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STATE OF CALIFORNIA, RESOURCES AGENCY

EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., GOVERNOR

DEPARTMENT
801 K STREET PHONE 916 / 445-1825

OF

CONSERVATION
WEBSITE conservation.ca.gov

CALIFORNIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


MS 12-30 SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 95814

FAX 916 / 445-5718

TDD 916 / 324-2555

January 12, 2012 Mr. Arthur Leahy, CEO Metro 1 Gateway Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90012 Re: Clarification of California Geological Survey Fault Evaluations

Dear Mr. Leahy: In the December 15, 2011 story on the Westside Subway Extension, the L.A. Weekly misunderstood written comments that the Public Affairs Office of the Department of Conservation provided in response to a reporters inquiries about previous investigations performed by the California Geological Survey (CGS). In 1978, when CGS made its initial assessment of the Santa Monica Fault for potential inclusion in an Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zone (then called a Special Studies Zone), there was no evidence discovered to demonstrate that the Santa Monica Fault was active. Active has specific connotations in this context, including that there is evidence of surface faulting (surface rupture) within the past 10-12 thousand years. Without evidence of such movement, CGS could not place a zone on the fault. The absence of evidence of surface fault rupture does not mean the fault is inactive, only that there was no substantive data at that time supporting surface fault rupture within the past 10-12 thousand years. CGS took no position on the activity of the fault, only that there was not enough evidence to place a zone on the fault. CGS is aware of more recent studies that indicate that the fault may be active and capable of future surface-rupturing earthquakes. The California Geological Survey has not yet evaluated the West Beverly Hills Lineament and can make no comment on the activity of this interpreted zone of faults. CGS evaluation for the placement of Alquist-Priolo (A-P) zoning does not entail trenching by the CGS the California Geological Survey makes an independent assessment of available geological data and surface observations. Subsequent detailed studies for specific development proposals within an established A-P Zone usually include subsurface investigations (often trenching) performed by geologic consultants hired by the developer.

The Department of Conservations mission is to balance todays needs with tomorrows challenges and foster intelligent, sustainable, and efficient use of Californias energy, land, and mineral resources.

Mr. Arthur Leahy, CEO January 12, 2012 Page 2

Thank you for your inquiries into this matter. If the California Geological Survey can be of further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us. Sincerely,

John G. Parrish, Ph. D, PG California State Geologist

cc: David Mieger