2012 Education

JANUARY

HERSAM ACORN NEWSPAPERS

Special Section to: Greenwich Post

I

The Darien Times

I

New Canaan Advertiser

I

The Ridgefield Press

I

The Wilton Bulletin

I

The Redding Pilot

I

The Weston Forum

I

The Lewisboro Ledger

ThistleWaithe
A MONTESSORI PRE-SCHOOL
AND KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER

by Polly Tafrate

Just over the Ridgefield border on Route 35
in South Salem, N.Y., is the new kid on the
block — ThistleWaithe Learning Center. You
may have given it a quick look when driving
past, remembering that this was once the
location of the Hayloft Motel. But if you stop
and venture up the long driveway, you’ll marvel at the transformation — once a motel,
now a school. This didn’t happen overnight
— it was completed in 2009 after three years
of work.
Director Maria Fitzgerald started ThistleWaithe
in Katonah. She named it after the resilient
wild thistle in her native Ireland. “Like
thistles, children are strong and resilient, but
just like the plant itself, not all grow to their
fullest potential unless they’re given the best
environment for growth.” Having leased
space in Katonah, she had searched tirelessly
for the right location for her own school.
A bucolic setting, easy access from the highway, a playground bigger than the parking
lot, woodsy grounds and a pond or wetlands
would be ideal, she thought. Once she saw
the Hayloft Motel, all she had to do was
convince the owner to sell, negotiate with
the bank for loans, get permits and licenses
from New York State and the town and find
the right architect and builders to develop an
environmentally sensitive and energy-effiThistleWaithe continued on page 10
Light fills the classrooms as it streams through the picture windows, creating a cheerful setting for all the learning activities.

���������� �������

��������������
����������

���������������������������������
���������������������������������������
����������������������������
������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������������
�������������� � �������������������������

����
����
���
�����
���� ��
�����
��

���
��� �
��

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•2•

• January 12, 2012 •

What will they do?
by Polly Tafrate
“You’re doing it wrong,” 14-year-old
Karla tells her brother Chip, when she
sees him using a screwdriver to pry out
the headlight in his first junk-of-a-car.
She rushes into the garage, brings out a
tool she’s seen her father use and carefully eases the headlight from its rusty
socket.
Because she handed tools to her father
when she watched him repair things, she
developed skills that have followed her
into adulthood. She can change the oil in
a car, install curtain rods, hang pictures
and unplug a pipe. Her two older siblings
lacked the patience to watch their father
work around the house. When pushed
into service, they’d drag a chair over, sit
down and alternate a yawn with a sigh.

But that’s not to say they didn’t have
their share of chores. Summer saw all
three kids weeding the family’s huge
vegetable garden, followed by raking
leaves in the fall. Winter meant cutting,
hauling and stacking wood for the woodburning stove and spring, at least for a
few years, was time to collect sap from
the maple trees to boil down into maple
syrup. Did they complain? Oh, yes! They
kept reminding their parents that none
of their friends had to do these chores.
They were partially right — some did
nothing; others did more.
Are today’s parents passing on skills
they were taught to their offspring? The
answer appears to be — not many. The
buzz word here is “outsourcing,” paying

�������������������������
������������������������
���������������������
������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������

���������������
�����������������

��������������

����������������

���������������

��������������������������������
���������������

someone else to do what you don’t have
time or inclination to do yourself. Kids
have grown accustomed to having someone clean their house, mow their lawn,
remove snow from their driveway and
clean their pool. They accompany their
parents to the car wash and have their
shirts washed and ironed to perfection at
the dry cleaners. When kids are asked to
help, eight-year-old Sarah’s response is
typical. When asked to butter the English
muffins for a family breakfast, she quit
after the first one. “Too much work,” she
said from the sofa, as she played with her
Game Boy. Moms fill in the gaps, washing clothes and cooking meals — that is
unless they get take-out, which is often
delivered to their door. Frozen meals-inminutes have replaced those made from
scratch. “No time,” moms say.

know that every tomato, although not
perfect, is still edible.

Is this outsourcing a good way to raise
children? Our grown son, Chip, wonders
if the hours spent on family chores as
a kid wouldn’t have been better spent
socializing with friends. But, in the next
sentence, he’s bewildered and concerned
when at a farm stand his son picks up an
over-ripe tomato that has a split in its
side. “What’s wrong with this one?” he
asks his dad. This family has never had
a vegetable garden, so how can the kids

Even though many family budgets are
strained today, most parents are adamant about not giving up their house
cleaners, snow plowers and lawn mowers, even when they have able-bodied teens living at home. Families have
become so accustomed to these services
that most don’t categorize them as luxuries. But this wasn’t always true. When I

Is this phenomenon of kids not having
meaningful family chores a regional one
confined to the East Coast? One pictures
children in Iowa and Nebraska helping
on the family farms, but this may not
be the case. Perhaps it’s a generational
attitude ... my kids aren’t going to have
to do what I did ... they’re going to have
fun, which is similar to the oft repeated
myth — “When I was your age I had to
walk five miles to school in the snow.”
Or did this evolve when moms entered
the workforce, giving the family more
spendable money? Or, maybe, time is
the culprit, as moms ferry their kids
back and forth to an array of after-school
activities.

Skills continued on page 11

����

����������������������������

����

������������������������������

������������������
�����������������

�������������������
�����������������

�������������������������

��������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������

���������������������

�����������������

������������������������
�����������

������������������

���������������������

������������������������

���������������������
������

�����������������������

���������������

�������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• January 12, 2012 •

•3•

Empowering students to shape the future!
Empowering students to shape the future!

A 21st Century High School
Education in a Small,
Caring Environment

Academy of
Information
Technology &
Engineering

A 21st Century High
School Education
students to
shape
the
future!
inEmpowering
a Small Caring students
Empowering
to
shape
the
future!
What makes AITE
Environment
unique?

�����������
������������
Small Student Population
IT & Pre-Engineering
Programs
Technology Rich
Environment

�� ��������������
Rigorous Academic
Preparation
����������
Early College Experience
Integration of Technology in
�� ���������������������
all Classes
Virtual High School
��������
Multicultural Diversity
Develops the Whole Child
��
����������������
A
21st
Century
HighSchool
School
A 21st Century High
Education
Small,
Education
inin
aa
Small,
�����������
Caring
Environment
Caring
Environment
�� �����������������������
�������
What
makesAITE
AITE
��
������������������
What
makes
�����������
unique?
unique?
�� ��������������
Small
Student
Population
Small
Student
Population
����������
& Pre-Engineering
IT IT
& Pre-Engineering
Programs
Programs
�� ���������������
Technology
Rich
Technology
Rich
������������������
Environment
Environment
�������
Rigorous
Academic
Rigorous
Academic
�� �������������������
Preparation
Preparation
Early
College
Experience
Early
College
Experience
�� ��������������
Integration
Technologyinin
Integration
ofof
Technology
���������
Classes
all all
Classes
Virtual
High
School
Virtual
High
School
�� �������������������
Multicultural
Diversity
Multicultural
Diversity
�����
Develops
WholeChild
Child
Develops
thethe
Whole

An Interdistrict Magnet Public
College Preparatory High School
Serving Lower Fairfield County

Academy
Academyofof
����������
Information
Information
��������
��������
Technology
Technology&&
Engineering
Engineering

AITE @ Rippowam Campus
411 High Ridge Road
Stamford, CT 06905
(203) 977-4336
(203) 977-6638 (fax)
www.aitstamford.org

��������������������������
�����������������

��������������������������
Interdistrict
Magnet
Interdistrict
MagnetPublic
Public
������������������

An
College Preparatory
High
College
Preparatory
HighSchool
School
�������������������
Serving �����������������
Lower
Serving
LowerFairfield
FairfieldCounty
County

AITE
Campus
AITE@@Rippowam
Rippowam
Campus
411
Road
411High
HighRidge
Ridge
Road
Stamford,
CTCT
06905
Stamford,
06905
(203)
(203)977-4336
977-4336
(203)
(fax)
(203)977-6638
977-6638
(fax)
www.aitstamford.org
��������������������
www.aitstamford.org

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•4•

• January 12, 2012 •

At Home at Fairfield Country Day School
by Polly Tafrate
Country Day School is unique in several ways.
One of these is that for 75 years it’s been educating boys — just boys. “They feel safe and
nurtured here,” says Rick Runkel, director of
admissions and science teacher. “They do things
at our school that they wouldn’t necessarily do at
others, partly because there are no girls and they
don’t feel the social pressure, but also because
they just feel so comfortable. It’s an environment
in which boys can be themselves.”

The curriculum is broad-based and balanced between academics, athletics, music and
the arts.

From Bronson Road, the school looks like an elegant home of yesteryear, which indeed it is. Once
inside the original blue door, the school descends
along a hillside where 250 focused and happy
boys learn more than academics. Located on 25
acres, there are four playing fields, a playground,
an outdoor classroom and ice rink. Inside it’s not

“As he masters each new skill, his self confidence increases...” -Maria Montessori

Belden Hill Montessori

���������������������

��������������������������������������������������
�������������������
������������������������
����������������������������

�����������������������
����������������������������������������������
������������������������

“Help me to help myself”- Maria Montessori

����������������������
������������������������������������������
������������������������������

����������������
���������������������������������������

��������������������������������
���������������������������������������
��������������������

���������������������
������������

����������� ���������������������������������������
����������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������

����������������������������������

Each teacher’s classroom reflects his or her personality, as does each boy’s interpretation of the

�����������������������
������������������������

�������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������

���������������������
���������������������������������������

Similar to other independents, Country Day has
three divisions: Lower School — Pre-K-3, Middle
School — 4-6 and Upper School — 7-9. Unlike
others, it continues through ninth grade. About
half of the boys leave Country Day after eighth
grade so as to start ninth grade at local high
schools. The class that remains revel in their
ninth-grade privileges, especially being allowed
to use the blue front door rather than the one in
the courtyard. After graduation, about 85% of
the boys go on to prestigious boarding schools.

����������������������������������������
������������
�����������������������

���������������������������������

���������������
������������

just the original wainscoting or the fireplaces in
the main building which gives the school an aura
of home, it’s the warm feeling throughout.

���������������������

���������
����������
�����������
�����������������

������������
�������
��������������
��������

������������������
�����������������
�������������
����������������

�������������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������

�������������������
����������������������

������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������
����������
��������������������������������� ���������
�������
������������������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������������

���������������������������
���������������������������

�����������

�������������������������

��������������������������������
��������������
������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������

��������������
�������������������������������

�������������������������������

���������������������������
��� ��������������������������������������������� ��������������������

����������������������������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• January 12, 2012 •

dress code. Starting in fourth grade, boys
are required to wear khaki pants and a navy
jacket, but are allowed to choose their own
shirts and ties. Cheerful colors and vibrant
patterns prevail.
The feeling that this is a home rather than
an institution is exemplified in the lunch
room. A hot meal is served family style with
a faculty member eating with a mix of boys
from each grade. I visited the Upper School’s
lunch and was impressed by the boys’ table
manners. These didn’t just happen — they
were taught as a Manner-of-the-Week in
the Lower School. The coveted privilege of
being a waiter is reserved for boys in fourth
and ninth grades, but only ninth graders are
allowed to access the salad bar.
The curriculum is broad-based and balanced between academics, athletics, music
and the arts. The classes are small; the
teachers enthusiastic and dedicated. They
get to know each boy well to help him to
achieve his fullest potential. “At Country
Day it’s cool to sing, ring in the hand bell

choir, paint, perform on stage and make the
football or hockey team,” says headmaster
John Munro, Jr.
Technology is integrated across all grade
levels and disciplines with two computer labs, school-wide wireless and smart
boards. Boys in the Upper School use their
own laptop in class and for homework,
ninth graders use iPads.
Latin is mandatory for the fifth graders;
Spanish from Pre-K-5. Those in the Upper
School may choose among French, Spanish
or Latin. A reciprocal partner exchange
with a school in Saragoza, Spain, occurs in
March and October.
Boys are taught to feel comfortable speaking in public. Kindergarteners through seventh graders work with their teacher and
parents to choose, memorize and recite a
poem at special assemblies. Once in fourth
grade, this becomes a prize-wining competition. Eighth and ninth graders write,
edit and perform their own speeches. The

�������������

•5•

debate program is an additional requirement for the Upper School, with every boy
required to participate in one debate each
year.
Boys in this school participate in weekly
advisory groups where they learn to solve
conflicts and discuss personal and academic topics. When asked about incidences
of bullying, Headmaster Munro feels it’s
minimal. “We live in relatively close quarters and the boys find many opportunities
to be successful. This doesn’t mean bullying doesn’t happen, but when it does, it’s
addressed immediately.”
Everyone plays and everyone excels in
athletics. Outdoors, the boys compete on
the playing fields or ice hockey rink, while
inside is a state-of-the-art gym. A highlight
of the weekly assembly of faculty and students is celebrating wins on the athletic
field by ringing the Victory Bell.
Community Service has a strong connection for the students and comes out

of the concerns of teachers and parents.
Every grade has a project from the third
grade’s collect-a-shoe campaign to Upper
School students helping the Fairfield Fire
Department dig out snowed-in hydrants
last winter.
Starting in sixth grade, the boys leave
the campus for several days of hands-on
learning — Cape Cod’s seashore, Boston’s
Freedom Trail, Adirondack winter survival,
White Mountain camp-outs. Headmaster
Munro feels “these trips often even the
playing field. The star of the basketball
team may have trouble ascending a mountain on snowshoes.
“Boys learn best in an all-boys educational environment,” he continues. “Teaching
boys is what we do best. Our commitment
to a single-gender education remains resolute. Quite simply, we know boys.”
Fairfield County Day School is at 2970
Bronson Road, Fairfield; 203-259-2723; fax
203-259-3249; fairfieldcountryday.org.

�������������
��� ��� �����
������������������������
���������������������������

������������������������������

�����������������
�����������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������
�����������
������������������ ���������� ������������
��

�� ���������������������

������������������������������������������

�������������

���
���������
�������
������
��������

�����������������������������
������������
�������������
���������������������������� �����������������������������
�����������
�������������
�����������
��������
���������
��������������
�������������
���������������
�������������

��������
������������������

����������������

���������

������������������
������������������������

New Canaan Campus
Gary Bloom
203-966-2937
gary@campplayland.com
Redding Campus
Richard Bloom
203-438-1711
campplayland@snet.net

Good Friends + Fun Times = Great Memories
Providing a safe, fun and instructional
summer for campers ages 3 to 14.
Transportation Provided

��������������
���������
���������������������

������������������������

������������������������
�������������������������
������������

www.campplayland.com

������������������������������

�������������

���������������������������

Jesse Lee Day School
Growing with Confidence

2012 Registration is Ongoing
We Offer
Toddler & Twos
������������������

Three Year Olds
���������������������

Four Year Olds
�������������

Transitional Kindergarten
�������������

Extended Day Classes

Classes at The Annex
are open to the
Entire Community
for more information go to

jesseleedayschool.org
����������������������������������
�������������
��������������
���������������������������������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������
��������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������

www.countrywillowkids.com���������������
��������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•6•

• January 12, 2012 •

Noroton Presbyterian Nursery School
OFFERS ONE-OF-A-KIND, PRE-KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM
Noroton Presbyterian Nursery School
(NPNS) — a non-profit, self-supporting
program licensed by the State Board of
Health — is holding a series of open
houses for its nursery school and prekindergarten program. Orientation will
include a presentation from the director,
tour of the school and classrooms and an
outline of all educational opportunities
at NPNS.
NPNS follows the Connecticut Preschool
Curriculum Framework and uses a method of teaching influenced by the Reggio
Emilia teaching philosophy.
Reggio Emilia, or Reggio as it’s commonly called, is a philosophy that was

developed in Italy in the 1940s and has
spread world-wide to preschools and
kindergartens.

Reggio is an approach to learning based
around fundamental values of how children learn. The core values are as follows:

• The child learns through experiences
of touching, moving, listening, seeing
and hearing.

“We were originally drawn to Reggio
Emilia because of the way it views and
respects the child,” said Martha Duff,
director of NPNS. “This method of teaching has allowed our faculty to act as
resource, provocateur and partner in
learning with the children. Our teachers
provide their students with opportunities to gain knowledge using the child’s
own interests. Teachers incorporate curriculum into these experiences. We see
a much higher level of thinking taking
place using this approach, which is both
intentional and emergent.”

• The child has unique strengths and
potential and is encouraged to construct
knowledge through exploration, selfexpression and interaction with others.

NPNS incorporates all of these values
and more through its unique, transitional
pre-kindergarten program for children
who are almost but not quire ready to
move on to kindergarten. The pre-K
classes, limited to 18 students with three
certified teachers for a ratio 6:1, is taught
in two large rooms, including an art studio. This small-class experience includes
multiple field trips, weekly music class,
Spanish, chapel and a junior Naturalist
program.

• The child’s environment is significant; it functions as another teacher and
serves a purpose to engage and communicate. The students value and care for
their school, equipment and materials.
• The child learns through interaction
with consistent and nurturing teachers,
parents and peers.

Noroton continued on page 12

��������������������������

�����������������������������
����������������������

����������

����������������������������
��������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������
�������������������
������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
��� ���� ��������� ������� ���� ���� ���������� ��� ������
���������

������������������
�������������������������
��������������������������������
���������������������������������
�������������������������

��� ����� ����� ��������� �������� ��������� ��������������
����� ���������� ������ ��������� ���� ���� ���������� ����
��������������

������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������������
��������������������������������
�������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������
��� �������������� ��� ���� ������ ��� ������ ������������
�����������������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

Open
OpenHouse
HouseFebruary
February 2,
2, 22012
012 99:00-10:30
:00-10:30 AA.M.
. M.

Saint Mary School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

SS A I N T M A R Y S C H O O L
Speak with staff and parents, tour our school, and see

Speak with staff and parents, tour our school, and see

classes in session. Come and experience the difference a
s ea sse di ne dsuecsast ii oo nn .c a nC po rmo ve i daen! d R eS Vx Pp e( 2r i0e3n) c4e3 8t -h7e2 8d8i f f e r e n c e a
f ac iltahs b
d wewd. us mc as rtiidogne f iceal dn. opr gr .o v i d e ! R S V P ( 2 0 3 ) 4 3 8 - 7 2 8 8
o fr aoi nt h
l i nbe aaste w

or online at www.smsridgefield.org.

Faith in Every Student

o r o n l i n e aFaith
t winwEvery
w .Student
s m s r�i dPreschool
g e f i ethrough
l d . oGrade
r g .8
Faith in Every Student

� 183 High Ridge Ave, Ridgefield CT 06877

Preschool through Grade 8 � 183 High Ridge Ave, Ridgefield CT 06877

�������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������
����������
������������

������������������������������
����������������������������
���������������������

��������������������������������
�������������������������������������
�������������������������������
�����������������������
���������������������
��������������
��������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

������

����������������������������������
������������������

• January 12, 2012 •

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•7•

Learning the language of teens
by Lois Alcosser

From one mom: “It’s the tone of my
son’s voice I object to. It’s so disrespectful.” From another: “I’d like to know who
my daughter’s friends are dating. Is that
wrong?” More than 60 moms and several dads recently listened intently to Dr.
Barbara Greenberg at the Wilton Library.
Her new book, “Teenage as a Second
Language,” addresses parents’ difficulties
communicating with their teenage children.
It’s filled with strategies to achieve peace
at home and diffuse teenage/parent battles. Dr. Greenberg, a clinical psychologist,
tackles the problems that today’s parents
face: drinking, drugs, sleepovers, cellphone texting, sex, bullying, driving, as

well as secrecy, stubbornness, hostility,
sarcasm.
“Parents actually have to become bilingual, because the same words may mean
one thing to teens and another to parents,”
Dr. Greenberg suggests. As a consultant on
teen issues at Silver Hill Hospital in New
Canaan — and therapist over the years
to hundreds of youngsters and their parents — she recognizes current difficulties.
She has also raised two teens. During the
talk, sponsored by Parent Connection and
the Wilton Youth Council, Dr. Greenberg
used no notes, didn’t stay behind the
podium, encouraged questions and made
her entire presentation feel like a personal,
face-to-face conversation.

“Teenagers don’t like direct questions,” she
said. “Asking how their day was or what
happened in school just doesn’t work. You
have to diffuse your approach. Start a conversation in an unexpected way, instead of
being a monitor. Difficult as it is, when a
child’s tone is hostile or sarcastic, ignore
the tone but not the words. You don’t want
to be insulted, but reacting emotionally
and arguing on their level doesn’t work.
When they do start telling you something
that’s happened, really listen. Don’t interrupt or tell them what to do. Your job is to
get the information, not give advice.
“Today’s teenagers use cellphones like a
drug. They should be considered privileges that have to be earned.” This is difficult,

����������������������

�������������������������

���������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������

Teenage continued on page 12

���

�����

�����

�����

���������

�����

����������

�����

���������

�����

����

��������������������������

�����������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������

“Unfortunately, there are parents who
allow drinking at parties in their homes.
They say it’s safer to have them drink
at home. That’s a terrible philosophy.
Serving alcohol to minors or permitting
them to smoke pot is illegal. When driving is involved, it could be endangering
the life of your child or someone else’s.
There should always be a parent present

������

�����

�������������������������������������������������
��
���������� ������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������

Dr. Greenberg admits. “It helps to set up
a list of expectations and consequences
before bad things happen. For example,
what are your expectations about drinking, driving, curfews, time spent on electronic devices?

�����������������������������

������������

���������������

�����������������������������������������������

�������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������ ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������� �����������������������������������������������
���������

���������������

�����������������������
����������������������������
������������� �
���� � ��������
�����������������������������������
��������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������

����������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

•8•

• January 12, 2012 •

Taking a gap year
by Polly Tafrate

Noroton Presbyterian Nursery School holds
Orientations for 2012-13 School Year
NPNS is holding a series of Open Houses for its Nursery
School and Pre-Kindergarten Program starting January 9, 2012.
Orientations include a presentation from the Director, tour of the
school and classrooms, and an outline of additional educational
opportunities.
NPNS is a Christian-based nursery school that was established
in 1957. The program follows the Connecticut Preschool Curriculum Framework and uses a method of teaching influenced
by the Reggio Emilia teaching philosophy. Through Reggio,
teachers provide students with opportunities to gain knowledge
using their own interests and incorporate curriculum into these
experiences. We pray with the students and share lessons to encourage Christian values and positive choices. Older students
attend weekly Chapel services. Other offerings include Spanish,
weekly music, a Junior Naturalist program, field trips, and visiting cultural arts. There is also an Extended Day program that
includes classes such as Athletics, Scientists, Karate, Spanish
and Alphabetics. Small classes and well-educated and experienced teachers preserve the high quality of our program.
We offer varied classes for two, three and four year olds. In
addition, we offer a unique, transitional pre-kindergarten program
for children, whose parents and teachers feel are not quite ready
to move to the next level. Pre-K allows children an additional
year for social maturation to ensure kindergarten success.
For information about our program or to sign up for an orientation
please call our office at 203-655-3223 or visit our website at
www.npns.org. Registration for the 2012-2013 school year will
take place Jan. 3rd – 20th.

Years ago, a handful of high school graduates chose the road not taken — they put
a knapsack on their backs and hitchhiked
around the United States or Europe on a
few bucks a day. They were going to “find
themselves” they’d tell anyone bold enough
to ask. Some had a concrete plan like hiking the Appalachian Trail from Maine to
Georgia, while many just wanted to step off
the treadmill of four more years of school.
Once getting a taste of the real world,
some of these students failed to return to
academia.
The gap year, as it’s now called, is gaining in popularity with today’s high school
seniors. Started by the Brits in the early
eighties, students defer entering college
for a year, using this time to explore other
options.
The possibilities fall into several categories: one is the fee or tuition programs like
Outward Bound, geared for small groups
with trained leaders. These typically run
for three months and cost between $6,000
to $7,000. Sarah is making a different
choice. She’s spending her gap year teaching English to elementary school students
in Santiago, Chile. She’ll live with a host
family who will provide room and board,
and her school will give her a small weekly
stipend, which her parents have agreed

to supplement. Josh chooses to work at
a national park in exchange for food and
lodging.
Many students break up the year with a
few months of a pricey program followed
by an internship, volunteer work, political
advocacy — whatever suits their fancy and
their parents’ pocketbook.
There is a need to plan well when considering a gap year so that zoning out in front
of the TV or slapping sandwiches together
at Subway doesn’t happen. This isn’t an
extended vacation — perfecting surfing
skills in Hawaii doesn’t count.
Part of the allure of becoming a gapper is
there’s no blueprint — each student can
structure it to suit his or her own desire.
Hence the evolution of gap year counselors.
They meet with the parents and students
to help them develop a realistic and wellconstructed plan. Some of these counseling
services can run into several thousand dollars; others are less.
“Take a year on” is the motto of Colleen
Joyce, founder of Gap Year Consulting
LLC©, which opened in Redding last year.
“There are many opportunities out there,”
she says. “I help kids find those that are
reputable.” Colleen is proud of the suc-

���������

��������������������
���������������������������

�������������������������

����������������������������
�����������������
��������������������������������������������

����������������

��������������������������������
������������

��������������������
��������������������������

�������������������

���������
������
����������
��������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
������������ ��������� ����������� ���������� ��
������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
�����������������������

�������������������������������
����������������
�����������������
���������������

��������������������
����������

���

�����������
�����������������

���������������������������

������������������������������������������������������

�����������

��������������������������
��������������������������������
�������������������

��������������������������� ����� ����������������
����������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• January 12, 2012 •

�����������������������

cessful gap years her students have experienced, and reports that every one of them
has returned to college.
Michael Morris was fortunate in that his
acceptance to Brown was deferred for a
year. He spent his gap year doing some
hiking, but returned to his hometown of
Hanover, N.H., to work for a start-up wireless company. “The adjustment to college
the following year was a little tough,” he
admits. “Most people were really excited
to get away from their parents and party
for the first time. I’d done that the previous
year and wasn’t very interested in joining.”
He explains that he did take off another
semester after his freshman year, largely
due to his difficulty in adjusting to college.
“That semester was the most valuable time
off for me,” he says. He sums up his experience this way: “Taking a gap year gives
you the opportunity to enter college with a
wealth of interesting experiences that can
inspire and motivate your college years.”
How did Michael’s parents feel about this?
His dad, Bill, explains, “In my generation,
virtually all my friends went to college directly after high school. We were all in a hurry
— but I wasn’t really ready. Looking back, I
might have benefited from doing something
else, at least for a while. As a parent, I simply
worried that Michael might somehow get
derailed and fall off the track permanently.”
Michael graduated from Brown as a math
major, magna cum laude, in 2009.
A new survey indicates that 50% of students
in four-year colleges are taking six-years
to graduate. Prestigious universities like
Harvard, Stanford and Princeton strongly

•9•

�������������

������������������������
������������������������������
�����������������

Gap year offers time for exploration.

support the gap year concept. Parent supporters claim that they’d rather see their
child learn and grow during this year off
than fund an extra year or so of college.
Taking a gap year isn’t for everyone, but
isn’t it a good feeling to know that kids now
have an opportunity to develop and follow
an interest that in all probability they’d
be unable to follow once in the traditional
track of college, grad school and jobs?

DETAILS
Helpful organizations: gapyearconsulting.
org; interimprograms.com; timeoutassociates.com; dynamy,org.
Organizations where students can earn
money: americorps.gov; cityyear.org.

�������������������������������
���������������������������������������

�������������������������
��������������������
������������������������
��������������������������

��������������������
�����������������������

����������
�������
������������
�������������

����������
����������
��

������������
����������
���
�����������
����������
�������� ��
������

����������

������������
������������

���

������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������
�����������������������������

���������������������������������
��������������������������

�������������

������������
�����������������������������

Accredited by the National
Academy for the Education
of Young Children

���������������������������������

��������������������������������
����������������������������������������������

������������

��������
���������
������
����������
������������
�����������
����������
��������
�������
���������
���������

���������������������������������
������������������
��������������������
������������������������
���������������������������

�������������������������������������
������������
�����������������������
�����������������������������

FREE

������������
�����������������

Is your son or daughter
going to be ready for
kindergarten in the
fall? Do you know what
type of program would
best meet his
needs and satisfy
his curiosity to
learn? Parents
want to make
the best
decision
and give
their child
every
possible
advantage.

FREE testing
appointments
are limited and
scheduled on
a first-come,
first-served basis.
Call Martha Olson at
203-261-6230 ext. 555

If you feel that
a standard
kindergarten
program might
not challenge
your child,
and you
want more
information,
consider
having him
take this
fun
20-25
minute
test.
����������
���������
�����������������������������
�����������
�������������������
��������������������
�����������������������

������������������������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 10 •

• January 12, 2012 •

ThistleWaithe continued from page 1
cient school. She hoped that families
would follow her there. They did.

A pond and wetlands is ideal for nature study.

Over 115 young children pass through
ThistleWaithe’s doors at different times
each day. They enter through a common
room that leads to a long hallway with natural light streaming through from floor-toceiling opaque windows. Across the hall,
windows look into each classroom, where
an aura of calm and quiet prevails.

ones are in the kitchen area, mashing
and measuring ingredients for the muffins they’ll enjoy for a snack. In another
classroom, two girls are enjoying their
snack next to a picture window that looks
out to the play area and woods beyond.
Absent here is the standard display of
children’s work (it goes home with them),
along with the ABC charts, mobiles, blocks
and trucks found in traditional pre-school
classrooms.

In one, two boys are expanding a tabletop sculpture of mini-marshmallows with
toothpicks connecting the pieces. Sitting
next to a nature table, a girl unrolls her
floor rug and sits upon it with a puzzle.
One of the teachers quietly sits with a
child learning to identify numbers on
sandpaper letters. Another child stands
next to her, resting his hand against her
shoulder — the silent signal that he needs
her attention. In a toddler classroom, little

The curriculum is customized to meet
the needs of each child. The teachers
follow the Montessori Method of helping
children explore, think critically and solve
problems, with an emphasis on large-andsmall motor coordination. Letter identification and their corresponding sounds are
taught to some children who are becoming early readers. Spanish is taught for the
primary children; Mandarin will continue
once a teacher is found. Interconnected

�����������������������������������������

������������������

������������������������������
�����������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������
������������������
�����������������������������
������������

������������������
���������������������������������
�����������������������

Fairfield
Fairfield Country
Country Day
Day School
School
����������

�����������������������
������������������������
���������������������
������������������������

������
�����������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������

������������������������������������
����������������� ��������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������

����������������

���������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������
��������������������������������
����������������������� �� ������������
�������������������������������������

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• January 12, 2012 •

themes continue throughout the year.
For example, starting at age three, the
children are taught to identify the seven
continents; by five years, they know the
continents’ placement on a world map
and begin constructing their own yearlong geography projects.
Equally as magnificent as the inside
classrooms is the area outside. The children develop a kinship with the natural
world, as they are taught to become
stewards of their environment. They
enjoy all seasons and weather, donning their Wellies on rainy days, their
snowsuits on snowy ones. A log balance beam, sand pit, toddler crawl tube,
climbing rock and swings for all sizes are
well loved. Undulating hills make ideals
places for rolling and sledding. Every
fall, the children plant bulbs and enjoy
raking and playing in the leaves. A favorite warm weather activity is the water
trench. Water is pumped into a trough
and the children explore ways to divert
its flow. ThistleWaithe parents helped to

construct an organic vegetable garden,
where the children enjoy planting, weeding and, especially, eating the vegetables
they harvest.
Nature’s playground extends to the pond
and adjacent wetlands in front of the
school. Here the children observe an
abundance of wetland inhabitants, listen
for the owls and song birds and welcome
the blue heron who calls ThistleWaithe
his home. One child tells of watching
the snapping turtles crawl out of the
pond to lay their eggs, another loves the
pond study when its water is scooped
into glass containers and brought into
the classrooms. With the help of magnifying glasses, the children observe the
tiny micro-organisms floating within.
ThistleWaithe is currently seeking certification by the Arbor Day Foundation as a
Nature’s Classroom.
When the children graduate at age six,
the majority of them segue nicely into
public schools. To the parents’ dismay,

• 11 •

there are no plans to expand at this time
due to licensing and space restrictions.

Skills continued from page 2

Even if that never happens, ThistleWaithe
is a treasure for young children — a little
school with a big name.

was growing up, an affluent family in
our neighborhood expected their kids
to paint the lawn furniture, dig the
moss out of the bricks on their front
sidewalk and do all the cleaning-up
after dinner.

DETAILS
ThistleWaithe Learning Center
1340 Route 35
South Salem, N.Y
914-977-3662
thistlewaithe.org
• Follows the Katonah-Lewisboro school
calendar
• Half-day program for toddlers (ages 1836 months)
• Full- and half-day primary programs for
children 3-6 years
• Kindergarten extension for KatonahLewisboro students
• Busing provided
• Wraparound care available, 7:30-6
• Half-day summer programs

So what’s going to happen to the
future generation? Chip rationalizes it
this way. “We have to pick and choose
where we’re going to put our limited
time and energy.” He considers the
possibility that when he’s no longer
around, his kids won’t know how to
carve a turkey, install a shelf that’s
level or change the spark plugs on a
lawn mower. But, he reasons, they’ll
know how to get on the Internet and
figure out at least some of it.

Jewish Family Congregation Early Childhood Center

�������������������������������������
����� ��������� ��� � � ��

Classes for 2, 3, & 4-Year-Olds

����������������������������������������

...where Family is our middle name

After-School Enrichment and Summer Fun Programs Available
�� Low Teacher/Child Ratio
�� Small Class Size
�� Stimulating Curriculum
�� Yoga
�� Cooking
�� Jewish Culture

�� Nature Trails
�� Beautiful Large Playground
�� Organic 12-Month Gardening
Curriculum
�� 10 Acres of Land
�� Field Trips

������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������
���� �������� �������� ���������� ������� ��������� ���� ����������
��������� ������������ ���� ������ ������� �������� ��� ���� ��������� ���� �����
�������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

Register NOW for Fall 2012
914-763-3028
Jane Weil Emmer, Director

www.jewishfamilycongregation.org

111 Smith Ridge Road (Rte. 123), South Salem, New York 10590

�������������������������������������������������������

���������������������
��� ����� ������ � �������� ��� ���������� � ���� ������������
���� ������������ � ������ �����������������

��������������
������������������������
����������������������
�������������

������������������������������

���������������������
���������������������
������������������
������������
�����������������������
�����������������������

Prepare for a new career
Medical Assis�ng
Medical Admin Assis�ng
Medical Billing & Coding
Massage Therapy
Informa�on Technology
Electrical Systems Technician

For more informa�on please visit our website

www.ridley.edu
Spring Classes now forming!

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 12 •

Noroton continued from page 6

• January 12, 2012 •

Teenage continued from page 7

“NPNS offers an invaluable pre-kindergarten program. The small class
size, low student/teacher ratio, large

NPNS students learn their letters by creating a
classroom alphabet. The experience involved
the children in a discussion of the letters and
their sounds, choosing items out of a recycling
center and matching them with the sound of
the letter. This exploration allows the children
to make connections between letter shapes,
sounds and objects that begin with the letter.

classrooms and Reggio Emilia-educated
teachers are just a few of the reasons NPNS’s pre-K program is so outstanding,” said Lorraine Collins, a current pre-K parent. “The pre-K teachers
encourage independence and nurture
each child’s love of learning, while fostering emotional, social and academic
development, thus fully preparing each
child for kindergarten.”
The school is a branch of the Children’s
Ministry of Noroton Presbyterian
Church and is guided by a volunteer
board of directors comprising parent
volunteers, the director of NPNS and a
church elder.
For more information on space in the
pre-kindergarten program or to register
for an orientation, please call the office
at 203-655-3223.

at a party, who knows what’s going on.
One technique is to serve them frequent
snacks, as a way of checking up.”

effect. It’s a parent’s responsibility to talk
to them about it, even if it’s very hard to
do.”

Dr. Greenberg also described the good
news, which she calls “the secrets of
teens. They do want to talk to you.
They do care what you think of them.
Above all, they don’t want you to be
disappointed with them. As a parent in
today’s world, you have to talk to them
about things like binge drinking, oral sex,
reckless driving. They have to learn to
be accountable. When a friend is doing
something dangerous, it isn’t snitching
to reveal it.

Parenting today requires many totally
new skills and attitudes. “It’s not easy,
but it doesn’t last forever. Children do
eventually grow up, but so many of their
values are formed during adolescence.
I’ve found that it’s very helpful to listen
when you have your teenager and some
friends in the car. When you drive, they
think you’re not there, and you can learn
a great deal about what’s happening.

“We’re living in a ‘hook-up’ culture, and
young people don’t know that many
things they consider cool are not OK at
all. What they may consider ‘not really
sex’ can have a devastating emotional

“The tricky thing is knowing what to do
with that information. Remember, you’re
the parent, not a friend. But you can
reach your teen more easily by talking
with them in their own language,” Dr.
Greenberg concluded. She is co-creator
of the website, talkingteenage.com.

�����������������������
���������������������
���������������������������������
���������������������������������

������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������

January 29, 2012

�������������������������������������
��������������������������
�������������������������������������
���������������������������������
������������������������

��������������������������
������������������������
��������������������
��������������������
���������������������
�����������������������������������������

������������������������������������
�������������������N�������������������N���������������
��������������������N���������������������
N �������������������� N
�������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������

���������
���������������������������

������������
�������������

�����������������
�������������

�������������������������������������
�����������������
��������������

��������������
��������������

�����������������
��������������

���������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������

�����������������������������������
������������������������������������������������

������������������

����������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������������������

������������������������������������������������
�������������
���������������������

�����������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������
�������������������������
���������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������
�������������������������
��������������������������

���������������������������������������������
���������������������
��������������������������
������������������������������������������������������������
������������������������������������������������

Connecticut State Approved Independent Schools.
Connecticut Association of Independent Schools. Financial Aid Available

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 13 •

• January 12, 2012 •

A star is born
HALLER PIANO RENTALS CAN HELP MATCH THE CHILD WITH THE INSTRUMENT
by G. Lisa Sullivan

I was fortunate enough to grow up with a
beautiful baby grand piano. The instrument,
which originally resided in my grandparents’
home, was made of gleaming dark wood
and was accompanied by a matching bench
with a lovely needlepoint cushion. When my
grandparents sold their house, my parents
inherited this gem on which my mother and
aunt had played as children.

“We offer complete rebuilding and refinishing, moving (short and long distance), tuning
and regulation, concert preparation, quality
pre-owned piano sales, appraisals and estimates, buying and selling,” Paul explains.
And the icing on the cake? You can actually
rent a piano from them.

I wasn’t fortunate enough, however, to inherit either the talent or the interest in playing
(although I did take lessons for several years),
and my parents finally sold it when they
downsized a decade ago. There was no room
for the piano in their new home or in my
own. Had it been possible, I would have kept
it for sentimental reasons, and it would certainly have come in handy when my daughter expressed an interest in playing when she
was in second grade.

Paul, a Stamford native who at 18 apprenticed with a piano technician in a rebuilding
shop and studied music privately, not only
tunes but also handles the refurbishing,
rebuilding and moving end of the business.
Philip, who was born and bred in New York
City, started lessons at age seven and spent
his formative years surrounded by music in
his father’s piano store. He tunes pianos and
specializes in sales and in procuring inventory for the business. (He has also worked
with some famous musicians, including Elton
John, Stevie Wonder and the Rolling Stones).

For several years, she practiced on an electronic keyboard, while she took lessons on
a piano at her teacher’s house. As she progressed, my husband and I found ourselves
confronted with a dilemma: should we invest
in a piano or should we keep her practicing
on the keyboard indefinitely? What if we did
make the purchase, and she decided after a
few months (or even weeks!) that she wanted
to stop playing?
We decided to investigate our options, and
after several friends recommended piano
experts Haller Piano LLC, we first visited the
company website with its comprehensive
piano photo gallery (including Steinways,
Yamahas, Kawais and Baldwins), and then
the Stamford-based showroom, owned and
operated by business partners Paul Haller
and Philip Calabrese.

Most of Haller’s clients who prefer to rent
opt for upright pianos, which measure from
approximately 40 inches high for a console
to 52 inches high for a full upright. The keyboard always remains just under five feet
across, regardless of the type of piano.

Piano Men

For purchase-shy parents like myself, the
option to rent — from a modest, upright console to concert grand — allows for a testing
of the waters, so to speak. “A minimal investment provides the opportunity to see if a
student is going to be serious enough to warrant the purchase of a piano,” Paul explains.
“A quality piano, as opposed to an electronic
keyboard or a spinet, has wonderful sound
and can inspire a beginner to play.”
Haller Piano offers three-month rental periods, with the option to apply the first six
months’ rent towards the purchase of a
piano. “Kids can be very fickle, and playing
is hard work,” Philip says. “Renting a piano
gives both the child and the parent a good
feel for where the student is, and where he
or she is headed.”

An upright is Haller’s most popular rental piano.

“There four types of upright pianos, including the spinet — which is the smallest in
terms of height — the console, the studio and
the full upright,” Paul says. “The bigger the
piano, the bigger the sound board and the
better the sound.”
The console and studio pianos, with their
larger sound boards and longer strings, produce a very pleasing sound and are what
Philip and Paul often recommend to beginners.
“When you are playing on a large piano, you
feel the vibrations in your feet, your fingers,
and your soul ... the vibrations move through
you and move you,” Philip explains. “It’s the
reason that electronic keyboards will never
replace acoustical keyboards ... you just can’t
get the same feeling.”

Playing It By Ear
The step up from the best upright is the
grand piano, which always has three legs
despite the size (from baby to concert).
“Grand pianos can be absolutely breathtaking,” Paul says, “and while the idea of a
grand in your home may be appealing, you
are often better off from an investment and
music standpoint to start with a quality console or studio piano. Plus, grand pianos take
up a lot of space. You can always trade in and
up for a grand (and Haller Piano does rent
grand pianos) later on.”
Piano tuning goes hand-in-hand with piano
owning or renting, and a finely-tuned instrument can produce sound that will continue
to inspire a student. “You can’t put a timeline
on when to tune,” Philip says. “However, a
piano should be tuned often, and you don’t
want to wait until it sounds terrible to make
the appointment.”
During concerts or for professional recording, for example, a piano may be tuned
several times, while for the average homeowner, a couple of times a year may be
sufficient.
“We try and guide parents into choosing a
piano that will be the right fit for their child
and their home,” Paul says. “Most of our
rentals become purchases, but we won’t
push a client towards a decision. Both the
parents and the child have to be happy with
whatever option they choose. If the student
isn’t enjoying playing, then he or she won’t
be inspired to continue and progress. It’s as
simple as that.”
For further information: 203-348-3183; hallerpiano.com.

��������������������
��������������������
�������������������

Stanwich is

BUILDING
Building character. Initiative. Curiosity. And an enduring respect for
meaning, purpose, and a life of success and service.

We serve a community of boys and girls from Pre-K through Grade 10,
expanding to a comprehensive Pre-K–12 learning experience in
the next two years.
Our foundation is one of ethics and values. From there, we are
poised to make history, and create leaders for tomorrow.

The Stanwich School
EDUCATING THE MIND, BODY AND SPIRIT

257 Stanwich Road, Greenwich, CT 06830
203.542.0035
admissions@stanwichschool.org
www.stanwichschool.org

• Education • Hersam Acorn Newspapers •

• 14 •

• January 12, 2012 •

�����������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������
��������������������������
������������������������
���������������������������
������������������������������
��������������������������
���������������������������
�������������
����������������������
������������������������������

�����������
����������������

���������������������
��������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������
��������������������������
������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������������

������������������������������
���������������������������������
�����������������������������
������������������������������
��������������������������������������
�����������������������������������
��������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������

�����������������
���������������

���������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������
������
���������������������������������

�������������������

������������������������

��������������

���������������������������������

�������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������������������

Character, Resilience,
Discipline and Courage

���

�������

����������������������������������

Open House Saturday, May 12, 2012
www.gunnery.org - 860-868-7334 - admissions@gunnery.org
99 Green Hill Road, Washington, Connecticut 06793

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful