O circuits are in use and how important they are to control of the turbine. or high temperatures. In either case.1. that assembly must be immediately replaced. provided external causes have been ruled out (see Analog Output Problems on page 118) • an “Aux. its failure would trigger an MPULoss shutdown. broken leads. • The engineering panel’s Signal Values Test [MODE TEST 4] will display each such signal as a percentage of the Maximum Control Speed [COND:S DISPLAY HIGH]. Either value will be accurate only if the input has been properly configured. If the inputs appear to be miscalibrated. these controllers provide two ways to display the value of each speed input: • The signal to each input can be displayed (in rpm) by the status screen’s In/Out menu.0) . Board” alarm If a Speed Controller exhibits any of those symptoms. If an Extraction Controller does.

Unless that problem is caused by a concurrent output failure.0) . or miscalibration or failure of the control element or an intermediate I/H or I/P converter. or Speed Controller can be configured to indicate a final control element positioning problem if it detects an excessive deviation between its intended control element position and a predefined or configured analog input signal (which might be an actual position measurement or a hydraulic / pneumatic actuator control pressure).1. Performance.122 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Positioning Problems An Antisurge. Check for wiring problems. the problem is external to the controller. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.

On the other hand.0) . call CCC at 515-270-0857 and ask to talk to the Return Goods Coordinator. Spare Parts If your chosen maintenance strategy is to replace malfunctioning units. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Package the items carefully (appropriate packing materials can be sent to you if needed) and ship them prepaid and insured to: Compressor Controls Corporation ATTN: Service Department 4725 121st Street Des Moines. Return Procedure To return any item for repair. you should stock spare assemblies at the same one-to-five level. without disturbing the field wiring (see Controller Replacement). Warning! To prevent damage from static-electric discharges. and describe the problem you are experiencing. or • replace the entire controller with a new one having the same hardware configuration. One or more complete. change. without dismounting the case and back panel (see Component Replacement). at least one controller with identical components should be stocked for every five in use. a Series 3++ Performance Controller). or reconfigure the installed application software (see Programming and Configuration on page 126).A. you might need to change the front panel (see Front Panel Replacement on page 125) or update.1. if you choose to do board-level troubleshooting and replacement. You will be asked to identify your controller model (for example. The equipment will usually be repaired and shipped back within five days of its arrival at the factory. The Series 3++ Controller Parts List [DS3300/P] lists the assemblies you might wish to stock. along with a selection of front panels. Either way. He or she will then schedule your repair and assign a return material authorization (RMA) number. spare controllers should also be stocked for use while troubleshooting suspect units. The RMA number should be clearly displayed on all cartons and noted in all correspondence.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 123 Replacement Procedures Series 3++ Controllers contain no user-serviceable parts. IA 50323 U. provide its serial number. Your spare parts inventory should be based on the total number of controllers using each assembly. all spare circuit boards should be stored and transported in static-resistant pouches. You can: • replace one or more internal components. Suspect units or components should be replaced with identical spares and returned to CCC for diagnosis and repair.S.

Step 15: Transfer control of the process to the reassembled unit. Step 14: Verify or reload the control program. then slide it back into the connector on the front of the CPU/IO PCB. Step 11: Align the tabs on the sides of the engineering panel’s mounting brackets with the grooves in the case. align the pins on its rear side with the corresponding connectors on the CPU/IO PCB. Step 7: To separate the auxiliary PCB. then disengage the pins on its rear side from their CPU/IO PCB connector. Step 2: Disconnect the power cable from the rear of the controller. Reinstall the screws. Step 3: Loosen the screw at the bottom of the front panel. pull its left side forward about an inch. and verify their switch and jumper settings (see page 48. then swing it out and to the left. Press fairly hard until you feel the PSA “pop” back into its connector. Step 12: Reinstall or replace the front panel with one having the same overlay as the original (see page 125). Step 4: Separate the engineering panel assembly by removing the four galvanized screws at its corners and pulling it forward to disengage it from the CPU/IO PCB and case. page 49. Never disassemble a controller or handle its components without taking steps to prevent static discharge. Step 13: Reconnect the power cable to the back panel. then press them together.0) . Step 6: Decide which components to replace.124 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Component Replacement Most controller malfunctions can be fixed by replacing some or all of the internal components from the front of the case: Disconnect the power cable before disassembling a controller. and page 51). Step 1: Transfer control of your process to the malfunctioning controller’s online backup or other alternate device. Step 5: Pull the internal components from the case. then reload its configuration parameters (see page 126). Step 8: To replace only the CPU/IO PCB or power supply. Warning! Caution: August 2007 UM3300/H (1.1. and re-install the clips. replace the defective assembly. Step 10: Slide the internal components into the case (the CPU/IO PCB and PSA fit into the left-most set of grooves). remove the four screws that attach it to the standoffs on the CPU/IO PCB. remove the two clips from the connector joining them. Secure this assembly by reinstalling the four screws at its corners. Step 9: To reinstall or replace the auxiliary PCB. obtain them from your company stores.

Step 5: Verify that all of the replacement unit’s internal switches and jumpers are set the same as in the controller being replaced (see Internal Settings on page 47). remove the slides and pull the controller forward from the panel cutout. then squeeze the top and bottom of the hinge together until you can insert the other tang into its hole. Step 2: Unplug the power cable from the controller’s back panel. Step 2: Unplug the cable connecting the front panel to the engineering panel. Step 3: Loosen and remove the slide clamps from the case.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 125 Controller Replacement If you suspect the inside of the back panel or case are corroded or contaminated with foreign materials. Step 3: Squeeze the top and bottom of the wire hinge together until you can pull it away from the engineering panel. Step 4: Insert either end of the new panel’s wire hinge into its hole in the engineering panel’s mounting bracket. use the following procedure to replace the entire controller rather than just its internal components: Step 1: Transfer control of your process to the controller’s online backup or other alternate device. replace the front panel with that of the original controller or a new one having the same overlay (see below) Step 8: Reconnect the FTA data cables or back-panel terminal strips and power cable. Step 9: Verify or reload the control program and configuration parameters (see Programming and Configuration on page 126). Step 4: Obtain a spare unit having the same hardware configuration from your company stores. then slide it into the panel cutout. Step 6: Close the front panel after completing any needed configuration or other engineering procedures. Reinstall its slides and slide clamps and tighten the pressure screws. Unplug the field wiring terminal strips or FTA cables (rather than disconnecting individual wires).1. Step 7: If needed.0) . Front Panel Replacement To replace a front panel that has failed or no longer matches a newly-installed control program: Step 1: Loosen the screw at the bottom of the front panel. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. Step 10: Transfer control of your process to the new controller. pull its left side forward about an inch. Step 6: Remove the slide clamps from the replacement controller. Step 5: Plug the ribbon cable from the engineering panel into the connector on the back of the front panel. then swing it out and to the left.

126 Chapter 6: Maintenance and Repair Whenever you replace a controller or its CPU/IO PCB. Programming and Configuration Note: Port 4 must be set for 19.200 baud and odd parity in order to replace the machine control program.0) . then assign the original values to the following parameters: • Computer ID Number [MODE:D COMM 0 •] • Port 3 Baud Rate [MODE:D COMM 3] • Port 4 Baud Rate [MODE:D COMM 4].1. Step 5: Download a saved copy of the original parameter set and verify the resulting parameter checksum. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. you must make sure the control program and configuration parameters of the new CPU match those of the original: Step 1: Retrieve the needed program information and serial communication settings from your records (see Overview on page 99). Step 3: Connect a PC running the Configurator program. Step 7: Use the Set Clock [MODE TEST 9] key sequence to set the internal date and time (Speed Controllers only). Step 6: Disconnect the Configurator program. reload it (see Reloading the Control Program on page 71). Step 2: Enter the Enable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 1] key sequence from the engineering panel. If not. Step 4: Use the Program Version [MODE TEST 2] test to determine if the replacement is running the desired control program.

including: • its functional name and a description of that function.1. Values that are selected from a list by pressing the decimal key are shown as “Value” or “Valu”. • the range of values it can be given. • any restrictions on the order in which it must be entered. pressing the indicated keys will produce the listed confirming display. A hexadecimal ten leading digit is entered by pressing HIGH and displays as “A” (100. The space before a negative value is replaced by a “–”.0). Values that are entered by pressing one or more numeric keys are shown as a series of “#” symbols representing digits. OFF/ON or OFF/HIGH/LOW choices are shown as such and are selected by pressing the corresponding key (0. Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual August 2007 UM3300/H (1. which consists of a prompt followed by the current value. • the sequence of keys you must press to view or change it from the engineering panel (often used as an alternate name). 1. HIGH. possibly including an automatically-placed decimal point.0) . or LOW).Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 127 Appendix A Configuration Parameters This appendix describes each configuration or tuning parameter discussed in the body of this manual. that prompt will include a “#” representing the digit corresponding to the array element. For array parameters.0 is entered as HIGH 0 0 and displays as A0. • its confirming display prompt. and • cross-references to the sections of this manual in which the parameter is discussed. Keyboard Entry As discussed in Chapter 2.

. . .9999 to . 85 COND:D BIAS 1 Output Scaling Bias Note: COND:D BIAS 2 Loopback Scaling Bias BIAS 1 and 2 can only be changed via the Engineering Panel. . .1. 146 COND:D CONST 2 Output Failure Delay This parameter defines the number of seconds the output or position feedback test deviation can be above its threshold before the corresponding alarm is signaled. . . . . . . .0000 to .00 to 9. . .00 to 9. . For controllers equipped with an auxiliary PCB. . . .9999 Display: B1 . . . . . . . .## Reference: Output Loopback Test . . . . . . .04) Display: CO2 #. . . . . Range: 0.9999 Display: B2 . . . . . . . . . . .0) . Range: 0. . . . . .#### Reference: Loopback Circuit Calibration . . . .## [f(X)] Reference: Numeric Parameters .99 percent [f(X)] Display: X2# #. . .## [X] Y2# #. . . 87 MODE TEST 4 . this parameter sets the bias used to scale and calibrate the high-current output’s loopback input signal. . . 88 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. 41 For controllers equipped with an auxiliary PCB. . . . .#### Reference: Output Circuit Calibration . . .00 to 9. Range: . . . . . .96 seconds (multiples of . . . . . Range: –. . . . . . .99 percent [X] 0.128 Appendix A: Configuration Parameters COND:A f(X) 2 # and X 2 # Reported Flow Characterizer These parameters characterize an Antisurge Controller’s reported flow measurement in multisection compressor applications. . . this parameter sets the bias used to scale and calibrate the high-current output signal. . .

. . . . . 75 Each of these parameters defines the position of the decimal point in the corresponding measured variable display. . . . . . (trailing decimal) 2 ##. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference 129 COND:D DISPLAY 0# Measured Variable Display Each of these parameters determines whether or not the corresponding measured variable can be viewed via the status screen’s Analog In menu. . . .### (leading decimal) Display: 0#. . . . . . . . . .## 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Each of these parameters defines the value the Analog In menu would display for the corresponding measured variable if the value of its signal variable was 100. . . . . . . . . . . 75 Range: Range: COND:D DISPLAY 0#– Measured Variable Name and Units COND:D DISPLAY 0 # HIGH Measured Variable Maximum COND:D DISPLAY 0 # LOW Measured Variable Minimum COND:D DISPLAY 0#• Measured Variable Decimal August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . . . . . then ENTER for each Reference: Label Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . 36 Analog Inputs . . . . . .0 percent. . . . . . then EU:AAAAA selected symbol (A) flashes press • to select. . Range: up to eight name and five units symbols Display: AAAAAAAA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Range: –9999 to 9999 Display: 0#H #### Reference: Analog Inputs . . . .0) . . 39 Analog Inputs . .# 3 #. . . . . . . . . . 4321 (selected digit is replaced by •) Reference: Enabling Parameters . . . 75 Each of these parameters defines the value the Analog In menu would display for the corresponding measured variable if the value of its signal variable was zero. Range: –9999 to 9999 Display: 0#L #### Reference: Analog Inputs . . Off variable cannot be displayed On variable can be displayed Display: D0# OFF/ON Reference: Analog Inputs . . 0 #### (no decimal) 1 ###. . . . . 75 Each of these parameters defines the name and engineering units shown when the corresponding measured variable is viewed. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . If it is negative. . . . . .00 to 99. . . . this parameter sets the gain used to scale and calibrate the high-current output signal. Act actuator control signal. . . Range: 00. Range: . . . . . . . . . . . . . Range: see UM3307 and UM3308 Display: ##+Value (press HIGH or LOW to select sign. . . . . . . .0000 to . . . . . .#### Reference: Output Circuit Calibration . 87 MODE TEST 4 . . 146 COND:D IN ## Discrete Input Assigned Function For turbine controllers. . . . . . . . 88 Range: August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . the input is asserted by lowering that voltage below the neutral zone. . . . . . . . this parameter sets the gain used to scale and calibrate the high-current output’s loopback input signal. . . . . 85 Note: COND:D GAIN 2 Loopback Scaling Gain GAIN 1 and 2 can only be changed via the Engineering Panel. . .99 Display: G2 ##. . the input is asserted by raising its voltage above the neutral zone. . no tests ActL Act plus current Loopback test only ActP ActL plus position feedback test Off constant. . . . . . . . then press • to select function) Reference: Discrete I/O . . . .1. .130 Appendix A: Configuration Parameters COND:D GAIN 1 Output Scaling Gain For controllers equipped with an auxiliary PCB. . . . 87 Output Loopback Test . . . . . . 74 COND:D OUT 1 First Output Assigned Variable This parameter selects the signal from which the high current output signal is calculated and enables or disables the current and position feedback tests. For controllers equipped with an auxiliary PCB. minimum signal Display: OT1 Valu Reference: Loopback Circuit Calibration . . If the value is positive. each of these parameters selects the function assigned to the corresponding discrete input. . . . .9999 Display: G1 .## Reference: Loopback Circuit Calibration . . . . .

. . . . . . . Range: Display: Enter After: Reference: 00000 to Maximum Control Speed A1 ##### COND:S DISPLAY HIGH MPU Tests . . . .0 to 99. . . . . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference 131 COND:D OUT 1 – Bipolar Output For controllers that support valve positioning via the high-current output. . 81 MODE:D ANIN LOW Transmitter Failure Limit For a Dual-Loop A/P Controller. . . . . . . . . . . 40 Analog Inputs . below which that input is considered to have failed. . . . . . . .1. . Range: 00. . . . . . . . . . . . .# Reference: Numeric Parameters . 83 Output Circuit Calibration . . . . . . . . . . 81 COND:S DISPLAY HIGH Maximum Control Speed This parameter serves as a reference value for converting the absolute speeds (in rpm) obtained from the speed inputs and displayed on the front-panel readouts to the percent-of-range values the controller uses internally. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . this parameter defines the minimum value for any offset-zero input’s analog-to-digital variable. . . . . 87 Range: COND:S ALARM 1 Control Threshold This parameter defines the minimum rotational speed below which the signal from a magnetic pickup is considered unreliable.9 percent Display: ANL ##. . . this parameter determines whether that output is generated as a unipolar or bipolar electrical signal. . . . . . . 86 Loopback Circuit Calibration . . . . . . . 75 MODE:D ANIN – . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . Off unipolar output On bipolar output Display: OT1. . . . . Range: 00000 to 64000 rpm Display: HI ##### Reference: MPU Tests . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . It should be set equal to or slightly greater than the maximum rotational speed your turbine could ever reach. . . . . . . . . .OFF/ON Reference: Bipolar Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 75 MODE:D ANIN – . . . Range: 00. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off actual zero (for example. . . . . . . . 141 Each of these parameters defines the minimum value for the corresponding analog input’s analog-to-digital variable. . . With the exception of redundant controllers. . . . . . . . . .# Reference: Analog Inputs . . . . . . . . . 103 MODE TEST 4 . .# Reference: Analog Inputs . . . . . . . .4 percent Display: A#H ##. . 75 Analog In Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Range: MODE:D ANIN # HIGH Analog Input High Alarm Limit Each of these parameters defines the maximum value for the corresponding analog input’s analog-to-digital variable. .1. . . . 75 MODE:D ANIN – . . . . . . . . . . . . . . this ID must be unique within that network. . . . . . . . . below which that input is considered to have failed. . . . . . .4 percent Display: A#L ##. . . . 110 MODE:D ANIN # LOW Analog Input Low Alarm Limit MODE:D COMM 0 Controller ID Number Note: COMM 0 and 0 • can only be changed via the Engineering Panel. . 73 Engineering Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 to 5 Vdc) On 20 percent offset zero (e. . . Range: 00. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .g. . . . 4 to 20 mA) Display: A# OFF/ON Reference: Analog Inputs . . .0 to 102. . . 141 This parameter identifies the controller in the network connected to its serial Port 1. . . . . . . . above which that input is considered to have failed.132 Appendix A: Configuration Parameters MODE:D ANIN # Offset Zero Input Each of these parameters identifies the zero level of the corresponding analog input signal (relative to its hardware configuration). Range: 1 to 8 Display: Ctrl# # Reference: Configuring Communications . . . . . . August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 to 102. . . . . .

. this ID must be unique within each of those networks. 19k2 (baud) Even. . . . . . Range: 4800. . . . .1. . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 MODE:D COMM 4 Port 4 Baud Rate Port 4 Parity Port 4 Scaling August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . then ENTER) Reference: Configuring Communications . 4095. and 4. Odd. . . . . 126 MODE:D COMM 2 Port 2 Baud Rate This parameter defines the data transmission rate for the Port 2 serial communication channel. . . . . . 9600. . then ENTER) PT4 Valu (press • to change. . . parity setting. 4095. .Series 3++ Hardware Reference 133 MODE:D COMM 0 • Computer ID Number This parameter identifies the controller in the networks connected to its serial Ports 2. . . and Modbus register scaling for the Port 3 communication channel. 9600. 73 MODE:D COMM 3 Port 3 Baud Rate Port 3 Parity Port 3 Scaling These parameters define the data transmission rate. . . . Range: 2400. . . . . . None (parity) 4000. . . . . then ENTER) PT3 Valu (press • to change. 37 Configuring Communications . . 4800. 19k2 (baud) Even. . . . . Odd. 64k (100% value) Display: PT4 Valu (press • to change. . 126 These parameters define the data transmission rate. . With the possible exception of redundant controllers. . . . . parity setting. . . and Modbus register scaling for the Port 4 communication channel. . . . 64k (100% value) Display: PT3 Valu (press • to change. . . . . . . . . 73 Programming and Configuration .0) . . . . 98 Programming and Configuration . . . . . . . . then ENTER) PT4 Valu (press • to change. . . . 73 Serial Ports . . . . then ENTER) Reference: Configuring Communications . . . . then ENTER) PT3 Valu (press • to change. . . Range: 01 to 64 Display: Comp# ## Reference: Configuring Communications . None (parity) 4000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9600 Display: PT2 Valu (press • to select. . . . . 73 Programming and Configuration . then ENTER) Reference: List Parameters . . Range: 4800. . .

. . . . 86 Loopback Circuit Calibration . . .134 Appendix A: Configuration Parameters MODE:D fC 1 Positioning Loop This parameter enables or disables the optional valve positioning loop and the display of its input signal value (LVDT1). . . . 73 Range: August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . 36 Range: MODE:D fE 1 Redundant Tracking This parameter determines whether the controller will operate in its redundant mode when a Track discrete input is asserted. . Off read and write access On read access only Display: LOC2 OFF/ON Reference: Enabling Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off host cannot monitor tracking controller On host can monitor tracking controller Display: LOC0 OFF/ON Reference: Serial Ports . . . . . enabling this parameter allows the Modbus host to monitor both controllers. . . 98 Range: MODE:D LOCK 2 Modbus Write Inhibit This parameter defines the level of access (read/write or read-only) that a host device has to the controller’s coils and holding registers. . . . . . 91 Range: MODE:D LOCK 0 Modbus While Tracking If redundant controllers are given the same Computer ID Number [MODE:D COMM 0 •]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off redundant tracking disabled On redundant tracking enabled Display: fE1 OFF/ON Reference: Overview . . . . . . . . . this parameter must be disabled so that only one of them will respond to Modbus data requests to that address. . . . . . .0) . . . . . Off measured total flow not calculated 1 to 8 selects corresponding analog input Display: fD1 OFF/# Reference: Enabling Parameters . . . . 87 Range: MODE:D fD 1 Mass Flow Input This parameter selects the analog input for the flow signal (∆Po) used to compute a Performance Controller’s measured total flow. . . . . . . . . 34 Configuring Communications . . . . . . Off valve positioning disabled On valve positioning enabled Display: fC1 OFF/ON Reference: Output Circuit Calibration . If they are given different ID numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Range: August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . 78 Alarm System . . . . then press • to select function) Reference: List Parameters . . . . . Off functioning auxiliary PCB required On auxiliary PCB ignored (if present) Display: LOC6 OFF/ON Reference: Speed Board Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Range: MODE:S ANIN 1 Speed Input 1 This parameter specifies whether the controller calculates a speed from the frequency of the first magnetic pickup input signal. . . . If the value is negative. . . . . 74 MODE:E LOCK 6 Auxiliary PCB Lockout An Extraction Controller that does not use the high-current analog output or discrete inputs of it auxiliary PCB assembly can be configured to ignore or operate without it by enabling this parameter. . .0) . . . . 79 Range: MODE:S ANIN 3 Speed Input 3 This parameter specifies whether the controller calculates a speed from the frequency of the third magnetic pickup input signal. . . . . the relay will de-energize. .Series 3++ Hardware Reference 135 MODE:D RA # Relay Assigned Function Each of these parameters selects the conditions under which the corresponding discrete output is triggered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Discrete I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . Range: see chapter 3 of each configuration manual Display: RA#±Valu (press HIGH or LOW to select sign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Range: MODE:S ANIN 2 Speed Input 2 This parameter specifies whether the controller calculates a speed from the frequency of the second magnetic pickup input signal. . . . . . If the assigned function is positive. Off MPU1 not read On MPU1 enabled Display: P1 OFF/ON Reference: Speed Inputs .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off MPU3 not read On MPU3 enabled Display: P3 OFF/ON Reference: Speed Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off MPU2 not read On MPU2 enabled Display: P2 OFF/ON Reference: Speed Inputs . the relay will be energized when the associated condition exists. . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . Range: 01 to 99 rpm Display: WIN ## Reference: MPU Tests .136 Appendix A: Configuration Parameters MODE:S ANIN 4 MPU Tolerance When all three magnetic pickup inputs are enabled.999 Display: Ri #. . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . Range: 0. . . . . . . . . . . this parameter defines their maximum acceptable deviation from the median speed. . . . . . Any input that deviates from the median by more than this amount is considered to have failed. . 81 MODE:S ANIN 5 Gear Tooth Count This parameter defines the number of speed input pulses the controller will expect to receive per revolution of the MPU gear shaft. . . . . . . Range: 000 to 999 teeth Display: GR ### Reference: Speed Scaling . . 86 Range: MODE:S SS 3 Alternate MW Input This parameter specifies how a Speed Controller’s megawatt droop algorithm selects its analog input (signal variable SV7 or SV8). . . . . . . . . 35 Range: August 2007 UM3300/H (1. 80 MODE:S ANIN 6 Shaft Speed Ratio This parameter defines the number of times the MPU gear shaft rotates per revolution of the turbine. . . . . . . 80 MODE:S REV 1 Output Reverse This parameter matches the direction of the actuator control signal to that of your steam control valve. .### Reference: Speed Scaling . . . . Off always select SV7 High select highest of two signals Low select lowest of two signals Display: SS3 OFF/HIGH/LOW Reference: Enabling Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .000 to 9. . . . . . . Off signal-to-open valve On signal-to-close valve Display: REV1 OFF/ON Reference: Output Circuit Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.

To display the number of I/O scans (out of 16) that remained before that would have happened. the first key is instead labelled ALT or LIMIT): LIMIT 2 ∇ Lp 5 If a control loop execution takes more than the allotted eight I/O scans. as indicated by the MODE:D notation and its “MODE: D” first step confirming display. the Transmitter Status Test [MODE:D ANIN –] is assigned to the Device page. at 40 millisecond intervals). they time out and automatically clear the display after 45 seconds of keyboard inactivity. Otherwise. Series 3++ Hardware Referencemanual LIMIT LOWER CPU Loading The Machine Control Program (see page 70) scans the controller’s inputs and outputs every five milliseconds. press the following Front Panel keys (for Dual-Loop A/P and Speed Controllers. That loop is interrupted by serial communication tasks and subsequent I/O scans. the first key would be LIMIT or POWER): LIMIT 3 ∇ Wp 16 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. and ideally executes the control loop after every eighth I/O scan (in other words. but should complete before the next eighth such scan. most of these procedural key sequences are not assigned to specific data pages. Unlike the key sequences used to enter configuration parameters.0) . A data page letter is indicated only when you must press the data group key as many times as needed to display the letter at the end of the first step confirming display. Pressing the CLEAR key will terminate any of these procedures and clear the display. For example. The CPU will then reset if the loop takes more than 120 more milliseconds to complete.1.Series 3++ Hardware Reference UM3300/H 137 Appendix B Controller Test Sequences This appendix describes the controller test procedures that can be executed from the engineering panel of a Series 3++ Controller. each such key sequence begins with a data group key that selects the function of the second key. press the following front panel keys (for Dual-Loop and Speed Controllers. To display the number of I/O scans that are being run between control loop executions on the engineering readout. As described in Chapter 2. the displayed Lp will be zero.

enter the Disable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 0] sequence to disable further changes (otherwise. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.0) . the controller will beep and display an Error! message on the confirming display. reconfiguration will be automatically disabled after thirty minutes of keyboard inactivity): MODE LOCK 5 0 Disable Reconfiguration To disable alteration of the controller’s configuration and tuning parameters from the engineering panel. the controller will beep and display an Error! message on the confirming display.1. When you finish reconfiguring your controller. press the following keys: 5 MODE LOCK 1 MODE LOCK 5 1 Enable Reconfiguration LOC5 ON ENTER If you make a mistake entering this sequence.138 Appendix B: Controller Test Sequences To enable alteration of the controller’s configuration and tuning parameters from the engineering panel. press the following keys: 5 MODE LOCK 0 LOC5 OFF ENTER If you make a mistake entering this sequence.

which you can abort at any time by pressing CLEAR. press the decimal (•) key: • Recall2? Pressing ENTER will then initiate a recall of the selected alternate parameter set.0) . If it is valid. To initiate this procedure. “No Match” is displayed to inform you that the recall has been aborted: ENTER Reset No Match or August 2007 UM3300/H (1. To select a different set. press the decimal (•) key: • Store2? Pressing ENTER will then copy the current parameters to the indicated alternate set and briefly display that set’s new checksum: ENTER CS= F882 MODE LOCK 3 • • Recall Alternate Parameters This procedure copies any of the three alternate parameter sets into the controller’s current set. To initiate this procedure. If the selected set is invalid (which probably means it was never defined). which you can abort at any time by pressing CLEAR.1. press the following keys: 3 MODE LOCK • ENTER Store1? This display indicates which alternate set the current parameters will be copied into. it is copied into the current set and the controller executes a soft reset.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 139 MODE LOCK 3 • Store Alternate Parameters This procedure copies the controller’s current parameters into any of its three alternate sets. press the following keys: 3 MODE LOCK • • ENTER Recall1? This display indicates which alternate set will be copied into the working memory. To select a different set.

0) . In that case. the two sets differ and the checksum shown is for the present set. To display the alternate parameter set checksums. If that display begins with P. you can display the long-term parameter checksum by pressing the decimal key: • L = A3C2 If the two parameter sets are different.140 Appendix B: Controller Test Sequences MODE LOCK 4 Parameter Checksum This procedure displays the checksum values of the controller’s various parameter sets. To view the parameter checksums. the present parameter set is the same as that stored in long-term memory. you should use the Disable Reconfiguration [MODE LOCK 5 0] procedure to disable reconfiguration.1. continue to press the decimal (•) key: • CS1=B94A CS2=632E CS3=44FC • • You can cycle through the displays of all four (or five) checksums by continuing to press the decimal (•) key as many times as you want. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. You can also tell if any of these parameter sets agree with those recorded on a parameter worksheet by comparing these checksums to those recorded on that worksheet. You can determine which (if any) of the alternate parameter sets is currently in use by comparing the checksum of the present and long-term sets to those for the alternate sets. press the following keys: 4 MODE LOCK CS= A3C2 P = A76F or If the confirming display beings with CS. The controller will then correct any errors that occur in the present parameter set.

which is indicated by lighting the front panel’s Alarm LED and displaying “TranFail” on its Alarms status screen. You can determine the status of each consecutive input signal by pressing the • key: • AN1 GOOD AN1 HIGH AN1 LOW or or This allows you to repetitively cycle through all the inputs. press the following keys: repeat MODE until you see – MODE: D AN IN AN1 GOOD AN1 HIGH AN1 LOW or or The digit in this display is the analog input channel number (AN1). MODE COMM Reset Controller To restart the control program without initializing its operating state and variables. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. press the following keys: MODE COMM ENTER Reset Doing so will increment both the CPU Reset Count [MODE TEST 6] and the Front-Panel Reset Count [MODE TEST 7]. the inputs are checked against a common Transmitter Failure Limit and only test as GOOD or LOW. LOW indicates it is below its Analog Input Low Alarm Limit.0) . HIGH indicates that signal is above its Analog Input High Alarm Limit.1. For a Dual-Loop Controller only. With previous versions. or GOOD indicates it is between those limits. the conditions of all eight inputs were checked only at the instant that this test was initiated and not updated thereafter. The status of the displayed input is updated continuously.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 141 MODE:D ANIN – Transmitter Status Test This procedure can be used to identify which analog input signal(s) triggered a transmitter failure alarm. To initiate this test.

Pressing the decimal key then advances this display through the list of designated Load-Sharing Controllers. To determine whether or not those controllers are responding. in the following order: 08 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 decrementing to decrementing to decrementing to decrementing to decrementing to decrementing to decrementing to decrementing to 01 09 17 25 33 41 49 57 The confirming display The End will appear after the status of all the designated secondary controllers has been reviewed. Note: Unless this port is used for performance or extraction load-sharing. The confirming display will be GOOD if that controller is responding to Station Controller requests. press the following keys: – MODE COMM 1 MODE COMM – 1 Port 2 Master Test -08 GOOD -08 BAD or where the number following the minus sign is the first designated load-sharing controller’s Computer ID Number (08 in the above example). August 2007 UM3300/H (1.0) . or BAD if it is not. press the following keys: – MODE COMM 2 -2 -2 GOOD BAD or where the confirming display will be GOOD if a serial transmission has been received during the previous second.1.142 Appendix B: Controller Test Sequences A Station Controller periodically requests information from each Load-Sharing Performance Controller. MODE COMM – 2 Port 2 Slave Test To determine if the controller has detected any Port 2 serial communications activity within the past second. it is usually not even connected to any other controllers and a BAD result for this test is of no consequence.

redundant controller tracking). press the following keys: – MODE COMM 3 -1 -1 GOOD BAD where the digit is a controller ID number. You can cycle through all eight possible ID numbers (including this controller’s own) by pressing that key as many times as you like: • -8 -1 BAD GOOD • Note: MODE TEST 3 Serial Port Activity Test Although transmissions are normally received from all controllers connected to Port 1 (including this one).Series 3++ Hardware Reference 143 MODE COMM – 3 Port 1 Test Each controller can be configured to expect Port 1 transmissions from other Series 3++ Controllers by enabling any of several features (for example. You can then check for communications activity on any other port by pressing the corresponding numeric key (for example. Similarly. press the following keys: 3 MODE TEST # PT# R-T_ where # is the numeric key corresponding to the port number. The bar after the R will be in the high position if that port is currently receiving a transmission. BAD indicates it is not. the bar after the T will be high only when that port is transmitting. To view a dynamic display of a specified serial port’s communications activity.0) August 2007 . press 4 to view Port 4’s activity): 4 PT4 R-T_ UM3300/H (1. GOOD indicates data is being received from that controller.1. The port in the above example is receiving but not transmitting. This procedure reveals whether or not this controller is receiving Port 1 transmissions from the associated controllers. To identify the companion controllers from which Port 1 transmissions are being received. otherwise it will be low. Subsequently pressing the decimal key displays the same information for the next possible companion controller. only those from specified companion controllers are normally of any concern.

production software has not yet been loaded into this controller. To determine which revision of the control program is installed in your controller. Pressing the decimal key (•) will then display the installed version of the FPGA or auxiliary PCB firmware: • FPGA0202 SPBD-010 -------- or or The SPBD (speedboard/auxiliary PCB) version is displayed only by Speed and Extraction Controllers with installed auxiliary PCBs. while the line of dashes is displayed by turbine controllers that are not so equipped.144 Appendix B: Controller Test Sequences MODE TEST 2 Program Version This procedure displays the installed control program and the FPGA and auxiliary PCB firmware revision numbers. In either case. pressing the decimal key (•) a second time would then display the FPGA firmware version.0) . August 2007 UM3300/H (1.1. press the following keys: 2 MODE TEST 1061-001 If the confirming display is blank.

their values are meaningless. press the following keys: 4 MODE TEST Note: Inputs To display the measured value of any analog input. and the currently-pressed front-panel buttons and control keys. press the decimal key to scroll past the CH8 input display: CH8 50. you can display the value of each consecutive input by pressing the decimal key (•).1. the intended states of the control relays. pressing 1 displays the current value of the CH1 input: 1 CH1 45. Because the Extraction Controller does not use these inputs.8 • PU1 00. The internal analog inputs for the output loopback measurements. position. Note: The engineering-units value of each enabled input can be displayed via the Analog In menu of the front-panel status screen. CPU/IO board power supply voltages and temperature can only be monitored via the via the front-panel status screen. speed (frequency). disable its Offset Zero Input [MODE:D ANIN #] parameter and compare the resulting TEST 4 value to a volt or ammeter measurement of the corresponding input signal. For example.0). Or. press the corresponding numeric key. and discrete input signals.9 percent display as A0. Note: The revolutions-per-minute value of each enabled speed input can be displayed via the In/Out menu of the front-panel status screen. To display a turbine controller’s speed/frequency inputs (MPUs).Series 3++ Hardware Reference 145 MODE TEST 4 Signal Values Test This procedure can display the current values of the analog.8 where the number in the display is the corresponding signal variable (values above 99.0) .0 Each input is displayed as a percentage of the defined maximum speed for the corresponding turbine shaft. To determine if an input is being read accurately. To initiate this test. August 2007 UM3300/H (1.

10 (A).3 AD4 00.0) . press zero (0). G=16). and 14 (E) are asserted.0 = +20 mA) AD5 output loopback value.0 = -20. …. A0.0 • LV1 35.0 AD5 01. The above examples show only inputs DI2. in percent of 200 mA.1 • • • These values represent: LV1 unscaled LVDT1 input. after applying the Loopback Scaling Bias and Loopback Scaling Gain To determine the status of the discrete inputs. AD4 auxiliary analog input (00. B=11. displayed as a percentage of its maximum range AD3 raw value of the output loopback signal.2 AD3 50. Digits above nine are shown in a modified hexadecimal notation (A=10. 5. scroll past the display for MPU 3: PU3 00. 13 (D). August 2007 UM3300/H (1.146 Appendix B: Controller Test Sequences To display the auxiliary PCB’s valve position and output loopback signals (see Loopback Circuit Calibration on page 87).1. Pressing the decimal key (•) then repeatedly toggles the display between inputs 1 to 8 and 9 to 16: 0 _2__5___ _A__DE__ _2__5___ • • Each character will be the input number if that input is asserted or an underscore if it is not.

In the above example.1. the group 1/2/5 shown above would indicate that only the Menu button is pressed or stuck down): 1356 12456 8 125 4 5 235 346 6 12346 127 1 237 7 2 Caution: This procedure does not disable the normal operation of the front panel keys and buttons. press nine (9): 9 1__4____ where each character will be either the relay number (if that relay is energized) or an underscore (if it is not). press the minus (–) key: – 12__5___ If no keys are pressed. Note: The status of the Auxiliary PCB Fault relay (DO9) cannot be viewed via this procedure.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 147 To determine which discrete outputs are energized. so pressing them to verify that they are working can affect the operation of the controller.0) . To display a group of digits indicating which front-panel keys and buttons are pressed. a line of eight underscores is displayed. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. If a single key is pressed or stuck. The 1 for fault relay CR1 will appear unless it (and possibly CR2) are de-energized by CR1’s assigned function. only relays CR1 and CR4 should be energized. one of the following unique groups of digits will appear (for example.

which does not change the operating state or analog output.1. This procedure checks the controller’s parameters to make sure they are reasonable. However. which can then be reset by pressing the zero key: 0 Z80 0000 MODE TEST 7 Front-Panel Reset Count To display the number of times the front-panel microprocessor has reset since this count was last zeroed. August 2007 UM3300/H (1. a Speed Controller will execute a hard reset (which trips the turbine) when it powers up or detects a fault. resets its serial ports and analog inputs. press the following keys: 6 MODE TEST Z80 #### where #### is the hexadecimal reset count. and begins a new scan cycle. press the following keys: 7 MODE TEST Mot #### where #### is its current hexadecimal value. the controller is reconfigured from a workstation. Most controllers always execute a soft reset.0) .148 Appendix B: Controller Test Sequences MODE TEST 6 CPU Reset Count Resetting the main CPU restarts its control program. To display the number of times the control program has restarted since this count was last zeroed. or the Reset Controller [MODE COMM] procedure is executed. This occurs when the controller is powered up. which can then be reset by pressing the zero key: 0 Mot 0000 Resetting or powering up the controller will usually increment this count by two. critical parameters are changed or alternate parameter sets are recalled. a hardware or software fault causes a watchdog time out.

day. the procedure aborts after briefly displaying an “Error!” message. To initiate this test. It is used primarily to verify the successful downloading of a new operating program.Series 3++ Hardware Reference 149 MODE TEST 8 Program Checksum This procedure initiates the calculation and display of a four-digit. year. hour and minute. Once you have entered a change. press the CLEAR key once to start over or twice to abort this procedure and leave the original value unchanged. it will be replaced by: CRC #### where #### is the hexadecimal checksum for the installed software. which it displays in that order. hexadecimal (for example. • enter a new value by pressing the corresponding two numeric keys and then the ENTER key. 1AF4) checksum for the controller’s internal binary operating instructions.0) . press the following keys to display the current month-of the-year setting (01≤##≤12): 9 MODE TEST Month?## Either pressing the decimal key (•) or entering a new month will then display the current day-of-the-month (01≤##≤days in month): # # Month?## Day? ## ENTER August 2007 UM3300/H (1. If you make a mistake while specifying a new value. To initiate this procedure. MODE TEST 9 Set Clock This procedure sets a Speed Controller’s clock to a specified month. making an error or aborting the procedure will not undo it. If you specify an invalid value and then press ENTER. you can: • press the decimal key (•) to leave it unchanged and display the next field’s value. press the following keys: 8 MODE TEST CRC BusY This message indicates the controller is calculating the requested checksum. or • press the CLEAR key to terminate this procedure.1. After a brief pause. The correct CRCs for the standard releases of each control application are listed on its revisions data sheet {DS33##/V]. As the current value of each field is displayed.

150

Appendix B: Controller Test Sequences
where each numeric key used to specify the new month is represented as # (you must press the leading zero for most months). Either pressing the decimal key (•) or entering a new day will then display the current year (20##):
# #

Day?

##

ENTER

Year? ##

Either pressing the decimal key (•) or entering a new year will then display the current hour-of-the-day (00 ≤ ## ≤ 59):
# #

Year? ## Hour? ##

ENTER

Pressing the CLEAR key or entering a new minute (00 ≤ ## ≤ 59) will then terminate this procedure. Entering a new minutes value will also set the seconds counter to zero:
# #

Minut?##

ENTER

MODE TEST HIGH
Auxiliary PCB Error Count

For Speed and Extraction Controllers, this procedure dynamically displays the number of times the auxiliary PCB has failed to respond to the main CPU since this count was last zeroed. To display this count, press the following keys:
HIGH

MODE

TEST

332=####

where #### is the communication error count, which can then be reset by pressing the zero key:
0

332=0000

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Glossary/Index
This combined glossary and index defines and references various topics discussed in this manual. Alarms are undesirable control system conditions indicated by the front-panel Alarms LED, Modbus and OPC Alarm variables, and any control relays assigned the Alarm function. Reference: Compressor Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 External Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Turbine Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 is one of three sets of configuration and tuning parameter values that the controller can store in addition to its primary (working) set. Recalling an alternate parameter set causes a Controller Reset. Reference: Alternate Parameter Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Displaying Checksums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Parameter Memory Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Storing and Recalling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 is a circuit that measures the electrical signal from a process variable transmitter, or the value of such a signal. Reference: Auxiliary PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Back Panel Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Current/Voltage Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 FIM Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Measured Variable Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Measured Variable Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Redundant Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Signal Values Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Signal Variable Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Transmitter Status Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 see also: Position Input, Transmitter Failure

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Alternate Parameter Set

Analog Input

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152

Glossary/Index
Analog Output is a circuit that generates an electrical signal that is used to manipulate a final control element, or the value of such a signal. Reference: Auxiliary PCB Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Back Panel Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Current/Voltage Switch and Jumper . . . . . . . . . . .50 FOM Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Monitoring Intended and Actual Signals. . . . 101–103 Redundant Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 see also: High-Current Output, Output Loopback Failure is a circuit board that provides the High-Current Output, Position Inputs, Speed Inputs, and Discrete Inputs 9 to 16. Reference: Auxiliary PCB Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Failure Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Fault Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Program Version Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144 Replacement Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 is one of several different assemblies that can be used to provide the power cord and field wiring or Field Termination Assembly connections. Reference: Back Panel Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23–24 Component Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53–56 Ethernet Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Serial Port Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 see: Serial Port is the frequency of the beep sound, which can be varied by pressing the Raise or Lower Key while holding down the Scroll button. Reference: User Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 is a feature of the High-Current Output that can generate bi-directional (forward and reverse) current flows. see: LED Brightness see: Control Keys, Control Loop Buttons, Menu System Buttons is the total of the lengths of all cables within any given RS-485 serial communication network. Reference: Serial Communication Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

Auxiliary PCB

Back Panel

Baud Rate Beep Frequency

Bipolar Output Brightness, Readouts Buttons Cable Length

August 2007

UM3300/H (1.1.0)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Serial Port Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Serial Port 1 Test . . . . . 107 is the repair of a malfunctioning controller by replacing only circuit boards that are believed to be malfunctioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . Program Checksum see: Isolation is an error in the reception of information from a companion Series 3++ Controller or a Modbus host. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 External Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Troubleshooting . . . . . 125 see: Parameter Checksum. . . . . 85–88 are slides along top and bottom of controller case that pull its front flanges back against the panel. . . 124 Return Procedure . . . . 16 are Series 3++ Controllers (Antisurge. . . . . . . . . 99. . 143 Serial Port 2 Test . . . . . 126 Front Panel . 46 Controller Replacement . . Reference: Compressor Controller Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . Dual-Loop A/P) that control and protect a centrifugal or axial compressor. 115 Turbine Controller Alarm. . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Modbus/OPC Alarm Bit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Component Configuration. 142 Serial Port Activity Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . All CPU/IO PCB I/O signals are permanently calibrated at the factory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference Calibration 153 is only possible for the high-current output circuit of the Auxiliary PCB. . . . . Reference: CPU Program and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Case Mounting Slides Checksum Circuit Isolation Communication Error Component Replacement Compressor Controller Configuration Compressor Controllers August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: High-Current Output . . Spare Parts Stocking is a hardware configuration that does not include an Auxiliary PCB. . . . . . . Reference: Alarms. . 125 Internal Circuit Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . thus holding it rigidly horizontal. . . . . 123 see also: Controller Replacement. . . . Performance. . . Reference: Controller Mounting . .

154

Glossary/Index
is the monitoring and control of a Series 3++ Controller by a Modbus host or a client of the Series 3 OPC Server Program. Reference: Ethernet Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Limiting Modbus Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Operational Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Ports 3 and 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Problem Indicator Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Redundant Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Serial Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 72 see also: Ethernet Port, Remote Control, Serial Port is a number between 1 and 64 that identifies a Series 3++ Controller over it Port 2, 3, and 4 communication networks. see: Ethernet Port, Serial Port is the adaptation of a Series 3++ Controller to a specific application by setting its Configuration Parameters. Reference: Alternate Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Enabling and Disabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138 Key Sequence Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34–42 Key Sequence Illustration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Parameter Memory Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Planner and Worksheet Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Viewing and Changing Parameter Values . . . . . . .32 see also: Alternate Parameter Set, Engineering Panel, Parameter Checksum are a set of numeric and other values that enable, disable, or otherwise adapt a Series 3++ Controller to a specific application. Reference: Parameter Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 see: Series 3 Plus Configurator Program see: Installation see: LCD Contrast are areas of the front panel with raised white outlines, which can be pressed to initiate various process control actions. Reference: Signal Values Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 see also: Control Loop Buttons, Menu System Buttons are the light emitting diodes in the left-lower portion of the Front Panel and embedded in the top row of Control Keys, which generally indicate the status of process control features. see: Status LEDs

Computer Communications and Control

Computer ID Number Configuration

Configuration Parameters Configurator Connections Contrast, LCD Control Keys

Control LEDs

August 2007

UM3300/H (1.1.0)

Series 3++ Hardware Reference
Control Loop Buttons Control Loop Readouts

155

are raised, labelled areas in the upper portion of the Front Panel that can be pressed to change the data displayed by the Control Loop Readouts. Reference: Signal Values Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 are the numeric LED readouts (PV or DEV or RPM, SP, and OUT) in the upper portion of the Front Panel, which generally display the control variable, set point, and response of a primary or limiting control loop selected by pressing one of the Control Loop Buttons. is a Series 3++ Controller’s (Antisurge, Performance, Dual-Loop, Speed, or Extraction) machine control application software, which is stored in the CPU/IO PCB’s EEPROMs. Reference: Controller Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Main CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Program Checksum Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Program Version Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 see also: Program Version is a relay that can be included in an external circuit and energizes or deenergizes to indicate the state of an internal variable or condition that can have one of two values. Reference: Assigned Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Auxiliary PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 78 Back Panel Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 FOM Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Monitoring Intended State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101–103 Signal Values Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 see: Model Conversion see: Disassembly see: Fault is a number between 1 and 8 that identifies a Series 3++ Controller on its Port 1 serial communication network. see: Serial Port see: Installation see: Installation see: Deinstallation

Control Program

Control Relay

Controller Conversion Controller Disassembly Controller Faults Controller ID Number Controller Installation Controller Mounting Controller Removal
August 2007

UM3300/H (1.1.0)

156

Glossary/Index
Controller Replacement is the installation of a functionally identical controller in place of one that is malfunctioning. Reference: Dismounting Old and Mounting New . . . . . . . . . .125 Programming and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . 99, 126 Return Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 see also: Component Replacement, Spare Parts Stocking is a sequence of actions the controller executes when it is powered up, detects a Fault, or is reconfigured using the Series 3 Plus Configurator Program, or when critical parameters are changed from the Engineering Panel, an Alternate Parameter Set is recalled, or the MODE COMM key sequence is entered. Reference: CPU Reset Count. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148 CPU/IO Fault Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Reset Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 see: Troubleshooting see: Ethernet Port, Serial Port is a circuit board that includes the controller’s central processing unit, serial ports, and basic field inputs and outputs. Reference: CPU Reset Count. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Fault Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Machine Control Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Monitoring Voltages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Parameter Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Replacement Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Startup and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Switch Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47–50 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 is a four-digit hexadecimal number calculated by applying a standard mathematical function to a group of numbers. see: Parameter Checksum, Program Checksum are configuration and tuning parameter subsets identified by the first key in the associated key sequence. Reference: Data Groups and Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 are basic categories of configuration and tuning parameters that roughly correspond to the type of feature (hardware or control algorithm) they govern. Reference: Data Groups and Pages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

Controller Reset

Controller Troubleshooting Converter CPU/IO PCB

Cyclic Redundancy Checksum Data Groups

Data Pages

August 2007

UM3300/H (1.1.0)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Monitoring State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Replacement Procedure . . . Reference: Controller Replacement . . . . . . . . . . and output loopback measurements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Internal Conditions . . . . . 124 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Diagnostic Messages . . . . 98 UM3300/H (1. . . . . 89 Key Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19. . . 69 Overview. 67 Controller Back Panels . . . or a circuit that determines the state of such a signal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101–103 Redundant Controllers . 119 Diagnostic Menu Disassembly Discrete Input Discrete Output Engineering Panel see: Control Relay is an assembly that provides a keyboard and alphanumeric display for controller configuration. . . . . . . . . 67 Connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30–44 see also: Configuration Series 3++ Controllers are intended to be permanently mounted in a dry environment that minimizes static electrical discharges and conforms to specified temperature and humidity restrictions. . . . . . . 100 of a panel-mounted controller can be accomplished without removing the case from the control panel. . . . . . . . . . 114 Using. . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Back Panel Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Signal Values Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 General Operation . . . . 74 Auxiliary PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Redundant Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . and troubleshooting. . . . . internal temperatures. . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Disassembly . . . 53 CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . 125 are the status screens Turbine Controllers use to display power converter voltages. . 47 is a signal from another device that can have one of two values. . . . 31 Operational Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Back-Panel LEDs . .0) Environmental Requirements Ethernet Port August 2007 . . . . . . . tuning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 FIM Connections. . . . . . . . 22 Problem Messages . . . . . . is a converter that allows Modbus TCP clients to communicate with a Series 3++ Controller’s Modbus RTU serial ports (3 and 4). . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Associated Functions . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference Deinstallation 157 is accomplished by removing the slide clamps and case slides and pulling the case out from the front of the control panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Compressor Controllers include those screens in their main menus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .74 is an external module that provides wiring terminals for turbine controller field input signals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: CPU/IO PCB Processor . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Discrete Output Switches. . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Auxiliary PCB Fault Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I/O logic. . . . . . Reference: Relay Functions .105 CPU/IO Fault Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: 24 Vdc Bus. . . . . . . . . used in combination with the CPC Back Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Field Termination Assemblies . . . . . . . and serial communication features of the Series 3 Plus Controller’s CPU and analog PCB assemblies. . . . . are control system conditions indicated by control relays assigned the corresponding functions. . . . .59 Discrete Input Connections . . . . . . which has been programmed to duplicate the computational. . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Serial Port Connections . . . . Reference: 24 Vdc Bus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . .57 Analog Input Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Position Input Connections . . . . . . . . .61 Speed Input Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . .62 Control Relay Connections . . . . . . .58 Field Termination Assemblies . . . . . . .108 is an internal malfunction that causes the Fault LED to light and the fault relays to de-energize. . .64 see also: DS3300/T is the microprocessor on the CPU/IO PCB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 is an external module that provides wiring terminals for turbine controller field output signals. . . . .70 Firmware Revision . . . . . .104 Fault LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Fault Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . It is not available for new Series 3++ but can be retained when upgrading from Series 3 Plus Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158 Glossary/Index is a controller equipped with an Auxiliary PCB. . . . . . . . . . . .62 Analog Output Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 see also: DS3300/T is an external module that provides wiring terminals for compressor controller field I/O signals. . . . . . . . used in combination with the CPC Back Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Input Module and Field Output Module. . .105 Fault Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CPC Back Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Field Termination Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144 Extended I/O Turbine Controller External Alarms Fault Field Input Module Field Input/Output Module Field Output Module Field Programmable Gate Array August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Front Panel Assembly. is accomplished by connecting the power cable ground conductor and one or both shield pigtails of any High-Density Interconnect Cable to an earth ground. . . . . . . 69 Preferences and Tests . . Field Input/Output Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 see also: Program Version see: Beep Frequency see: Speed Input is an assembly that provides the Control Keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 is a label that covers the Front Panel and identifies the functions of its LEDs. . . Reference: Connections . . 65 Serial Ports 3 and 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Menu System Buttons. . . . . . . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference Field Termination Assembly 159 is a generic term for any external module that provides wiring terminals that augment or replace those on the controller Back Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . keys. . . . . . . . . . and the optional Auxiliary PCB. . . . . . . . buttons and readouts. Control Loop Buttons. . . . . . . 78 Engineering Panel . . . . . . . . . 66 see also: Isolation is the Auxiliary PCB Analog Output. . 21 Front-Panel Reset Count . . . . . . . . . . . . . Control Loop Readouts. is the revision level (for example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Program Version Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57–63 see also: Field Input Module. . 89 Operational Overview . . . . . .1. . . . . . . Reference: Fault LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FPGA0202) of the stored programs that govern the operation of the Engineering Panel. Field Output Module. . . . . . . . . Beep Frequency Inputs Front Panel Front Panel Overlay Grounding High-Current Output August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . Reference: Power Cable . Reference: Auxiliary PCB Assembly . .0) . . . . 125 Troubleshooting . . . . . . Field Programmable Gate Array. . . . . . . . . . . 90 Replacement. . . which can generate uni. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Serial Ports 1 and 2 . . Status LEDs. . .or bi-polar current-loop signals up to 200 mA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Auxiliary PCB . . . . . . . . and Status Screen. . 20 Calibration. . . Control LEDs. 90 Field Programmable Gate Array . . . . . . . . . 85–88 High-Current Analog Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Firmware Version Frequency.

. . . . . . Discrete Output. 64–67 Switch and Jumper Settings. . . .23 Field Termination Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Ethernet Ports . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Back Panel Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Output. . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Speed Controller Set Clock Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160 Glossary/Index High-Density Interconnect Cable is a cable for connecting a Field Termination Assembly to a controller Back Panel. .61 see also: Grounding ID Numbers Indicator Lights Installation Interface Preferences Internal Clock Internal Conditions Isolation August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . Temperature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see: Serial Port see: Ethernet Port. . . . . . .75 Analog Output Installation . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Discrete I/O Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Serial Ports. .0) . . . . . . Reference: Analog Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Serial Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Discrete Input. . Position Input. . . . . . . . . . . Speed Input see: Beep Frequency. . . and capacitive techniques to prevent interactions between electrical circuits. . . . . . 53–56 Controller Mounting . .68 Serial Ports. . . . optical. . . . . . . . . . High-Current Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Power Cable. . . . .67 FTA Connections . . . . . . . . . . LED Brightness is an auxiliary function of the CPU/IO board’s random access memory (RAM) chip that keeps track of the current date and time. 57–63 Overview . . . . . . . . . . .149 see: Output Loopback Failure.1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal is the use of magnetic. . . . . . . . . . . . . which is used to timestamp entries in the Speed Controller Shutdown Log. .15 are parameters that identify a Series 3++ Controller to other devices on a serial communications network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voltages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: CPU/IO PCB Components . . . . .24 Mounting Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Status LEDs is the mounting of a controller and connection of its I/O terminals to the corresponding field devices. . . . . 47–52 see also: Analog Input. . LCD Contrast. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Back Panel Assemblies . . Internal. . . . . 72 Speed Inputs . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . 90 is a device for measuring the linear displacement of an object (such as the head of a valve stem) from some reference position. . . . . . . . . . . which is usually to either replace them completely or to identify and replace only their malfunctioning component assemblies. . 27 Troubleshooting . . . . . . .0) Key Sequence Keyboard Test Keys LCD Contrast LED LED Brightness LED Test Linear Variable Differential Transformer LVDT Input Machine Control Program Magnetic Pickup Maintenance Strategy August 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34–42 Key Sequence Illustrations . . . . . . . . . . . . see: Speed Input is a user’s basic response to controller malfunctions. . . Control Loop Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . is an input for a Linear Variable Differential Transformer signal. . . . . . . . . . 99 Maintenance Strategies . . . . . . . . Reference: Configuration and Testing. . . 90 see: Alarms. . . Ethernet Port. . . . . . . . . . . 34 is a diagnostic procedure that can be run by entering an associated Key Sequence from the Engineering Panel. . . . Reference: Auxiliary PCB Assembly . . . . . . . Reference: User Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 see also: Switch Settings is an Engineering Panel procedure for examining or changing a configuration or tuning parameter or executing a controller test. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference Jumper Settings 161 are hardware options that are selected by installing small electrical connectors on one of the controller’s circuit boards. . . . . . Fault. . . 31 Key Sequence Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . Menu System Buttons is the adjustable difference between the light and dark areas of the Status Screen’s liquid crystal display element. . . Reference: User Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . see: Position Input see: Control Program is a device that generates a frequency signal proportional to the speed of a rotating shaft. . . . . Reference: Key Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: User Preferences . . . . 90 is the ability to turn on all LEDs and alphanumeric readout segments on the Front and Engineering Panels to see if any are not working. 114 see: Control Keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Maintenance and Repair Overview. . . . . . . . . Engineering Panel. . . . . . . Control LEDs. . . . . . . . 123 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . 51 Back Panel Assembly . . . Status LEDs is the adjustable brightness of the Control Loop Readouts. .1. . .

. .108 High-Current Analog Output. . . .107 is one whose internal components are contained in an aluminum case for mounting in a control panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Control Program. . . . .147 is a protocol that allows master devices to read and write variables within Series 3++ Controllers and other slave devices via serial (Modbus RTU) or ethernet (Modbus TCP) communication networks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 see also: Computer Communications and Control is the transformation of one Series 3++ Controller model into another by replacing its Front Panel. . . . . . . . .15 is a Cyclic Redundancy Checksum calculated from the controller’s Configuration Parameters. . . . . . . . .0) Modbus Model Conversion Mounting Mounting Configuration Operator Panel Output Loopback Failure Panel Mounted Controller Parameter Checksum Parity August 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Test Procedure. . . . . . . . see: Installation is the mounting of a controller’s CPU/IO. . . . Reference: Serial to Ethernet Converters. . . . . . . Auxiliary. . . . . . . . and perhaps altering the hardware configuration. . .76 are raised. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Internal Loopback Inputs . . . . . Reference: Mounting Configuration . . Reference: Controller Components . Reference: General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Parameter Checksum . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Turbine Controller Alarm . . . . . Reference: Controller Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . areas (labelled ACK. . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Loopback Circuit Calibration .90 Signal Values Test . . . . . . . and Power Supply Assemblies within an extruded case or on a flat plate (usually within a NEMA rated enclosure). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162 Glossary/Index Measured Variable Menu System Buttons is a scaled representation of an Analog Input signal that can be displayed by the Status Screen.106 External Alarm . . . . . Reference: Analog Input Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Compressor Controller Alarm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Modbus/OPC Alarm Bit . . .140 see also: Configuration see: Serial Port UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . . . . .1. 15–16 see: Front Panel is an excessive deviation of an analog output signal’s measured and intended values. MENU and SCROLL) in the center of the Front Panel that can be pressed to change the information displayed by the Status Screen. . .

Series 3++ Hardware Reference
Plate Mounted Controller Position Input

163

is one whose internal components have been mounted on a plate or wall or within an enclosure other than the standard panel-mounting case. Reference: Mounting Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 is the Auxiliary PCB’s LVDT Input or Analog Input, one of which might be used to measure the position of a control valve. Reference: Auxiliary PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Daughter Board Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 External Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 FIM Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Input Signal Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Modbus/OPC Alarm Bit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Positioning Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Troubleshooting Positioning Problems . . . . . . . . 122 see also: Output Loopback Failure is the cable that supplies electrical power to the controller. Reference: Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 is a circuit board that provides regulated 24 Vdc power to the controller’s other circuit boards. Other needed component power voltages are generated by converters on the CPU/IO board. Reference: Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Monitoring Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Replacement Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 is a Cyclic Redundancy Checksum calculated from the controller’s Control Program. Reference: Controller Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Program Checksum Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Power Cable Power Supply Assembly

Program Checksum

Program Version

is the revision level (for example, 1061-001) of the Control Program loaded in a Series 3++ Controller. Reference: Controller Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Controller Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Machine Control Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Program Version Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 see also: Firmware Version is usually accomplished by installing new or repaired internal components into a still-mounted case from the front of control panel. Reference: Reassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Reassembly

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164

Glossary/Index
Redundant Controllers are Series 3++ Controllers installed in pairs in which one serves as an online backup to the other. Reference: Analog Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 Analog Output Connections and Switching . . . . . .92 Discrete Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 Ethernet Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 General Failure Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Modbus Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 MPU Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Redundant Control Selector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94–97 Serial Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Switching Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 Tracking Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 is the monitoring and operation of a controller via electro-mechanical and/or electronic indicators, readouts, potentiometers, and switches connected to some of its analog and discrete inputs and outputs. Reference: Operational Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Relay Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 see also: Computer Communications and Control see: Deinstallation see: Controller Replacement, Component Replacement see: Controller Reset tells how to return a malfunctioning controller or assembly to CCC for repair or replacement. Reference: Return Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123 is a device for measuring the angular displacement of an object (such as a guide vane linkage) from some reference position. see: Speed Input All wiring and maintenance must be performed by qualified personnel in conformance with all applicable safety codes. see: Communication Error

Remote Control

Removal Replacement Resetting Controller Return Procedure

Rotary Variable Differential Transformer Rotational Speed Safety Considerations Serial Communication Error

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UM3300/H (1.1.0)

Series 3++ Hardware Reference
Serial Port

165

is a circuit used to exchange digital information with other devices. Reference: Baud Rate and Parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 CPU/IO PCB Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 18 Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64–67 Network Cable Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Redundant Controller ID Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Redundant Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 RS-232 Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Setting ID Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Station Controller Port 2 Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Surge Suppression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Termination Resistors Not Needed. . . . . . . . . . . . 64 see also: ID Numbers is a TrainTools program that provides OPC online data access to a superset of the Modbus data from Series 3, 3 Plus, and 3++ Controllers. see: Series 3 OPC Server user manual [UM5503] is a PC program that can read, edit, and replace a Series 3* Controller’s configuration parameter set and update or change a Series 3 Plus or 3++ Controller’s control program via its Modbus communication ports. Reference: Configuration and Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Controller and Component Replacement . . . 99, 126 is a Speed Controller Status Screen menu that displays the time, date, and cause of the last eight turbine shutdowns. see: Isolation is an internal variable representing the percent-of-range value of an Analog Input signal. Reference: Analog Input Processing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 are adjusting screws mounted behind the case mounting slides that push them against the control panel, thus pulling the controller back. Reference: Controller Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Controller Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 see: Program Checksum see: Program Version is simplified and reduced by the use of a standard hardware platform for all Series 3 Controller models. Reference: Spare Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 see: Auxiliary PCB

Series 3 OPC Server Program Series 3 Plus Configurator Program

Shutdown Log Signal Isolation Signal Variable

Slide Clamps

Software Checksum Software Version Spare Parts Stocking Speed Board

August 2007

UM3300/H (1.1.0)

. are front-panel indicator lights for controller and process conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 is a turbine controller that is not equipped with the CPC Back Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 MPU Fail Alarm . . . . .76 Monitoring . . . . . which displays a set of controller status variables or operator prompts selected by pressing the Menu System Buttons. Reference: Internal Analog Input .100 are installed at the ends of high-frequency electrical buses in order to keep reflected signals from disrupting communication signals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . is the ten-character by four-line liquid crystal display element in the center of the Front Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Modbus Serial Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145 Troubleshooting . . . .90 is the protection of the controller’s electronic components by shunting high voltage transients to ground. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Configuration and Operation .79 FIM Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 MPU Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 General Operation . . . . . . . Reference: Changing Contrast . . . . as measured by a sensor on the CPU/IO PCB. . . . . . . .0) . . Transmitter Failure. . . . . . . . .49 Analog Outputs .48 see also: Jumper Settings Is the temperature inside the controller case. . .64 see: Fault. . . . . . . . . . .166 Glossary/Index Speed Input is an input circuit used to measure the frequency of the signal from a Magnetic Pickup speed sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Analog Inputs . . . .64 are hardware options that are selected by position small switches on one of the controller’s circuit boards. . . . . . . . Troubleshooting Standard Turbine Controller Status LEDs Status Screen Surge Suppression Switch Settings Temperature. . . . . . . . . . . .61 Modbus/OPC Alarm Bits . . . . . Field Input Module and Field Output Module. . . . . . . . . . . Output Loopback Failure. Series 3++ serial communication networks rarely if ever need them. . . . and thus has fewer field I/O channels than an Extended I/O Turbine Controller. . . . . . Reference: Auxiliary PCB Assembly. . . .1. . . . . . .81 Scaling and Normalization . . . . . . . . . Reference: Serial Ports. . . Internal Termination Resistors Testing August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . . . . . . .20 Back Panel Connections . . . .50 Control Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keyboard Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Signal Values Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Supply Assembly. . . . . LED Brightness the minimum and maximum rotational speeds that can be read by the controller’s frequency / magnetic pickup (MPU) inputs. . . . . Reference: Compressor Controller Alarm . . . . . . . . . 81 Scaling and Normalization . . . . . . . . . 118 Auxiliary PCB . . . 118 Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . . . 141 Turbine Controller Alarm. . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Front and Engineering Panel . . . . . . . . . . . 115 CPU/IO Board Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Output. . . . . . . . Reference: MPU Testing . . 17 see also: TrainTools Product Overview and Setup manual [UM5500] is an alarm condition that is indicated when any analog input signal is not within user-specified limits or exceeds the 21. . . Discrete Output. . . 16 are Series 3++ Controllers (Speed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Discrete Input. . . . . . . . . 107 see: Beep Frequency. . . . 114 Positioning Problems . . . . . . . . . 75 Modbus/OPC Alarm Bits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Speed Inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Alarms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Transmitter Status Test . . . . . . . . . . . . LCD Contrast. . . 106 External Alarm . .Series 3++ Hardware Reference TrainTools 167 is a group of PC software packages whose programs can be used to monitor and maintain CCC Controllers. . . . . . . . 121 Communication Errors . . . High-Current Output. . . . . . . . . . .0 mA smart-transmitter fail signal specified by the Namur NE 43 recommendation. . . . . . . . . Reference: Updating and Configuring Controllers. . . . . . . . 108 Input Testing . . . . . Reference: Component Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extraction. . 117 Discrete Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Position Input. . . . . 107 is the investigation of controller problems in order to identify and correct the cause. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Discrete Outputs . . . . Speed Input Transmitter Failure Troubleshooting Turbine Controller Configuration Turbine Controllers User Preferences Valid Speed Range is a hardware configuration that includes the Auxiliary PCB. . . . . . . Serial Port. . . 121 see also: Analog Input. . . . Reference: Analog Inputs . . . . . Fuel) programmed to control and protect a steam or gas turbine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. see: Fault Voltages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0) . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Modbus/OPC Alarm Bit . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .168 Glossary/Index are the internally-monitored component power voltages from the Power Supply Assembly and the CPU/IO PCB voltage converters. . . . . . . . . . . .107 is a feature that forces a Controller Reset if a power interruption or certain internal errors are detected. . . . . . . . . . . . Reference: Compressor Controller Alarm. .106 External Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Internal Analog Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Watchdog Time Out August 2007 UM3300/H (1. . .100 Turbine Controller Alarm . .

(68. +0.02 in.04 484 # Compressor Controllers Hardware Specifications This data sheet specifies the physical and operating characteristics of Series 3++ Controllers that do not include the optional Auxiliary PCB Assembly (Speed Board).70 in.3 kg) Operating Temperature: -4 to 140°F (-20 to 60°C) Storage Temperature: -22 to +185°F (-30 to +85°C) Relative Humidity: 0 to 95% (if free from condensation) see: Agency Certifications for Series 3++ Controllers [TN41] General Specifications Mounting Dimensions Weight Ambient Conditions Ratings and Certifications Design Life Design MTBF Program Updating and Configuration 15 years (continuous operation) 45 years Front panel swings out to expose configuration and testing panel. (0. and tune control program.2 mm).DS3300/C Series 3++ Compressor Controllers Hardware Specificationssheet U 2.96 75.0 lb (2. (56 cm) from front of panel 5.0) .60 in. (142.6 mm).8 mm)/–0. whose dimensions are illustrated in Figure 1.5 mm)/–0.1 6.03 in.2 1. August 2007 Page 1 of 4 DS3300/C (1. (0. +0.0 26 19. Cutout Width: 2. configure.00 Cutout Height: 5.50 140 dimensions in inches and millimeters Figure 1 Controller Dimensions This section lists various general characteristics of this device.00 153 5.68 68.00 Cabinet Depth: 22 in. 2. Optional PC software can load.1.

0±1. 4800.8 mm2) conductors is supplied per pair of controllers. EIA RS-485 Two Modbus RTU or TCP ports (3 and 4) for communicating with support PCs or third-party supervisory systems: • RTU: five-wire serial ports are EIA RS-422/485 compatible • TCP: RJ45 ethernet ports are IEEE 802. isolated and regulated 30W (includes 6W output power) One 14 ft. 50 to 60 Hz 24.1. 9600 4800. either option requires a back panel with a matching power cable connector: 21 to 32 Vdc or 96 to 264 Vac. Custom length cables are available.0) August 2007 . Two serial ports for communicating with other CCC controllers • Port 1: three-wire.2 Vdc. none 1/8/2 1/8/1 up to 4000 feet (1200 meters) Two to 32 transceivers can be connected to each RS-485 network Page 2 of 4 DS3300/C (1.3 m) cable with AWG 18 (0. Configuration data stored in non-volatile EEPROM Process data stored in RAM with a backup battery (minimum battery life is 1 year @ 70 °C).3 10/100Base-T compatible (see the Series 3++ Modbus TCP Ethernet Options data sheet [DS3300/N]) Input Voltage Output Power Maximum Power Consumption Power Cable Power Failure Protection Communication Ports Table 1 Baud Rate Parity Start/Data/Stop Bits Cable Length Transceivers (1) 1 Up Serial Communication Formats Port 1 38400 Even 1/8/2 One Port 2 Ports 3 and 4 2400. 6. even. 19200 Even odd. 9600. Both ends are plug-compatible with the specified PSA. (4. AC conversion or DC regulation modules can be specified. EIA RS-485 • Port 2: five-wire.AC Cable Line (Black) Ground (Green) Neutral (White) Cable Controller – (Black) Ground (White) + (Red) DC Cable Power Cable Connector Configurations Cable Controller Figure 2 Power Supplies The internal power supply PCB mounts twin third-party 24 Vdc power modules that separately power the internal circuitry and external transmitters.0W maximum.

I/O Circuits Terminals Scan Time Static Protection Analog Input Channels August 2007 Page 3 of 4 DS3300/C (1.1% accuracy analog inputs. or • 5 Vdc (400 kΩ impedance). Inputs are sampled every 5 milliseconds.8 to 2. 30 Vdc over-voltage protection. lab tested to 7. Each signal is tested against Namur NE 43 high failure (21 mA) and independently-configurable high and low alarm limits.0) . Outputs are updated every 40 milliseconds. 540 Vdc (lowest to highest channel).CH 1 + – CH 2 + – CH 3 + – CH 4 + – OUT 1 + OUT 2 + CH 1 + – CH 2 + – CH 3 + – CH 4 + – OUT 1 + OUT 2 + CH 5 + – CH 6 + – CH 7 + – CH 8 + – CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CH 5 + – CH 6 + – CH 7 + – CH 8 + – CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 PORT 1 TX/RX 1 + – PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 PORT 1 TX/RX 1 + – PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 PORT 3 TX3 RX3 3 + – + – NOT USED PORT 4 TX4 RX4 4 + – + – PORT 3 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC PORT 4 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC TB6 MADE IN USA N GRD H 35 W max MADE IN USA N GRD H 35 W max Figure 3 Back Panel Terminal Blocks All wiring terminals are located on the Back Panel (see Figure 3). 300 Vdc over-voltage protection Floating-ground isolation to 270 Vdc (adjacent channels). each internally switch-selected as: • 20 mAdc (100 Ω impedance).000 volts.1% accuracy analog inputs. Removable back-panel compression terminals accept AWG 18 to AWG 14 (0.1.0 mm2) wire. each switch-selected as: Extended I/O controller has eight and standard controller has four 0. design protection to 4.000 volts Eight 0.

IA 50323. COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION 4725 121st Street. each switch-selectable as normally-open or normally-closed: • CR1 is hard-wired to always indicate hardware faults.0) L Printed in U. Five single-pole electromechanical relay circuits rated 1 A at 30 Vdc. Each is independently switch-selectable for either: • 20 mAdc signals (0 to 750 Ω impedance) • 5 Vdc signals (2 kΩ minimum impedance) Seven 2.A.cccglobal.S. USA Phone: (515) 270-0857 • Fax: (515) 270-1331 • Web: www.Analog Outputs Two isolated.2 kΩ discrete inputs with common return • Energized state: +10 to +30 Vdc • De-energized state: 0 to +2 Vdc. internally-verified. factory-calibrated outputs.1. Des Moines. Discrete Inputs Discrete Output Control Relays August 2007 Page 4 of 4 DS3300/C (1.com . • CR2 can be switch-configured to also indicate faults.

whose dimensions are illustrated in Figure 1. 2. Cutout Width: 2.70 in.00 153 5. Optional PC software can load. (56 cm) from front of panel 5.96 75.00 Cutout Height: 5.2 1.5 lb (2.1 6. and tune control program. configure.5 kg).8 mm)/–0. (0. +0.50 140 dimensions in inches and millimeters Figure 1 Controller Dimensions This section lists various general characteristics of this device. (0. (68.68 68.00 Cabinet Depth: 22 in. August 2007 Page 1 of 8 DS3300/T (1.04 484 # Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications This data sheet specifies the physical and operating characteristics of Series 3++ Controllers that do include the optional auxiliary PCB assembly (speed board).0 26 19.1.5 mm)/–0.0) . (142.60 in.DS3300/T Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specificationssheet U 2.02 in.03 in.6 mm).2 mm). +0. not including FTAs Operating Temperature: -4 to 140°F (-20 to 60°C) Storage Temperature: -22 to +185°F (-30 to +85°C) Relative Humidity: 0 to 95% (if free from condensation) see: Agency Certifications for Series 3++ Controllers [TN41] General Specifications Mounting Dimensions Weight Ambient Conditions Ratings and Certifications Design Life Design MTBF Program Updating and Configuration 15 years (continuous operation) 45 years Front panel swings out to expose configuration and testing panel.

2 Vdc.3 m) cable with AWG 18 (0. 6. (4. 19200 Even odd. 50 to 60 Hz 24. even. Both ends are plug-compatible with the specified PSA.0) . isolated and regulated 30W (includes 6W output power) One 14 ft.0±1.0W maximum. Input Voltage Output Power Maximum Power Consumption Power Cable Power Failure Protection Communication Ports Table 1 Baud Rate Parity Start/Data/Stop Bits Cable Length Transceivers (1) 1 Up Serial Communication Formats Port 1 38400 Even 1/8/2 One Port 2 Ports 3 and 4 2400. Two serial ports for communicating with other CCC controllers • Port 1: three-wire. 9600 4800. either option requires a back panel with a matching power connector: 21 to 32 Vdc or 96 to 264 Vac.1. Custom length cables are available. RS-422/485 compatible Modbus RTU serial ports for communicating with support PCs or third-party distributed control and supervisory systems. 4800. 9600.8 mm2) conductors is supplied per pair of controllers. EIA RS-485 Two five-wire. none 1/8/2 1/8/1 up to 4000 feet (1200 meters) Two to 32 transceivers can be connected to each RS-485 network August 2007 Page 2 of 8 DS3300/T (1.AC Cable Line (Black) Ground (Green) Neutral (White) Cable Controller – (Black) Ground (White) + (Red) DC Cable Power Cable Connector Configurations Cable Controller Figure 2 Power Supplies The internal power supply PCB mounts twin third-party 24 Vdc power modules that separately power the internal circuitry and external transmitters. Configuration data stored in non-volatile EEPROM Process data stored in RAM with a backup battery (minimum battery life is 1 year @ 70 °C). AC conversion or DC regulation modules can be specified. EIA RS-485 • Port 2: five-wire.

I/O Circuits Extended I/O Turbine Controllers provide terminals for every input and output circuit on external Field Termination Assemblies (see page 5). DI 9 to 16 share a common return. each internally switch-selected as: • 20 mAdc (100 Ω impedance).0) . electromechanical control relays.000 volts. Removable back-panel compression terminals accept AWG 18 to AWG 14 (0. 300 Vdc over-voltage protection Floating-ground isolation to 270 Vdc (adjacent channels). Design protection to 4. rated 1A at 30 Vdc • 9: jumper-selectable as normally-open or normally-closed. 540 Vdc (lowest to highest channel). rated 1A at 30 Vdc CR1 and CR9 are hard-wired to always indicate hardware faults. Standard controller has nine such inputs.2 kΩ Input functions are user-defined and can be redundant.0 mm2) wire. Extended I/O controller has one five-wire LVDT and one bipolar 20 mA. Standard controller has neither. standard controller has three: • minimum 1.8 to 2.1. Each signal is tested against Namur NE 43 high failure (21 mA) and independently-configurable high and low alarm limits. Terminals Static Protection Frequency Inputs Analog Input Channels Position Inputs Analog Outputs Discrete Inputs Discrete Output Control Relays August 2007 Page 3 of 8 DS3300/T (1. lab tested to 7. Extended I/O controller has six frequency inputs for 0-to-30 kHz magnetic pickup speed signals. Extended I/O controllers have nine single-pole.0 V peak-to-peak signal for active pickups • impedance: 100 kΩ nominal. CR2 can be switch-configured to also indicate faults. OUT1: Current-loop driver that can be configured to generate any needed signal up to 200 mA OUT2 and OUT3: independently switch-selectable for either: • 20 mAdc signals (0 to 750 Ω impedance) • 5 Vdc signals (2 kΩ minimum impedance) All three circuits provide internal reliability tracking Extended I/O controller has sixteen inputs: DI 1 to 8 have individual grounds. 20 kΩ minimum @ 1 kHz Extended I/O controller has eight and standard controller has four 0. 30 Vdc over-voltage protection. all of which share a common ground.1% accuracy analog inputs. standard controllers have eight (all but CR8): • 1 to 8: switch-selectable as normally-open or normally-closed. • Energized state: +10 to +30 Vdc • De-energized state: 0 to +2 Vdc • Resistance: 2. or • 5 Vdc (400 kΩ impedance).000 volts. Standard Turbine Controllers provide back-panel terminals (see Figure 3) for most but not all I/O circuits.5 V peak-to-peak signal for passive pickups • minimum 8. 250 Ω position input.

0" (76 mm) DIN EN 50 035 (TS 32) DIN EN 50 022 (TS 35) Figure 4 FTA Mounting Options August 2007 Page 4 of 8 DS3300/T (1.0) .+ CH 1 – + CH 2 – + CH 3 – + CH 4 – + OUT 1 OUT 2 + MADE IN USA 1 OUT 3 + CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 CR5 1 2 4 INPUTS (J1) 60 63 CR6 1 2 CR7 1 2 CR9 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 PORT 1 1 TX/RX + – PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 1 4 DISCRETE PORT 3 PORT 4 TX4 RX4 TX3 RX3 D8 D9 3 4 + – + – + – + – 60 OUTPUTS (J2) 63 FREQ1 + – FREQ2 + – FREQ3 + – 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC 21-32 VDC TB6 MADE IN USA N GRD H 35 W max N G H 96-264 VAC 35 W max Figure 3 Standard and Extended I/O Back Panels 3.1.25" (82 mm) 3.

Field Input Module: 2. Plug-in.8 mm2) to AWG 12 (3.0 lb (0.0 Amp 1 (in controller) C D E F G H A B C D E F 1. Jumper blocks use soldered-in AWG 22 jumper wires. • the field Output Module (FOM) provides the analog output. Standard HDICs are 10 ft. remove the CD jumper from the 24 Vdc jumper block or the corresponding fuse: 24 VDC (to I/O circuits) 24 Vdc Power Options 24 VDC (to I/O circuits) A C E G A B 1.0) . (30 m). August 2007 Page 5 of 8 DS3300/T (1. If an external source is connected.3 mm2) wire. Field Output Module: 2.9 kg).).1. frequency.5 lb (1. 125 V microfuses (Littel Fuse PN 273-XXX or equiv. and position input terminals. Mounting Options Field Terminals Jumper Blocks Fuses Weight Cable Length DIN EN 50 035 or EN 50 022 (see Figure 4) Compression terminals accepting AWG 18 (0. control relay. and serial communication port terminals.Field Termination Assemblies Extended I/O controllers are supplied with two rail-mounted Field Termination Assemblies that connect to the controller using HighDensity Interconnect Cables (HDICs) with CPC-23/63 connectors: • The field input module (FIM) provides the analog. discrete. (3 m) long. Custom cables can be made in any length up to 100 ft. The FIM’s analog and discrete input circuits can be powered from an internal bus that draws power either from the controller or an external source connected to terminals 1 and 2.1 kg).0 Amp G H B D F H 2 (in controller) 1 2 The FOM’s control relay circuits can be powered from an internal bus that draws power from an external source connected to terminals 29 and 30: 24 VDC (from controller) 24 VDC (to I/O circuits) 26 27 28 29 30 The controller’s transmitter power output (terminals 26 and 27) does not have sufficient capacity to drive the relay circuits and should not be connected to these terminals.

• OUT2 and OUT3 have CPU PCB switches that select currentloop or voltage operation. and two field wiring terminals (labelled as + and – on page 7): A B C DI A B C 24 Vdc D E F 50 mA – + D E F Configuration block options are discussed in the FIM Discrete Input Circuits section in Chapter 3 of UM3300/H. negative. Analog Output Circuits Each FOM analog output circuit has dedicated positive. 1. August 2007 Page 6 of 8 DS3300/T (1. and shield terminals: • OUT1 is a current-loop signal with a configurable range. 50 mA fuse. and S on page 7): A C E G 24 Vdc B A E C 50 mA B C/E D/F H S CH G F D B D F H H Configuration block options are discussed in the FIM Analog Input Circuits section in Chapter 3 of UM3300/H. C/E.Discrete Input Circuits Each FIM discrete input circuit has a configuration block. H. If an output is set for 20 mA operation. 50 mA fuse.1. Control Relay Circuits Each FOM control relay circuit has a configuration block. and five field wiring terminals (labelled as B. its parallel redundant terminals can only be connected to a highimpedance voltmeter. Analog Input Circuits Each FIM analog input circuit has a configuration block. Terminal polarity markings must be observed only for circuits powered by the FOM.0 amp fuse. and two field wiring terminals (labelled as + and – on page 8): A C E G B 1.0 A + CR C D H G 24 Vdc – A B D F H Configuration block options are discussed in the FOM Control Relay Circuits section in Chapter 3 of UM3300/H. D/F.0) .

0) .0" 40. 16.Terminal Blocks TB2 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Discrete Input 7 + Discrete Input 7 – Discrete Input 8 + Discrete Input 8 – Discrete Input 9 + Discrete Input 9 – Discrete Input 10 + Discrete Input 10 – Discrete Input 11 + Discrete Input 11 – Discrete Input 12 + Discrete Input 12 – Discrete Input 13 + Discrete Input 13 – Unused 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 4.0 Amp 24 Vdc Jumpers TB5 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 Input Channel 7 B Input Channel 7 C/E Input Channel 7 D/F Input Channel 7 H Shield Input Channel 8 B Input Channel 8 C/E Input Channel 8 D/F Input Channel 8 H Shield Auxiliary Input – Auxiliary Input + Shield LVDT 1 Common Earth Ground The Shield terminals are tied to the Earth Ground terminal. Frequency Input 6 – is on Field Output Module.9 cm TB1 Discrete Input Jumpers and Fuses 50 mA 24 VDC In + 24 VDC In – Discrete Input 1 + Discrete Input 1 – Discrete Input 2 + Discrete Input 2 – Discrete Input 3 + Discrete Input 3 – Discrete Input 4 + Discrete Input 4 – Discrete Input 5 + Discrete Input 5 – Discrete Input 6 + Discrete Input 6 – Unused 2 4 50 mA 1 3 6 8 50 mA 5 7 10 12 50 mA 9 11 TB4 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 Unused Unused Unused Do Not Use Do Not Use LVDT 1 Exc + LVDT 1 Exc – LVDT 1 Ret + Do Not Use LVDT 1 Ret – Frequency Input 5 – Frequency Input 5 + Frequency Input 4 – Frequency Input 6 + Frequency Input 4 + 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 TB3 Discrete Input 14 + Discrete Input 14 – Discrete Input 15 + Discrete Input 15 – Discrete Input 16 + Discrete Input 16 – Frequency Input 1 + Frequency Input 1 – Shield Frequency Input 2 + Frequency Input 2 – Shield Frequency Input 3 + Frequency Input 3 – Shield 14 16 50 mA 1.3" 10.7 cm Analog Input Jumpers and Fuses 50 mA 2 50 mA 1 TB7 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 Input Channel 4 B Input Channel 4 C/E Input Channel 4 D/F Input Channel 4 H Shield Input Channel 5 B Input Channel 5 C/E Input Channel 5 D/F Input Channel 5 H Shield Input Channel 6 B Input Channel 6 C/E Input Channel 6 D/F Input Channel 6 H Shield 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 TB6 Input Channel 1 B Input Channel 1 C/E Input Channel 1 D/F Input Channel 1 H Shield Input Channel 2 B Input Channel 2 C/E Input Channel 2 D/F Input Channel 2 H Shield Input Channel 3 B Input Channel 3 C/E Input Channel 3 D/F Input Channel 3 H Shield 4 50 mA 3 6 50 mA 5 8 7 Figure 5 Field Input Module Dimensions and Terminals August 2007 Page 7 of 8 DS3300/T (1. which should be connected to an external earth ground.1.0 Amp 13 15 1.

3" 10. Commons for Ports 1 to 4 are isolated. USA Phone: (515) 270-0857 • Fax: (515) 270-1331 • Web: www.com .A. which should be connected to an external earth ground. COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION 4725 121st Street.0 Amp 2 5 1.1.8" 32.5 cm Both sets of terminals for analog output 2 or 3 can be connected only if its PCB switch is set to V position.0 Amp 6 9 8 Figure 6 Field Output Module Dimensions and Terminals August 2007 Page 8 of 8 DS3300/T (1.0) L Printed in U.Terminal Blocks TB2 6 7 8 9 10 Port 4 Tx + Port 4 Tx – Port 4 Common Port 4 Rx + Port 4 Rx – 1 2 3 4 5 4.0 Amp TB7 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 Analog Output 2 + Analog Output 2 – Shield Analog Output 3 + Analog Output 3 – Shield Current Output 1 + Current Output 1 – Shield Analog Output 2+ Analog Output 2– Shield Analog Output 3 + Analog Output 3 – Shield 12.0 Amp 3 1. The Shield terminals are tied to the Earth Ground terminals. Des Moines.9 cm TB1 Port 1 Tx/Rx + Port 1 Tx/Rx – Port 1 Common Unused Unused TB4 16 17 18 19 20 Do Not Use Do Not Use No connection Do Not Use Do Not Use 11 12 13 14 15 TB3 Port 2 Tx + Port 2 Tx – Port 2 Common Port 2 Rx + Port 2 Rx – TB6 26 27 28 29 30 + 24 VDC (Out) – 24 VDC (Out) Unused + 24 VDC (In) – 24 VDC (In) 21 22 23 24 25 TB5 Port 3 Tx + Port 3 Tx – Port 3 Common Port 3 Rx + Port 3 Rx – Control Relay Jumpers and Fuses 1.0 Amp 4 TB9 Control Relay 8 + Control Relay 8 – Control Relay 9 + Control Relay 9 – +15 VDC Ground – 15 VDC Frequency Input 6 – Spare – Shield Diagnostic Port + Diagnostic Port – Shield Earth Ground Earth Ground 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 TB8 Control Relay 1 + Control Relay 1 – Control Relay 2 + Control Relay 2 – Control Relay 3 + Control Relay 3 – Control Relay 4 + Control Relay 4 – Control Relay 5 + Control Relay 5 – Control Relay 6 + Control Relay 6 – Control Relay 7 + Control Relay 7 – Unused 7 1.S. 1 1. The Ground terminals are tied to the controller digital ground. IA 50323.cccglobal.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-panel terminals. 50-002420-001 CPU/IO PCB (note 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 mA . . Turbine (note 2): Field Input and Output Modules. . . .0 A . . . . . . . . . . Detachable terminal blocks are included with complete controllers and all FTAs. . . . . .50-001290-005 Dual-Loop A/P Controller. . . 50-002422-001 Slide Clamp . . . . . . . . . . . .50-002431-001 Front Panel Overlays: Antisurge Controller . . . . . 1. . . . . . .0 A . . . . . . . . . . . plate mount. . . . Compressor Controller (note 2): AC. . .DS3300/P Controller Parts List Series 3++ U Assembly # Controller Spare Parts List Part Number Assembly Part Number Complete Electronics Assembly (note 1): CPU/IO PCB and AC Power Supply . . .20-401830-251 Fuse. . . . . . for FIM & FOM . . . . . . . . August 2007 Page 1 of 2 DS3300/P (1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50-002551-001 Field Termination Assemblies. 15-300500-006 DC. . . . . . . . . . .15-500200-003 hinge only . . . . . 18-211656-001 1. . . . . . . 15-300600-C01 Back Panel. . .18-211657-1AC Back Panel Terminal Block (note 2): 6 terminals . . .18-002542-024 Power Supply Assembly: 21-to-32 Vdc . . . .20-401830-101 Fuse. . . . . . . DC. . . . . . . . . . . .18-211657-1DC 96-to-264 Vac. . . . 15-300500-D02 DC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . serial Modbus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . wired ethernet . . .50-001280-005 Performance Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20-401830-500 Fuse. . 20-002568-F12 Case: Assembly with Slides and Clamps . . Turbine Controller (note 2): AC. . . . . . . . . . .50-203130-148 Fuse. . . . . . . . . . . . 15-300500-002 AC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Longer cables will be quoted on request. . . . . . wired ethernet . . . . 15-300300-001 Mounting Slide . . . . . . . . . . . . . DC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-002830-210 Front Panel Assembly (without overlay): with hinge. . . but not with replacement back panels. . . . . . . . . . . AC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . which will yield one long or two short cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . one for FOM). . . .50-001270-005 Extraction Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-002542-120 for DC Power Supply . . . . . . . . . .20-401830-502 HDIC (note 3) . 100 mA . . . .0) . .15-500400-001 Keypad only . . for FIM & FOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back-panel terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . .50-001271-005 Power Cables (note 4): for AC Power Supply . 20-002568-F06 12 terminals . . . . . . . . . . .20-401830-102 Fuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . Custom lengths will be quoted on request. 15-300500-D06 Back Panel. . Standard high-density interconnect cable is 10 feet long with two right-angle connectors. . . . . . . serial Modbus. . Back-panel terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 mA . . . . . . . 4.50-001291-005 Speed Controller . . . . . . . AC. . . . 15-300500-004 15-300500-005 15-300500-003 15-300510-004 15-300510-003 Engineering Panel: Assembly with Keypad . . . . . . . . . 15-500000-002 CPU/IO PCB and DC Power Supply. . . the analog circuits are not on a separate PCB but the 24 Vdc power supplies or regulators are). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standard power cables are 14 feet long with two back-panel connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . Two are required for each turbine controller (one for FIM. . . . . . . . . . . . . Series 3++ CPU/IO PCB includes all field I/O circuits but not the power supplies (unlike Series 3 Plus. . . . . 15-500010-002 Auxiliary PCB (Speed Board): Assembly with Daughter Card . .

A. Des Moines.0) L Printed in U. USA Phone: (515) 270-0857 • Fax: (515) 270-1331 • Web: www.S.Side Views of Series 3++ Controller Showing Locations of Major Assemblies Case Mounting Slide Slide Adjuster Front Panel Assembly Engineering Panel Assembly Back Panel Assembly Power Supply Assembly CPU/IO PCB Assembly Auxiliary PCB Assembly (optional) Auxiliary PCB Daughter Card August 2007 Page 2 DS3300/P (1.cccglobal. IA 50323. COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION 4725 121st Street.1.com .

Overview August 2007 Page 1 of 2 DS3300/N (1. which allow Modbus TCP clients (masters) to communicate directly with their Modbus RTU serial ports (3 and 4). CH 3 + – CH 4 + – OUT 1 + OUT 2 + CH 7 + – CH 8 + – CR1 1 2 CR2 1 2 CR5 1 2 DISCRETE IN D1 D2 D D3 D4 D5 PORT 2 TX2 RX2 + – 2 + – 24VDC DISCRETE + – D6 D7 PORT 3 96-264 VAC 21-32 VDC PORT 4 MADE IN USA N GRD H 35 W max Figure 1 Ethernet Back Panel Series 3++ Compressor Controllers can be purchased with two Digi Connect ME ethernet to serial port converters built into their back panels.0) .0.DS3300/N Series 3++ Modbus TCP Ethernet Optionsdata sheet U CH 1 + – CH 2 + – CH 5 + – CH 6 + – CR3 1 2 CR4 1 2 PORT 1 1 TX/RX – + # Modbus TCP Ethernet Options This data sheet specifies the built-in Modbus TCP/RTU converter options for Series 3++ Controllers. For example. No built-in option is currently available for Turbine Controllers. the Digi One IA and IAP are Digi International’s rail-mounted equivalents to the Connect ME. and they also offer modules with multiple serial ports. Connection and configuration instructions can be found in Chapter 4 of the Series 3++ Modbus Reference manual [UM3300/M] or Appendix B of the Series 3 OPC Server user manual [UM5503]. but they can be similarly connected using external converters that are available from numerous vendors.

IA 50323. Compatible with Internet Protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6. (approximate maximum is 1700 data bytes per second). EN 55022 Class B • EN 61000-3-2 and EN 61000-3-3 • ICES-003 Class B. or its default user name and password can be changed. or modules can be set to obtain them from a DHCP server. EN 301 489-17 • UL 60950-1. and can also be rebooted via its configuration interface. The data transfer capacity of each converter is limited to that of the 19200 baud. No. Des Moines. then intermittently to indicate data communication. Upper. yellow LED lights when electrically connected.S. odd-parity Modbus RTU controller port it connects to. USA Phone: (515) 270-0857 • Fax: (515) 270-1331 • Web: www.A. Default static IP addresses and subnet masks can be changed.cccglobal. Each converter’s Modbus node number is configurable.2.0) L Printed in U.com . green LED flashes three times while converter is booting. AS 3548 • FCC Part 15 Sub C Section 15. each communicating via either the transmission control or user datagram protocol (TCP or UDP). monitored.247 • IC RSS-210 Issue 5 Section 6.0.Modbus TCP Each converter can service simultaneous requests from multiple clients. COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION 4725 121st Street. Each converter has a recessed reset switch.2. and/or updated using a web browser or the Series 3 OPC Server program. VCCI Class II. EN60950 (EU) • CSA C22. Each converter can be configured.2(o) • EN 300 328. Secure Sockets Layer/Transport layer Security (SSL/TLS) HTTP configuration interface can be disabled. after which they are flushed. Such requests are queued for a configurable maximum time. 60950 • EN 55024 Relative humidity: 5 to 90% (non-condensing) Temperature limits exceed those of Series 3++ Controllers Ambient Conditions August 2007 Page 2 of 2 DS3300/N (1. Lower. and the Modbus TCP exception responses (0A and 0B) can be disabled. Bandwidth IP Settings Status LEDs Configuration and Maintenance Security Options Regulatory Approvals The following certifications have been obtained by the converter’s manufacturer (Digi International): • FCC Part 15 Class B.

• When energized. Both the operator panel and switching unit have LEDs that indicate which controller is currently selected and buttons for transferring control of the process to the other. Each Redundant Control Selector (RCS) has two main components: • an operator panel that is usually mounted between the operator panels of a redundant pair of controllers. If power to the RCS failed. In addition. the master relay is connected to the fault (and possibly other) relays of the main and backup controllers.0) .0. the slave relays connect their COMMON and RUN terminals. control is transferred to the backup if the main controller faults or the Switch to Backup (or Trip) button is pressed. thus selecting the main controller. the slave relays would de-energize. control can be transferred to the main controller only by pressing the Switch to Main (or Reset) button. However.DS3300/R Series 3++ Redundant Control Selectordata sheet U Overview and Operation # Redundant Control Selector This data sheet specifies the Redundant Control Selector for duplex Series 3++ Control Systems. July 2007 Page 1 of 4 DS3300/R (1. the latched master would remember which controller had been selected and return control to it when power was restored. see Chapter 5 of the Series 3++ Hardware Reference manual [UM3300/H]. thus selecting the main controller. The switching unit includes a latched master relay that controls four 4PDT slave relays: • When de-energized. even if it is healthy and the backup is not. • If the main controller is selected and the backup is healthy. If each of those circuits is set up to open when the corresponding controller should not be in control: • Either healthy controller can be manually selected by pressing one of the corresponding buttons. • If the backup is selected and the main controller is healthy. and • a switching unit that can be mounted in an inaccessible location. Note that control of the process can never be transferred to a failed controller and is never automatically transferred to the main controller. For usage information. thus selecting the backup controller. they connect their COMMON and TRACKING terminals.

96 75.4 1.0.75 222 dimensions in inches and millimeters Figure 2 July 2007 Switching Unit Dimensions Page 2 of 4 DS3300/R (1.25 133.0 dimensions in inches and millimeters Figure 1 Operator Panel Dimensions and Connector Pinouts 7.3 33.0 25.25 31.8 2.0 152.75 171 4.4 5.8 71 8.0) .25 108 2.0 25.2 1.4 GREEN ACTIVE Switch to Main RED TRACK 2.REDUNDANT CONTROL 3.63 16 +24V Trip Reset Backup Main Ground MAIN Switch to Back-Up BACK-UP 1.25 184 6.125 79.4 6.8 SELECTOR .00 50.4 1.

one for each slave relay and one that lights when the main controller faults. slow-blow fuse and surge-suppression circuitry. otherwise red.0. excluding pass-through loads One 14 ft. Momentary-contact. Switching Unit: 2.) cable with AWG 18 (0.75 lb (1. @ 28 Vdc (resistive) or 3 A. @ 120 Vac Either the Main or the Backup discrete output is connected to the supplied power when the corresponding controller is selected. 7 W. Four 4PDT electro-mechanical slave relays controlled by a magnetically-latched master relay. (90 m) in length. Custom length cables are available.0 mm) to AWG 14 (1.25 kg) Operator Panel: 0. Total pass-through load should not exceed 5 W.0 A. Main and Backup LEDs on operator panel and switching unit are green when corresponding controller is active. The switching unit also has five red LEDs. Two pass-through power circuits are provided on terminal block TB5.General Specifications Switching Relays The dimensions of the operator panel and switching unit are shown in Figure 1 and Figure 2. Both ends are equipped with compatible connectors as shown in Figure 3. push-button switches for selecting the main or backup controller are shrouded to prevent inadvertent operation.25 lb (0.11 kg) Discrete Outputs Status LEDs Operator Panel Switches Wiring Terminals Maximum Separation Weight — (Black or Brown Ground (White) + (Red or Orange) Cable Connector End-Panel Connector Figure 3 Power Connector Pinouts The switching unit has connectors for two independent external power supplies and automatically powers its circuits from the source providing the highest voltage. Slave relay contacts are rated at: 3 A. 24 Vdc (± 10%) Each power supply circuit includes a 2. Power Inputs Required Voltage Protective Features Pass-Through Power Power Consumption Power Cable July 2007 Page 3 of 4 DS3300/R (1.6 mm) wire.. Removable compression terminals accept AWG 18 (1. Cable connecting operator panel to switching unit can be up to 300 ft. (4.3 m.0) .8 mm2) conductors is supplied per pair of controllers.

0) L Printed in U. Des Moines.com .cccglobal. COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION 4725 121st Street. IA 50323.S.A.Terminal Block TB6 Terminal Block TB5 Manual Selection Switches Main LED Backup LED Fuses Power Cord Connectors Terminal Block TB1 Terminal Block TB2 Terminal Block TB3 Terminal Block TB4 Figure 4 +24V Trip Reset Backup Main Ground Switching Unit Components 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 operator panel connections TB5 TB1 through TB4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 pass-through grounds isolated spares pass-through +24 Vdc to Main Fault Backup Active DO isolated spares to Backup Fault Main Active DO + – + – + – + – D C B A D C B A D C B A COMMON terminals (to field devices) TRACK terminals (to backup controller outputs) RUN terminals (to main controller outputs) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 TB6 Figure 5 Switching Unit Terminal Blocks July 2007 Page 4 of 4 DS3300/R (1.0. USA Phone: (515) 270-0857 • Fax: (515) 270-1331 • Web: www.

This release of the hardware reference manual incorporated the changes described below. analog input over-voltage. The optional Modbus TCP Back Panel for compressor controllers replaces the Port 3 and 4 terminal blocks of the Modbus RTU Back Panel with built-in ethernet-to-serial port converters (see page 23.0 Modbus TCP Option Hardware Specifications # Controller Hardware Revisions This data sheet describes the new and modified hardware changes documented by the corresponding release of the Series 3++ Hardware Reference manual [UM3300/H]. page 67. and maximum power consumption specifications were revised (see the Series 3++ Compressor Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/C] and the Series 3++ Turbine Controllers Hardware Specifications sheet [DS3300/T]). August 2007 Page 1 of 2 DS3301/V (1.1. page 98.0) . The communication port.1.DS3301/V. Series 3++ Controller Hardware Revisionsdata sheet U Manual Version 1. and the Series 3++ Modbus TCP Ethernet Options data sheet [DS3300/N]).

COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION 4725 121st Street. USA Phone: (515) 270-0857 • Fax: (515) 270-1331 • Web: www.August 2007 Page 2 of 2 DS3301/V (1. IA 50323.S.1.cccglobal.A.0) L Printed in U. Des Moines.com .

and Barometric Pressure Operating Conditions for Industrial Process Measurement and Control Equipment. Part 2) MIL-PRF-28800F (1996) (Class 3 and 4) Certification Level Operating Conditions for Industrial Process Measurement and Control Equipment. which have been determined to be compliant with the following safety. and Laboratory use – General Requirements Note: Other agency certifications are in process and will be added to this publication when certificates are issued. Part 2: Power Equipment for use with Electrical and Electronic Equipment. Electrical Safety Industrial Process Measurement and Control Compliant Standard EN 61010-1 IEC 1010-1 (2005) (Low-Voltage Directive) Certification Level Safety Requirements for Electrical Equipment for Measurement. General Specifications for Navy Ship Systems – Vibration TN41 (1. and EMC standards. Part 1: Temperature. Control. AM Environmental Industrial Process Measurement and Control Compliant Standard IEC 60654-1 (2003) (IEC 654.TN41Agency Certifications for Series 3++ Controllerstechnical note U Technical Note A/D Agency Certifications for Series 3++ Controllers This document documents the current agency certifications for Controllers and related components. Part 1) IEC 60654-2 (2001) (IEC 654.0) April 2007 . environmental. Humidity.

A. TTC. Vantage. Guardian. Safety On. and voltage variations immunity tests (CISPR 11 (2004)) (FCC part 15 subpart B) IEC 61000-4-2 (2001) IEC 61000-4-3 (2002) IEC 61000-4-4 (2001) IEC 61000-4-5 (2005) IEC 61000-4-6 (2004) IEC 61000-4-8 (2004) IEC 61000-4-11 (2004) The TTC and impeller logos. Vanguard. SureLink.0) April 2007 COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION 4725 121st Street. and WOIS are registered trademarks. TrainWare. Part 4: Testing and Measurement Techniques Section 8: Power frequency magnetic field immunity test Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). Recycle Trip. TrainTools. induced by radio-frequency fields Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). U. Part 4: Testing and Measurement Techniques Section 6: Immunity to conducted disturbances. © 2007 Page 2 TN41 (1. Part 4: Testing and Measurement Techniques Section 4: Electrical Fast Transient/Burst Immunity Test Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC).com . Part 4: Testing and Measurement Techniques Section 2: Electrostatic Discharge Immunity Tests Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). Air Miser. Part 4-3: Testing and Measurement Techniques . and the Series 3++ and Series 5 logos. Des Moines. Reliant. Control. Total Train Control. Phone: (515) 270-0857 • Fax: (515) 270-1331 • Web: www.S. COMMAND.EMC Requirements. and TrainPanel are trademarks of Compressor Controls Corp.Agency Certifications for Series 3++ Controllers Electromagnetic Capability (EMC) European Union: 73/23/EEC Low Voltage Directive and 89/336/EEC Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive Compliant Standard IEC 61326 A3:2003 BS EN 55011 A2:2002 Certification Level Electrical Equipment For Measurement. Iowa 50323-2316. scientific and medical (ISM) radio-frequency equipment emissions – Electromagnetic disturbance characteristics – Limits and methods of measurement Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). Part 4: Testing and Measurement Techniques Section 11: Voltage dips. and Laboratory Use -. Industrial. Part 4: Testing and Measurement Techniques Section 5: Surge Immunity Test Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC).cccglobal.Radiated. TrainView. Electromagnetic Field Immunity Test Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). short interruptions. Radio-Frequency.

Did you find what you were looking for? 3. Do you require system maintenance information? 5.: UM3300/H (1.0) . Do you require system configuration information? 6. Do you require system operation information? Please provide the following information if you wish to be contacted: Company: Name: Email: You may also fax your questions or comments to: Fax: (515) 334-2500 ATTN: Manager. Technical Documentation Comments: Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì May 2006 FM73 (3.1. How do you prefer to access our documentation? Printed Online Ì Yes Ì No Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì 2.0) Publication Date: August 2007 If you have questions or comments concerning the information provided in this user manual or in any of our technical documents please contact CCC’s Technical Documentation Department: E-mail: TechDocsMgr@cccglobal. and are you using our TrainTools software? Series 4 Ì Series 5 Ì TrainTools Ì Guardian Ì Vantage Ì Air Miser Ì Some additional information we would like to know: 1. Do you require system installation information? 4.FM73 U Series 3+/3++ Ì Documentation Feedback Form Publication Title: Series 3++ Hardware Reference Manual Publication No.com Which Series of Controllers do you have.

IOWA POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE NO POSTAGE NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES COMPRESSOR CONTROLS CORPORATION Technical Documentation Department 4725 121st Street Des Moines. Iowa 50323-9906 Fold Along Dotted Line Please Fasten Here With Tape — Do Not Staple . 7515 DES MOINES.a BUSINESS REPLY MAIL FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO.