VS.

 


FACTS OF MUCH USE!
WHOS SLEEPING 
WITH WHO (jk)




 
 
 


 

An Introduction 

“Welcome to Brandeis” im sure you’ve heard that a mi l l ion t imes and you’ re
st i l l not sure whether i t means anything. “How’s col lege so far” you’ l l be
hear ing that one a mi l l ion t imes too. It’s hard to verbal ize what is a very
confusing and di f f icul t, but always new exper ience. And honest ly, a lot of
people: tour guides, OLs, your professors are there to be opt imist ic and
won’ t be f rank wi th about how ser ious and t rying i t can be. It’s something
you’ re going to have to face up to on your own, we’ re not gonna l ie. But
we’ve wr i t ten this zine in par t to make i t easier.

AND A Warning 

But we’ve also wr i t ten this for opposi te reasons: to throw you head f i rst
into real i ty. And that is where we come to who “We are”

We shouldn’ t exist. We, the capi tal ‘L’ Lef t at Brandeis. Yet, we hold onto
that romant ic idea that an educat ion is a means to l iberat ion, despi te
wherever else stale cl ass-conscious road maps might lead us. We see an
educat ion as more than just grades 13-16, resume bui lding, networking, and
pl ay t ime. We want col lege to be more than just the pl ace where middle-
cl ass youths pl ay at rebel l ion and learn management ski l ls. We are
f ierce, brave, and ser ious. Yes, we are pr ivi leged – let us use this
insight to tear apar t the wor ld that raises us up whi le lower ing our
fel lows to a l i fe of corporate feudal ism.

Whi le you may r idicule us in publ ic, abhor us, throw us in the t rash, we
are a f r iend who wi l l not reject you, a map which wi l l not fal ter when i t
becomes unfashionable, a secret conf idant one can go into the night wi th.

This zine, the f i rst at Brandeis for many years, is brought to you through
the ef for ts of the dis-or ientat ion commi t tee. We come f rom di f ferent
backgrounds - ideological, exper ient ial, and otherwise - to br ing you a
shi t -ton of words to disor ient you f rom a cul ture at war wi th the pl anet
and the popul ace. To that end, this zine contains polemic weapons, recipes
for l iberat ion, dreams of future wor lds, and resources for the thi rsty. It
ain’ t our f inest work, but we’ re not apologizing.
- The Disorientation Committee

Contents 
2 . . . . This page
3 . . . . War on the Middle
Class
5 . . . . Bullshit Majors
6 . . . . The past 60 years
7 . . . . for fucks sake
know your enemy
9 . . . . Traveling
10 . . . . Radical Privilege
Check
12 . . . . Mental Health at deis
13 . . . . Why 6.5 billion < G20? 
15 . . . . Revolutionaries Got to
Eat
17 . . . . General Advice Pt One
18 . . . . Environmentalists:
step up the game
21 . . . . A Brandeis Drug FAQ
22 . . . . General Advice Pt Two
23 . . . . Radical Possibilities
of the university
25 . . . . Hours
26 . . . . We Are Fucking Doomed 

War on the Middle Class!! 
By Diogenes of Sinope 
There are a variety of demeaning euphemisms for those people who, through no 
fault of their own, have committed the ghastly crime of not being wealthy. The poor (and 
by extension racial minorities, immigrants, and others) get labeled irresponsible, lazy 
freeloaders and criminals, whose mere existence is borderline illegal, if not downright 
unpatriotic. Under the noble tutelage of a broken education system and the mass media 
echo room, we’re successfully programmed with the nonsensical belief that these ‘little 
chiselers’ are the source of our problems – a convenient distraction from the horrific 
crimes of the big chiselers telling us this. 
 
However, if we wanted to compile a longer and tawdrier list of the absurdities that 
we kowtow to, nothing could truly equal the masturbatory delusions of grandeur that the 
American middle class has constructed around itself. Braying to all who will listen that 
it is the very purpose of human history, the middle class has the unmitigated audacity to 
claim itself as the midwife of some half­dozen Enlightenment values – liberty, 
democracy, tolerance, equality – that time and again it has strangled in the cradle. Under 
the purview of this ignoble illusion all that is solid melts into the air; all experiences and 
realities that lie outside of its dictates are passed over for a bland fiction, as lukewarm 
and sickly sweet as spent jism. 
 
Small wonder that Americans are unusually fond of this fantasy. 
 
Middle­class ideology, though occasionally mocked, identified with dead suburban 
landscapes and stultifying mores, nonetheless exercises a pernicious force behind even 
‘liberal’ forces and idea. For American society to almost wholly identify itself as middle 
class, an enormous amount of implicit and explicit violence must be waged in its name, 
both at home and abroad. 
 
We can see this when wars of aggression in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as 
extensive economic exploitation throughout the planet, are honeyed up as “spreading 
democracy”. Believe it or not, structuring other societies for the horrendous inequality 
that America made famous does not create just or peaceful communities. The middle class 
foists itself on lands and peoples it considers empty and valueless, and subsequently is 
truly blind to their well­being. Thus for decades despotic regimes can ritualistically 
exploit their people, even murder several human rights workers, assisted in no small part 
by generous aid and weapons packages – but if a democratic government seeks to curtail 
American corporations, watch the fuck out! 
 
Identification of the middle class as the norm, as the indisputable baseline for 
society, profoundly distorts and undermines a substantive political process. The most 
obvious effect is the stigmatization and legalized exclusion of poor and minority voices. 
Thus when white middle­class individuals represent their interests, it is seen as  
democracy­in­action, the pinnacle of political participation, allowing a great wave 
of self­congratulation to sweep o’er the land. Conversely, when oppressed people organize 
for change, their access to the halls of power is not only obstructed but denounced, such 
that candidates who meet with them are accused of “passing out entitlements”, alleged 
freebies understood to come out of middle­class checkbooks. ACORN, the largest 
organization of working people in the United States, makes such a great whipping boy 
that the right has taken to invoking them constantly as a bogeyman. Of course, while the 
middle class gnashes its teeth about uppity poor people, they easily overlook the collusion 
between politicians and elite industrial players – after all, only the poor engage in class 
warfare. 
 
But the middle­class mindset is simultaneously destructive for those who buy into 
it. One stands immobile between capital and labor, not just unwilling to pick sides but 
positively joyous in one’s complacency. Personal and social security are assumed but 
ultimately foundationless, and so anxiety becomes the constant background noise to one’s 
existence. Having broken itself off from the working class so forcefully, the middle class 
fetishizes affluence and the affluent, and as such defends a cutthroat social structure in 
exchange for a vanishingly small chance of joining their ranks.  
 
And yet beyond this pipe dream capitalism offers precious little protection against 
falling into the grips of poverty. So precariously perched, but so dutifully committed to its 
ideology, the middle class plugs its ears and soothes itself with mantras of self­adoration, 
repeating over and over how they have earned their position, that it is their work ethic 
alone that provides them with comfort and privilege. Naturally, faith in material 
possessions as the measure of merit leads the middle class to deny, whitewash, even justify 
the harsh and pervasive realities of racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression. 
Absurdly, the conservative “tea parties” and rallies against the Obama administration, 
funded by far­right groups and populated with stolid middle­class stock, are being covered 
as legitimate political expression, and not the death cry: “My privilege! Please don’t erode 
my precious privilege!” 
 
Attacking middle­class ideology strikes me as a particularly important cause. After 
all, truly elite power players are few in number, whereas the bearers of the middle class 
standard far exceed them, and enable their misdeeds for little conceivable benefit. For 
these imperial henchmen to be stripped from their masters they must be shocked out of 
their self­congratulatory stupor, rudely awakened from a plasticine reverie to their 
absurd and treacherous collaboration. If we catch them with their hand down their pants, 
only to expose that there was nothing there to begin with – then so be it! 
·· ··
Don’t fall for this bullshit!  Instead, try this… 
Sociology – In terms of political self‑indulgence, SOC is the major 
offender, presumably devoted to world‑changing efforts but more often 
collapsing into mindless faux‑leftist discussion of feelings. The spaciest 
courses lack even the veneer of academic rigor, and your average soc 
paper or class will generally be “theory or model” + “random pop 
culture item/social phenomenon” = “whatever your professor said.” 
Gordie Fellman’s Marx & Freud, despite the title’s seeming depth, is 
especially noteworthy for its superficiality and inability to engage in 
original thinking; some call it the Bataan Death March of ex‑hippie wank 
sessions. * 
Anthropology – Instead of layering absurd and 
implausible social theories on whatever’s handy, ANTH 
actually seeks to explicate the intimate workings of human 
societies past and present. Unlike SOC’s trite & cliché 
appropriation of all things Buddhist, ANTH respects and 
seeks experience of non‑Western cultures in a way that 
decenters American myopicism. Richard Parmentier in 
particular is a bad ass motherfucker. *(One of our authors 
loves Soc, but still agrees with everything written there.) 
International & Global Studies – Besides serving as a crutch for the 
non‑profit industrial complex (pg8), IGS  is a virtually incoherent field 
for palliating Western guilt over exploitation of the Global South; 
academia’s own colonization program. 
History (of Ideas) – Great mental exercise for thinking 
theoretically. Hulliung, despite some problematic sexism, 
is plugged into radical modes of thought. 
Economics / Business – Justifying exploitation and calling it a field of 
study? The sheer audacity of the capitalist system knows no bounds! 
Health: Science, Society & Policy – A bit of econ, but 
with the important context that makes it human. 
Creative Writing – Have any great writers emerged from a creative 
writing program? Seminars rarely, if ever, achieve anything more than 
giving the biggest mouths (and the worst writers) the chance to bloviate 
on how their clumsy, trite stories and poems are soooo Nietzschean. On 
the other hand, if you’d like to start a heroin addiction, people in this 
major will think you’re soooo edgy and let you nod off in class. 
English – While not exceptionally radical, the department 
is very open to Marxist, postmodern, and other 
revolutionary theories. Although readings are plentiful, 
seeing your professor artfully put down that obnoxious 
blabbermouth is totally worth it. 
American Studies – Really? Like we don’t know enough about America 
that we have to narcissistically give ourselves degrees in it? Just smoke a 
bowl and read Gravity’s Rainbow. 
Women’s & Gender Studies / African and African‑
American Studies – Learning  lessons from the 60s – pay 
attention SOC!. 
Yiddish – You will not get laid with this degree.  Art History – You will get so much ass it hurts. 

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In the past 60 years there’s been a whol e lot of
both Globali zation and Neoliberalism.
It's a confusing fucking thing which means a lot of things, so here
we're just going to t alk about
(not liberal as in 'democrat')
By Unstuck
A poli tical-economic-mili t ary syst em that invol ves the world bank, the imf, the wto, secret mili t ary support ed
coups, “free (t o st arve) t rade, ” a global t rade syst em that is perpetuating that world hunger you always hear about.

How to begin to approach the subj ect mat t er?

Pret end you run a small f arm in a developing count ry. You hear about this free t rade agreement or these
st ructural adjustment programs going down. A year l at er, the f arml and in your count ry has been mono-cropped,
indust ri ali zed, t aken over by foreign corporations, and is put ting you and a lot of old l aborers out of business. Sure, i t's
much more effici ent (so much more effici ent that there are now thousands of unemployed f armhands) but is i t reall y
helping the communi t y? Especi all y wi th all those pesticides and soil damage? Maybe this t ransi tion was rather f ast? A
li t tl e unprepared?

There was the promise that this awesome agreement or adjustment program would creat e jobs (perhaps to offset
the many jobs i t dest royed – maybe they were jobs doing what now seems like make-work, but at l east they paid bills, at
l east one had money, at l east one could afford food) and indeed i t has: More export jobs. These are in the middl e of the
ci t y. To survi ve, your f amil y must l eave the home i t’s inhabi t ed for hundreds of years (but can no longer find work in) to
the ci t y, which they find flooded wi th the unemployed. The compani es could pay more, but every company is paying rock
bot tom wages to workers in third world free t rade count ri es, so to st ay “competi ti ve” the company also has to pay them
low wages.

Low wages are the order of the day in the count ry: workers are desperat e for some jobs, and so is the count ry's
government: i f they set the l abor st andards too high, the company will just migrat e to a more fl exibl e count ry – so
count ri es wi thout lots of assets for corporations must sell themsel ves very very low to compensat e for all the jobs they've
lost through the effici enci es of the global economy. That's their “competi ti ve advant age” - their abili t y to work for penni es
when the coff ers of Nike, The Gap and such hold billions. The chamber of commerce t ypes in l arger indust ri ali zed count ri es
puff themsel ves up about how they are creating jobs in your count ry (which to the day haven't come close to making up
for all the jobs immedi at ely lost through the border opening, bringing running wat er to new areas of the ci t y (whil e
poisoning and buying up vast t racts of previousl y inhabi t ed rural f arml and). The wonders of the competi ti ve free market is
at i t again as mul ti-billion doll ar int ernational corporations pul veri ze small local businesses into sand. And onl y some of the
displ aced get to work for what is now the onl y business in town. The government must st and idly by – i t must participat e in
the neo-liberal int ernational economy. It knows who i ts peopl e's new mast er is.

But there’s still hunger, and there are a coupl e new reall y good jobs, but of the f ew jobs that are creat ed most of
them are not that great. Why? Peopl e cannot buy food because they have no money. Peopl e cannot get money because
despi t e their work ethic or creati vi t y, they cannot get a job because of the high effici ency of a global production chain
which doesn’ t need them (at some point the question must be asked “can we reall y count this as effici ent?”) Wi th so many
peopl e competing for so f ew jobs and the l aws the way they are, workers have li t tl e to no l everage. The rising tide was
supposed to raise all boats but inst ead i ts capsi zed the small ones.

There are some serious probl ems at pl ay wi th the current syst em. I encourage before you get all in a huff about i t,
or beli eve everything I say here, or beli eve all the bullshi t your economics t eacher will load you wi th about how the
neocl assical model of economics is a dogma to t ake wi th you to the grave, you read up a li t tl e bi t on i t, on not just the
abst ract numbers and theori es of neoliberalism, but the actual experi ences of workers on the ground being aff ect ed by
this policy. I may not have an answer, there may not be one cl ear answer. It's not as simpl e as bl ack and whi t e, communism
or capi t alism. But our current t rade syst em is all about corporat e profi ts, and i ts a whol e lot of broken. It's something to
think about.

for fucks sake know your enemy
by jesus h christ
Factory Farms
There are few greater hells on earth than the factory farm and the accompanying dis-assembly line of the industrial
slaughter house. Factory farms (also known by the industry label “confined animal feeding operations”) operate by tightly packing
thousands of animals indoors, restricting their mobility, and denying their natural social behaviors to produce the highest amount of
flesh and product at the lowest cost and as quickly as possible. Their large nature makes them more able to secure the attention and
favor of regulatory bodies, and this, along with their intense economies of scale have combined to destroy the ‘family farm’ further
emptying our rural areas, while their systemic inhumane treatment of animals creates psychological issues for the workers on the
front lines. This high density of animals has the effect of increasing infectious disease (hear of swine flu?) and other maladies,
which necessitates antibiotics as other labor-intensive treatment is often forgone. The growth hormones and selective breeding used
to increase production speed have the effect of crippling animals whose bones often cannot take the weight of the unnatural load of
flesh. The vast, concentrated quantities of excrement require processing, and with limited regulation, it is often poured onto fields
as “fertilizer” when it in reality it over-saturates the fields and runs heavily into the watershed. Automation necessitates that the
animals are grain fed as opposed to grass fed, thereby increasing the load on the crop supply and the accompanying ecological
destruction. Note: if you consume eggs or milk from factory farms, you contribute to the slaughter of animals as well, for when a
chicken or cow’s production slacks they are killed; further, calves (for whom the milk is intended) are weaned off at an early age (so
that we can drink their milk) and male calves are confined to cages for months until there are slaughtered for veal, a product which
would not be economical to produce if not subsidized by milk consumption.

“~ Complexes” and the Military-Industrial Complex
“~ Complexes” are used to describe configurations of politics, capital, and government that are self-perpetuating and that
vastly affect the course of economic, political, and social development. And, along with altering the landscape of power, they
change people’s perception of themselves in the world as people become accustomed to new situations and circumstances – with
forms come norms. The military-industrial complex (MIC) is arguably the most prominent, powerful, and dastardly of these, and
provides a useful model for their functioning.
The warfare industry, by creating political action committees (PACs), foundations, think tanks, industry groups, and so on,
craft policies, do media work, and otherwise craft favorable social conditions. They provide support for politicians favorable
towards enacting policies that increase military spending, which in turn provides greater profit and power for the warfare industry.
This combined with the relative autonomy of the Pentagon, and the numerous personal connections between the warfare industry,
politicians, and the military (how many politicians and war-industry heads are retired service-members?), strengthens the cycle
further. This results in semi-state entities, motivated by profit rather than a sensible military policy (if such a thing can be
conceived). However, this isn’t to say that only the warfare industry is culpable, nor that all employees of the warfare industry are
equally conscious of their role as they work for their day’s wage. The autonomy of the various military and intelligence branches
allow for them to argue for more funding and self-perpetuation. A recent interesting twist on this is as ‘terrorists’ (indeterminate,
anywhere) are The Enemy, we get a militarization of the homeland! All together, this ensures that we have a permanent war
economy where the U.S. government funds over half of the military expenditure on the planet!
Further, the research funded through military contract largely remains in the hands of the private industries (universities are
no stranger to this). The effects of this are pervasive, and profits gained in the civilian market further strengthen the means of the
warfare industry. Consider Raytheon, a company headquartered in Waltham and world’s largest producer of guided missiles. After
WWII Raytheon’s research into radar technology produced methods for creating microwaves, which led to the commercial
development of microwave ovens. A side point of this is that the same companies that manufacture weapons also market civilian
uses for these technologies, and so the same company that makes your lethal toxin also makes your toxic pesticide.

Prison-Industrial Complex
Like the above MIC, the PIC now operates as a sector of society that is largely self perpetuating. During the last 50 years,
the simultaneous rise of “tough on crime” politics and public officials screaming for privatization has resulted in the creation of a
prison industry. As an industry this includes private prison service contractors, police, public prosecutors, construction firms
specializing in prisons, surveillance technology companies, prison guards unions, and local gov’t that seeks money for federal
prisons. Motivated on the premise of increasing profit and armed with the ability to manipulate social conditions favorable to its
growth, the prison industry is unable to focus on providing meaningful rehabilitation. Consider mandatory minimum incarceration
sentences for nonviolent crimes, California’s Three Strikes policy, and the War on Drugs, as policies either created or furthered
through the efforts of the PIC. While affecting only a small percentage of the budget, the increased presence in our communities,
felt as either the absence of a loved one or the possibility of arrest, cannot be dismissed. This has resulted in the U.S. having the
highest rate of incarceration in the world; despite having only 5% of the population, the U.S. holds 25% of the world’s prisoners.
Our prison population has risen so rapidly that many of our prisons are grossly overcrowded and industry’s response is modular
prison cells, streamlining production and installation. Finally, the similarity between MIC and PIC is striking as both are
ideologically premised upon the idea that the only means by which peace is achieved are through total annihilation of any possible
enemy. Fire to the prisons.


Non-Profit-Industrial Complex
To be sure, this one strikes dear to the heart of the establishment Left, as ensconced in non-profit structures: think tanks,
foundations, 501(c)(3)s, and so on. While in the above complexes, the non-state actors advocate reform to benefit themselves, the
reform action of the NPIC results in the exclusion of mass movements outside of the non-profit structure, thereby ensuring the
continued dominance of the NPIC. Despite the mass-movement legacy of the 60s and 70s, the non-profit model, the 501(c)(3), has
became the dominant model for social change organizing, largely due to the rise of foundations, changes in tax codes, and the ‘ease’
of getting grant money. As above, forms create norms, and so possibilities outside of the non-profit structure are not pursued. The
dependence upon grant money (largely funded through philanthrocapitalists who have attained their wealth by through social
inequity) means that some strategies, positions, and tactics will not be tenable as the threat of grant-pulling is constant. Further, this
style of organization directs activist energies into career-based modes of organizing instead of more volatile mass-based
organizations – additionally, who gets excited about grant proposals – and encourages social movements to adopt hierarchical and
capitalist structures instead of challenging them. While the PIC overtly represses dissent, the NPIC manages dissent and brings it
into a state sanctioned apparatus. While we know a lot of people at Brandeis lurv the NPIC, may we acknowledge that there are
some problems in running dissent, advocating for social justice, and providing social goods as a business?

Propaganda Model of the Media
The myth of the liberal or anti-establishment media is unfortunate. We’ve reached a point where, simultaneously, the
media establishment has lauded itself into somnambulance, endlessly congratulating itself on its watchdog role, while horrific
crimes and social problems are either distorted into victim-blaming or ignored altogether. Media independence is wholly illusory;
rather, to gain a better perspective on how the objective news is produced, we can conceive of a series of filters between real events
and how they’re reported. The biggest filter, of course, is concentrated media ownership: the major news outlets in print and on air
are owned by multinational corporations, and therefore spin the news to promote their economic agenda. The widespread reliance of
news media on advertising as a source of funding adds additional economic interests laundering news content. Another filter is an
ingrained pro-establishment bias. Government, military, and business institutions are perceived as major newsmakers because they
maintain truly astounding media operations, and in order to ensure access to these sources of news reporters do all they can to
mollify them. If these bodies are dissatisfied, they (as well as ideological think-tanks and non-profits, often corporate-funded)
produce great reams of ‘flak’ or negative responses to news articles; not only does this set up an often false dichotomy, that both
sides have a legitimate case, it also results in censored, neutered stories and reduced future coverage. Together, these filters serve to
channel news reporting into acceptable, generally harmless pathways, which reduces if not eliminates possible challenges to elite
powers.

Ed. By INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence
The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex
By Michael Edwards
Just Another Empire
By G. William Domhoff
Who Rules America: Power, Politics, and Social Change
By Eric Marcus
Meat Market
by Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky
Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of Mass Media

(By las­j) You've probably already learned a lot of this even if you’ve just been  
here for a week; maybe we can brighten the corners if you missed something 
 
Branvan 

 
here is the Waltham Branvan’s path. The 
campus van goes to the circle stops. 
The Waltham van goes to all stops in 
the order below and a couple more if you 
ask specifically. The vehicles look 
identical, you can ask the driver 
whether it’s Waltham or campus van 
 
 Campus runs every 15 min. from 8am to 
midnight; Waltham every half hour from 
4p to 2a. Waltham gets full and often 
runs late at busy times like friday 
nights and early at slow times. Both 
vans drop off and pick up only at 
specific stops.  If you are not at one of 
these stops, the BranVan will likely 
not stop for you. If the driver doesn't 
know ahead of time to stop somewhere, 
he might not even drive by the stop. For 
a pick up on either van: Call ahead to 
reserve up to 4 seats (@ 781­73(6­4999)) 
and wait at the stop you told them 
you'd be at.
 
  Be polite to the driver & 
the coordinator – if the van is full and 
the driver doesn't let you on, it's 
because they don't want to get fired.  
Btw, Waltham van does the charles 
river run after going through Waltham. 
A  North / Rabb steps 0 min  J  Epstein    CampusVan: Mods    Main and Moody   
B  Heller School    K  commuter Rail    CampusVan: East    Train station   
C  H­Lot  1 min  L  Grad/Charles Rvr    The 99  12  Asian Grill  20 
D  Spingold  2  M  J­Lot  10  Walgreens    Lizzy’s   
E  Admissions    N  567 South    Bank of America    Moody & Maple   
F  The Main Gate  3    Gosman    Hannafords, CVS  15  Moody and High  25 
 
Traveling To Boston 
 
The Brandeis Boston shuttle
 
(1 or 2 crystal buses) runs every 1.5 hrs Thurs­Sun 
evenings. Free, close to your dorm, and runs the latest. After leaving campus it 
detours to Harvard square (25 min.) before traveling and stopping at the Mass 
Ave./Beacon St. crossroads (45 min. after start). To board, stand around at Rabb or 
H­lot on time and the bus will stop for you, unless it’s already full and you’re at H­
Lot (rarely happens). The bus leaves 6pm on thursday, and leaves last at 1:30am. 
Likewise, on Friday and Saturday, first departure is 3:30, last one is 2am. Sunday, first 
departure is 12:30, last one is 9:30pm.(times for shuttle listed out fully at [ 
http://tinyurl.com/krmxlh ] ) 
#70/#70a T Bus,is 2
nd
 
 
best in price ($1.50), not as easy to get to as shuttle or rail, and takes about 
as long as the shuttle, it runs every twenty minutes during most of the day, every day.  
Inbound: Catch the 70 weekdays at Main St. bus stops (going toward Moody), or everyday at 
Waltham square’s bus stop. Many buses begin even closer: take the forest path north of H­lot or 
the one through J­lot, walk down Harland or Thornton road, respectively, take a right onto 
cedarwood, and the bus stop is at the first big intersection.  
 
The 70­bus goes to Cambridge Central Square, which is on Mass Ave. You can walk/take the #1 bus 
south on Mass Ave. to get into Boston proper. Or enter the subway (red line) from 
there. The bus stop for the outbound 70 is a bit hidden (go from central sq. down 
magazine st. and take a left on green st. and there’s the bus stop). The last 
outbound 70 is at midnight each night.  Schedule should be printed ahead of time, 
find it @  [ http://tinyurl.com/625vcq ]… select the right day of week. 
 
commuter rail is more expensive ($4.75 1­way), but cheaper than a taxi, and runs 
straight into downtown. Goes thru to Porter Square (from which you can take the 
red line quickly to many places), and ends at North Station (from where you can 
take the green and orange lines). The schedule: [ http://tinyurl.com/m8e8vo ]. The 
commuter rail stop (Brandeis/Roberts) is basically on the way to the Charles River 
Apartments (grad), take campus Van to it or take a right as you’re leaving 
Brandeis’ main entrance and you’ll see a railroad pretty soon. The inbound 
platform is across the railroad. The rail runs every 1 to 3 hours during daytime. 
YO! Radical Privilege Check 
By Lulu Luxembourg 
 
Hopefully, if you chose to devote your time and mental energy to pick your way through this disorientation guide you’ve got 
radical inclinations. So, unlike the gleefully ignorant bourgeois consumers who are just here to inherit their dad’s dealerships, 
you’re on the right path to leaving school with the burning desire and ability to overthrow capitalism, sabotage patriarchy, 
upend racism, and in general subvert the dominant paradigm.  
 
But wait! Don’t pat yourself on the back just yet! Just because you eat vegan or have an Obama sticker on your laptop doesn’t 
make you a radical. Being vaguely in line with progressive ideas is all well and good, but to be radical by definition requires 
us to strike at the root of injustice. And you can’t start hacking away at the roots until you take a cold, hard look at yourself to 
see how you fit into just those systems of domination. 
 
One useful way to start this self‑examination is through the prism of privilege. Privilege refers to the unearned, often‑invisible 
powers and gifts bestowed upon those of the dominant sectors of society – for this reason, we can speak of white privilege, 
male privilege, able‑bodied privilege, and so on. For individuals from these dominant groups, privilege confers considerable 
resources to them that dispossessed individuals are denied – resources that dominant individuals come to see as ‘naturally’ 
theirs, denying the possibility that they have them largely because others are denied. 
 
Like what, you may ask? 
 
!  White privilege means, among other things, that when people discuss “our civilization” or our “national heritage”, 
they’re referring almost exclusively to whites.  
!  Male privilege means, among other things, that men can drive poorly, fail a math test, or overdraw on their checking 
account, and their actions will be seen as entirely their own. 
!  Heterosexist privilege means, among other things, that heterosexuals never need to fear that they will be insulted, 
assaulted, or even killed simply because of their sexual orientation.  
!  Christian privilege means, among other things, that Christians can expect to have their specific values and religious 
traditions exalted as ‘normal’, even within such secular activities as a political election.  
!  Able‑bodied privilege means, among other things, that the able‑bodied (or temporarily abled) never need to worry 
that public accommodations and services won’t be accessible to them.  
!  Class privilege means, among other things, that upper and middle‑class individuals have access to a whole range of 
institutions which bolster their economic position. This goes beyond education – superior knowledge of elite cultural 
norms and social networks gives upper‑class individuals a huge boost in the job market, implicitly excluding people 
of more moderate means. 
 
…and so on. Notice that, even in this very limited selection of examples, privilege bestows benefits on the dominant group by 
excluding, alienating, and even visiting violence upon oppressed individuals. A more in‑depth look at what privilege entails 
can be found at www.amptoons.com/blog/files/mcintosh.html. 
 
Privilege forms the backbone of any oppressive system which seeks to position itself as ‘normal’. This makes privilege very 
problematic from a liberal perspective – liberals rarely, if ever, acknowledge the reality of privilege, instead (for instance) 
pointing out the numerous ways they oppose racism and befriend people of color. (lconservatives are, of course, beyond 
hope). While opposition to oppressive systems is important, without a sincere acknowledgement of the ways that even well‑
meaning progressives are entangled in them, it’s impossible to confront them. And without this confrontation, we find 
progressive organizations and movements led almost exclusively by upper‑class white men, a situation which shuts out 
minority voices and needs. 
 
What privilege also allows us to do is firmly upend the common understanding of what oppression constitutes. Far too often, 
people assume that it is equivalent to prejudice or bias, ignoring the structural components that more ingrained, more 
widespread, and do the worst damage. This is problematic because we’ve reached a point where discrimination or oppression 
is only recognized as such when difference is highlighted, such as the use of racial slurs or homophobic violence. Not 
recognizing how these are part and parcel with wider systems of oppression, and not the whole shebang, enables the power 
structure to continue dominating people and prevents our ability to dismantle them. 
 
While I’ve only listed a few examples of privilege, it’s vital to keep in mind the immense violence that an ingrained system of 
privilege wreaks. If you want to fight dominant systems, it’s imperative that we recognize how systems of privilege enable 
and maintain the social divisions which allow oppressive –isms to do their dastardly work. Racism, sexism, homophobia, and 
other oppressive hierarchies aren’t just mean words that can be fixed in the course of an after‑school TV special. Unless you 
can acknowledge that oppression structures the lives and realities of oppressed individuals, in ways that can be invisible to 
dominant individuals, you can’t make serious on any threats of liberation. 
 
Privilege checking is a critical self‑examination that, while necessary from time to time, should never devolve into a soupy 
morass of guilt and lethargy. If you can see how you benefit or are harmed by an oppressive system, simply by your 
membership in a category, that’s your cue to do something about it! 
 
Some more Privilege 101s: 
http://www.prisonactivist.org/archive/cws/sharon.html 
http://academic.udayton.edu/race/01race/Whiteness00.htm 
http://www.amptoons.com/blog/archives/2006/09/26/a‑list‑of‑privilege‑lists/ 
http://academic.udayton.edu/RACE/05intersection/   



Bonus Section!
On places to explore
By Edward Callahan

Like all myths, Brandeis has forgotten chapters; relics that lie around waiting for someone to recognize that there are
spaces outside of the trodden path. Here are some of the best ones deserving of illumination.
! The Fall home to that boozy trap for freshman girls known as the “The Disco Tent,” Sachar woods offers tried and
untried paths, trees for the needy, quiet, a brook, a farmland that has been fallow for a half century, and other
treasures.
! The water tower by Rabb didn’t always have a fence around it (with barbed wire? fuck that fence!). Even so, I
recommend checking it out at night – the view from top of the hill overlooking the city lights below is matched by
none, save that from the tops of the buildings on campus.
! Tops of buildings. The new science center is the tallest. Shapiro Campus Center looks terrible from high above.
! The old pumping station. Note: not Brandeis property so the cops might not be as nice. ;D
! Can you find: the small unused room in a humanities building with gorgeous graf on the walls?
! Go with friends when on illicit exploration of the night-time science complex, It is possible to enter the closed
science library at night without detection. Though I don't know why you'd want to. Unless, y'know, you were trying
to prove something.
! The railroad tracks. What’s more romantic?
! Mt. Feake Cemetery! Graves + Charles River + Trees = beautiful place after dark. Not Brandeis property.
! At one time, the castle was the university, and no space inside was left empty. But, as maintenance looks less
attractive than building anew, the interior rotted away and walkways became fewer. What you’re missing: turrets,
tunnels underneath, roofs above. They’re still there, just lying in wait.
Figure it out. Be prepared. Stay safe.


Why 6.5 billion < 20
Aka we’re going to G20 and want you to come along
By Theograph

I definitely like Unstuck’s piece on neoliberalism, but I think it’s important to get more particular on what the
problems really are, you know why?

This month, the G20 is a-happening. The G20 functions as the collusion of governments of the wealthiest 20
countries of the world against all the poor ones, and well, and the people in general (instead favoring corporate
interests). The G20 functions as the tool by which Neoliberal policy, sometimes thought by those enacting it to be
a positive boon upon the world, sometimes enacted with no such delusions, is coordinated and projected upon
the world. In 1999 the WTO meeting in Seattle was shut down by massive protests a la . 10 years later, we face
our governments working against us and others in the name of the almighty dollar (or Chinese Yuan if you will),
and those entities who hold the most of it. The time has come to fight this and fight for a better vision of the world
–one where everyone has a shot at a good job, a good wage. See the other side of this page to get involved.

But before you protest anything, you need to be prepared to argue clearly and vocally for your viewpoint. Let’s
get you started.

We could have a good world. Honest. We could.
We have a really efficient global production chain. It’s just that it views worker and community needs as an unnecessary cost to be cut. This
is a shame, because all of the basic needs of humanity are provided by global environmentally irresponsible production practices. Efficiency
has risen to the level where, if the infrastructural investments were provided for, even with the current burgeoning population, everyone could
be fed, everyone could be clothed and everyone could have some rudimentary medical care and water.

But free trade policy has been destroying all the jobs, hasn’t been replacing them enough, and hurting the people who do get new
jobs.
To participate in the global economy and not get left in the dust as to having things like computers, free trade agreements demand they cede
to draconian demands which end up washing out all the jobs in what is, relative to the history of that country’s development in a blink of an
eye. You end up with a bunch of people without jobs who can’t eat and can’t get a job because they aren’t needed for jobs producing
anything that a relatively rich person in another country (like nearly anyone in America) might want to buy. That person already has clothes, a
car, the basics. But what more valuables do they need? How to get them to buy more things? In the current system, the solution is
consumerism, and that isn’t working.

The neoclassical model says jobs are going to be created, but that ain’t working.
Rampant consumerism has been neoliberal capitalism's answer so far: get the rich to buy things they don't need and wouldn’t otherwise buy.
Constant advertisements. The constant manufactory of insecurity and assumption that the earth provides us an infinite resource to make
more things and then needlessly dispose of them: a constant engine of consumption and discard and needless consumption again is
neoliberal capitalism's answer to the problems created by its own centralization of production: create artificial production needs to account for
the efficiency. And even with the many problems that has, it still hasn’t created the promised jobs (there are hundreds of good books and
websites to learn more about how and why this system has failed to live up to its promises and alternatives, I’d recommend checking out
foodfirst.org for starters)

Neoliberal policy, in conjunction with the massive unemployment it creates, also makes the jobs workers do have worse.
It's not just the unemployed who can't afford food now –with the advent of a those who do successfully find factory jobs also experience a
decrease in their standard of living relative to their standard of living before the advent of free trade. Another reason for workers' lack of
access to even the most basic goods: the free trade zones and free trade agreements serve to demolish their negotiating power. Even worse
for it is the massive wave of national or localized unemployment these deals by higher ups cause. Because in the same way that countries
must sell themselves low in order to attract any of the few jobs, at all, workers’ ability to organize against the conditions they’re in, or even
find a better job, is compromised by the massive amount of jobless workers they have to work against and the law not being on their side.
Workers are thrown into a position where the employers have all the power over them, and the employers sure make the worst use of it.

First-world governments would have you believe that workers in the third world receive a low wage because their work isn't worth very much.
But factory workers utilizing new technologies are, in many cases, paid less than farmers using older technologies Shouldn't the efficiency
gains in production trickle down to the workers? How does it make sense to ask workers to learn new skills in order to manipulate new
technologies and then pay them less than you would if they hadn't made the effort of attending job trainings and moving house to obtain
factory jobs? Furthermore, in some maquilas, workers' economic output per capita is tens or hundreds of times higher than the wage they're
paid--that is to say, they generate 100 times more money for the corporation they work for than they receive as a wage. Talk about
exploitation. Talk about a rip off.

Tired of humanity being fucked with by big businesses? Fight back.
Workers aren't earning so little because corporations can't afford to pay them--they earn poverty-level incomes because corporations as a
group have chosen not to pay them. If workers in the third world had more negotiating clout with their employers (which is to say, they had
governments willing to fight on their side), they might be able to demand a higher wage. But the governments of the richest countries have
shown themselves to not be working on our side. They’ve made their bed. Now is not the time to let them sleep in it. Come to G20 with me
and others across the nation and let’s shake things up.



Hi. Yeah.
Yeah. Oh, I'm in Pittsburgh
trying to shut down the
globally exploitative
neoliberal system.
Where are you?






COME TO PITTSBURGH
G20 SEPT 22-25TH




Contact Brandeis’ G20 resistance at brandeisVSg20@gmail.com for info
about the brandeis contingent or head out on your own/with your own
group. The cheapest way to get there is either car pooling / bus (which
might be booked). keep your eyes peeled in the coming days.
Check out resistg20.org and otherwise arm yourself with information


E V E N R E V O L U T I ON A R I E S G O T T O E A T

Whi le some may decry the idea of personal choices earning the
l abel of pol i t ical acts, terming i t l i fe-styl ist, the choices that
we make in l i fe are inherent ly pol i t ical as they af fect states of
the wor ld. For example, even i f you eat a diet wi th ingredients
sources f rom at most one hundred mi les away, you st i l l emi t more
greenhouse gasses than i f you eat vegan once a week.

Vegan
Veganism descr ibes the phi losophy of those who have chosen to
eschew as many animal products and animal -exploi tat ive pract ices
f rom thei r l i fe as possible. Thus they exclude: dai ry, f ish, eggs,
vivisect ion (animal test ing), honey, leather, hunt ing, wool, and
fur. Why? Because there is no qual i ty that separates humans f rom
nonhuman animals that is a wor thy basis for moral decision
making, and you wouldn’ t simi l ar ly exploi t your neighbor just
because they’ re less intel l igent than you. Because of factory
farms. Because indust r ial animal agr icul ture as a sector
cont r ibutes 34 percent of greenhouse gas emissions, and is
otherwise dest roying t he pl anet through dest ruct ion of ecosystems.
Because a pl ant based diet has been shown to be heal thier than the
Standard Amer ican Diet. However, this does not mean that al l
vegans love PETA or agree on al l of the par t icul ars.

Post­Veg 
This author can f ind no respect for the “post -vegetar ian” as an
ideologue. Cer tainly there are many val id cr i t icisms of vegs,
par t icul ar ly wi th regard to considerat ions of non-indust r ial and
local agr icul ture. However, t he idea that as we must ki l l to
survive, we may as wel l ki l l animals is r idiculous. Whi le we may
never know the sent ience of pl ants, i f we raise animals to eat, we
par take in thei r ki l l ing of pl ants. If we take this ethic
ser iously, we might as wel l ki l l your parents for ‘ f ree’-range
human(e) meat!






 
Fregan 
Freeganism takes many of the considerat ions of veganism, whi le
also adding a cr i t ical analysis of par t icipat ing in a capi tal ist
system. If you consume products that were otherwise going to end
up in a l andf i l l, you do not cont r ibute to thei r product ion.
Common pract ices: dumpster diving, shopl i f t ing, and f inding f ree
food. In a suburban area such as Wal t ham, the supermarkets and
restaurants throw away otherwise heal thy food because a sel l -by
date has passed or people won’ t buy i t because there’s a more
appeal ing copy r ight next to i t. Despi te l iving in a wor ld where
many go hungry (even on Amer ican st reets), the pract ice dest roying
surplus edible food also keeps pr ices high. Unfor tunately, because
you can create consumers out of an act ive dumpster ing popul at ion
i f you take away the dumpsters, some businesses poison thei r t rash.
If you dumpster, know which businesses use poison, watch out for
smel ly food, and general ly avoid animal products (as they spoi l
faster than veggies). Fun Fact: In Br i ton, dumpster ing is known as
skipping. However, some are f reegan wi thout dumpster ing: be
sneaky.

Fruitarian 
Responding to the cr i t icisms of veggies, f rui tar ians subsist by
at tempt ing to eat as few things that need to die for thei r pl ate,
including pl ants. Frui ts, considered as nuts, grains, f rui ts,
f leshy veggies, and legumes: general ly any par t that may be
removed f rom the pl ant wi thout ki l l ing the whole are fai r game.
Some may not eat the seeds, prefer r ing to pl ant them.

Steal this recipe 
Al r ight cl ass, this recipe is vegan. Good cookies get a C. Freegan
cookies get a B. Freegan cookies that you share wi th everyone else
get an A. Figure i t out.

two cups f lour mix f lour, baking powder, sal t,
two tsps baking powder and chips in a bowl
one hal f tsp sal t in anot her bowl, mix the rest
cinnamon to taste! br ing i t al l together
vegan chocol ate chips make bal ls, pl ace on cookie sheet
one cup brown sugar bake for nine mins at three f i f ty
one hal f cup oi l
one teaspoon vani l l a
one quar ter cup water
GEN'L ADVICE – The social scene

by Debord and Weber and Shruggin’ Shaun

Competition

My first year here, people were so competitive. Everyone was trying to make the best friends, go to
the best parties (though no one knew what the best parties were), do the coolest things (but everyone
disagrees what that is). In a small college, it's easy to maintain the illusion that there really is a game
going on, with winners and losers. There's too many students here with too many interests; social
hierarchies don't really work. If someone tries to establish that they're too cool for you, you can
always just walk away and hang out with someone else. Your time is better spent just going for your
interests or whatever catches your eye rather than trying to win some imaginary game. What was it
that glossy magazine adbusters says about individualism? “Rethink the cool”?

friends

During your freshman year, you'll make a lot of sorta-friends with people you might not normally
expect, just to bring some stability to your life. This is natural and fine. A lot of people with whom
you feel you have nothing in common grow to be really close friends as college goes on. Some you'll
invariably drift away from. Make the best of it by keeping an open mind, learning a lot, and involving
people who look bored of sitting around in their dorm.

Making friends a couple different ways helps you out. Do more than just hang out with the people on
your hall, or the people in your chem class. Take initiative and branch out in several directions. Learn
to say hi to strangers, make groups on your own. It'll expand your horizons, it'll give you options, it
will give you more flexibility in your personal life, and if you get too caught up with drama with one
group of friends, you can back off for a while without being totally isolated.

On relationships... Quality time is a wonderful thing that you have all of adulthood for. Now is your
only chance to be a college student and to try all the things that are much easier to try during college
(sports, music, crazy adventures). Friends, studies and activities are all nice things, and if you get all
caught up in a relationship, it's easy to lose touch with those things.

Long- distance relationships

The general water cooler talk you've heard is that 80 or 90% of the long-distance high school
relationships eventually fell apart (often without anyone 'new' on the side) – many times the person
involved felt they really had something going and were really trying to make it work. Well, it's true.

Why does this happen? I've heard this explanation “a LDR carries all the rules and responsibilities of a
relationship but only 10% of the fun.” No physicality, no eating dinner together, no getting to look into
their eyes, doing work together, playing with their hair. But that's the best parts.

This is not to brush dust on the earnestness of your affection for your long-distance S.O. Or say your
relationship can't work – I know maybe one or two people who are still in a relationship from High
School. But consider being open to other relationships, especially during these turbulent years…
change is a positive and natural thing, not an admittance of failure.

drugs!

If you do them or don’t do them, respect and take care of yourself, know your shit, don’t get in over
your head, and keep a loving eye on the people around you. If you do hallucinogens, you’ll likely have
a shitty trip if you do them when: you’re feeling depressed, just because you can, to prove you can, or
are in uncomfortable settings. Recognize that $ and obligations can turn friendships sour, which is
stupid. Would drugs be as popular in a consumer society if you didn’t have to pay for ‘em? Find out.
For a good resource in general on drugs, check out http://www.erowid.org/

 
EN V I R ON MEN TA LI STS:   St e p   u p   t h e   g a me !  
By Sandia 
Just a couple things to think about… 
 
 
RECYCLING. 
 
 Recycling's a bit of a scam, ain't it? Cause like, it seems like we've forgotten about those other two 'R's, reduce and re­use, right? You 
need all three. 
 
For example, you can recycle a coke bottle, but you're still left with the problem that coke makes so many coke bottles. They're always 
going to make many more cans than they sell, and unless you get 100% of people recycling, make more than can will recycled (even if 
all the cans get sold!). Because they're making so many many coke bottles, they're still going to make millions of pounds of new 
petroleum­based plastics.  And the production process of billions of coke bottles, even if all of them are from recycled material, is still 
hugely destructive. That bottle's got to be shipped to the recycling plant, melted down, shipped to a manufacturing plant, re­
manufactured into a product, and shipped back to the consumer's area. Gas, coal­based electricity, by­products, pollutants. 
 
Trying to get a handle on processing our garbage is nice, but I think all the nice processes in the world can't keep up with the river of 
garbage we're making. We don't need to be taking in and disposing of so much *stuff* all the time.  
 
Why is the only 'R' we remember recycling? Because the idea is super profitable to giant companies. Companies promote ‘green 
consumer behavior’ like crazy. Recycling makes us think we can buy as much as we want as often as we want without problems. We 
are told on every billboard, tv thirty­second spot, magazine ad­page, and all over the web the doubletalk that one saves the 
environment by buying more things. Often marketers don't even need to pay to convince us, environmentalist types will market the 
“green” products themselves, becoming more corporate cheerleader for the slightly­less­evil than someone who is really working 
towards understanding and changing the problems affecting our planet. Try not to fall into the trap of making so many “practical” 
compromises that you actually volunteer for the devil. 
 
Breaking the consumption cycle and figuring out how to get more out of things we already have short­circuits the over­production of 
tens of thousands of things we find ourselves better off without. Less need, less want, less brand­slave, more independence. DIY is 
where it’s at. 
 
CONSCIOUS CONSUMERISM : It doesn’t work! 
 
Why? 
 
A. It's prohibitively expensive. 
 
Corporations can take advantage of economies of scale courtesy of their massive power.  For example, to get a specialized product 
(organic food) from a specialized dealer (organic food processors) who works with specialized producers (farmland tenants and their 
employees) and only be able to sell that product to a specialized audience (people who will pay extra for organic food, as because of the 
other specializations, they can't afford to sell it to people who won't) will cost a lot more money per item sold than selling a food which 
is produced in mass (GMO corn) to be sold to the masses from any of several huge dealers who work with or are gigantic producers of 
the same good.  
 
B. Guess who controls the farms, food processors, and grocery stores: not you! 
 
Even if you're putting a bunch of that old­fashioned consumer pressure on stores, it's really up to them to change. Who owns the 
farmland, the trucks, the stores, the processing plants? As long as they have the cost advantage (see #A) Cargill has a guaranteed 
revenue stream and can simply choose to not sell organic and simultaneously keep the prices of organic high. That's consolidation and 
anti­competitive trusts for ya. 
 
C. Conscious consumerism is not concerted enough 
 
Back when boycotts worked, they worked because they were concerted, visible efforts, which got lots of people involved at the same time around a 
single issue. 
 
Conscious consumerism is the opposite. It's a bunch of people vaguely and uncoordinatedly making haphazard, spur­of­the­moment and pseudo­logical 
decisions about what and what not should be bought when. Power in numbers is not exercised effectively 
 
Even if a store­owner wanted to please his conscious customers, (that is, assuming we're talking about a store where the owner has a level of control 
over the merchandise, which these days is probably not the majority), he would have no idea where to begin. A drop in sales might mean any number of 
things.  People may have stopped liking the product, may object to animal experimentation, they might object to the worker practices, and so on. They 
can't tell whether the environmentalists will come back tomorrow and buy that soap after all. You may think you're influencing them through your 
purchasing decision, but they don't really have any numbers on what might be best to carry – they have to work with guesses (the only reliable 
difference is that you are providing funding to a different company). 
 
For conscious consumerism to be powerful, it requires more clarity, coordination, and communication than that. 
 
D. Nobody knows what's cool anymore 
Rules are usually a bad thing, but there are some places that they can be undoubtedly good: health codes, pollution laws. Toxic waste restrictions… 
While there should definitely be more leniencies for small businesses, etc., there shouldn't be any mercy for corporate giants. There are some places that 
they can be undeniably good: health codes, pollution laws, toxic waste restrictions… whether the rules are enforced by direct community action, or by a 
govt that may or may not work for the people. A lot of environmentalists seem to love the government, seeing it as the only counterweight to corporate 
power – as if you can only choose between distant unaccountable masters.  May we remember that we can shut down coal plants as a community in 
many ways if we decide that that is what we want to do.  In either case we should have rules in place and they should be good and change­able rules.
 
Free enterprise types will argue “oh, why have rules: if there's a problem, the free market and capitalism will solve it. If people don't 
want BGH in their milk, they just won't buy it. Why regulate? Why make choices for them?” 
 
There are times where the choice to be made is relatively obvious, but that the choice requires information which most consumers 
cannot easily get.  They already find themselves without the ability to make the decisions they might like to make. The free market 
can't work as it should here; this is where rules have to step in.  
 
If toxicologists and other chemists calculate a healthy standard for pesticide limits, why not use it? Or when a bunch of scientists are 
publishing papers showing that the artificial hormone a company is injecting into their cows stays in that cow's milk, and the milk then 
greatly increases the rate of human cancer, and that earlier government and industry studies had purposely covered up that important 
data, perhaps it would be more appropriate to have an FDA that wasn't chilling with Monsanto. Times like that, government regulation 
are appropriate. Honestly, if some consumers really wanted cancer­milk, maybe it should be legal to operate a small­time cancer­milk 
farm, just like it's legal to use small amounts of drugs in many countries. But if we take it as a given that most people don't like getting 
cancer, why should it be legal to sell cancer­milk to people without telling them it'll give them cancer, or without providing an 
affordable alternative? 
 
Another problem with the Austrian school folk: it's not just a consumer decision at the counter, because you don't get the full story at 
the counter about a product’s environmental record. Perfect theoretical capitalism and the free market depend on the open flow of 
information and peoples' ability to make informed choices about what they're buying. A lot of people don't have the time or capacity to 
find the information and adhere to all its sticking points: this is exactly why regulation is necessary. 
 
If I’m working a ten hour day, with a bad job, I won’t always have money to pay for the right products (see letter A) or live in the 
proximity to a store that sells them. Beyond that it's a pain in the ass for me to keep track of all the things it's okay or not okay to buy 
this week and why.  To do it right requires several hours of unpaid work each week searching about which farming company has been 
the most evil recently and researching the conduct of every other corporation you buy from. Do you want to have to do that all the 
time? For each and every of the hundreds of companies you buy products from? Which one has a record of sexual harassment, which 
one has the longest list of workers rights abuses, which one uses the most deadly chemical byproducts in its industry. Why should I 
have to learn every detail about farm processing and which is a healthy thing to use on corn and which is not? I just want to eat my 
corn, right?  How can you each and every person be expected to keep track of all this stuff? It's not just a pain in the ass, it's impossible. 
   
Again, here's a situation where I would consider conscious consumerism not only unnecessary, but insulting and inappropriate. There 
should be better laws against putting poisons in our air, water, food, and household goods, we shouldn't have to have every American 
jump backwards through a hoop before the companies and the rich kids that run them agree to do something for us. 
 
LIFESTYLE ACTIVISM 
 
And that’s really my biggest complaint. My real problem is that in today's environmentalist movement, the solution is to go up to 
consumers and hold them accountable for industry failure: demanding that individual people change, often at that person's great 
individual expense.  
 
Today's environmentalist groups are overly dependent on this “lifestyle activism” – making individual, personal sacrifices for one's 
cause: using less water, growing one’s own food, printing zines on expensive recycled paper, not using a car, only buying organic food. 
Some problems have always manifested when depending on this strategy. First, lifestyle activism often begins in a position of naïveté as 
to whether this inconvenience is practicable by the majority of people within our society as it is. Not only that, the impact in the light 
of larger structural environmental destruction is questionable – often with things like the environmental movement, it serves as little 
more than a “fashion statement” of how committed you think you are. 
 
There are times when lifestyle activism has valid justifications that don’t involve delusions about its effectiveness. 
 
A. We can’t expect these giant companies and organizations to change if we aren’t also willing to make sacrifices first – it makes us look 
naïve when we can't even bring ourselves to abstain in the product of a system we denounce? 
 
 B. Well, I do it because to me it represents a commitment on my part towards working towards (fixing this problem) so every time I 
(eat vegan/buy organic/bike to work) it reminds me that I need to do what I can to make the earth a livable place. 
 
Both are a step down from “this will save the world.” It won't. Lifestyle activism won't. Especially because it's so often bogged down 
with all this other baggage, including the privilege of the people who can have the time and money to learn about and participate in it. 
Like, a whole culture of superiority over and disdain for the mainstream develops around it which twists and turns the vocabulary and 
ideas until it seems like you'd only want to get involved if you wanted to live exactly like that.  
 
You need to go to people where they are; you need to shape your goals and criticisms in a way they can understand and connect to, but 
that's hard to do when you're expecting that to get involved they have to take on all these new jargon words and cultural things (like 
“GMO” “crop density” “precautionary principal” “terminator seeds” “native plants” or “bourgeois” “lumpen” “alienation” “surplus value” 
­ communists do the same thing, is what I'm getting at).  
 
I guess when it comes down to it, I'm really just tired of a bunch of idiots demanding that EVERY SINGLE INDIVIDUAL must be less 
wasteful before we force a corporation to be less wasteful. Where do they get this attitude that corporate interests constitute some 
special thing inviolate of criticism? You know what's destroying our planet? Not the tupperware I bought to wrap my lunch in. 
ExxonMobil is destroying our fucking planet. If my tupperware is a grain of sand in the eye of mother earth, ExxonMobil isn't just 
throwing the sand, he's also running at her with a friggin' hatchet with plans to tear her purse from her cold dead body.  
 
 
The real problem always comes down to that, as a society, the majority of us have little to no influence over the means of production. 
We are not allowed to decide that from now on all farms are going to be organic, or that there will be no more of this 'dumping poisons 
into waterways' bullshit, or that these old growth trees will not be cut down, because we do not have the legal say in those things. 
Those decisions are controlled by profit thieves and criminals: factory bosses, corporate­types and property owners. 
 
Our masters, if you will. Up until now, many have stayed complacent in the cultural belief that those who have been so irresponsible 
with our resources deserve continued monolithic control. If we can point out who has been slaughtering the planet, why just stand 
there in horror? Why resign to changing our light­bulbs as some expression of futility?  
 
A Brandeis Drug FAQ 
by Alexis de Toquesville
What’s available? 
Brandeis fits into a very snug section of the drug-use-on-campus continuum. The neo-
hippies and semi-beatniks are just wealthy enough to smoke weed on a regular basis, yet 
not wealthy enough to need the existential thrill rides that Harvard students get from 
cocaine, heroin, and crack. About the strongest drugs you’ll encounter at Brandeis are 
magic mushrooms and possibly LSD, but most of your time will be spent with pot. 
 
How much is it? 
My experience with Brandeis has been that the going rate is about $60 per 1/8th ounce 
for weed, and about the same for mushrooms. Occasionally, dealers have been known to 
sell pot brownies for about $5-10 each. 
 
Where should I smoke? 
Smoking indoors is generally discouraged; besides being illegal, it’s a fire hazard and a 
nuisance to one’s neighbors. To smoke inside, you’ll need to ensure that the fire alarm 
won’t go off – although tying a plastic bag around it is effective, doing so is illegal and 
should be removed immediately. Another possibility is to use a ‘spoof’, a cardboard paper 
towel roll stuffed with dryer sheets. Presumably, if you exhale into one of these, the 
smoke is dissipated and rendered less noxious, although a more common result is a room 
with a weird pot-laundry aroma. 
 
Where can I smoke outside? 
Ah, a much better question! There are in fact a number of relatively secluded spots 
around the Brandeis campus that are ideal for undercover drug use: 
•  The North woods are right next to the North Quad parking lot. What makes this 
useful is the big slope downwards from the parking lot, rendering you invisible to passing 
security, and the distance from the houses on South St., which are mostly full of Brandeis 
students getting high anyway. 
•  If you can get into it, the Pirate Lounge is the little shed between East, the 
Castle, and North Quad. So long as you’re fairly quiet, and aren’t seen going in, you’re 
assured a rustic setting for your smoking den. 
•  Between the science buildings on one side, and Brown/Pearlman on the other, there 
is a long no-man’s land of rocks and trees. Besides being very fun to climb on, this area 
offers some very good views of Boston at night – but be careful not to go up there after 
it rains! 
•  The unique design of the Chapels, besides highlighting Brandeis’ commitment to 
tolerance etc. etc., offers several nooks and crannies that are great to light up in.  
•  Sachar Woods is obviously a great place to go, but if you’re not used to it the 
area can be forbidding, especially at night. The two best ways to get there are 1) on the 
Loop Road between the Chapels and Massell Quad, there’s a blue light next to an opening 
in the fence. Take a left through there, go through the playground, and walk into the 
woods. 2) At the front of the International Business School, there’s a series of stairs 
which will take you onto the roof. Take a left, and you can walk right into the woods. 
•  And, if you’re really daring, you can go to the garden behind Jehuda’s office in Irving 
and smoke there at night. 
 
What do I do if I get caught? 
Among other things, be calm, courteous, and don’t run away. Unless they specifically ask 
you for your stuff, don’t give it up – it’s possible they may not have seen it! While BranPo 
are not the regular police, some resources on dealing with police encounters are available 
at flexyourrights.org. 
 
Who can I buy from? 
Sorry, pal – with that you’re on your own. 
GEN'L ADVICE 2 - College life

by Emma G.

grades

While we’d hope that our grades were actually representative of our grasp of the material, we must
recognize that they are the result of a variety of functions, or at the least useful as pedagogical
necessities. Last year, a physics professor from Ottawa was fired after he gave everyone in his class a
passing grade. It was not his job, as he explained later, to rank their skills for future employers, or
train them to be “information transfer machines,” regurgitating facts on demand. Released from the
pressure to ace the test, they would become “scientists, not automatons,” he reasoned. – from the
Globe and Mail

If you're in the sciences and trying to get into a good med or prestigious grad program, I can
understand why grades are still a legit issue of concern. Outside of that, I wanna say, they're not:
Most employers and grad schools ignore your grades. At Brandeis, you can fail a course or withdraw
halfway through (the better option) and you'll be fine. In most cases, it's just a waste to stress about
getting that A. Let it go, cause there is no one you need to impress. Not your parents, not anyone. It's
your life. Feel free to do things you want to do or you feel are useful for you. “Dropping out” is ok!

It's not you, it's campus parties

Big campus parties aren't representative of college parties as a whole – there are many different types.
As a rule, the official giant Brandeis-approved parties like Pachanga or the trisk halloween dance are
loud all over and dark all over. You can't see or hear each other that well and are surrounded by
people and standing or dancing the entire time. There's nowhere to talk or chill or take a break which
isn't a big pain to get to. This doesn't make them bad, this just makes them good for some things,
and not others. People usually go to these kinds of parties to hang out and dance with people they
already know, and not to meet new people. Consider them as social performances or spectacles
where people often go to prove their command over the lexicon of cool, to be seen, and pass through
rituals of age.

Procrastination

Seriously, it’s ok to procrastinate. Just, stop complaining about it. Consider ‘unwanted’
procrastination as a reactive indicator of the amount of stupid shit that our society ‘forces’ us to do.
Did we evolve to spend our days huddled over a bright light and typing, sitting and listening in class,
and otherwise not enjoying ourselves? Also, instead of procrastinating over the internet, do actually
fun and meaningful things and refer to the sections on grades and competition.

Brawkward...

During my freshmen year, I heard everyone complain about how awkward Brandeis was. I heard this
from like every direction. The speaker was clearly the only normal one while everyone else was
awkward. Establishing social hierarchies and dominance? You bet! People often come here from very
different and disagreeing social backgrounds and when you jam them together, you get a lot of
learning and interesting results but also a lot of under-the-water tension, confusion, and conflict. So it
can be awkward.

But college is what you make of it. If you want to sit in your room and listen to techno and study all
day, I guess you'll spend college sitting in your room and listening to techno and studying unless
someone drags you out of it. If you want to spend your time with mary jane on the roof talking about
existentialism, that's what it'll be spent doing. If you want to spend your time playing video games, or
drinking and chilling with your frat brothers, running a show on the radio station, or over-stretching
yourself on a zillion new things, that's what you'll do with it. I once heard someone say “There aren't
any good parties here? Then make the good parties!” and I think that's true: college is what you make
out of it.
T h e R a d i c a l P o s s i b i l i t i e s o f t h e Un i v e r s i t y

In the United States, college is known more as a playground on which students play-act their
revolutionary fantasies than as a staging-ground for truly revolutionary gestures. Yet in other countries—
France, Algeria, Cuba—students have been at the vanguard of revolutions. Why this colossal difference?
One of the explanations has to do with the socioeconomic mix of people that the American
university system engenders. Unlike its state-funded counterparts, the American university system is, in
its idealized Harvard- or Princeton-esque form, the province of polo-clad scions of the privileged classes
rather than an incubator for the talents of the most marginal members of the nation.
But even within an environment where class privilege is such a given that students indulge in
ignorance and binge drinking and then obtain high-paying jobs with i-banking and consulting firms, the
structural features of the university system provide possibilities for radicalism. For starters, the university
is the closest most of us will ever get to communal living: shared meals and bathrooms, shared outdoor
spaces, and public spaces over which we have at least limited ownership. What can we do to radicalize
our shared space?

! Universities are supposed to be about the “life of the mind”: while we’re enrolled in college, the
theory goes, our basic needs are taken care of by others so that we can dedicate ourselves to
intellectual pursuits, learning from each other and from our professors. So why, in the modern
university, do we confine teaching and learning to classroom buildings and devote only a small
portion of our waking hours each week to these activities? Be honest—how much do you actually
learn outside of scheduled class time? For that matter, how much do you actually learn in your
classes? For this to change, we need to recognize students as teachers and teachers as students.
Teach in your classes, teach or attend a Communiversity course, teach on the Great Lawn. Teach
skills, teach a language, “teach” philosophy or poetry.
! Universities aren’t only universities—they’re also part of the university-industrial complex that
takes research funding from the Department of Defense, conducts research to make both weapons
and genetically modified organisms more potent, invests its earnings in companies that practice
corporate terror both in the U.S. and abroad, and funnels its best students toward uncreative and
unfulfilling jobs in the private and public sectors. This means that: 1) if you feel like you just have
to protests something, there are myriad options only a short walk away! 2) You can make change,
or at least stir up some publicity in favor of change, by targeting a participant in oppression over
whom you have direct influence and the subjectivity to demand change. As a paying student who
participates in the daily life of and creation of the university community, you should be able to
exercise a right to full participation. Right now, students aren’t afforded this right. But that
doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be.
! There’s a proletariat here, and it isn’t the students. Changing class relations begins with changing
the way you relate to others. Don’t just treat the custodial, gardening, and dining staff respectfully.
Befriend them, learn from them, teach them what you know, and support them in their campaigns
for justice.
! Brandeis University has two student newspapers, a TV station, a radio station, and about 10
million journals/lit magazines/reviews. Finally, a chance to control the media and its message!
! There are about 4,000 students at Brandeis. Find a way to mobilize them: to buy organic food,
oppose budgets cuts, or canvas for a political candidate.
! Some of the older folk that teach or work at Brandeis did some pretty radical things Back in The
Day. Talk to them. You might learn something, and they might want to become involved in your
own radical activities.
! There’s a lot of money floating around at any university—you just need to convince someone to
give it to you. Use the Community Engaged Learning program as an opportunity to funnel some
money and manpower to Waltham-area struggles for justice and as a way to bring somewhat-
unwilling classmates along for the ride. Use money available to student groups to bring radical
films and speakers to campus. Use internship and research grants to fund individual forays into
above- and under-ground pathways to change.
! Direct your own education! Choose classes that teach you sills for life and revolution. Within
these classes, don’t just follow the syllabus. Every discussion, reading, and assignment should be
a chance to deepen and expand your thinking and to further explore your own ideas.
! Consciously create community. Make sure the community you’re participating in matches the
ideal of the community you want to be participating in. Every day, push it closer toward that ideal.


Surviving the Dining Hall Experience

! Get whichever meal plan maxes out your points. $10 in points? Pathetic.
That won’t even cover the number of times you go over the per‐meal
dollar allotment (does anyone know what these amounts are?). Plus,
after 2 weeks of pizza, Asian chicken wraps, and suspicious sushi,
you’ll be craving frozen Amy’s meals from the POD store.
! Make friends with seniors. If they have kitchens, that’s good,
obviously. But even if they don’t, they can make you alcoholic
milkshakes for dinner whenever you want.
! Use the communal cooking spaces on campus. If you’re sketched out by
the shared pots and spoiled milk in the Polaris kitchen, make the
investment of $15 and buy your own cooking utensils. You can buy them
at Hannaford’s, which you can get to with the Bran van. If there’s a
group of people watching Gray’s Anatomy in Polaris, you can cook in
the Castle or Village.
! Join a cooking co‐op (the Veg*ns may be starting one this year), or
start one with friends. Even if you don’t eat co‐op style every day,
it’s a nice once‐weekly change from the dining halls.
! Join a club that likes to cook or provide people with free food.
! Get free food whenever it’s offered (there used to be a directory of
free food. Anyone remember it?)
! If all else fails, eat out.

HOURS OF BUILDINGS AND SERVICES AT BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY key:
FaII '09 Tear out, fold up, carry around, copy, share. On-Campus 911: 1-781-73(6-3333). or ~
provided by the Disorientation Committee
MON TUES WED THURS FRÌ SAT SUN
Main Library 8:30 ! ~ ! 6p noon ! 6p noon ! ~ CLOSED
Science Library 9 ! 8p noon ! 11p noon ! 11p Closed for the day.
7 ! ~ ! 8p 10 ! 6p 10 ! ~
P.O.D. (New C-store) 9:30 ! 2 ~ ! 11:30 ! 11:30 ! ~
Health Center 8 ! 8p 10 ! 4p 10 ! 4p
Registrar Office 9 ! 5p Card office (downstairs) closes at 4pm CLOSED CLOSED
9 ! 5p Shipping open from 10am-3:30pm CLOSED CLOSED
11 ! ~ ! 10p CLOSED 7p !
8 ! 10:15 CLOSED CLOSED
11:30 ! 2:15p ~ ! 3p ~ ! 3p
4:45p ! 8p CLOSED ~ ! 7p ~ ! 7p
Sherman Breakfast 7 ! 10 8:30 ! ~ 8:30 ! ~
Sherman Lunch/Dinner 11:30 ! 8p ~ ! 7p 10 ! 7p ~ ! 7p
Einstein's Bagels 8 ! 2 ~ ! 4p 11 ! 3p 5p ! ~
The Stein 5p ! 9p 5p ! 0:30 5p ! 5p ! 5p ! 9p
Ollie's Eatery CLOSED CLOSED CLOSED 10p ! 3 10p ! 3 10p ! 3 10p ! 3
Chums 9p ! 1 ~ ! 2 ~ ! 2 open iI booked
4p ! 2 Reserve a seat: 1-781-73(6-4999).
Campus Van 8 ! 2
7 ! 3:40p CLOSED CLOSED
Campus Bus 7:30 ! 4:30p CLOSED CLOSED
Boston Shuttle Departs at & every 1.5 hrs between 6p ! 1:30 3:30p ! 2 3:30p ! 2 12:30 ! 10p
70 Bus (roughly)
Commuter Rail
STAR 2p-4p and 7p-10p CLOSED CLOSED
10p ! 2 1-781-73(6-TALK)
SSÌS noon ! 6p CLOSED 2p ! ~
Same as monday
midn
Gosman midn
midn midn
Mailroom (receiving)
Upper Usdan midn midn
L. Usdan Breakfast
L. Usdan Lunch
L. Usdan Dinner
midn midn
Waltham Van
Watham Bus Leaves every forty minutes from T-Lot (behind spingold)
Leaves every fifteen minutes from Rabb
Last bus to Brandeis: midn. Last bus to Boston: 0:30
Last train to Brandeis: midn (11:20p wkends). Last train to Boston: 11:20p (10:40p wkends)
Crisis Hotline (6-TALK)
We Are Fucking Doomed 
OR 
Sustainable Capitalism?Who the fuck would want to 
sustain capitalism?
OR 
The Audacity of Hopelessness 

Our so-cal led green consciousness doesn’t do shi t to get to the root of
protect ing the planet in any meaningful way. Can we be consumers in a
capi tal ist society and somehow leave a l ivable planet to our offspring? No
mat ter how much Tom Friedman (‘75) may praise market solut ions to ecological
catast rophes in wai t ing, capi tal ism is inherent ly unsustainable. Honest ly,
even i f we somehow make a carbon neut ral economy, we wi l l st i l l be ki l l ing
the planet on a massive scale and most of the world’s populat ion wi l l be
relegated to a l i fe of wage slavery. The world’s fisheries wi l l st i l l be
over exploi ted. Our rural areas wi l l cont inue to be eviscerated for thei r
resources, further poisoning the landscape. Species ext inct ion wi l l cont inue
to be a fact of l i fe, so too wi th ecocide, pat riarchy, homophobia, racism,
etc. unt i l every last acre is a feed lot , shopping mal l , or highway; every
proletariat earns one mi l l ionth the income of the every exec; every free
animal is a slowly dying escapee of a factory farm; and assimi lat ion into
st raight whi te l iberal middle-class society wi l l be complete.

Or , maybe i t won’t happen l ike that . Maybe we’l l find a series of
technological fixes to al low for an atomized society such as ours to cont inue
indefini tely, wi th the al ienat ion and isolat ion overcome through ret reat into
the l imi ted real i t ies of fami ly, video games, sex, the internet , ‘art ,
subcul tural mi l ieu, i rrelevant intel lectual ism, drugs, minor reformism,
myst icism, and pat riot ism. Wi th such dist ract ions, who the fuck needs actual
freedom, radical equal i ty, respect , or wi ld spaces?

Or , perhaps we don’t honest ly face an existent ial threat . If the work of the
compassionate is t riage, and we’re concerned wi th the l imi ts by which we wi l l
cal l our planet unconsciousness and dead, perhaps that which we consider the
moment of death for our planet wi l l pass. Unnot iced. And those that take up
the st ruggle after us wi l l place i t yet later . Drink up. We wi l l never wake,
even as the end of the world passes overhead.

Considering ourselves to be at odds wi th those that are dest roying the planet
and our communi t ies, to date we have won few victories. At our best , we may
have only stopped the bleeding for moments at a t ime, staying the blade just
another minute. So you say we need a revolut ion? Do you honest ly think that
we wi l l be able to pul l ourselves out of the mess that we’re in? Looking
around us, are the condi t ions at al l ripe for any revol t?

Perhaps i t ’s best that we simply

Drop out .

But , we know that we could never go that way. We’d st i l l be persecuted, our
friends would st i l l be inmates, and the dominant cul ture would push out any
wi ld space we exploi t . We may ki l l some of them, but they shal l dest roy al l
of us. Essent ial ly, we are doomed.

Take this understanding to heart and may the feel ing i t gives you, chi l l you
to the core.

An Introduction 
“We l come t o B r andeis” im su r e you’ve hea r d t ha t a mi l l ion t i mes and you’ r e s t i l l no t su r e whe t he r i t means any t h i ng. “How’s co l l ege so fa r ” you’ l l be hea r i ng t ha t one a mi l l i on t i mes t oo. I t ’s ha r d t o ve r ba l ize wha t is a ve r y confusi ng and di f f i cu l t , but a l ways new expe r i ence. And hones t l y, a l o t of peop l e: t ou r guides, OLs, you r p r ofesso r s a r e t he r e t o be op t i mi st ic and won’ t be f r ank wi t h abou t how se r i ous and t r ying i t can be. I t ’s some t h i ng you’ r e go ing t o have t o face up t o on you r own, we’ r e no t gonna l ie. Bu t we’ve w r i t t en t h i s zi ne i n pa r t t o make i t easie r .

AND A Warning 
Bu t we’ve a l so w r i t t en t h i s fo r opposi t e r easons: t o t h r ow you head f i r s t i n t o r ea l i t y. And t ha t i s whe r e we come t o who “We a r e” We shou l dn’ t ex i st . We, t he capi t a l ‘L’ Lef t a t Br andei s. Ye t , we ho l d on t o t ha t r oman t ic idea t ha t an educa t ion is a means t o l i be r a t i on, desp i t e whe r eve r e l se s t a l e c l ass-consc ious r oad maps mi gh t l ead us. We see an educa t ion as mo r e t han just g r ades 13-16, r esume bui l di ng, ne t wo r ki ng, and p l ay t ime. We want co l l ege t o be mo r e t han jus t t he p l ace whe r e mi dd l ec l ass yout hs p l ay a t r ebe l l i on and l ea r n managemen t ski l l s. We a r e f i e r ce, b r ave, and se r ious. Yes, we a r e p r ivi l eged – l e t us use t h i s i nsi gh t t o t ea r apa r t t he wo r l d t ha t r a i ses us up wh i l e l owe r i ng ou r fe l l ows t o a l i fe of co r po r a t e feuda l i sm. Wh i l e you may r idicu l e us in pub l ic, abho r us, t h r ow us i n t he t r ash, we a r e a f r iend who wi l l no t r ejec t you, a map wh i ch wi l l no t fa l t e r when i t becomes unfash ionab l e, a sec r e t conf idant one can go i nt o t he nigh t wi t h. Th i s zi ne, t he f i r st a t B r andei s fo r many yea r s, i s b r ough t t o you t h r ough t he ef fo r t s of t he d is-o r ient a t ion commi t t ee. We come f r om di f fe r en t backgr ounds - i deo l ogica l , expe r ien t i a l , and o t he r wi se - t o b r i ng you a sh i t - t on of wo r ds t o di so r ien t you f r om a cu l t u r e a t wa r wi t h t he p l ane t and t he popu l ace. To t ha t end, t h i s zi ne con t a i ns po l emi c weapons, r ecipes fo r l i be r a t i on, d r eams of fut u r e wo r l ds, and r esou r ces fo r t he t h i r st y. I t a i n’ t ou r f i nest wo r k, bu t we’ r e no t apo l ogiz i ng.

-

The Disorientation Committee
2 3 5 6 7 . . . . This page . . . . War on the Middle Class . . . . Bullshit Majors . . . . The past 60 years . . . . for fucks sake know your enemy . . . . Traveling . . . . Radical Privilege Check . . . . Mental Health at deis . . . . Why 6.5 billion < G20? 15 17 18 21 22 23 25 26 . . . . Revolutionaries Got to Eat . . . . General Advice Pt One . . . . Environmentalists: step up the game . . . . A Brandeis Drug FAQ . . . . General Advice Pt Two . . . . Radical Possibilities of the university . . . . Hours . . . . We Are Fucking Doomed

Contents 

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    However. as well as  extensive economic exploitation throughout the planet. though occasionally mocked. lazy  freeloaders and criminals. identified with dead suburban  landscapes and stultifying mores. immigrants. and subsequently is  truly blind to their well­being. whose mere existence is borderline illegal. nonetheless exercises a pernicious force behind even  ‘liberal’ forces and idea.War on the Middle Class!!  By Diogenes of Sinope  There are a variety of demeaning euphemisms for those people who. even murder several human rights workers. we’re successfully programmed with the nonsensical belief that these ‘little  chiselers’ are the source of our problems – a convenient distraction from the horrific  crimes of the big chiselers telling us this. have committed the ghastly crime of not being wealthy. watch the fuck out!    Identification of the middle class as the norm. For American society to almost wholly identify itself as middle  class. Believe it or not.    We can see this when wars of aggression in Iraq and Afghanistan. are honeyed up as “spreading  democracy”. it is seen as   . Under  the purview of this ignoble illusion all that is solid melts into the air.    Middle­class ideology. The poor (and  by extension racial minorities. structuring other societies for the horrendous inequality  that America made famous does not create just or peaceful communities. and others) get labeled irresponsible.  both at home and abroad. Braying to all who will listen that  it is the very purpose of human history. an enormous amount of implicit and explicit violence must be waged in its name. Thus for decades despotic regimes can ritualistically  exploit their people. nothing could truly equal the masturbatory delusions of grandeur that the  American middle class has constructed around itself. as lukewarm  and sickly sweet as spent jism. if not downright  unpatriotic. tolerance. assisted in no small part  by generous aid and weapons packages – but if a democratic government seeks to curtail  American corporations. equality – that time and again it has strangled in the cradle. The most  obvious effect is the stigmatization and legalized exclusion of poor and minority voices. The middle class  foists itself on lands and peoples it considers empty and valueless.  democracy.  Thus when white middle­class individuals represent their interests. profoundly distorts and undermines a substantive political process. if we wanted to compile a longer and tawdrier list of the absurdities that  we kowtow to. the middle class has the unmitigated audacity to  claim itself as the midwife of some half­dozen Enlightenment values – liberty. Under the noble tutelage of a broken education system and the mass media  echo room.    Small wonder that Americans are unusually fond of this fantasy. as the indisputable baseline for  society. through no  fault of their own. all experiences and  realities that lie outside of its dictates are passed over for a bland fiction.

 ACORN.  funded by far­right groups and populated with stolid middle­class stock. only the poor engage in class  warfare. makes such a great whipping boy  that the right has taken to invoking them constantly as a bogeyman. whitewash. rudely awakened from a plasticine reverie to their  absurd and treacherous collaboration. and as such defends a cutthroat social structure in  exchange for a vanishingly small chance of joining their ranks. For  these imperial henchmen to be stripped from their masters they must be shocked out of  their self­congratulatory stupor. are being covered  as legitimate political expression. not just unwilling to pick sides but  positively joyous in one’s complacency. and so anxiety becomes the constant background noise to one’s  existence.  repeating over and over how they have earned their position. their access to the halls of power is not only obstructed but denounced. whereas the bearers of the middle class  standard far exceed them.     And yet beyond this pipe dream capitalism offers precious little protection against  falling into the grips of poverty. So precariously perched. they easily overlook the collusion  between politicians and elite industrial players – after all. that it is their work ethic  alone that provides them with comfort and privilege. such  that candidates who meet with them are accused of “passing out entitlements”. faith in material  possessions as the measure of merit leads the middle class to deny. the middle class plugs its ears and soothes itself with mantras of self­adoration. the largest  organization of working people in the United States. and other forms of oppression. the pinnacle of political participation. when oppressed people organize  for change. truly elite power players are few in number.  only to expose that there was nothing there to begin with – then so be it!  . allowing a great wave  of self­congratulation to sweep o’er the land. the conservative “tea parties” and rallies against the Obama administration. Of course. Personal and social security are assumed but  ultimately foundationless. After  all. If we catch them with their hand down their pants. One stands immobile between capital and labor. and enable their misdeeds for little conceivable benefit. even justify  the harsh and pervasive realities of racism. Having broken itself off from the working class so forcefully. Conversely. while the  middle class gnashes its teeth about uppity poor people. but so dutifully committed to its  ideology. alleged  freebies understood to come out of middle­class checkbooks.democracy­in­action. sexism.    But the middle­class mindset is simultaneously destructive for those who buy into  it.  Absurdly. the middle class  fetishizes affluence and the affluent. Naturally. and not the death cry: “My privilege! Please don’t erode  my precious privilege!”    Attacking middle­class ideology strikes me as a particularly important cause.

 Treasurer  and Secretary. The  power of the Student Union changes on a yearly basis. but  with the important context that makes it human.      The Union is a government with four branches of power. and your average soc  paper or class will generally be “theory or model” + “random pop  culture item/social phenomenon” = “whatever your professor said. they decide which clubs are ‘worthy’ of receiving Student Union funds. but still agrees with everything written there. The student body elects four of the members­­–President. postmodern.  Yiddish – You will not get laid with this degree. the department  is very open to Marxist. Unlike SOC’s trite & cliché  appropriation of all things Buddhist. Besides their undeniable mandate from their constituents. The President may appoint as many members as he  chooses. Society & Policy – A bit of econ.  seeing your professor artfully put down that obnoxious  blabbermouth is totally worth it. Your Student Union representatives control this massive budget and distribute  the funds to clubs.  .      The second least useful branch is the Student Union Senate. trite stories and poems are soooo Nietzschean.000 of union money).000. ANTH  actually seeks to explicate the intimate workings of human  societies past and present. The Senate also directs a budget of roughly $10. The primary function of  the Union Judiciary is to settle election disputes; they do this getting the parties involved to dress up in suits.”  Gordie Fellman’s Marx & Freud. SOC is the major  offender.  Economics / Business – Justifying exploitation and calling it a field of  study? The sheer audacity of the capitalist system knows no bounds!  Creative Writing – Have any great writers emerged from a creative  writing program? Seminars rarely. pretend to be lawyers  and argue their case before five people with no qualifications to hear ‘law’ other than maybe some experience in Mock Trial (funded. people in this  major will think you’re soooo edgy and let you nod off in class.Bullshit Brandeis Majors (And the Less­Bullshit Ones) Don’t fall for this bullshit!  Sociology – In terms of political self‑indulgence. achieve anything more than  giving the biggest mouths (and the worst writers) the chance to bloviate  on how their clumsy.  American Studies – Really? Like we don’t know enough about America  that we have to narcissistically give ourselves degrees in it? Just smoke a  bowl and read Gravity’s Rainbow.000.  Health: Science. the Brandeis Student Union Government represents an agent for democratic change in decisions that affect students.  Instead. and activity on campus benefits from student union money. But the other members are appointed by the President.  academia’s own colonization program. They operate in secret and most of their functions are unknown to the student body. Most large universities keep their Senates to under fifteen members. Nearly every club.  incidentally. the Student Union’s main power is funding.)  History (of Ideas) – Great mental exercise for thinking  theoretically. E­Board. is highly mysterious.  Art History – You will get so much ass it hurts.  English – While not exceptionally radical.000 off the top to fund the budget of the  Student Union itself.  but Brandeis allows twenty­two resume­padders to debate for hours over issues of little importance. Richard Parmentier in  particular is a bad ass motherfucker. IGS  is a virtually incoherent field  for palliating Western guilt over exploitation of the Global South. The only  requirement is that it must be a ‘Union Government’ project.    What’s the Student Union. F­Board is the most critical to most  students as they decide just how much money each clubs gets. despite some problematic sexism. skimming approximately $50. presumably devoted to world‑changing efforts but more often  collapsing into mindless faux‑leftist discussion of feelings. They are even more mysterious than E­Board. ANTH respects and  seeks experience of non‑Western cultures in a way that  decenters American myopicism.  is plugged into radical modes of thought. This has caused problems in the past. On  the other hand. with $13. Every  year when you pay your tuition bill you also pay $324 in taxes to the Student Union and $70 to Student Events. Anyway?    Arguably. is  especially noteworthy for its superficiality and inability to engage in  original thinking. some call it the Bataan Death March of ex‑hippie wank  sessions. try this…  Anthropology – Instead of layering absurd and  implausible social theories on whatever’s handy.  simply whether or not they are eligible. Vice­President.000 to Senators’ passion projects. Although readings are plentiful. *  International & Global Studies – Besides serving as a crutch for the  non‑profit industrial complex (pg8).     The third branch. if ever. They don’t decide the amount given. and other  revolutionary theories. The least pertinent branch is the Union Judiciary. if you’d like to start a heroin addiction. The spaciest  courses lack even the veneer of academic rigor.  Women’s & Gender Studies / African and African‑ American Studies – Learning  lessons from the 60s – pay  attention SOC!. the Student Activities  Fee (SAF); this yields a yearly budget of over $1. Their power is to charter and  recognize clubs ­­ that is. depending on the perceived popularity of the President and the strength of  his or her backbone. organizations and other various uses. despite the title’s seeming depth. publication. *(One of our authors  loves Soc. Hulliung.

and there are a couple new really good jobs. on not just the abstract numbers and theories of neoliberalism.” a global trade system that is perpetuating that world hunger you always hear about. It knows who its people's new master is. But our current trade system is all about corporate profits. the imf. The Gap and such hold billions. GLOBALIZATION… It's a confusing fucking thing which means a lot of things. your family must leave the home it’s inhabited for hundreds of years (but can no longer find work in) to the city. But there’s still hunger. It's something to think about. Sure. it's much more efficient (so much more efficient that there are now thousands of unemployed farmhands) but is it really helping the community? Especially with all those pesticides and soil damage? Maybe this transition was rather fast? A little unprepared? There was the promise that this awesome agreement or adjustment program would create jobs (perhaps to offset the many jobs it destroyed – maybe they were jobs doing what now seems like make-work. but of the few jobs that are created most of them are not that great. It's not as simple as black and white. industrializ ed. at least one had money. There are some serious problems at play with the current system. You hear about this free trade agreement or these structural adjustment programs going down. they cannot get a job because of the high efficiency of a global production chain which doesn’t need them (at some point the question must be asked “can we really count this as efficient?”) With so many people competing for so few jobs and the laws the way they are. People cannot get money because despite their work ethic or creativity. at least one could afford food) and indeed it has: More export jobs. and so is the country's government: if they set the labor standards too high. Why? People cannot buy food because they have no money. or believe everything I say here. you read up a little bit on it. The rising tide was supposed to raise all boats but instead its capsiz ed the small ones. secret military supported coups. A year later. taken over by foreign corporations. but at least they paid bills. I may not have an answer. so to stay “competitive” the company also has to pay them low wages. I encourage before you get all in a huff about it. the company will just migrate to a more flexible country – so countries without lots of assets for corporations must sell themselves very very low to compensate for all the jobs they've lost through the efficiencies of the global economy. These are in the middle of the city.their ability to work for pennies when the coffers of Nike. and is putting you and a lot of old laborers out of business. and its a whole lot of broken. the farmland in your country has been mono-cropped. Low wages are the order of the day in the country: workers are desperate for some jobs. The wonders of the competitive free market is at it again as multi-billion dollar international corporations pulveriz e small local businesses into sand. there may not be one clear answer. The chamber of commerce types in larger industrialized countries puff themselves up about how they are creating jobs in your country (which to the day haven't come close to making up for all the jobs immediately lost through the border opening. communism or capitalism.In the past 60 years there’s been a whole lot of both Globalization and Neoliberalism. workers have little to no leverage. so here we're just going to talk about NEOLIBERALISM… A political-economic-military system that involves the world bank. “free (to starve) trade. bringing running water to new areas of the city (while poisoning and buying up vast tracts of previously inhabited rural farmland). the wto. That's their “competitive advantage” . (not liberal as in 'democrat') By Unstuck . or believe all the bullshit your economics teacher will load you with about how the neoclassical model of economics is a dogma to take with you to the grave. but the actual experiences of workers on the ground being affected by this policy. The companies could pay more. How to begin to approach the subject matter? Pretend you run a small farm in a developing country. To survive. but every company is paying rock bottom wages to workers in third world free trade countries. The government must stand idly by – it must participate in the neo-liberal international economy. which they find flooded with the unemployed. And only some of the displaced get to work for wha t is now the only business in town.

This has resulted in the U. and with limited regulation. public prosecutors. Prison-Industrial Complex Like the above MIC.S. calves (for whom the milk is intended) are weaned off at an early age (so that we can drink their milk) and male calves are confined to cages for months until there are slaughtered for veal.S. craft policies. a product which would not be economical to produce if not subsidized by milk consumption. anywhere) are The Enemy. thereby increasing the load on the crop supply and the accompanying ecological destruction. the research funded through military contract largely remains in the hands of the private industries (universities are no stranger to this). and the War on Drugs. political. and the numerous personal connections between the warfare industry. prison guards unions. After WWII Raytheon’s research into radar technology produced methods for creating microwaves. California’s Three Strikes policy. This results in semi-state entities. and provides a useful model for their functioning. and local gov’t that seeks money for federal prisons. industry groups. However. Consider Raytheon. nor that all employees of the warfare industry are equally conscious of their role as they work for their day’s wage. The autonomy of the various military and intelligence branches allow for them to argue for more funding and self-perpetuation. This high density of animals has the effect of increasing infectious disease (hear of swine flu?) and other maladies. This combined with the relative autonomy of the Pentagon. the U. restricting their mobility. and otherwise craft favorable social conditions. A recent interesting twist on this is as ‘terrorists’ (indeterminate. they change people’s perception of themselves in the world as people become accustomed to new situations and circumstances – with forms come norms. and social development. and dastardly of these. and profits gained in the civilian market further strengthen the means of the warfare industry. which necessitates antibiotics as other labor-intensive treatment is often forgone. and denying their natural social behaviors to produce the highest amount of flesh and product at the lowest cost and as quickly as possible. felt as either the absence of a loved one or the possibility of arrest. construction firms specializing in prisons. While affecting only a small percentage of the budget. The military-industrial complex (MIC) is arguably the most prominent. motivated by profit rather than a sensible military policy (if such a thing can be conceived). the prison industry is unable to focus on providing meaningful rehabilitation. it is often poured onto fields as “fertilizer” when it in reality it over-saturates the fields and runs heavily into the watershed. which led to the commercial development of microwave ovens. and so on.S. concentrated quantities of excrement require processing. and the military (how many politicians and war-industry heads are retired service-members?). As an industry this includes private prison service contractors. politicians. the PIC now operates as a sector of society that is largely self perpetuating. having the highest rate of incarceration in the world. . do media work. further. by creating political action committees (PACs). Automation necessitates that the animals are grain fed as opposed to grass fed. foundations. A side point of this is that the same companies that manufacture weapons also market civilian uses for these technologies. Their large nature makes them more able to secure the attention and favor of regulatory bodies. and so the same company that makes your lethal toxin also makes your toxic pesticide. the simultaneous rise of “tough on crime” politics and public officials screaming for privatization has resulted in the creation of a prison industry. and government that are self-perpetuating and that vastly affect the course of economic. holds 25% of the world’s prisoners. while their systemic inhumane treatment of animals creates psychological issues for the workers on the front lines. police.for fucks sake know your enemy by jesus h christ Factory Farms There are few greater hells on earth than the factory farm and the accompanying dis-assembly line of the industrial slaughter house. powerful. as policies either created or furthered through the efforts of the PIC. the increased presence in our communities. cannot be dismissed. despite having only 5% of the population. and this. “~ Complexes” and the Military-Industrial Complex “~ Complexes” are used to describe configurations of politics. for when a chicken or cow’s production slacks they are killed. Factory farms (also known by the industry label “confined animal feeding operations”) operate by tightly packing thousands of animals indoors. And. along with altering the landscape of power. this ensures that we have a permanent war economy where the U. The warfare industry. you contribute to the slaughter of animals as well. think tanks. government funds over half of the military expenditure on the planet! Further. which in turn provides greater profit and power for the warfare industry. They provide support for politicians favorable towards enacting policies that increase military spending. Consider mandatory minimum incarceration sentences for nonviolent crimes. During the last 50 years. capital. this isn’t to say that only the warfare industry is culpable. a company headquartered in Waltham and world’s largest producer of guided missiles. we get a militarization of the homeland! All together. Motivated on the premise of increasing profit and armed with the ability to manipulate social conditions favorable to its growth. The growth hormones and selective breeding used to increase production speed have the effect of crippling animals whose bones often cannot take the weight of the unnatural load of flesh. along with their intense economies of scale have combined to destroy the ‘family farm’ further emptying our rural areas. strengthens the cycle further. The effects of this are pervasive. The vast. Note: if you consume eggs or milk from factory farms. surveillance technology companies.

While in the above complexes. We’ve reached a point where. this one strikes dear to the heart of the establishment Left. While we know a lot of people at Brandeis lurv the NPIC. which reduces if not eliminates possible challenges to elite powers. while horrific crimes and social problems are either distorted into victim-blaming or ignored altogether. William Domhoff Meat Market By Eric Marcus Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of Mass Media by Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky . rather. the reform action of the NPIC results in the exclusion of mass movements outside of the non-profit structure. Politics. endlessly congratulating itself on its watchdog role. neutered stories and reduced future coverage. generally harmless pathways. these filters serve to channel news reporting into acceptable. the media establishment has lauded itself into somnambulance. to gain a better perspective on how the objective news is produced. and tactics will not be tenable as the threat of grant-pulling is constant. we can conceive of a series of filters between real events and how they’re reported.Our prison population has risen so rapidly that many of our prisons are grossly overcrowded and industry’s response is modular prison cells. is concentrated media ownership: the major news outlets in print and on air are owned by multinational corporations. not only does this set up an often false dichotomy. of course. streamlining production and installation. Despite the mass-movement legacy of the 60s and 70s. Finally. the 501(c)(3). largely due to the rise of foundations. who gets excited about grant proposals – and encourages social movements to adopt hierarchical and capitalist structures instead of challenging them. this style of organization directs activist energies into career-based modes of organizing instead of more volatile mass-based organizations – additionally. that both sides have a legitimate case. Government. Fire to the prisons. and the ‘ease’ of getting grant money. forms create norms. By INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence Just Another Empire By Michael Edwards Who Rules America: Power. the NPIC manages dissent and brings it into a state sanctioned apparatus. Media independence is wholly illusory. the non-profit model. the similarity between MIC and PIC is striking as both are ideologically premised upon the idea that the only means by which peace is achieved are through total annihilation of any possible enemy. positions. If these bodies are dissatisfied. 501(c)(3)s. and in order to ensure access to these sources of news reporters do all they can to mollify them. foundations. and therefore spin the news to promote their economic agenda. The biggest filter. Non-Profit-Industrial Complex To be sure. The dependence upon grant money (largely funded through philanthrocapitalists who have attained their wealth by through social inequity) means that some strategies. The widespread reliance of news media on advertising as a source of funding adds additional economic interests laundering news content. they (as well as ideological think-tanks and non-profits. Another filter is an ingrained pro-establishment bias. advocating for social justice. and so on. and Social Change By G. Together. As above. While the PIC overtly represses dissent. and business institutions are perceived as major newsmakers because they maintain truly astounding media operations. and providing social goods as a business? Propaganda Model of the Media The myth of the liberal or anti-establishment media is unfortunate. may we acknowledge that there are some problems in running dissent. the non-state actors advocate reform to benefit themselves. and so possibilities outside of the non-profit structure are not pursued. Further. as ensconced in non-profit structures: think tanks. has became the dominant model for social change organizing. often corporate-funded) produce great reams of ‘flak’ or negative responses to news articles. The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex Ed. simultaneously. it also results in censored. changes in tax codes. thereby ensuring the continued dominance of the NPIC. military.

 unless it’s already full and you’re at H­ Lot (rarely happens). and runs the latest.5 hrs Thurs­Sun  evenings. first departure is 3:30. close to your dorm. Waltham gets full and often  runs late at busy times like friday  nights and early at slow times.  find it @  [ http://tinyurl.  he might not even drive by the stop. not as easy to get to as shuttle or rail.com/krmxlh ] )    #70/#70a T Bus. and runs  straight into downtown. After leaving campus it  detours to Harvard square (25 min. stand around at Rabb or  H­lot on time and the bus will stop for you. The schedule: [ http://tinyurl. CVS  15  Moody and High  25    Traveling To Boston  The Brandeis Boston shuttle(1 or 2 crystal buses) runs every 1.75 1­way).  here is the Waltham Branvan’s path.(times for shuttle listed out fully at [  http://tinyurl. Both  vans drop off and pick up only at  specific stops. Many buses begin even closer: take the forest path north of H­lot or  the one through J­lot. to get into Boston proper. down  magazine st. and takes about  as long as the shuttle.is 2nd best in price ($1.  The Waltham van goes to all stops in  the order below and a couple more if you  ask specifically.) before traveling and stopping at the Mass  Ave. the BranVan will likely  not stop for you. The bus stop for the outbound 70 is a bit hidden (go from central sq. The vehicles look  identical. after start). from 8am to  midnight; Waltham every half hour from  4p to 2a.  Schedule should be printed ahead of time. and ends at North Station (from where you can  take the green and orange lines).  If you are not at one of  these stops. take a right onto  cedarwood. last one is 2am. Goes thru to Porter Square (from which you can take the  red line quickly to many places).     Inbound: Catch the 70 weekdays at Main St. For  a pick up on either van: Call ahead to  reserve up to 4 seats (@ 781­73(6­4999))  and wait at the stop you told them  you'd be at. or everyday at  Waltham square’s bus stop.50).     The 70­bus goes to Cambridge Central Square. take campus Van to it or take a right as you’re leaving  Brandeis’ main entrance and you’ll see a railroad pretty soon. but cheaper than a taxi. Waltham van does the charles  river run after going through Waltham. The bus leaves 6pm on thursday. walk down Harland or Thornton road. The  campus van goes to the circle stops. The last  outbound 70 is at midnight each night. Free. and there’s the bus stop). You can walk/take the #1 bus  south on Mass Ave. first  departure is 12:30. bus stops (going toward Moody).  Be polite to the driver &  the coordinator – if the van is full and  the driver doesn't let you on.  A  B  C  D  E  F    (By las­j) You've probably already learned a lot of this even if you’ve just been   here for a week; maybe we can brighten the corners if you missed something    Branvan  . To board. which is on Mass Ave. respectively.  North / Rabb steps 0 min  J  Epstein    CampusVan: Mods    Main and Moody    Heller School    K  commuter Rail    CampusVan: East    Train station    H­Lot  1 min  L  Grad/Charles Rvr    The 99  12  Asian Grill  20  Spingold  2  M  J­Lot  10  Walgreens    Lizzy’s    Admissions    N  567 South    Bank of America    Moody & Maple    The Main Gate  3    Gosman    Hannafords. every day. The inbound  platform is across the railroad. and take a left on green st.     Btw.    commuter rail is more expensive ($4.com/625vcq ]… select the right day of week. Sunday. it runs every twenty minutes during most of the day. The rail runs every 1 to 3 hours during daytime. last one is 9:30pm. and the bus stop is at the first big intersection. on Friday and Saturday. crossroads (45 min. Or enter the subway (red line) from  there.  Likewise. it's  because they don't want to get fired. you can ask the driver  whether it’s Waltham or campus van     Campus runs every 15 min.com/m8e8vo ]. If the driver doesn't  know ahead of time to stop somewhere./Beacon St. and leaves last at 1:30am.  . The  commuter rail stop (Brandeis/Roberts) is basically on the way to the Charles River  Apartments (grad).

 For individuals from these dominant groups.    What privilege also allows us to do is firmly upend the common understanding of what oppression constitutes. or even killed simply because of their sexual orientation.  assaulted. but to be radical by definition requires  us to strike at the root of injustice. fail a math test. without a sincere acknowledgement of the ways that even well‑ meaning progressives are entangled in them. among other things.    Like what.html. among other things. that heterosexuals never need to fear that they will be insulted. unlike the gleefully ignorant bourgeois consumers who are just here to inherit their dad’s dealerships. ignoring the structural components that more ingrained. and so on. hard look at yourself to  see how you fit into just those systems of domination. denying the possibility that they have them largely because others are denied.    One useful way to start this self‑examination is through the prism of privilege. even within such secular activities as a political election. among other things. This is problematic because we’ve reached a point where discrimination or oppression  is only recognized as such when difference is highlighted.  they’re referring almost exclusively to whites. that upper and middle‑class individuals have access to a whole range of  institutions which bolster their economic position. or overdraw on their checking  account. even in this very limited selection of examples. if ever. and even visiting violence upon oppressed individuals.  upend racism. Privilege refers to the unearned. among other things. able‑bodied privilege.com/blog/files/mcintosh. Being vaguely in line with progressive ideas is all well and good. (lconservatives are.   !  Christian privilege means. you may ask?    !  White privilege means. privilege bestows benefits on the dominant group by  excluding. This goes beyond education – superior knowledge of elite cultural  norms and social networks gives upper‑class individuals a huge boost in the job market. Notice that. And without this confrontation.   !  Class privilege means. privilege confers considerable  resources to them that dispossessed individuals are denied – resources that dominant individuals come to see as ‘naturally’  theirs.    …and so on. implicitly excluding people  of more moderate means. instead (for instance)  pointing out the numerous ways they oppose racism and befriend people of color. if you chose to devote your time and mental energy to pick your way through this disorientation guide you’ve got  radical inclinations.  people assume that it is equivalent to prejudice or bias.   !  Male privilege means. that when people discuss “our civilization” or our “national heritage”. acknowledge the reality of privilege. a situation which shuts out  minority voices and needs. we find  progressive organizations and movements led almost exclusively by upper‑class white men. we can speak of white privilege. such as the use of racial slurs or homophobic violence.   !  Able‑bodied privilege means. This makes privilege very  problematic from a liberal perspective – liberals rarely. of course. among other things. and do the worst damage. And you can’t start hacking away at the roots until you take a cold. that men can drive poorly.  you’re on the right path to leaving school with the burning desire and ability to overthrow capitalism.    Privilege forms the backbone of any oppressive system which seeks to position itself as ‘normal’. So. sabotage patriarchy. and their actions will be seen as entirely their own.  !  Heterosexist privilege means. often‑invisible  powers and gifts bestowed upon those of the dominant sectors of society – for this reason. more  widespread. Not  . alienating.YO! Radical Privilege Check  By Lulu Luxembourg    Hopefully. among other things. and in general subvert the dominant paradigm. that the able‑bodied (or temporarily abled) never need to worry  that public accommodations and services won’t be accessible to them. Far too often.     But wait! Don’t pat yourself on the back just yet! Just because you eat vegan or have an Obama sticker on your laptop doesn’t  make you a radical. it’s impossible to confront them. beyond  hope).  male privilege.amptoons. While opposition to oppressive systems is important. A more in‑depth look at what privilege entails  can be found at www. that Christians can expect to have their specific values and religious  traditions exalted as ‘normal’.

But. Though I don't know why you'd want to. the castle was the university. sexism. . and not the whole shebang. ! The old pumping station.recognizing how these are part and parcel with wider systems of oppression. If you want to fight dominant systems. What you’re missing: turrets. Be prepared. it’s imperative that we recognize how systems of privilege enable  and maintain the social divisions which allow oppressive –isms to do their dastardly work.edu/race/01race/Whiteness00. They’re still there. enables the power  structure to continue dominating people and prevents our ability to dismantle them. Racism.org/archive/cws/sharon.udayton. Even so. Unless you  can acknowledge that oppression structures the lives and realities of oppressed individuals. that’s your cue to do something about it!    Some more Privilege 101s:  http://www. simply by your  membership in a category. ! The railroad tracks.amptoons. Unless. What’s more romantic? ! Mt. ! The water tower by Rabb didn’t always have a fence around it (with barbed wire? fuck that fence!). Figure it out. it’s vital to keep in mind the immense violence that an ingrained system of  privilege wreaks. save that from the tops of the buildings on campus.” Sachar woods offers tried and untried paths. Not Brandeis property.htm  http://www.    Privilege checking is a critical self‑examination that. should never devolve into a soupy  morass of guilt and lethargy. The new science center is the tallest. as maintenance looks less attractive than building anew. ! The Fall home to that boozy trap for freshman girls known as the “The Disco Tent. tunnels underneath. quiet. Stay safe. Feake Cemetery! Graves + Charles River + Trees = beautiful place after dark.prisonactivist. I recommend checking it out at night – the view from top of the hill overlooking the city lights below is matched by none. you were trying to prove something.udayton. just lying in wait. Shapiro Campus Center looks terrible from high above. relics that lie around waiting for someone to recognize that there are spaces outside of the trodden path. trees for the needy. Note: not Brandeis property so the cops might not be as nice. ! At one time. Brandeis has forgotten chapters. Here are some of the best ones deserving of illumination. the interior rotted away and walkways became fewer.edu/RACE/05intersection/    Bonus Section! On places to explore By Edward Callahan Like all myths. in ways that can be invisible to  dominant individuals. y'know.html  http://academic. and  other oppressive hierarchies aren’t just mean words that can be fixed in the course of an after‑school TV special. and no space inside was left empty. roofs above.    While I’ve only listed a few examples of privilege. homophobia. and other treasures. while necessary from time to time. a brook. you can’t make serious on any threats of liberation. . a farmland that has been fallow for a half century.com/blog/archives/2006/09/26/a‑list‑of‑privilege‑lists/  http://academic. It is possible to enter the closed science library at night without detection. If you can see how you benefit or are harmed by an oppressive system. ! Tops of buildings.D ! Can you find: the small unused room in a humanities building with gorgeous graf on the walls? ! Go with friends when on illicit exploration of the night-time science complex.

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a good wage. or even find a better job. The neoclassical model says jobs are going to be created. The G20 functions as the tool by which Neoliberal policy. sometimes thought by those enacting it to be a positive boon upon the world. See the other side of this page to get involved. in some maquilas. a car. the solution is consumerism. and that isn’t working. you need to be prepared to argue clearly and vocally for your viewpoint. Come to G20 with me and others across the nation and let’s shake things up. everyone could be fed. Even worse for it is the massive wave of national or localized unemployment these deals by higher ups cause. they had governments willing to fight on their side). you know why? This month. But before you protest anything. But the governments of the richest countries have shown themselves to not be working on our side. the basics. The time has come to fight this and fight for a better vision of the world –one where everyone has a shot at a good job. Honest. but I think it’s important to get more particular on what the problems really are. and those entities who hold the most of it. the G20 is a-happening.5 billion < 20 Aka we’re going to G20 and want you to come along By Theograph I definitely like Unstuck’s piece on neoliberalism. free trade agreements demand they cede to draconian demands which end up washing out all the jobs in what is. The constant manufactory of insecurity and assumption that the earth provides us an infinite resource to make more things and then needlessly dispose of them: a constant engine of consumption and discard and needless consumption again is neoliberal capitalism's answer to the problems created by its own centralization of production: create artificial production needs to account for the efficiency. This is a shame. is compromised by the massive amount of jobless workers they have to work against and the law not being on their side. and the people in general (instead favoring corporate interests). We could have a good world. I’d recommend checking out foodfirst. in many cases. . But factory workers utilizing new technologies are. paid less than farmers using older technologies Shouldn't the efficiency gains in production trickle down to the workers? How does it make sense to ask workers to learn new skills in order to manipulate new technologies and then pay them less than you would if they hadn't made the effort of attending job trainings and moving house to obtain factory jobs? Furthermore. Constant advertisements. It's not just the unemployed who can't afford food now –with the advent of a those who do successfully find factory jobs also experience a decrease in their standard of living relative to their standard of living before the advent of free trade. Workers are thrown into a position where the employers have all the power over them. because all of the basic needs of humanity are provided by global environmentally irresponsible production practices. but that ain’t working. It’s just that it views worker and community needs as an unnecessary cost to be cut. Talk about exploitation. it still hasn’t created the promised jobs (there are hundreds of good books and websites to learn more about how and why this system has failed to live up to its promises and alternatives. also makes the jobs workers do have worse. Efficiency has risen to the level where. sometimes enacted with no such delusions. You end up with a bunch of people without jobs who can’t eat and can’t get a job because they aren’t needed for jobs producing anything that a relatively rich person in another country (like nearly anyone in America) might want to buy. But what more valuables do they need? How to get them to buy more things? In the current system.Why 6. Now is not the time to let them sleep in it. First-world governments would have you believe that workers in the third world receive a low wage because their work isn't worth very much. And even with the many problems that has. and the employers sure make the worst use of it. even with the current burgeoning population. Another reason for workers' lack of access to even the most basic goods: the free trade zones and free trade agreements serve to demolish their negotiating power. But free trade policy has been destroying all the jobs. We have a really efficient global production chain. we face our governments working against us and others in the name of the almighty dollar (or Chinese Yuan if you will). and hurting the people who do get new jobs. they generate 100 times more money for the corporation they work for than they receive as a wage. everyone could be clothed and everyone could have some rudimentary medical care and water.org for starters) Neoliberal policy. if the infrastructural investments were provided for. at all. To participate in the global economy and not get left in the dust as to having things like computers. in conjunction with the massive unemployment it creates. 10 years later. In 1999 the WTO meeting in Seattle was shut down by massive protests a la . is coordinated and projected upon the world. workers’ ability to organize against the conditions they’re in. hasn’t been replacing them enough. Rampant consumerism has been neoliberal capitalism's answer so far: get the rich to buy things they don't need and wouldn’t otherwise buy. and well. relative to the history of that country’s development in a blink of an eye. If workers in the third world had more negotiating clout with their employers (which is to say. Talk about a rip off. Workers aren't earning so little because corporations can't afford to pay them--they earn poverty-level incomes because corporations as a group have chosen not to pay them. Tired of humanity being fucked with by big businesses? Fight back. workers' economic output per capita is tens or hundreds of times higher than the wage they're paid--that is to say. they might be able to demand a higher wage. We could. Let’s get you started. That person already has clothes. Because in the same way that countries must sell themselves low in order to attract any of the few jobs. The G20 functions as the collusion of governments of the wealthiest 20 countries of the world against all the poor ones. They’ve made their bed.

keep your eyes peeled in the coming days. Check out resistg20. Oh. I'm in Pittsburgh trying to shut down the globally exploitative neoliberal system.Hi. The cheapest way to get there is either car pooling / bus (which might be booked). Yeah.org and otherwise arm yourself with information .com for info about the brandeis contingent or head out on your own/with your own group. Yeah. Where are you? COME TO PITTSBURGH G20 SEPT 22-25TH Contact Brandeis’ G20 resistance at brandeisVSg20@gmail.

Because a p l an t based die t has been shown t o be hea l t h ie r t han t he S t anda r d Ame r i can D ie t . Fo r examp l e. Because indus t r i a l ani ma l ag r icu l t u r e as a sec t o r con t r ibu t es 34 pe r cen t of g r eenhouse gas emiss ions. f ish. and is o t he r w ise des t r oying t he p l ane t t h r ough des t r uc t ion of ecosys t ems. we may as we l l ki l l an ima l s is r idicu l ous. even i f you ea t a die t w i t h ing r edien t s sou r ces f r om a t mos t one hund r ed mi l es away. Why? Because t he r e is no qua l i t y t ha t sepa r a t es humans f r om nonhuman anima l s t ha t is a wo r t hy basis fo r mo r a l decision making. Because of fac t o r y fa r ms.indus t r i a l and l oca l ag r icu l t u r e. vivisec t ion (anima l t es t ing). honey. Ce r t a in l y t he r e a r e many va l id c r i t icisms of vegs. Thus t hey exc l ude: da i r y. and you wou l dn’ t simi l a r l y exp l o i t you r neighbo r jus t because t hey’ r e l ess in t e l l igen t t han you. t h is does no t mean t ha t a l l vegans l ove PETA o r ag r ee on a l l of t he pa r t icu l a r s. woo l . Post­Veg  Th is au t ho r can f ind no r espec t fo r t he “pos t -vege t a r i an” as an ideo l ogue. Howeve r . eggs. Vegan Veganism desc r ibes t he ph i l osophy of t hose who have chosen t o eschew as many anima l p r oduc t s and an ima l -exp l oi t a t ive p r ac t ices f r om t hei r l i fe as poss ib l e. t he choices t ha t we make in l i fe a r e inhe r en t l y po l i t ica l as t hey af fec t s t a t es of t he wo r l d. you s t i l l emi t mo r e g r eenhouse gasses t han i f you ea t vegan once a week.r ange human(e) mea t !   . t he idea t ha t as we mus t ki l l t o su r vive. i f we r a ise anima l s t o ea t . Howeve r . If we t ake t h is e t h ic se r ious l y. t e r ming i t l i fe-s t y l is t . Wh i l e we may neve r know t he sen t ience of p l an t s.E V E N R E V O L U T I ON A R I E S G O T T O E A T Wh i l e some may dec r y t he idea of pe r sona l choices ea r ni ng t he l abe l of po l i t ica l ac t s. we mi gh t as we l l ki l l you r pa r en t s fo r ‘f r ee’. l ea t he r . and fu r . pa r t icu l a r l y w i t h r ega r d t o conside r a t ions of non. hun t ing. we pa r t ake in t hei r ki l l ing of p l an t s.

inc l uding p l an t s. wh i l e a l so adding a c r i t ica l ana l ysis of pa r t icipa t ing in a capi t a l is t sys t em. because you can c r ea t e consume r s ou t of an ac t ive dumps t e r ing popu l a t ion i f you t ake away t he dumps t e r s. If you consume p r oduc t s t ha t we r e o t he r w ise going t o end up in a l andf i l l . p r efe r r ing t o p l an t t hem. some a r e f r eegan w i t hou t dumps t e r ing: be sneaky. and l egumes: gene r a l l y any pa r t t ha t may be r emoved f r om t he p l an t w i t hou t ki l l ing t he who l e a r e fa i r game. F r ui t s. t wo cups f l ou r t wo t sps baking powde r one ha l f t sp sa l t cinnamon t o t as t e! vegan choco l a t e ch ips one cup b r own suga r one ha l f cup oi l one t easpoon vani l l a one qua r t e r cup wa t e r mix f l ou r . mix t he r es t b r ing i t a l l t oge t he r make ba l l s. shop l i f t ing. sa l t . Some may no t ea t t he seeds. conside r ed as nu t s. t he p r ac t ice des t r oying su r p l us edib l e food a l so keeps p r ices h igh. Howeve r . and ch ips in a bow l in ano t he r bow l . f l eshy veggi es. you do no t con t r ibu t e t o t hei r p r oduc t ion. In a subu r ban a r ea such as Wa l t ham. Unfo r t una t e l y. F r eegan cookies t ha t you sha r e w i t h eve r yone e l se ge t an A. p l ace on cookie shee t bake fo r nine m ins a t t h r ee f i f t y . baking powde r . and f inding f r ee food. f r u i t s. some businesses poison t hei r t r ash. Despi t e l iving in a wo r l d whe r e many go hung r y (even on Ame r ican s t r ee t s). F r eegan cookies ge t a B. Good cookies ge t a C. Steal this recipe  A l r igh t c l ass. Common p r ac t ices: dumps t e r diving. wa t ch ou t fo r sme l l y food. Fun Fac t : In B r i t on. Figu r e i t ou t . t he supe r ma r ke t s and r es t au r an t s t h r ow away o t he r w ise hea l t hy food because a se l l -by da t e has passed o r peop l e won’ t buy i t because t he r e’s a mo r e appea l i ng copy r igh t nex t t o i t . g r a ins. know wh ich businesses use poison. and gene r a l l y avoi d anima l p r oduc t s (as t hey spoi l fas t e r t han veggies). dumps t e r ing is known as skipping. If you dumps t e r . Fregan  Fruitarian  Respond ing t o t he c r i t icisms of veggi es.F r eegan ism t akes many of t he conside r a t ions of vegani sm. t h is r ecipe is vegan. f r u i t a r i ans subsis t by a t t emp t ing t o ea t as few t h ings t ha t need t o die fo r t hei r p l a t e.

just because you can. Learn to say hi to strangers.” No physicality. and involving people who look bored of sitting around in their dorm. drugs! If you do them or don’t do them. Now is your only chance to be a college student and to try all the things that are much easier to try during college (sports. with winners and losers. Long. you can always just walk away and hang out with someone else. do the coolest things (but everyone disagrees what that is). respect and take care of yourself. But consider being open to other relationships. doing work together. and keep a loving eye on the people around you. For a good resource in general on drugs.distance relationships The general water cooler talk you've heard is that 80 or 90% of the long-distance high school relationships eventually fell apart (often without anyone 'new' on the side) – many times the person involved felt they really had something going and were really trying to make it work. studies and activities are all nice things.. check out http://www. If someone tries to establish that they're too cool for you. crazy adventures). make groups on your own. or the people in your chem class. go to the best parties (though no one knew what the best parties were). This is natural and fine.O. and if you get all caught up in a relationship. learning a lot. Friends. Make the best of it by keeping an open mind. This is not to brush dust on the earnestness of your affection for your long-distance S. you'll make a lot of sorta-friends with people you might not normally expect. and if you get too caught up with drama with one group of friends. On relationships. Everyone was trying to make the best friends. Recognize that $ and obligations can turn friendships sour. Would drugs be as popular in a consumer society if you didn’t have to pay for ‘em? Find out. you’ll likely have a shitty trip if you do them when: you’re feeling depressed. not an admittance of failure. which is stupid. people were so competitive. social hierarchies don't really work. to prove you can. Quality time is a wonderful thing that you have all of adulthood for. Well. music. Some you'll invariably drift away from. Your time is better spent just going for your interests or whatever catches your eye rather than trying to win some imaginary game. no eating dinner together.erowid. A lot of people with whom you feel you have nothing in common grow to be really close friends as college goes on. it's true. If you do hallucinogens. But that's the best parts. you can back off for a while without being totally isolated.org/ . it'll give you options. know your shit. Take initiative and branch out in several directions. In a small college. don’t get in over your head. Making friends a couple different ways helps you out. playing with their hair.. There's too many students here with too many interests. it's easy to maintain the illusion that there really is a game going on. It'll expand your horizons. Do more than just hang out with the people on your hall. Why does this happen? I've heard this explanation “a LDR carries all the rules and responsibilities of a relationship but only 10% of the fun. or are in uncomfortable settings. just to bring some stability to your life. no getting to look into their eyes. What was it that glossy magazine adbusters says about individualism? “Rethink the cool”? friends During your freshman year. Or say your relationship can't work – I know maybe one or two people who are still in a relationship from High School. it will give you more flexibility in your personal life. especially during these turbulent years… change is a positive and natural thing.GEN'L ADVICE – The social scene by Debord and Weber and Shruggin’ Shaun Competition My first year here. it's easy to lose touch with those things.

    C. That's consolidation and  anti­competitive trusts for ya. Recycling makes us think we can buy as much as we want as often as we want without problems.     Why is the only 'R' we remember recycling? Because the idea is super profitable to giant companies. and all over the web the doubletalk that one saves the  environment by buying more things. reduce and re­use. right? You  need all three. shipped to a manufacturing plant. it seems like we've forgotten about those other two 'R's. as because of the  other specializations. visible efforts. less want. they're still going to make millions of pounds of new  petroleum­based plastics. It's prohibitively expensive. Less need. by­products. magazine ad­page. environmentalist types will market the  “green” products themselves.  For example. Often marketers don't even need to pay to convince us. That bottle's got to be shipped to the recycling plant. they worked because they were concerted. Try not to fall into the trap of making so many “practical”  compromises that you actually volunteer for the devil. and shipped back to the consumer's area. melted down.  ENVIRONMENTALISTS: Step up the game!  By Sandia  Just a couple things to think about…      RECYCLING. DIY is  where it’s at. becoming more corporate cheerleader for the slightly­less­evil than someone who is really working  towards understanding and changing the problems affecting our planet. it's really up to them to change. they can't afford to sell it to people who won't) will cost a lot more money per item sold than selling a food which  is produced in mass (GMO corn) to be sold to the masses from any of several huge dealers who work with or are gigantic producers of  the same good. less brand­slave. re­ manufactured into a product. Companies promote ‘green  consumer behavior’ like crazy. and unless you get 100% of people recycling. coal­based electricity. more independence.     B.    CONSCIOUS CONSUMERISM : It doesn’t work!    Why?    A. Gas.    . even if all of them are from recycled material.    Breaking the consumption cycle and figuring out how to get more out of things we already have short­circuits the over­production of  tens of thousands of things we find ourselves better off without. tv thirty­second spot. the processing plants? As long as they have the cost advantage (see #A) Cargill has a guaranteed  revenue stream and can simply choose to not sell organic and simultaneously keep the prices of organic high. Guess who controls the farms. pollutants. make more than can will recycled (even if  all the cans get sold!). to get a specialized product  (organic food) from a specialized dealer (organic food processors) who works with specialized producers (farmland tenants and their  employees) and only be able to sell that product to a specialized audience (people who will pay extra for organic food. Who owns the  farmland. We don't need to be taking in and disposing of so much *stuff* all the time.    For example. but I think all the nice processes in the world can't keep up with the river of  garbage we're making. and grocery stores: not you!    Even if you're putting a bunch of that old­fashioned consumer pressure on stores.    Trying to get a handle on processing our garbage is nice. food processors. We  are told on every billboard. but you're still left with the problem that coke makes so many coke bottles. They're always  going to make many more cans than they sell.  And the production process of billions of coke bottles.     Recycling's a bit of a scam. is still  hugely destructive. Because they're making so many many coke bottles.    Corporations can take advantage of economies of scale courtesy of their massive power. you can recycle a coke bottle. Conscious consumerism is not concerted enough    Back when boycotts worked. which got lots of people involved at the same time around a  single issue. the stores. the trucks. ain't it? Cause like.

  Free enterprise types will argue “oh. they might object to the worker practices. which  one has the longest list of workers rights abuses. If people don't  want BGH in their milk.    For conscious consumerism to be powerful.  May we remember that we can shut down coal plants as a community in  many ways if we decide that that is what we want to do. pollution laws. but they don't really have any numbers on what might be best to carry – they have to work with guesses (the only reliable  difference is that you are providing funding to a different company). Do you want to have to do that all the  time? For each and every of the hundreds of companies you buy products from? Which one has a record of sexual harassment. the free market and capitalism will solve it.    D. why should it be legal to sell cancer­milk to people without telling them it'll give them cancer. he would have no idea where to begin. the solution is to go up to  consumers and hold them accountable for industry failure: demanding that individual people change. I won’t always have money to pay for the right products (see letter A) or live in the  proximity to a store that sells them.  In either case we should have rules in place and they should be good and change­able rules. Why should I  have to learn every detail about farm processing and which is a healthy thing to use on corn and which is not? I just want to eat my  corn. or without providing an  affordable alternative?    Another problem with the Austrian school folk: it's not just a consumer decision at the counter. maybe it should be legal to operate a small­time cancer­milk  farm. which these days is probably not the majority). A lot of people don't have the time or capacity to  find the information and adhere to all its sticking points: this is exactly why regulation is necessary. My real problem is that in today's environmentalist movement. coordination. Honestly. why have rules: if there's a problem. toxic waste restrictions… whether the rules are enforced by direct community action. etc. A lot of environmentalists seem to love the government. here's a situation where I would consider conscious consumerism not only unnecessary. assuming we're talking about a store where the owner has a level of control  over the merchandise.. seeing it as the only counterweight to corporate  power – as if you can only choose between distant unaccountable masters. Toxic waste restrictions…  While there should definitely be more leniencies for small businesses. and so on. there shouldn't be any mercy for corporate giants. Perfect theoretical capitalism and the free market depend on the open flow of  information and peoples' ability to make informed choices about what they're buying. pollution laws. They  can't tell whether the environmentalists will come back tomorrow and buy that soap after all. government regulation  are appropriate. The free market  can't work as it should here; this is where rules have to step in. Why regulate? Why make choices for them?”    There are times where the choice to be made is relatively obvious.  People may have stopped liking the product. and the milk then  greatly increases the rate of human cancer.     If toxicologists and other chemists calculate a healthy standard for pesticide limits.    If I’m working a ten hour day. if some consumers really wanted cancer­milk. right?  How can you each and every person be expected to keep track of all this stuff? It's not just a pain in the ass.Conscious consumerism is the opposite.      Again. but there are some places that they can be undoubtedly good: health codes. Nobody knows what's cool anymore  Rules are usually a bad thing. Power in numbers is not exercised effectively    Even if a store­owner wanted to please his conscious customers. You may think you're influencing them through your  purchasing decision. It's a bunch of people vaguely and uncoordinatedly making haphazard. food. and that earlier government and industry studies had purposely covered up that important  data. but that the choice requires information which most consumers  cannot easily get.  To do it right requires several hours of unpaid work each week searching about which farming company has been  the most evil recently and researching the conduct of every other corporation you buy from. Times like that. just like it's legal to use small amounts of drugs in many countries. or by a  govt that may or may not work for the people. spur­of­the­moment and pseudo­logical  decisions about what and what not should be bought when. (that is. we shouldn't have to have every American  jump backwards through a hoop before the companies and the rich kids that run them agree to do something for us. Beyond that it's a pain in the ass for me to keep track of all the things it's okay or not okay to buy  this week and why.    LIFESTYLE ACTIVISM    And that’s really my biggest complaint. it requires more clarity. and communication than that. and household goods. with a bad job. There are some places that  they can be undeniably good: health codes. But if we take it as a given that most people don't like getting  cancer. A drop in sales might mean any number of  things. they just won't buy it. water. perhaps it would be more appropriate to have an FDA that wasn't chilling with Monsanto. There  should be better laws against putting poisons in our air. may object to animal experimentation.   . because you don't get the full story at  the counter about a product’s environmental record. why not use it? Or when a bunch of scientists are  publishing papers showing that the artificial hormone a company is injecting into their cows stays in that cow's milk. often at that person's great  individual expense.  They already find themselves without the ability to make the decisions they might like to make. which one uses the most deadly chemical byproducts in its industry. but insulting and inappropriate. it's impossible.

 Especially because it's so often bogged down  with all this other baggage.     I guess when it comes down to it. as a society.  ExxonMobil is destroying our fucking planet.    Both are a step down from “this will save the world. Not only that. personal sacrifices for one's  cause: using less water. it serves as little  more than a “fashion statement” of how committed you think you are. because we do not have the legal say in those things. If we can point out who has been slaughtering the planet.    A. why just stand  there in horror? Why resign to changing our light­bulbs as some expression of futility?     . Where do they get this attitude that corporate interests constitute some  special thing inviolate of criticism? You know what's destroying our planet? Not the tupperware I bought to wrap my lunch in.    Our masters. the impact in the light  of larger structural environmental destruction is questionable – often with things like the environmental movement. growing one’s own food. printing zines on expensive recycled paper. ExxonMobil isn't just  throwing the sand. Up until now.    There are times when lifestyle activism has valid justifications that don’t involve delusions about its effectiveness. Well. I'm really just tired of a bunch of idiots demanding that EVERY SINGLE INDIVIDUAL must be less  wasteful before we force a corporation to be less wasteful. First.     You need to go to people where they are; you need to shape your goals and criticisms in a way they can understand and connect to. including the privilege of the people who can have the time and money to learn about and participate in it. is what I'm getting at). corporate­types and property owners. the majority of us have little to no influence over the means of production.  We are not allowed to decide that from now on all farms are going to be organic. If my tupperware is a grain of sand in the eye of mother earth. lifestyle activism often begins in a position of naïveté as  to whether this inconvenience is practicable by the majority of people within our society as it is.  Today's environmentalist groups are overly dependent on this “lifestyle activism” – making individual. a whole culture of superiority over and disdain for the mainstream develops around it which twists and turns the vocabulary and  ideas until it seems like you'd only want to get involved if you wanted to live exactly like that.” It won't. or that there will be no more of this 'dumping poisons  into waterways' bullshit. Lifestyle activism won't. if you will. only buying organic food.       The real problem always comes down to that.  Those decisions are controlled by profit thieves and criminals: factory bosses. but  that's hard to do when you're expecting that to get involved they have to take on all these new jargon words and cultural things (like  “GMO” “crop density” “precautionary principal” “terminator seeds” “native plants” or “bourgeois” “lumpen” “alienation” “surplus value”  ­ communists do the same thing. many have stayed complacent in the cultural belief that those who have been so irresponsible  with our resources deserve continued monolithic control. We can’t expect these giant companies and organizations to change if we aren’t also willing to make sacrifices first – it makes us look  naïve when we can't even bring ourselves to abstain in the product of a system we denounce?     B. he's also running at her with a friggin' hatchet with plans to tear her purse from her cold dead body.  Like.  Some problems have always manifested when depending on this strategy. or that these old growth trees will not be cut down. I do it because to me it represents a commitment on my part towards working towards (fixing this problem) so every time I  (eat vegan/buy organic/bike to work) it reminds me that I need to do what I can to make the earth a livable place. not using a car.

 this area  offers some very good views of Boston at night – but be careful not to go up there after  it rains!  •  The unique design of the Chapels. and crack. To smoke inside. and walk into the  woods. be calm. some resources on dealing with police encounters are available  at flexyourrights. besides being illegal. Occasionally.  •  And. which are mostly full of Brandeis  students getting high anyway. The two best ways to get there are 1) on the  Loop Road between the Chapels and Massell Quad. Another possibility is to use a ‘spoof’. Besides being very fun to climb on. and Brown/Pearlman on the other. go through the playground.    Where can I smoke outside?  Ah. and North Quad. Take a left through there. Presumably. dealers have been known to  sell pot brownies for about $5-10 each. if you exhale into one of these. Unless they specifically ask  you for your stuff. and about the same for mushrooms. and don’t run away. and you can walk right into the woods. especially at night. and aren’t seen going in. heroin.A Brandeis Drug FAQ  by Alexis de Toquesville What’s available?  Brandeis fits into a very snug section of the drug-use-on-campus continuum. you can go to the garden behind Jehuda’s office in Irving  and smoke there at night.    How much is it?  My experience with Brandeis has been that the going rate is about $60 per 1/8th ounce  for weed. pal – with that you’re on your own.  •  If you can get into it. doing so is illegal and  should be removed immediately. 2) At the front of the International Business School. but if you’re not used to it the  area can be forbidding. Take a left. the  Castle. it’s a fire hazard and a  nuisance to one’s neighbors.org. you’ll need to ensure that the fire alarm  won’t go off – although tying a plastic bag around it is effective. if you’re really daring. etc. but most of your time will be spent with pot. don’t give it up – it’s possible they may not have seen it! While BranPo  are not the regular police. the Pirate Lounge is the little shed between East. So long as you’re fairly quiet. The neohippies and semi-beatniks are just wealthy enough to smoke weed on a regular basis. although a more common result is a room  with a weird pot-laundry aroma.    What do I do if I get caught?  Among other things.    Where should I smoke?  Smoking indoors is generally discouraged. About the strongest drugs you’ll encounter at Brandeis are  magic mushrooms and possibly LSD. and the distance from the houses on South St.. the  smoke is dissipated and rendered less noxious. there’s a blue light next to an opening  in the fence. rendering you invisible to passing  security.. besides highlighting Brandeis’ commitment to  tolerance etc. a cardboard paper  towel roll stuffed with dryer sheets.    Who can I buy from?  Sorry. yet  not wealthy enough to need the existential thrill rides that Harvard students get from  cocaine.  .  •  Between the science buildings on one side. you’re  assured a rustic setting for your smoking den. What makes this  useful is the big slope downwards from the parking lot. offers several nooks and crannies that are great to light up in. there  is a long no-man’s land of rocks and trees. a much better question! There are in fact a number of relatively secluded spots  around the Brandeis campus that are ideal for undercover drug use:  •  The North woods are right next to the North Quad parking lot. there’s a series of stairs  which will take you onto the roof.   •  Sachar Woods is obviously a great place to go. courteous.

to be seen. “Dropping out” is ok! It's not you. they're not: Most employers and grad schools ignore your grades. Not your parents.” he reasoned. grades While we’d hope that our grades were actually representative of our grasp of the material. I can understand why grades are still a legit issue of concern. not anyone. I once heard someone say “There aren't any good parties here? Then make the good parties!” and I think that's true: college is what you make out of it. that's what you'll do with it. instead of procrastinating over the internet. Feel free to do things you want to do or you feel are useful for you. I wanna say. So it can be awkward. running a show on the radio station. not automatons. The speaker was clearly the only normal one while everyone else was awkward. I heard this from like every direction. There's nowhere to talk or chill or take a break which isn't a big pain to get to. sitting and listening in class. and pass through rituals of age. the official giant Brandeis-approved parties like Pachanga or the trisk halloween dance are loud all over and dark all over. you get a lot of learning and interesting results but also a lot of under-the-water tension. stop complaining about it. During my freshmen year. Let it go.GEN'L ADVICE 2 . Consider ‘unwanted’ procrastination as a reactive indicator of the amount of stupid shit that our society ‘forces’ us to do.. or train them to be “information transfer machines. they would become “scientists. If you want to spend your time playing video games. Just. I guess you'll spend college sitting in your room and listening to techno and studying unless someone drags you out of it. as he explained later. it's just a waste to stress about getting that A. Brawkward. confusion. cause there is no one you need to impress. Consider them as social performances or spectacles where people often go to prove their command over the lexicon of cool. This doesn't make them bad. this just makes them good for some things. – from the Globe and Mail If you're in the sciences and trying to get into a good med or prestigious grad program. do actually fun and meaningful things and refer to the sections on grades and competition.College life by Emma G. But college is what you make of it. You can't see or hear each other that well and are surrounded by people and standing or dancing the entire time. that's what it'll be spent doing. Did we evolve to spend our days huddled over a bright light and typing. . If you want to sit in your room and listen to techno and study all day. Establishing social hierarchies and dominance? You bet! People often come here from very different and disagreeing social backgrounds and when you jam them together.. we must recognize that they are the result of a variety of functions. Last year. People usually go to these kinds of parties to hang out and dance with people they already know. or over-stretching yourself on a zillion new things. It was not his job. As a rule. Procrastination Seriously. I heard everyone complain about how awkward Brandeis was. Outside of that. In most cases. Released from the pressure to ace the test.” regurgitating facts on demand. to rank their skills for future employers. it’s ok to procrastinate. At Brandeis. It's your life. and conflict. and otherwise not enjoying ourselves? Also. it's campus parties Big campus parties aren't representative of college parties as a whole – there are many different types. or at the least useful as pedagogical necessities. or drinking and chilling with your frat brothers. If you want to spend your time with mary jane on the roof talking about existentialism. a physics professor from Ottawa was fired after he gave everyone in his class a passing grade. you can fail a course or withdraw halfway through (the better option) and you'll be fine. and not others. and not to meet new people.

teach them what you know. ! ! ! ! . Unlike its state-funded counterparts. and about 10 million journals/lit magazines/reviews. and abroad.Th e Ra di c a l Po s sibi l i t i e s o f t h e Uni v e r s i t y In the United States. What can we do to radicalize our shared space? ! Universities are supposed to be about the “life of the mind”: while we’re enrolled in college. As a paying student who participates in the daily life of and creation of the university community. or at least stir up some publicity in favor of change. learn from them. do we confine teaching and learning to classroom buildings and devote only a small portion of our waking hours each week to these activities? Be honest—how much do you actually learn outside of scheduled class time? For that matter. Finally. So why. by targeting a participant in oppression over whom you have direct influence and the subjectivity to demand change. and it isn’t the students. and dining staff respectfully. Brandeis University has two student newspapers. Universities aren’t only universities—they’re also part of the university-industrial complex that takes research funding from the Department of Defense. our basic needs are taken care of by others so that we can dedicate ourselves to intellectual pursuits. and support them in their campaigns for justice. For starters. the province of polo-clad scions of the privileged classes rather than an incubator for the talents of the most marginal members of the nation. But even within an environment where class privilege is such a given that students indulge in ignorance and binge drinking and then obtain high-paying jobs with i-banking and consulting firms. in its idealized Harvard. a chance to control the media and its message! There are about 4.or Princeton-esque form. and funnels its best students toward uncreative and unfulfilling jobs in the private and public sectors. Find a way to mobilize them: to buy organic food. invests its earnings in companies that practice corporate terror both in the U. or canvas for a political candidate. in the modern university. Why this colossal difference? One of the explanations has to do with the socioeconomic mix of people that the American university system engenders. the structural features of the university system provide possibilities for radicalism. the American university system is. students aren’t afforded this right. Don’t just treat the custodial. Algeria. There’s a proletariat here. This means that: 1) if you feel like you just have to protests something. Yet in other countries— France. learning from each other and from our professors. Cuba—students have been at the vanguard of revolutions. Teach skills. we need to recognize students as teachers and teachers as students. a radio station. shared outdoor spaces. a TV station. you should be able to exercise a right to full participation. the theory goes. teach or attend a Communiversity course. gardening. the university is the closest most of us will ever get to communal living: shared meals and bathrooms. teach on the Great Lawn. there are myriad options only a short walk away! 2) You can make change. and public spaces over which we have at least limited ownership. oppose budgets cuts. But that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be. teach a language. Befriend them.S.000 students at Brandeis. “teach” philosophy or poetry. Right now. Teach in your classes. Changing class relations begins with changing the way you relate to others. how much do you actually learn in your classes? For this to change. conducts research to make both weapons and genetically modified organisms more potent. college is known more as a playground on which students play-act their revolutionary fantasies than as a staging-ground for truly revolutionary gestures.

Get free food whenever it’s offered (there used to be a directory of free food. or start one with friends. and assignment should be a chance to deepen and expand your thinking and to further explore your own ideas. after 2 weeks of pizza. Use the communal cooking spaces on campus. push it closer toward that ideal. If there’s a group of people watching Gray’s Anatomy in Polaris. Direct your own education! Choose classes that teach you sills for life and revolution. But even if they don’t. that’s good.! ! ! ! Some of the older folk that teach or work at Brandeis did some pretty radical things Back in The Day. Join a cooking co‐op (the Veg*ns may be starting one this year). There’s a lot of money floating around at any university—you just need to convince someone to give it to you. If they have kitchens. Within these classes. Every day. Make friends with seniors. Make sure the community you’re participating in matches the ideal of the community you want to be participating in. Plus. Surviving the Dining Hall Experience ! Get whichever meal plan maxes out your points. which you can get to with the Bran van. You can buy them at Hannaford’s. and suspicious sushi. That won’t even cover the number of times you go over the per‐meal dollar allotment (does anyone know what these amounts are?). and they might want to become involved in your own radical activities. make the investment of $15 and buy your own cooking utensils. obviously. Consciously create community. Join a club that likes to cook or provide people with free food. Even if you don’t eat co‐op style every day. you can cook in the Castle or Village. reading. ! ! ! ! ! ! . Anyone remember it?) If all else fails. it’s a nice once‐weekly change from the dining halls.and under-ground pathways to change. Use money available to student groups to bring radical films and speakers to campus. Asian chicken wraps. they can make you alcoholic milkshakes for dinner whenever you want. eat out. Use the Community Engaged Learning program as an opportunity to funnel some money and manpower to Waltham-area struggles for justice and as a way to bring somewhatunwilling classmates along for the ride. don’t just follow the syllabus. If you’re sketched out by the shared pots and spoiled milk in the Polaris kitchen. Use internship and research grants to fund individual forays into above. $10 in points? Pathetic. you’ll be craving frozen Amy’s meals from the POD store. Every discussion. You might learn something. Talk to them.

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fur ther poisoning the landscape . so too wi th ecocide . or highway. and assimi lat ion into s t raight whi te l iberal middle-class society wi l l be complete . homophobia . Wi th such dis t ract ions . to date we have won few victor ies . Consider ing ourselves to be at odds wi th those that are dest roying the planet and our communi t ies . We may ki l l some of them . every proletar iat earns one mi l l ionth the income of the every exec. minor reformi sm . or wi ld spaces? Or . perhaps that which we cons ider the moment of death for our planet wi l l pass . chi l l you to the core . ‘ar t . Take thi s understanding to hear t and may the feel ing i t gives you . respect . our f r iends would s t i l l be inmates . even as the end of the wor ld passes overhead . Essent ial ly . But . Unnot iced . maybe i t won’ t happen l ike that . At our best . i rrelevant intel lectual ism . and the dominant cul ture would push out any wi ld space we exploi t . pat r iarchy . s taying the blade jus t another minute . even i f we somehow make a carbon neut ral economy . Hones t ly . we are doomed . we may have only s topped the bleeding for moment s at a t ime . who the fuck needs actual f reedom . We’d st i l l be persecuted . raci sm . mys t icism . Species ext inct ion wi l l cont inue to be a fact of l i fe . Maybe we’ l l f ind a ser ies of technological f ixes to al low for an atomized society such as ours to cont inue indef ini tely . unt i l every last acre i s a feed lot . drugs . sex . are the condi t ions at al l r ipe for any revol t? Perhaps i t ’s best that we simply Drop out . wi th the al ienat ion and isolat ion overcome through ret reat into the l imi ted real i t ies of fami ly . but they shal l des t roy al l of us .We Are Fucking Doomed  Sustainable OR  Capitalism? Who the fuck would want to  sustain capitalism? OR  The Audacity of Hopelessness   Our so-cal led green consciousness doesn’ t do shi t to get to the root of protect ing the planet in any meaningful way . the internet . Can we be consumers in a capi tal i st society and somehow leave a l ivable planet to our of fspr ing? No mat ter how much Tom Fr iedman (‘75) may prai se market solut ions to ecological catas t rophes in wai t ing . So you say we need a revolut ion? Do you hones t ly think that we wi l l be able to pul l ourselves out of the mess that we’ re in? Looking around us . video games . Or . We wi l l never wake . perhaps we don’ t honest ly face an exi stent ial threat . radical equal i ty . If the work of the compassionate i s t r iage . etc . shopping mal l . And those that take up the s t ruggle af ter us wi l l place i t yet later . . and we’ re concerned wi th the l imi ts by which we wi l l cal l our planet unconsciousness and dead . every f ree animal i s a s lowly dying escapee of a factory farm. Dr ink up . and pat r iot i sm . we know that we could never go that way . subcul tural mi l ieu . we wi l l st i l l be ki l l ing the planet on a massive scale and most of the wor ld’s populat ion wi l l be relegated to a l i fe of wage slavery . Our rural areas wi l l cont inue to be eviscerated for thei r resources . capi tal i sm is inherent ly unsus tainable . The wor ld’s f isher ies wi l l st i l l be over exploi ted .