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Jefferson, St. John’s fall in league contest p6 & p7 This and That, p4 T he

Jefferson, St. John’s fall in league contest p6 & p7

HERALD

This and That,

p4

The

DELPHOS

Jefferson, St. John’s fall in league contest p6 & p7 This and That, p4 T he

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

50¢ daily www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 Delphos, Ohio
50¢ daily
www.delphosherald.com
Saturday, January 14, 2012
Delphos, Ohio
Upfront
Upfront

No school Monday

Delphos Public and Parochial schools will be closed on Monday in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Delphos Public Schools will also be closed for students on Tuesday for a teacher in-service day. Buses will run as normal for St. John’s students on Tuesday.

Hall of Honor nominations being taken

Nominations for the second annual Hall of Honor induction are currently being sought in an effort to recognize outstanding graduates, or former employees of the district, as well as any others whose achievements have reflected positively upon the Delphos City School District in some significant way. Potential candidates may be someone who has earned recognition in the community, may have received high honors or have had distinguished careers away from the Delphos City School District. Length, quality of service to their particular field, contributions to the school district, the community they live in and to society in general are all criteria for nominations for this honor. This year’s induction will take place in conjunction with the annual Delphos Jefferson Alumni Dinner in June at the Delphos Eagles Hall. Nominations for Hall of Honor inductees may be submitted via e-mail to brostorfer@DL.NOACSC. org,; online at dl.noacsc.org; or by stopping in or calling the Administration Building, 234 N. Jefferson St., Delphos 45833 to get a nomination form.

Sports
Sports

TODAY

Boys Basketball (6 p.m.):

St. John’s at Shawnee; Bluffton at Fort Jennings; Ottoville at Pandora- Gilboa (PCL); Lincolnview at Miller City; Tinora at Kalida; Leipsic at Columbus Grove (PCL); Arlington at Crestview; Jefferson at Wayne Trace, 6:30 p.m.; Elida at Archbold, 6:30 p.m. Girls Basketball: Ottawa- Glandorf at St. John’s, noon; Fort Jennings at Pandora- Gilboa (PCL), 1 p.m.; Allen East at Kalida, 1 p.m.; Leipsic at Columbus Grove (PCL), 1 p.m. Wrestling: Jefferson and Spencerville at Lima Senior Spartan Invitational, 9 a.m.; Lincolnview at Garrett Invitational, 9 a.m.; St. John’s at CIT, 10 a.m. JANUARY 15 SUNDAY Wrestling: St. John’s at CIT, 10 a.m.

Forecast
Forecast

Cloudy tonight with 20 percent chance of snow and low 15-20. Partly cloudy Sunday; high in upper 20s. Low 15-20.

Jefferson, St. John’s fall in league contest p6 & p7 This and That, p4 T he

Index

Obituaries

2

State/Local

3

Politics

4

Community

5

Sports

6-7

Church

8

Kid’s page

9

Classifieds

10

TV

11

Jefferson, St. John’s fall in league contest p6 & p7 This and That, p4 T he

4-H stays afloat

BY MIKE FORD mford@delphosherald.com

LIMA — When the 2009 Allen County Budget was passed, a 21 percent cut was made across the board. All agencies outside of law enforcement supported with general fund dollars were drastically affected. The 4-H program was at risk because its operations are under OSU Extension, which will only fund a county office if the county in question forks over funding first. When the first half of the match was removed by commissioners, Extension removed its share and the office closed. County residents raised funds to keep the 4-H pro- gram going at the Allen County Fairgrounds. Program Assistant Leanna McKamey says the commis- sioners came through this week when they approved this year’s appropriations. “They came up with $25,000 last year but it was a little later and we weren’t able to get a 4-H Educator, which we’ve been without. They continued the funding

and with the $25,000, we’ll combine that money with state and federal grant money to hire a 4-H Educator,” she said. The program will not be able to do a lot of the things it once did when it received much more funding. However, restored funding is matched, so having $50,000 to work with as a result of the commissioners’ sup - port keeps it alive in Allen County. “We won’t have tradition- al programs like ag, natural resources and consumer sci- ences but we will be able to do more afterschool pro- grams. We currently have one called ‘Real Money, Real World’ that helps junior high and high school students pre- pare for when they get out of school. We will be able to do more with a 4H Educator,” she said. Anyone interested in the position should keep in touch with the office or watch media for postings. Appropriate documentation has been filed in Columbus and when the job is posted, it will only be so for a month.

Photo submitted Robins take shelter from wind? Delphos Herald reader Chelsea Wellmann submitted this photo of

Photo submitted

Robins take shelter from wind?

Delphos Herald reader Chelsea Wellmann submitted this photo of robins taking shelter in a tree at her home. Wellmann said nearly a dozen of the birds gathered in the tree during the worst of the wind Friday.

Tender Times children earn Olympic medals during ‘O’ week Photo submitted During “O” week at Tender

Tender Times children earn Olympic medals during ‘O’ week

Photo submitted

During “O” week at Tender Times Child Development Center, the preschool class won Olympic medals. Above: Students show off their med- als.

Nancy Spencer photo Trees, limbs brush removed to improve reliability To increase reliability of electric service,

Nancy Spencer photo

Trees, limbs brush removed to improve reliability

To increase reliability of electric service, Asplundh crews have been clearing trees, limbs and brush from around electrical facilities that provide power to homes or businesses in the Ottoville and Fort Jennings areas. The work began Monday and will continue for approximately two weeks, barring inclement weather. Areas of concen- tration in Ottoville include: US 224; SR 66, SR 189; CR Q, CR 24, CR 23M and CR 25P. Above Asplundh crews finish a row of trees on US 224 near the Little Auglaize River. Areas of concentration in Fort Jennings include: Cottonwood Drive; SR189, SR 634, SR 190, SR 66; CR R and CR 24.

US warns Iran not to block shipping

By ANNE GEARAN AP National Security Writer

WASHINGTON — Tensions rising by the day, the Obama administration said Friday it is warning Iran through public and private channels against any action that threatens the flow of oil from the Persian Gulf. The Navy revealed that two U.S. ships in and near the Gulf were harassed by Iranian speedboats last week. Spokesmen were vague on what the United States would do about Iran’s threat to block the strategic Strait of Hormuz, but military officials have been clear that the U.S. is readying for a possible naval clash. That prospect is the latest flashpoint with Iran, and one of the most serious. Although it currently overshadows the threat of war over Iran’s dis- puted nuclear program, perhaps beginning with an Israeli mil- itary strike on Iran’s nuclear structure, both simmering crises raise the possibility of a shoot- ing war this year. “We have to make sure we are ready for any situation and have all options on the table,” Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said, addressing a soldier’s ques- tion Thursday about the overall

risk of war with Iran. Navy officials said that in separate incidents Jan. 6, three Iranian speedboats — each armed with a mounted gun — briefly chased after a U.S. Navy ship just outside the Gulf near the Strait of Hormuz and a U.S. Coast Guard cutter in the north- ern Gulf. No shots were fired and the speedboats backed off. For several reasons, the risk of open conflict with Tehran appears higher in this election year than at any point since President Barack Obama took office with a pledge to try to bridge 30 years of enmity. A clash would represent a failure of U.S. policy on several fronts and vault now-dormant national security concerns into the presi- dential election contest. The U.S. still hopes that international pressure will per- suade Iran to back down on its disputed nuclear program, but the Islamic regime shows no sign it would willingly give up a project has become a point of national pride. A nuclear bomb, or the ability to quickly make one, could also be worth much more to Iran as a bargaining chip down the road. Time is short, with Iran making several leaps toward

See IRAN, page 2

2 – The Herald

Saturday, January 14, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

2 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Let the snow warm

For The Record

Let the snow warm up conversation

Aaah. Winter is here! The snow if flying, the thermometer is dip- ping down below 20 and the wind is making the flap on the exhaust from the stove rat-a-tat out a tune. I’ve found that in the last several years, I am less agreeable to snow than I was. I used to wait anxiously for the first snowfall to coat my world in sparkling white. Everything just looks so pretty right after it snows. Now, I just grumble like everyone else and go find my boots because the dog has to go out. Where’s my scarf? Have you seen my gloves? Ringo likes the snow. When it is actually snowing, he leaps and bounds to catch flakes in the air before they fall. He digs and jumps and runs in circles. It’s quite amusing. Then his feet get cold. It’s all fun and games until your feet get cold. Amen. The kids will enjoy a four-day weekend due to the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday on Monday. Jefferson kids get a five-day weekend due to a teacher in-service day on Tuesday. Oh, how at times I would love a snow day or teacher in-service day. Just to roll over and go back to sleep and know the whole day stretches out in font of you with nothing to do. Just not meant to be. That’s what happens when you become an adult. It’s funny how kids always want to be more like adults when they’re supposed to be kids and once we become adults, we want to be kids again. It’s funny how much things have changed with snow and technology. When I was young, we couldn’t wait to rush out and play. When we were frozen like popsicles and couldn’t stand it anymore, we’d go in and throw our outerwear in the dryer. We’d wait for them to dry while sipping hot chocolate. Then we gear up and head out again.

iran

(Continued from Page 1) the ability to manufacture a nuclear weapon if it chooses to do so. Iran claims its nuclear development is intended for the peaceful production of energy. Meanwhile, several longstand- ing assumptions about U.S. influence and the value of a targeted strike to stymie Iran’s progress toward a nuclear weapon have changed. For one, the White House is no lon- ger confident it could prevail on Israel not to launch such a strike. An escalating covert cam-

FUNERALS

roe HM, Jeanette J., 79, of Delphos, services begin at 2 p.m. today at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, the Rev. Jacob Gordon officiating. Burial will follow in Walnut Grove Cemetery. Friends may

call an hour before the ser - vice. Memorials are to The Humane Society or donor’s choice. B en D e L e , Robert M., 95, of Delphos, Mass of

Christian Burial begins at 11 a.m. Monday at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Jacob Gordon offi - ciating. Burial will follow in Resurrection Cemetery with military rites by the Delphos Veterans Council. Friends may call from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. Sunday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, where a parish wake begins at 7:30 p.m. In lieu of flow - ers, take someone you love to dinner.

LOTTERY
LOTTERY

CLEVELAND

(AP)

The winning numbers in

Friday evening’s drawing of the Ohio Lottery

Pick 3 Evening

5-6-2

Pick 4 Evening

0-3-6-9

Rolling Cash 5

06-22-28-38-39

Ten OH Evening

The Delphos Herald

Vol. 142 No. 164

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald, Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager

The Daily Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $1.48 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $97 per year. Outside these counties $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villages where The Daily Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $1.48

per week.

405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015

Office Hours

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

C orreCtions

CorreCtions

The Delphos Herald wants to correct published errors in its news, sports and feature articles. To inform the news- room of a mistake in published

Homeless teen up for science prize gets house

BRENTWOOD, N.Y. (AP) — Samantha Garvey and her family had been liv- ing in a shelter for several

days when they got word the

17-year-old aspiring marine biologist had made it to the semifinals of the prestigious national Intel science com- petition.

Now, with donations com-

ing in and the county finding them rent-subsidized hous - ing, she’ll again be able to do her homework in a home. “This is just the most amazing thing you could ask for,” the diminutive Garvey said at a news conference Friday, surrounded by her parents, brother, sister and a cadre of politicians and school officials. “We’re all in tears here,” she said after Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone announced that the Department of Social Services had located a nearby three-bedroom house where the family could live. “This is what we’ve always wanted.” Garvey is one of 300 teenagers nationwide named this week as semifinalists in the prestigious Intel sci- ence competition; finalists will be announced at the end of January. She spent more than two years researching the effects of the Asian short crab on the mussel popula - tion in a salt marsh on Long Island, east of New York City.

NANCY SPENCER

On the Other hand

2 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Let the snow warm

We’d make forts and play on the canal and have snowball fights. What fun. There are no ice skates in my closet anymore and I just don’t get the urge to dig around in the snow to build anything. Perhaps just to look for the keys I just dropped but that’s it. Now, kids are hunched over their comput- ers or phones or sitting in front of the TV. They make our job a little more difficult to get good outdoor pictures in the winter and sometimes all year long. Kid’s just don’t play outside like they used to. We’ve become an indoor society. This mentality spills over to other things as well. We don’t neighbor like we used to — we send them a text. We don’t sit down and have conversations — we catch up on Facebook — even if it’s with someone who live a few houses down. Facebook is great for keeping in touch with old classmates who have moved or relatives who live in faraway places but if I want to talk to my neighbor, I pick up the phone or walk over. Jeez. Why’s that so hard? So as you snuggle in for a long winter’s night, think about someone you haven’t seen or talked to in a while and give them a call on Sunday. Find out what they’re up to and share what’s going on in your life. Sometimes there is no replacing an hon- est-to-goodness, actual conversation without abbreviations. LOL!

  • 03-04-05-06-07-13-16-19- information, call the editorial

20-33-35-36-38-43-45-47-52- 58-71-79 department at 419-695-0015. Corrections will be published on this page. Delphos City Schools Week
20-33-35-36-38-43-45-47-52-
58-71-79
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
Delphos City Schools
Week of Jan. 9-13
Friday:
Breaded
chicken
sandwich, corn, cake, fruit.

Monday: No school. Tuesday: No school. Wednesday: Pepperoni pizza, tossed salad, fruit, low- fat milk. Thursday: Chicken strips, dipping sauce, bread and but- ter, oven potatoes, apple crisp, lowfat milk. Friday: Franklin: Hot dog sandwich; Middle and Senior:

Footlong hot dog, corn chips, baked beans, diced pears, lowfat milk.

St. John’s Week of Jan. 9-13

Monday: No school. Tuesday: Chicken and noodles/ roll or shredded beef sandwich, peas, salad, straw- berries, milk. Wednesday: Beef and cheese nachos/ breakstick or meatloaf sandwich, green beans, salad, pears, milk. Thursday: Pancakes and sausage or shredded chicken sandwich, hash browns, salad, orange juice, milk. Friday: Chicken quesadilla/ salsa/ sour cream or cold meat sandwich, corn, salad, peach- es, milk.

Landeck Week of Jan. 9-13

Monday: No school. Tuesday: No school. Wednesday: Breaded chicken nuggets, butter/pea- nut butter bread, french fries, fruit, milk. Thursday: Chicken noodle soup, crackers, butter/peanut butter bread, carrot sticks, fruit, milk. Friday: Toasted cheese sandwich, corn, fruit, milk.

Fort Jennings Week of Jan. 9-13

Chocolate, white or straw- berry milk served with all meals. H.S. - Ala Carte - Pretzel and cheese available every Friday; Salad bar with fruit and milk for $2.00 available every Wednesday. Monday: No school. Tuesday: Beef gravy over mashed potatoes, corn, dinner roll, fruit. Wednesday: Coney dog, baked beans, sherbet, fruit. Thursday: Chili, PB & butter bread, mixed vegetables, fruit.

Ottoville Week of Jan. 9-13

Monday: No school .. Tuesday: Grades 4-12:

Meatball sub; Grades K-3: Hot dog, tri tator, peaches, cookie, milk. Wednesday: Corn dog, corn chips, green beans, mixed fruit, milk. Thursday: Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes with gravy, butter bread, applesauce, milk. Friday: Pizzaburger, tossed salad, cherries, brownie, milk.

Lincolnview Week of Jan. 9-13

Monday: No school. Tuesday: Cheese pizza, California blend/cheese, applesauce, milk. Wednesday: Toasted cheese, tomato soup/ crack- ers, mixed vegetables, mixed fruit, milk. Thursday: Country fried steak/ gravy, mashed pota- toes, dinner roll, pineapple, milk. Friday: Popcorn chicken, green bean casserole, bread and butter, peaches, milk.

Gomer Week of Jan. 9-13

Monday: No school. Tuesday: Turkey and cheese sub, waffle fries, diced pears, milk. Wednesday: Chicken nug- gets, green beans, apple- sauce, dinner roll, milk. Thursday: Chicken soft taco with toppings, seasoned corn, mandarin oranges, breadstick, milk. Friday: Mini corn dog, sea- soned carrots, diced peaches, milk.

Spencerville Week of Jan. 9-13

Choice of daily salad or sandwich/wrap with fruit and milk as another meal option. Monday: No school. Tuesday: Shredded beef and cheese sandwich, curly fries, fruit snacks, milk. Wednesday: Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes/ gravy, 8 grain dinner roll, applesauce, milk. Thursday: Wedge slice, pepperoni pizza, corn, banana, milk. Friday: Grilled cheese sand- wich, tomato soup, Goldfish crackers, applesauce, milk ..

Elida Middle/Elementary Week of Jan. 9-13

Choice of daily salad or sandwich/wrap with fruit and milk as another meal option. Monday: No school. Tuesday: Sloppy Joe sand- wich, waffle fries, diced pears, milk. Wednesday: Chicken nuggets, green beans, apple- sauce, dinner roll, milk. Thursday: Chicken soft taco with toppings, seasoned corn, mandarin oranges, breadstick, milk. Friday: Mini corn dog, sea- soned carrots, diced peaches, milk ..

paign of sabotage and targeted assassinations highlighted by this week’s killing of an Iranian nuclear scientist may not be enough to head off a larger shooting war and could prod Iran to strike first. The brazen killing of a young scientist by motorcycle-riding bombers is seen as almost surely the work of Israel, according to U.S. and other officials speak- ing on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters. The killing on a Tehran street followed the deaths of several other Iranians involved in the

nuclear program, a mysterious explosion at an Iranian nuclear site that may have been sabo- tage and the apparent targeting of the program with an efficient computer virus. Iranian officials accuse both Israel and the U.S. of carrying out the assassination as part of a secret operation to stop Iran’s nuclear program. The killing came a day after Israeli military chief Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz was quoted as telling a parlia- mentary panel that 2012 would be a “critical year” for Iran — in part because of “things that happen to it unnaturally.” Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Panetta made a point of publicly deny- ing any U.S. involvement, but the administration tied itself in knots this week over how far to go in condemning an action that could further the U.S. goal of stalling Iranian nuclear prog- ress. The U.S. position remains that a military strike on Iran’s known nuclear facilities is undesirable because it would have unintended consequences and would probably only stall, not end, the Iranian nuclear drive. That has been the con- sensus view among military leaders and policy makers for roughly five years, spanning a Republican and Democratic

administration. But during that time Iran has gotten ever closer to a potential bomb, Israel has gotten more brazen in its threats to stop an Iranian bomb by nearly any means, and the U.S. administra- tion’s influence over Israel has declined. Israel considers Iran its mortal enemy and takes seri- ously the Iranian threat to wipe the Jewish state from the map. The United States is Israel’s strongest ally and international defender, but the allies differ over how imminent the Iranian threat has become and how to stop it. The strained relationship between Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu plays a role, as does the rise in influence of conser- vative political parties in Israel. U.S. officials have concluded that Israel will go its own way on Iran, despite U.S. objections, and may not give the U.S. much notice if it decides to launch a strike, U.S. and other offi- cials said. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive diplomacy. The Obama administration is concerned that Iran’s claim this week that it is expanding nuclear operations with more advanced equipment may push Israel closer to a strike.

Answers to Friday’s questions: Nobel Prize-winning author T.S. Eliot wrote a poem enti- tled, “Ash Wednesday”
Answers to Friday’s questions:
Nobel Prize-winning author T.S. Eliot wrote a poem enti-
tled, “Ash Wednesday” after he converted to Anglicanismin
1927.
The Buffalo Bills, Minnesota Vikings and Denver
Broncos share the title for the most Supper Bowl losses,
with four each.
today’s questions:
What role did a teenager named Maggie Graham play
in James McNeill Whistler’s decision to paint of portrait of
his mother?
How far underground have mound-building termites
been known to burrow in search of water?
Answers in Monday’s Herald
today’s words:
Humectant: retaining moisture
osmagogue: stimulating the sense of smell
2 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Let the snow warm
2 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Let the snow warm

www.delphosherald.com

Saturday, January 14, 2012

The Herald –3

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald –3

STATE/LOCAL

On the banks of yesteryear ...

Eligible Ohioans can file taxes for free using the Ohio Benefit Bank™

COLUMBUS — Tax sea- son is quickly approaching and thousands of Ohioans will soon begin filing to ensure they receive their refunds quickly. To help taxpayers save a little extra money this year, the Ohio Association of Second Harvest Foodbanks (OASHF) is once again helping moderate- and low- income Ohioans obtain free federal and state income tax assistance, while also identi- fying if they are eligible for other benefit programs. Beginning Jan. 17, Ohioans with an annual household income of $60,000 or less can file their federal and state taxes for free using The Ohio Benefit Bank (OBB™), an online service that connects Ohioans to benefit programs, such as health care cover- age, home energy assistance, child care subsidies and food assistance. “Too many Ohio taxpayers miss out on receiving free tax assistance each year because either they don’t know it’s available or they don’t know where to get this valuable service,” said Jason Elchert, OASHF deputy director. “At

a time when many Ohioans are stretching every penny in their pocket as far as possible, the OBB can help working

individuals and families max- imize their full tax refund.” Individuals can obtain free tax assistance by visiting The OBB’s free online, self-ser- vice program at ohiobenefits. org or by calling 1-800-648- 1176 to talk to a live operator for assistance. The web site is designed to help individu- als and families prepare and electronically file their taxes as well as enable Ohioans to claim all the tax credits for which they are eligible at no cost while reviewing poten- tial eligibility for other bene- fit programs. If clients choose to use direct deposit, they can receive their refunds in as few as seven to 10 days. In addition, more than 3,500 trained OBB coun - selors, located at more than 1,100 locations across the state, are available to help Ohioans file their tax returns at no cost. Tax returns in many instances are a great way for working families and individuals to put thousands of dollars in their pockets and infuse money into their local economies. “At least one in every four taxpayers eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit fails to claim the credit,” said Elchert. “The EITC could put more than $5,800 into the

pockets of eligible Ohio tax- payers. This is money that taxpayers can use now to make their lives a little easier or money they can put away for a rainy day.” Each year, more than $2.24 billion dollars in tax credits and other supports go unclaimed by eligible Ohioans. More than 97 per- cent of these unclaimed funds are federal dollars. Claiming these dollars will bring more federal money to Ohio, there- fore helping to boost the state’s economy. Through The Ohio Benefit Bank, more than 273,000 Ohioans have gained access to potential tax credits and work supports valued at more than $577 million. To locate an OBB site or to access the online self-ser- vice program, visit ohioben- efits.org or call 1-800-648- 1176. To stay connected online, follow The Ohio Benefit Bank on Twitter at @OhioBenefitBank or like The Ohio Benefit Bank on Facebook at facebook. com/ohiobenefitbank, both being great ways you can get updates and information throughout tax season about tax filing events throughout Ohio, savings tips and helpful tax information!

Author Stewart to address Civil War Roundtable

Western Ohio’s own Civil War military unit will be the subject of discussion when author Martin Stewart addresses the Western Ohio Civil War Roundtable on

Jan. 26. The Western Ohio regiment, the 71st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, (about 800 men led by Colonel Rodney Mason and Lt. Col. Barton Kyle) was composed of recruits from Miami, Mercer, Auglaize, Montgomery, Hamilton and Clark Counties. Meeting time is 7:15 p.m. in Room 186 Andrews Hall Wright State Lake Campus. The public is invited. Stewart, who is a noted lecturer sought by Civil War enthusiasts, will make his second speaking engage - ment before the Western Ohio CWRT. According to Stewart, a native of Miami Co. and descendant of four Union soldiers, the 71st Ohio embarked for Cincinnati by

train three days after their

flag presentation at Camp Tod on Febr. 15, 1862. The 71st OVI was part of General Sherman’s Army of the Tennessee. The green troops would quickly be ini- tiated into the “sheer terror” of war in what would be called the Battle of Shiloh

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald –3 S TATE /L OCAL On the banks of

Photo submitted

Martin Stewart, author of “Redemption: The 71st Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War” will speak at the 7:15 p.m. Jan. 26 Western Ohio Civil War Roundtable meeting in Room 186 Andrews Hall Wright State Lake Campus.

Confederate Army’s early morning surprise attack. The Buckeyes were forced back three times, with Col. Mason unaccounted for in the chaos and confusion in rough, wooded country and Lt. Col. Kyle killed. By the end of the day, General U. S. Grant’s army backed up towards Pittsburg Landing,

the 71st would lose two men to battle deaths, along with 15 men missing. Martin’s presentation will provide more information from his research on the his- tory of the 71st OVI and the events that brought this regiment from the shame of Shiloh to one of prestige and Redemption.

Edelbrock- Reitz LLC Income Tax and Business Tax Preparation and Accounting Services, Payroll Preparation edelbrockreitz.com 945
Edelbrock-
Reitz LLC
Income Tax and Business Tax
Preparation and Accounting
Services, Payroll Preparation
edelbrockreitz.com
945 E. Fifth
(by bowling alley)
Delphos
419-695-1099
HAPPY HOLIDAYS During this holiday season and every day of the year, we wish you all
HAPPY HOLIDAYS
During this holiday season and every day of the year,
we wish you all the best.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

From the Delphos Canal Commission

The Fluoroscope

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald –3 S TATE /L OCAL On the banks of

The Canal Commission Museum has a fluoroscope unit on hand for visitors to see.

If you were born before 1960, you prob- ably remember going to a shoe store as a child and having your feet x-rayed with a fluoro- scope. You would try on a new pair of shoes, stick your feet in the opening at the bottom of the unit and while you were looking through a porthole on top and wiggling your toes, your parent and the shoe salesman were looking through similar openings which showed a fluorescent image of the bones and soft tissue of the foot inside the shoe as well as an outline of the shoe. The purpose was to see if the new shoes you had on were the right fit. In actuality, this was just a sales gimmick

as the same fit could be done using simple measurements. It was a big draw for children, who loved to go into the shoe store and stick their feet in the machine just for the fun of seeing the greenish yellow image of their bones. Introduced in the 1930s, the units grew in popularity until by the 1950s, there were 10,000 such devices in shoe stores in the United States. At the same time scientists began to voice concern about the potential hazards of radiation, and by 1970 shoe x-ray machines had been banned in 33 states. The unit at our museum was donated by Bob McNamee, who was the manager of Charles Company Shoes, 229 N. Main St., which is now Delphos Sporting Goods. Sorry, the inside workings have been removed, so it’s not as much fun to stick your feet in as it was then, but you’re welcome to visit to the museum for a bit of childhood nostalgia.

The museum is open from 1-3 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday and from 9 a.m. to noon

every Thursday.

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald –3 S TATE /L OCAL On the banks of

When operational, the user could peer down from the top and see the bones and soft tissue of their feet clad in new shoes.

Lima Symphony Orchestra to present Mozart by Candlelight

The Lima Symphony Orchestra will warm a cold winter’s weekend with two performances of Mozart by Candlelight. Performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 21 at Trinity United Methodist Church in Lima and conclude at 4 p.m. on Jan. 22 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Defiance. The professional musi- cians of the Lima Symphony Orchestra will present the maj- esty and splendor of Mozart’s music as it was written to be performed: surrounded by the warm glow of hundreds of glisten- ing candles in stunning sacred spac- es.

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald –3 S TATE /L OCAL On the banks of

Szabo

The pro- gram will i n c l u d e several of

M o z a r t ’ s most beau- tiful and well-known

arias performed by vocal solo- ist Julia Szabo, the Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 4 performed by violin solo- ist Mary Kettering, and one of Mozart’s final sympho- nies, the intense and moody Symphony No. 40. Szabo received her bach- elor’s degree in music from Northern Illinois University. She was a professional sing- er in New York City for 25 years leading to numerous solo concert appearances at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall. She has performed opera roles with several distinguished

opera

companies,

such as

Washington National Opera,

Tulsa

Opera

and Sarasota

Opera. For

five years, Ms.

Szabo performed in abridged

operas for school audiences

under the education depart-

ments

of the Metropolitan

Opera and

New York City

Opera. Her work with early

music specialists led

to her

European debut at the Teatro

Poleteamo

Garibaldi

in

Palermo, Sicily, singing the

lead role in Alessandro Scarlatti’s opera Gli

E q u i v o c i

lead role in Alessandro Scarlatti’s opera Gli E q u i v o c i Kettering

Kettering

n e l Sembiante. As a for- mer mem- ber of the New York Choral Artists – the profes-

sional chorus for the New York

Philharmonic -- she has sung under the baton of Sir Colin Davis, Ricardo Chailly, Zubin Mehta, Eza-Pekka Salonen and Kurt Masur. Her work in various vocal ensembles led to a spot backing up Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli on “The Late Show with David Letterman.” Szabo now lives in Bluffton where she is Director of alum- ni relations and annual giving at Bluffton University. Kettering grew up in Granville and began play- ing the violin in her school orchestra at age 10. At the age of 15, she auditioned and was accepted into the Columbus Symphony Youth Orchestra. Kettering is principal sec- ond violin in both the Ashland

and Lima Symphonies, and she plays fiddle and sings with the bluegrass band Kentucky Border. She was a member of the Ashland-based Faces Made for Radio bluegrass band, has toured with the Celtic rock group Ceili (Kay-lee) Rain, and performed onstage for Ashland University’s produc- tion of The Spitfire Grill. Kettering earned her music degrees in violin performance at Baldwin Wallace College

and Belmont University in Nashville. She has studied with Elisabeth Small, Julian Ross, and Gary Kosloski.

After finishing school in Nashville, she took fiddle les- sons with Grammy-nominated Casey Driessen, Daniel Carwile, Brian Wicklund, Megan Lynch and Bobby

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4 — The Herald
4 — The Herald

Saturday, January 14, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

4 — The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com

POLITICS

“If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion,

mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would

be justified in silencing mankind.”

— John Stuart Mill, English philosopher (1806-1873)

4 — The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com P OLITICS “If all mankind minus one,

IT WAS NEWS THEN

One Year Ago

• Contestants from throughout the region will get the chance

to show off their entertainment prowess and compete for prize money in the fourth annual Ohio Has Talent! Show on Feb. 5 at Niswonger Performing Center in Van Wert. Local contestants include Hayleigh Bacome, Jordan Rode and Jennifer Kahlig,

Breece Rohr and Madilynn Schulte and Stephanie Spitnale.

  • 25 Years Ago — 1987

• Delphos native Tom Nomina of Loveland, Colo., who played professional football with the Denver Broncos and the Miami Dolphins, will be inducted into the Miami University

Athletic Hall of Fame. Nomina, who played football at St.

John’s High School, was a tackle and earned All-America honors.

• Misty Diltz hit three of four foul shots down the stretch

to help lead the Jefferson girls to a 50-45 win over Van Wert. The Cougars were able to close within two in a final quarter that saw five players foul out. Jefferson lost Deana Schmersal and Angie Gonyea and Van Wert lost Teresa Kreischer, Amy Culler and Jodie Kleman. Margie Miller was in double figures for Jefferson with 11 points. • In recent months, Stoller’s Hatchery, State Route 118, Van Wert, has had a 500-foot long by 40 foot wide chicken house erected west of Delphos on the Joel Gerdemann farm on Delphos-Jennings Road. Gerdemann will serve as manager of the new facility which received the first shipment of over

60,000 laying hens.

  • 50 Years Ago — 1962

• The Lincolnview Lancers were no match for the high fly- ing St. John’s Blue Jays in their game Friday night in St. John’s gym. The Jays defeated Lincolnview by a score of 64-43. Three of the Blue Jays scored in the double digits. Gene Klaus put in seven from the field and added 4 foul shots for 18 points. Charlie Ellis snapped seven in from the field and added two from the foul line for 16 points and Captain Jim Fischer scored 11 points, four from out on the court and three gift shots. • R. B. Rozelle was elected president of the Delphos Board of Education at a meeting Friday night in the office at Delphos Jefferson High School. Ray Pohlman was named vice president and Oris Sawmiller was reappointed clerk of the board. Prior to the business meeting, Louis Scherger and Pohlman, who were re-elected at the November election, were sworn in along with new member Nile Brenneman. • The Ada Bulldogs threw a full court press at the Delphos Jefferson Wildcats Friday night, and the local cagers simply could not solve it as they went down, 79-54, on the Bulldog floor. Ed Porter was high man for the Wildcats with 14, and Jim Dorman and Ed Jackson each scored 12 in the losing cause.

  • 75 Years Ago — 1937

• Streams in Delphos and vicinity were raging as the result

of heavy rains. The Flat Fork Creek is overflowing its banks in many places in Delphos and the Waterworks Park has taken on the appearance of a miniature lake. Delphos experienced a heavy wind storm and torrential downpour early Thursday morning. The smokestack at the Schaffer sawmill was blown down. • A fine program was presented at Morris Chapel Church Wednesday evening under the sponsorship of the members of the Epworth League. The program was as follows: Instrumental duet – Nile and Richard Brenneman; vocal quartet – Dwight

Ludwig, Richard Thompson, Esther and Betty Brenneman;

vocal solo – Dwight Ludwig; woodwind quartet – Ruth Baxter, Arlene Leist, Norma Jean and Edith Ditto; and cast members of a play – Dwight Ludwig, Joseph Hurley, Leslie Peltier, Roscoe Thompson, Frances Baxter and Mary Copus. • On Jan. 24, Dr. Don R. Falkenberg, executive secretary of the Pocket Testament League and Bible study teacher on the Ohio State University campus, will bring a special message to the people of Delphos on the menace of communism. The Girls Glee Club of Jefferson School, under the direction of Esther Leilich, will sing several selections during the program.

by HELEN This and That
by HELEN
This
and
That

KAVERMAN

We are made up of the people we have met through the years — good or bad.

Now and then someone comes

along who touches the lives of many, many people. Rita Turnwald was one of them. Rita was born on a farm near Columbus Grove but spent most of her years in the Ottoville community. She

was dedicated to God and her

family — then to Ottoville.

Rita loved books and his- tory in her early years. She was a “visionary.” She envi- sioned the history of Ottoville passing by without being

recorded. She made plans to

do something about that. Rita

helped write an early history

of the Immaculate Conception Church in Ottoville but want-

ed to go further. She knew

this would take time, not

just months but years. She began saving newspaper clip- pings. Her daughter, Dorothy,

recalled that as a young girl,

her mother had her cutting clippings from the news- paper. These were stashed

away until it was time to write

the book. This project also required several trips to the

2002. Gathering and writing helped Rita get through her

grief. The book was sent to the publisher in 2005. She

sold more than 700 hard

bound copies. This manuscript covered everything. There were chapters on The Black Swamp, The Miami and Erie Canal, Coming to America, farming, schools, sports, busi- nesses, church, Prohibition, organizations, the park, mili- tary history, manufacturing,

the life of a homemaker, etc. You name it, it’s in the book. Rita would be pleasant- ly surprised to discover that many people of Ottoville,

including the mayor, are try-

ing to get a reprint of her famous book. Their goal is

to get at least 100 orders to

keep the price of the reprint at $55 or $60. So far they have

at least 80 orders, so get your

order in. The Ottoville Park

Carnival will be 50 years old

this summer. The committee

hopes to have copies for sale during that event. You don’t have to have roots in Ottoville to enjoy this book because the stories describe the way of life in

4 — The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com P OLITICS “If all mankind minus one,

Rita and Leon Turnwald

library to search records and papers on the micro-film. She spent years putting this book

together because she wanted it to be complete and “just right.” People would ask: “Is the book done yet?” They didn’t realize how much work

went into it. Although Rita enjoyed the work, it would

still take years of research and

writing. She put her writing on

hold during the time of her husband’s illness, to devote

her time to him.

Leon passed away 19 May

small towns and rural Ohio

for 156 years.

Let me tell you a little

about this great lady, the Ottoville Historian. Rita was born in 1923 to Steve and Mary (Weber) Miller on their farm near Columbus Grove. The family moved to Ottoville when she was a young girl. Rita was the oldest of 12 chil- dren. Her siblings are: Ethel Burgei, Julie Kaskel, Lou Madigan, Irene Horner, Dolly Mesker, Donna Schlagbaum, Norb, Ralph, Donald “Doc”, Virgil and Art Miller.

Rita’s book:

Ottoville & Vicinity 1845 – 2001

4 — The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com P OLITICS “If all mankind minus one,

Rita Turnwald was archivist of the Parish Museum, which had its beginning in the church basement in 1988, when the church building was 100 years old. She collected all kinds of pictures and church memorabilia.

Rita married Leon

Turnwald in 1944, dur- ing World War II. They had six children: Dorothy Flores, Steve Miller, Jeanette Hazelton, Irene Helms, Nancy Suer and Aggie Ellerbrock.

Rita grew up during the depression so she learned to

be frugal. She loved school and books and encouraged their children to read by tak- ing them to the bookmobile

every time it came to town. Rita was a 4-H Advisor for more than 30 years. She served as president of the

Putnam County Historical

Society. When the kids

would ask “Where’s Mom?” on a given night, their father answered “Oh! She went

to the Hysterical Society

meeting.” Rita won an Outstanding Achievement Award for her book down

at the Ohio Historical Center

in Columbus. She also had the honor of being chosen “Woman of the Year” for the Delphos Herald.

Rita was the founder and archivist of the Parish Museum, which had its beginning in the church basement in 1988, when the church building was

100 years old. She collected all

kinds of pictures and church memorabilia. Eventually the

museum found a home on the second floor of the par- ish center. Many other volun- teers helped with this project.

Her husband often helped her,

especially when it was time to

move all the artifacts.

Rita was also a woman

of faith. She was a CCD

teacher and was the Parish

Religious Education Director. Her husband, Leon served

as a Deacon in the Catholic Church. While he was pre- paring for this position, Rita

went to the ministry classes right along with him.

The list of her achieve- ments could go on and on. I might add Rita learned to use

a computer at the age of 84.

Rita went to eternal reward on

8 March 2011. Her husband died 19 May 2002. The following is just a sample of some of the histori- cal tid-bits in her book:

“The Delphos Herald 9 August 1877 The grand picnic will be held at Ottoville on Tuesday, Aug. 14 to which all are invit- ed. The silver Cornet Band of Delphos, and the bands of Ft. Jennings and Ottoville will be present to enliven the occasion

with music. Refreshments of all kinds will be supplied on the grounds ” ..

“Delphos Weekly Herald

24 May 1883 The Great May Snow.

– A heavy snow the 21st

day of May is a phenom- ena so remarkable that (even the ‘oldest inhabitant’ can’t remember anything like it.) The steady fall commenced

Monday morning, covering the ground to the depth of nine inches with a heavy and soggy snow of which a considerable

amount still remained up to

Wednesday noon.”

So get your order in by calling: Doris Honigford at 419-453-3243; Ron Miller at 419-453-3149; Millie Ruen at Milruen@bright.net; or Village of Ottoville at 419-

453-3636.

Addressing the housing crisis

Some Ohio families are

starting the New Year in a

new neighborhood, apartment, or shelter after being fore- closed upon or being unable

to sell their former home for as much as they paid for it. Meanwhile, once-thriving, middle-class neighborhoods are being undermined by vacant homes, vandalism, and declining property values. If we’re going to continue our economic recovery, we

need to address the issue that

put our economy on the brink of collapse: the housing crisis. When it comes to the

housing crisis, there is plen-

ty of blame to go around. But before the recession, too many fast-talking mortgage brokers steered Americans into unfair loans that helped put the U.S. economy on the brink of collapse – costing millions of Americans their homes and jobs. Federal reg- ulators were asleep on the

job – failing to ensure that responsible mortgages were being underwritten and then

managed properly by financial institutions. Now, after

American taxpayers

bailed them out, Wall Street banks are walk- ing away from their bank-owned proper- ties, leaving behind

homes that are often vandalized and left

4 — The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com P OLITICS “If all mankind minus one,

to dilapidate. As a result, Ohioans are seeing their property

Sen. Sherrod

Brown

often exceed the real estate value. The result is needless evictions – forcing Ohioans from

their homes only to

have the banks later abandon the property. These so-called “bank walkaways” leave

communities – and

local taxpayers – to

deal with the blight.

I’m demanding solutions. Nearly 14

values plummet as abandoned homes are stripped of copper and anything else of value.

Broken windows are not

months ago, the Government Accountability Office (GAO)

issued a report – that I

requested – on bank walk-

always boarded up. Busted pipes are not always fixed.

aways. The report found that bank walkaways, though not

According to a Policy

Matters Ohio report, one in three Ohio homeowners in 2010 owed more on their loans than their homes were

worth. Instead of approving these sorts of “short sales,” banks are foreclosing on homes, but then declining to take possession of them – sometimes because legal fees and maintenance costs

a common practice nation- wide, are concentrated in economically struggling areas

and distressed urban areas of

particular cities, including

those with low-value prop- erties and sub-prime loans.

Cleveland, Ohio, experienced the third most bank walk- aways in the nation, while

Akron, Columbus, Dayton,

Youngstown, and Toledo

were all among the 20 com- munities with the most aban- doned foreclosures. For too long, banking reg- ulators have looked out for the big banks’ bottom lines,

at the expense of families in

already hard-hit communities.

In December, the Treasury

Department’s Office of the

Comptroller of the Currency

(OCC) issued guidance to the

banks instructing them on how to properly walk away from

their properties. In response, I wrote to the OCC – which oversees the five largest mort- gage servicers – outlining the devastating effect that bank walkaways have on low- income and middle-class fam- ilies and their neighborhoods. The Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland has found that vacant homes in a neighbor- hood lower surrounding prop-

erty values by 3.1 percent – in

an already sluggish housing

market. We need stronger

standards that will help keep

Ohio families in their homes

and protect communities

from having to pay thousands in maintenance fees on aban- doned homes. In addition to demand-

ing additional action from OCC, I’ve also introduced the Foreclosure Fraud and Homeowner Abuse Prevention Act, which would require mortgage servicers

to work with homeowners to

modify their mortgage prior

to foreclosure. Preventing foreclosures is the best way

to protect Ohio communi-

ties from the harm caused by

abandoned properties.

Earlier this month, I met

with a Cleveland Heights resident who lost her job after the company she worked for downsized. Then she lost

her home. Jeanette Smith

was forced to move to an

apartment as the bank initi- ated foreclosure. But, without alerting her, the bank stopped the Sheriff’s sale. Without

being able to back out of the

lease, Ms. Smith was hit with

a double disadvantage: local vacancy fines for a property

she thought she no longer owned and a rent check she

now had to pay. If the banks are not will- ing to work with a struggling homeowner to prevent evic- tion, then the banks should be accountable for maintain- ing the foreclosed property. If

they don’t, then they should pay a penalty as would a homeowner who allows a

roof to collapse or fails to repair broken windows.

Ohioans are seeing their

property values plummet as

abandoned homes on their block or in their neighbor- hood are stripped literally to

their foundations. Meanwhile,

local cities and counties are

left footing the bill because a bank has abandoned its responsibility. The only party

that wins when homes are

abandoned is big banks. We

should not allow this practice to go on any longer.

Now is the time Main

Street stops paying for the financial and housing crisis it

did not create.

www.delphosherald.com

The Herald – 5

Saturday, January 14, 2012

www.delphosherald.com The Herald – 5 Saturday, January 14, 2012

COMMUNITY

LANDMARK

www.delphosherald.com The Herald – 5 Saturday, January 14, 2012 C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Delphos Post Office

Delphos Post Office

COMING

EVENTS

TODAY

8:30-11:30 a.m. — St. John’s High School recycle, 600 block of East Second Street. 9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shop- ping. St. Vincent DePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School park- ing lot, is open. Cloverdale recycle at vil- lage park. 10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre.

SUNDAY

8-11:30 a.m. — Knights of Columbus benefit for St. John’s School at the hall, Elida Ave. 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open.

MONDAY

11:30 a.m. — The Green Thumb Garden Club will meet at the Delphos Public Library for luncheon and program. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 7 p.m. — Washington Township Trustees meet at the township house. Delphos City Council meets at the Delphos Municipal Building, 608 N. Canal St. 7:30 p.m. — Jefferson Athletic Boosters meet at the Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth St.

Please notify the Delphos Herald at 419-695-0015 if there are any corrections or additions to the Coming Events column.

www.delphosherald.com The Herald – 5 Saturday, January 14, 2012 C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Delphos Post Office

Photo submitted

At 8 p.m. on June 5, 1947, in the Ohio Theatre, the Lima Junior Chamber of Commerce premiered their film, “It’s Our Town.”

Historical society to present ‘It’s Our Town’

The Allen County Historical Society will hold its 104th Annual Membership Meeting and a program at the Allen County Museum at 2 p.m. on Jan. 29. A slideshow of historic Lima, Allen County pho- tos will precede the meeting. Following a brief business meeting, including the election of five historical society trustee positions, the movie, “It’s Our Town,” will be presented. At 8 p.m. on June 5, 1947, in the Ohio Theatre, the Lima Junior Chamber of Commerce premiered their film, “It’s Our Town.” The film featured Wendell Stewart as “Fred Smith” and also contained the voice of Pat Sullivan as, “The Spirit of Lima.” Locally produced

and directed by Otto Austin of Austin Productions, the movie opens with “The Songmasters” performing the theme music and lyrics, “It’s Our Town,” written by local musician, Don Williams. “The Junior Chamber of Commerce is proud to be able to present this film but proud- er still of the action taken by every member of the Junior Chamber of Commerce in the Making of the film.” Richard B. Hardy served as president of the Jaycees at the time the film was made. The film considers the his- tory of the city, its growth and prosperity. A quote from the June 5 program reveals the purpose of the film. “We, the present citizens [of Lima], must make sure that we, our-

selves, know what has been

done and what can be done to insure progress. We must make doubly sure that those who follow us are made suffi- ciently aware of our city and what is needed to continue its growth. The purpose of the film is, therefore, to give an added jolt to the possible laxity which may be keeping ourselves from helping our city and to supply a historical document to teach the young concerning the continued needs of the city.” This nostalgic look back at postwar Lima is filled with images of people, businesses, places and organizations. For more information, contact Pat Smith at the Allen County Museum at 419-222-

9426.

Elvis Presley appeared for the first time on the “Ed Sullivan Show” in 1956.

PET CORNER Lilo is a 3-year-old female Shepherd mix. She has had obe- dience classes and

PET CORNER

PET CORNER Lilo is a 3-year-old female Shepherd mix. She has had obe- dience classes and
PET CORNER Lilo is a 3-year-old female Shepherd mix. She has had obe- dience classes and

Lilo is a 3-year-old female Shepherd mix. She has had obe- dience classes and knows her commands. She craves attention and needs a family who has time to spend with keeping up her training and daily structured exercise.

PET CORNER Lilo is a 3-year-old female Shepherd mix. She has had obe- dience classes and

Breckin is a brown and white tiger with golden eyes and a pink nose, with a face so cute you are sure to fall in love.

The Humane Society of Allen County has many pets wait- ing for adoption. Each comes with a spay or neuter, first shots and a heartworm test. Call 419-991-1775.

The following pets are available for adoption through The Animal Protective League:

Cats

M, 3 years, fixed, tabby, black and white, name Hank and

Ceaser

Kittens

M, F, 11 weeks, black M, F, 4 months, black and white M, F, 3 months, gray, white face, black and white, tiger stripe M, F, 7 weeks, white and light brown

Dogs

Cocker Spaniel, F, 6 years, strawberry blond, shots, name Ann Marie Jack Russell, M, 2 years, black and tan, name Butterball Rat Terrier Shih Tzu, M, 11 years, fixed, shots, tan and white, name Duke Pom-Jack Russell, M. 5 years, shots, white, name Spook

Puppies

Beagle mix, M, F, 6 weeks, brown and black, black and white

For more information on these pets or if you are in need of finding a home for your pet contact The Animal Protective League from 9-5 weekdays at 419-749-2976. Donations or cor- respondence can be sent to PO Box 321, Van Wert OH 45891.

JAN. 15 Mackenzie Osting Paul Slygh Kyle Beam Sandy Hellman Martha Dickrede Kaitlyn Berelsman Nate Rostorfer
JAN. 15
Mackenzie Osting
Paul Slygh
Kyle Beam
Sandy Hellman
Martha Dickrede
Kaitlyn Berelsman
Nate Rostorfer
JAN. 16
Tanner Vermule
Stephanie Sherrick
Happy Birthday
Elle Gable
Meet the Newest Oncology Specialist of St. Rita’s. Henry Gerad, MD Dr. Gerad is pleased to
Meet the Newest
Oncology Specialist
of St. Rita’s.
Henry Gerad, MD
Dr. Gerad is pleased to announce his
association with St. Rita’s Medical Center
and St. Rita’s Professional Services. Formerly
of the Gerad Center for Cancer Treatment,
he joins Dr. Chris Rhoades of the Oncology
Specialists of St. Rita’s. Dr. Gerad brings
many years of expertise to his new position.
You can reach his of ce at 419-222-3737.
803 W. Market St., Lima, Ohio
www.delphosherald.com The Herald – 5 Saturday, January 14, 2012 C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Delphos Post Office

6 – The Herald

Saturday, January 14, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

6 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com

SPORTS

Jennings upsets Kalida in PCL thriller

By BOB WEBER The Delphos Herald btzweber@bright.net

most of their team’s 10 points during the quarter. Kalida con- tinued to use its inside/outside combination the remainder of

KALIDA — In a showdown of two Putnam County League boys basketball units teams only separated by a few miles, the fans from Kalida and Fort Jennings tonight definitely got their money’s worth.

The

contest

at

the New

Wildcat

Den matched

up two teams direct-

the quarter to battle back to a tie at 34-34 at quarter’s end. The fourth quarter was a

battle from start to

finish with Kalida pulling out front early and midway through the quarter. As the Wildcats started to build on the lead, they began to start taking the air out of the ball to take time off the

clock. However, the

6 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Jennings upsets Kalida in PCL

ed

by

very expe-

Musketeers stayed

rienced

coaches

Warnecke

within reach and after

and programs that were both trying to pick up a PCL win that is never easy to achieve regardless of the team records. The first quarter was a back- and-forth quarter with neither team pulling away. Ft. Jennings turned to their two experienced leaders in the Warnecke (Cody and Kurt) boys to help them stay close to the Wildcats dur- ing the quarter. The Wildcats used their inside/outside game with 5-10 senior Paul Utendorf

(2 3-pointers) and 6-5 senior Ben Schroeder helping under- neath with some much needed and timely baskets. The quarter ended with the Wildcats lead- ing by a slim total of 13-12. The second quarter saw things starting to slip away for the Musketeers. Kalida went on a 7-0 start before Ft. Jennings could get its first basket, coming at the 4:48 mark — a deuce by Kurt Warnecke. However, the

the Wildcats missed on their end, the Musketeers quickly came the other way. As Coach Von Sossan had hoped all week, 5-10 freshman Nick Von Sossan did not let him down, canning a deep 3 to knot the score at 43-43. “That’s what really stood out for me tonight. Our two freshman: Wallenhorst (2 in the first half) and Von Sossan (1 in the second half) hitting three of the biggest 3-oint shots we’ve had all year long,” Coach Von Sossan commented. Kalida had its chances to

take the lead but the ball just could not find the bottom of the net in the last minute for the Wildcats. Twice they were forced to foul, which they did

and sending Cody

Warnecketo the line. However, Warnecke was only able to col- lect on one of the four attempts (the make with 17 seconds left), leaving Kalida with one final attempt to win. However, the

’Cats did not get the

6 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Jennings upsets Kalida in PCL

M u s k e t e e r s weren’t ready to roll over, going on

Schroeder

shot off in time as the

Musketeers come away with a hard-fought PCL

their own run to end of the quarter with 6-0 freshman 6-0 Connor Wallenhorst hitting two deep 3s to bring his team back before halftime, trailing 24-22. The Wildcats played a very aggressive defensive quar- ter which led to six turnovers by the Musketeers, helping the Wildcats to outscore the Musketeers 11-10 to take that 2-point lead into halftime. Jennings coach John Von Sossan had preached to his team all week at practice “we knew they were going to pack it in on us and the Warnecke (Cody) kid and we kept telling our kids someone is just going to have to step it up and hit the big shot.” As Kalida had done in the second quarter, the Musketeers started the third quarter with a 10-0 spurt before Kalida head coach Dick Kortokrax called timeout to settle his team down. Coach Von Sossan credited much of this run to 5-11 senior Nolan Neidert: “The Neidert kid played exceptionally well tonight. He battled Kalida’s big guys all night under the boards and got a body on them and really did some nice things on the defensive end.” The timeout and a third foul called on Cody Warnecke at the 5:30 mark started the momen- tum leaning back towards the Wildcats led by two senior cap- tains, 6-1 Kevan Unverferth and Schroeder, who both chipped in

win Cody Warnecke and Kurt Warnecke each had 11 points for the winners, with Neidert adding nine. For the game, the Musketeers (3-7, 2-1) finished 11-21 (52%) from the field, 5-17 (29%) from beyond the arc and 7-14 (50%) from the foul line. They pulled down 24 rebounds and committed 20 turnovers. For the Wildcats (5-4, 1-1), they were led by Unverferth and Schroeder will 11 points apiece. The Wildcats were 13-36 (36%) from the field, 4-13 (31%) from 3-point land and 5-9 (56%) from the stripe. They committed 14 turnovers and pulled down 17 rebounds. In the JV contest, Kalida came away with a 41-31 win. The Musketeers host Bluffton on Saturday, while the Wildcats host Tinora.

FORT JENNINGS (44)

Nick Von Sossan 1-1-0-5, Conner

Wallenhorst 0-2-0-6, Nolan Neidert 2-1-2-9, Cody Warnecke 3-0-5-11, Kurt

Warnecke 4-1-0-11, Brandon Kohli 1-0- 0-2. Totals 11-5-7/14-44.

KALIDA (43)

Paul Utendorf 0-2-0-6, Cody Mathew

1-1-0-5, Kevan Unverferth 3-1-2-11, Austin Roebke 1-0-1-3, Ben Schroeder 5-0-1-11, Austin Horstman 3-0-1-7. Totals 13-4-5/9-43.

Score by Quarters:

Ft. Jennings 12

10

12

10 - 44

Kalida

13

11

10

9 - 43

Three-point goals: Fort Jennings, Wallenhorst 2, Von Sossan, Neidert, K. Warnecke; Kalida, Utendorf 2, Mathew, Unverferth. JV score: 41-31 (Kalida).

STOCKS

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LCC rolls past Jefferson

By MALLORY KEMPER The Delphos Herald

mkemper2011@

hotmail.com

LIMA — The Lima Central Catholic Thunderbirds boys

3-pointer from senior Billy Taflinger at the 3:45 mark of the opening quarter. Jefferson

junior Dakota Stroh banked in a long triple at the buzzer to bring the deficit to 23-11 at the end of the first period.

basketball teams kept on roll-

The

Wildcats

used

that

ing

with a big 81-44 win

momentum to bounce back

in the Northwest Conference

the second quarter with two

over

Jefferson

over Jefferson buckets from

buckets from

Friday night at Herr

senior

Nick

Gymnasium.

 

Dunlap to bring

LCC

shot

an

Jefferson within

impressive 9-of-

seven, 23-16.

18

from

long

However, LCC

range and 24-of-

then went on a

39

from the floor.

16-4 run to close out the half with a 39-20 lead.

e T h u n d e r b i r d s

T

h

The Thunderbirds improved to 9-1 overall and 3-0 in the NWC and the

Klinger

Wildcats fell to 1-9 on the season and 0-3 in the

added to their mar- gin in the third quarter, tak-

ing a 48-26 lead with a trey

league.

from sophomore

Martyce

“I think we did more posi- tive things tonight than we

have all year. I know that the final score doesn’t show that but we played really hard,

Kimbrough midway through the third quarter. LCC finished up the con- ference win scoring 25 points

in the final stanza of play.

better than we have all year,”

“With the guys

coming

Jefferson coach Marc Smith said. LCC started off strong,

off

the

bench and

making

taking

a

16-6

lead

with

a

things happen for us, it helps a lot,” LCC coach Frank Kill

said. “I thought Kimbrough did a really nice job tonight,

not just in one quarter but playing very well in all four quarters. We have had some defensive breakdowns in the

past couple

games

and we

are going to need to fix that this week.” Kimbrough led all scor-

Thompson led Jefferson with a double-double of 12 points and 10 rebounds. Senior Shayn Klinger had eleven points. Dunlap added seven points. The Wildcats shot just 4-of-16 at the charity stripe. LCC won the junior var- sity contest 61-31. Jefferson pays a visit to

ers with 20 points, includ - ing four 3-point- ers for the home team. Taflinger had 17 points. Sophomore Bruce Hodges added 12 points and four steals. Senior

Tyler O’Connor chipped in with

10 points and eight

Wayne Trace tonight

for a non-league bat- tle, with a JV start of 6:30 p.m.

JEFFERSON (44)

Ross Thompson 6-0-12, Shayn Klinger 4-3-11, Nick

Dunlap 3-0-7, Nick Fitch 2-1-5, Dakota Stroh 2-0- 5, Austin Jettinghoff 1-0-2, Zach Ricker 1-0-2. Totals

17-2-4-44.

LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC (81)

Martyce Kimbrough 8-0- 20, Billy Taflinger 6-2-17, Bruce Hodges 6-0-12, Tyler O’Connor 5-0-10, Tre’on Johnson 2-2-7, Caleb Hodges 1-1-4, John Kidd 2-0-4, Jarren Crawford 1-1-3, Darius West 1-0-2, Tom

Judy 1-0-2, Cory Stewart 0-0-0. Totals

24-9-6-81.

Score by Quarters:

Jefferson 11

Lima CC

23

9

16

12

17

12 - 44 25 - 81

Three-point goals: Jefferson, Dunlap, Stroh; Lima Central Catholic, Kimbrough 4, Taflinger 3, Johnson, C. Hodges.

JV score: 61-31 (Jefferson).

6 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Jennings upsets Kalida in PCL

Dunlap

rebounds. “Missing free throws didn’t help us at all tonight because LCC plays really good transition basketball,” Smith added. “I thought we did a good job competing and we gave ourselves chances to complete 3-point plays and that hasn’t really happened for us all year.” Sophomore Ross

Knights hold off county archrival

By KIRK DOUGAL

Times Bulletin Publisher kdougal@timesbulletin.com

MIDDLE POINT — As cross- county rivalries go, the ongoing competition between Crestview and Lincolnview has been occur- ring for more than 50 years. On Friday night, the two schools rejoined that feud as the Knights traveled to Middle Point and went

home with a hard-fought 47-36 Northwest Conference win over the Lancers. Although the Crestview vic- tory was not over until late in the contest - Lincolnview was down by only five points with the ball and less than three minutes remaining - what proved to be the deciding quarter was the second when the Knights outscored the Lancers 14-2. “Defensively is where we have to make our money,” Crestview coach Jeremy Best said about the second period. “The bad part was that we forced them into several turnovers and then we would turn it right back over. I know we had a 14-point lead at the half but we needed to convert some more of those open-court situations and we’re just not doing a very good job of that right now.” “We did a good job keep- ing them from converting early in the second quarter,” agreed Lincolnview coach Rob Welch. “It was our unforced turnovers in the second quarter and then we couldn’t make a shot. We missed a couple of shots and then we got a little bit frustrated because things weren’t going our way. And then it affected us on the defensive end and we gave up some easy layups and a wide-open 3.” Neither team started the game on fire in what would prove to be an old-fashioned, man-to- man matchup for most of the night. Crestview’s Damian Helm opened the scoring two minutes into the contest with

two shots from beyond the arc before Lincolnview’s Kade Carey answered with a trey. Clayton Longstreth scored from the block to narrow the count to 6-5 before Helm made his third 3 of the quar- ter. That just about accounted for all the scoring except for a Kyle Williams trey for the Lancers as they trailed by only 10-8 after one period. The Lancers’ shooting con- tinued to go colder and colder as they turned the ball over in the second eight minutes. Nick Adam cut through the lane for a bucket and hit a 3 around a Helm putback. Helm put in a free throw for an 8-0 Knight run to start the period before Carey hit a 17-footer to stop the bleeding. But that was all the home team could muster as Adam hit from the elbow and Helm nailed a 10-foot floater as Crestview went into the half leading 24-10. Although neither coach was happy with the way his team took care of the ball in the first half - Crestview had nine turnovers to Lincolnview’s 12 - it was the shooting where the big difference showed. Crestview was 8-of-17 (47%) from the field, including 4-of-7 (57.1%) from beyond the arc; the Lancers were only 4-of- 16 (25%) shooting. Lincolnview came out in the third quarter with their defensive intensity ratcheted up for the final 16 minutes. Lincolnview’s lead- ing scorer Sloan Whitaker, held scoreless in the first half on a fine defensive effort by the Knights’ Matt Holden, finally got on the board the only way open - at the line. He hit 6-of-6 attempts in the period; Carey nailed a 3 along with a Longstreth putback as Lincolnview clawed back within six on two different occasions. However, Helm answered again for Crestview in the last two min- utes, hitting a runner down the lane and his fourth bomb to put his team back up 33-22 at the end

of the third period. But this is an old rivalry and no game is ever quite out of reach. Adam hit a free throw to start the fourth but Lincolnview’s Nick Leeth hit a jumper, Longstreth an old-fashioned hoop-and-harm in the lane and he followed with an 18-footer from the wing. Suddenly, the game was 34-29 with nearly five minutes left to play and Coach Best called a timeout to stop the rally. Dallis Gibson and Whitaker traded buckets before Best had his team go the 4-corner route with a little less than four min- utes to play. Cameron Etzler got loose in the spread for a baseline drive before Williams hit two free throws in response. From there on out, the line was where the game was decided as only a long 3 from Whitaker went into the net to go with all the charity tosses. “I told our kids that I was pleased. We played really hard,” Best added. “It was just an ugly game. Both teams played very hard defense. Damian played fabulous. He’s just a sophomore but you can see his confidence growing as we go along and he gave us some great minutes. We checked Whitaker’s shot chart in the first half and Matt’s defense was huge on him and he relishes that role. And our other guys stepped up, too.” For Coach Welch, he admired what he saw from Crestview’s Helm but he was disappointed in seeing how the game leaked away at the end. “Damian played well; he played for us all summer. He’s a great kid and he works hard,” Welch added. “But there are two teams that truly beat us. All the other games we have had chances to win. Right here, we are down six with the ball and playing well. Then we have a turnover or take a bad shot instead of thinking that this is what we need to do to execute. We have got focus on

that kind of stuff. But we never gave up.” Helm led all scorers with 25 points while Adam added 10 off the bench. The Knights continued their good shooting throughout the contest, making 15-of-34 attempts from the field, a 44-percent clip, including 5-of- 11 (45.5%) from beyond the arc. They made 12-of-20 free throws for 60 percent. Linclolnview was led by Whitaker with 11 points while Longstreth added nine. The Lancers never did get hot, making only 11-of-39 field goal attempts for 28 percent, with 4-of-10 (40%) from 3-point land. The home team did shoot a sizzling 77 percent from the charity stripe on 10-of-13 attempts. Crestview won the battle of the boards 24-19, with Helm leading with eight. Longsgtreth led the Lancers with nine. The Knights won the turnover contest

as well 20-22. With the win, Crestview goes to 9-2 overall and 3-1 in the Northwest Conference. Lincolnview falls to 3-8, 1-3. The Knight junior varsity also took home a win, holding off a hard-charging Lincolnview squad 39-36 as a 3-point attempt bounced away at the buzzer. Lincolnview visits Miller City tonight, while Crestview enter- tains Arlington. Crestview - Adam 4-1-10, Rolsten 0-2-2, Etzler 1-1-3, Helm 8-5-25, Holden 0-0-0, Gibson 2-1- 5, Bolenbaugh 0-2-2, Ream 0-0-0 Totals 15-12-47 Lincolnview - Leeth 1-0-2, Carey 3-0-8, Williams 1-2-5, Evans 0-0-0, Whitaker 2-6-11, Longstreth 4-1-9, McCleery 0-0-0, Ludwig 0-1-1 Totals

11-10-36

Score by Quarters:

Crestview 10 14 9 14 - 47 Lincolnview 8 2 12 14 - 36

Three-pointers: Crestview 5 (Helm 4, Adam); Lincolnview 4 (Carey 2, Williams, Whitaker).

Cougar boys slip by Bulldogs in 2 OTs

By Brian Bassett Times Bulletin Sports Editor sports@timesbulletin.com

VAN WERT — Van Wert coach Dave Froelich’s 402nd win may be one of the most exciting. On the night Coach Froelich was honored for joining the 400-win club in the state of Ohio with a win over Kenton last Friday, the Cougars beat the Elida Bulldogs in dramatic fashion - a 66-61 double- overtime victory. “Tonight [the win] stacks pretty high. It was a great game. Both team laid it all out, came through some adversity from both teams. It was probably a fun game to watch,” Froelich said of the game which also marked the return of the Van Wert High School Winter Homecoming. The Bulldogs stormed out to an 8-2 lead to begin the game behind six points from its 2-time reigning Western Buckeye League Player of

the Year, senior forward Reggie McAdams. The spurt forced a Cougar timeout. Out of the break, Van Wert answered with a rally of their own, a 10-1 run which featured baskets by senior guard Reggie Phillips, senior forward Chadd Phillips and junior forward A.J. Smith, whose 3-pointer later gave the Cougars a 12-11 advantage with 1:53 to play in the quarter. Van Wert continued the run and a Reggie Phillips steal and score gave then a 16-13 to end the first quarter. Senior forward Cory Royster returned the lead to the Bulldogs midway through the second quarter with a put- back to make the score 21-20. Reggie Phillips tied the game with 1:11 to play in the half with a drive and score but the Bulldogs put a rally together heading into the break. Two McAdams free throws in the final seconds of the quarter made the score at the half 32-28, Elida. Senior guard Jacob Myers opened the third quarter

6 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Jennings upsets Kalida in PCL

with a jump shot to bring the Cougars within two and junior point guard Joey Hurless gave the Cougars a 34-31 lead with a 3-point play midway through the quarter. McAdams hit a trey to return the lead to the Bulldogs; after a Smith layup, Royster hit a jump shot to give Elida a 38-36 lead after three quarters of play. A Royster 3-point play with 3:57 to play in the game put the Bulldogs up 44-40 but a pair of Hurless free throws and a Smith layup tied the game with 2:44 to play. McAdams and Smith then traded bas- kets to tie the game at 46 with two minutes to play. The Bulldogs called a tim- eout with 1:21 to play and attempted to run out the clock for a last-second shot. They were forced to take another timeout at the 34.1-second mark. McAdams went to work with 14 seconds left and drove the lane to score but the shot was negated by a charge call. Van Wert could

not counter in regulation and the game went to overtime with the score tied at 46. Hurless and junior guard Aric Thompson traded buck- ets to open the overtime and Elida took a 2-point lead on a pair of McAdams free throws from separate trips to the line. McAdams was fouled again with 32.7 seconds to play but missed the front end of a 1-and-1. Myers was fouled at the other end of the floor and hit a pair of free throws to tie the game at 50 with 21.1 seconds to play. McAdams drove for the Bulldogs and put up a shot for the lead but senior center Joe Moonshower got a piece of the ball for a block. Neither team could get anoth- er shot off and time expired with the game still tied at 50. Reggie Phillips got the tip to begin the second overtime and took the ball in for an acrobatic basket to give the Cougars a 52-50 lead. Royster hit a pair of free throws and converted a layup to put the

See COUGARS, page 7

6 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Jennings upsets Kalida in PCL

www.delphosherald.com

Saturday, Jauuary 14, 2012

The Herald —

7

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, Jauuary 14, 2012 The Herald — 7 Redskins roll in 4th, rout Jays By

Redskins roll in 4th, rout Jays

By JIM METCALFE jmetcalfe@ delphosherald.com

the beginning of the end for the Blue and Gold (4-5, 2-1). After junior Ryan Buescher (11 coun- ters, 5 caroms) hit the 2nd-of-2 tosses at 6:08, the Redskins ran

off eight in a row — four differ- ence players scoring two points — to assume a 50-33 bulge. The Jays tried to rally, get-

ST. HENRY — St. John’s and St. Henry battled in a close boys basketball contest for three quarters Friday night at the St. Henry Middle School Redskin Gymnasium. Not so the fourth. The Redskins got on a roll and buried the Blue Jays with a 27-12 period to secure a 62-44 Midwest Athletic Conference victory. Shooting ended up being the major dif- ference in this contest:

ting within 50-37 on a pair of bas- kets by junior Seth Bockey (10 coun- ters).
ting within 50-37
on a pair of bas-
kets by junior Seth
Bockey (10 coun-
ters). However,
the Redskins had
begun to go to the
free-throw line —
as the Jays were
forced to foul and
started
to
add
up
the
fouls — very
Buescher

the Redskins netting 20-of-32 tries (2-of-6 downtown) for a torrid 62.5 percent while the Jays were as chilly as the temperatures out- side — 17-of-51 (5-of-29 long range) for 33.3 percent. “Right now, we aren’t shooting with a lot of confi- dence. Just like confidence can be contagious, so can a lack of confidence,” St. John’s coach Aaron Elwer noted. “I don’t know what it is right now:

maybe we’re shooting off-bal- ance some or something but we have to figure it out. The 1-3-1 zone they play is not something you see all the time, especially with the length and athleticism they bring to the table, so it can be tough to game-plan for. That has something to do with it.” The Redskins (6-3, 1-2 MAC) led 35-32 to start the finale and used freshman Ryan Mikesell (19 markers) in scor- ing the first seven points of the stanza to grab a 42-32 lead with 6:36 remaining. That was

early on and with Mikesell nailing 10-of-13 from that spot in the stanza, they canned 12-of-18 in that span (20-of-30 for the night for 66.7% versus 5-of-9 for the Jays for 55.6%). The Jays — though they scored the first six markers of the contest — had trouble working against the length that the Red and White had in their 1-3-1 zone defense, only occasionally extending it to 3/4-court. They committed five miscues (15 for the night; 11 for the ’Skins) in the first period but they still had an 11-9 edge at the end of the span as Bockey hit a baby hook inside with 54 ticks on the clock. There wasn’t a lot of differ- ence between the units in the second period, either, though the hosts began to find their range. They shot 6-of-10 from the field in the canto but the Jays began to get second and third chances at their end (win- ning the battle of the back-

boards 29-25, 14-4 offensive). The Jays had trouble match- ing up with 6-4 junior Kyle Stahl (18 markers, 10 boards, 3

blocks) as he scored six in the stanza and 10 for the half. His putback of his own miss with 4.1 ticks on the clock made the Redskin halftime margin

host Tri-Village tonight. In JV action, St. Henry’s Jesse Evers canned a trifecta from the right wing with 4.1 ticks on the clock to give the Redskins a 46-45 double-over- time victory. Justin Ahlers led the vic- tors with 13 and Jason Jacobs added 10.

Sophomore Ryan Koester and Eric Clark topped the Jays (3-6, 0-3) with 19 and 13, respectively.

VARSITY ST. JOHN’S (44)

Ryan Buescher 5-1-11, Alex Clark 2-2-8, Tanner Calvelage 0-1-1, Ben

Warnecke 2-0-6, Curtis

Geise 3-1-8, Cody Looser 0-0-0, Andrew Metzger 0-0-0,

Josh Rode 0-0-0, Seth Bockey 5-0-10. Totals 12-5-5/9-44.

ST. HENRY (62)

Kyle Stahl 8-1-18, Jordan Bender 0-5- 5, Alex Post 2-1-5, Nate Uhlenhake 1-0-2, Mitch Davis 1-0-2, Steven Luttmer 1-0-2, Kevin Knapke 0-0-0, Caleb Heitkamp 1-0- 2, Ryan Mikesell 4-10-19, Craig Knapke 2-3-7. Totals 18-2-20/30-62.

Score by Quarters:

 

St. John’s 11 9

12

12 - 44

St. Henry 9

16

10

27 - 62

Three-point goals: St. John’s, Clark

2, Warnecke 2, Geise; St. Henry, Stahl, Mikesell.

-------

JUNIOR VARSITY ST. JOHN’S (45)

 

Aaron Hellman 0-0-0, Eric Clark 4-4-

13, Ben Wrasman 3-1-7, Ryan Koester 5-7-19, Cole Fischbach 0-0-0, Evan Hays 2-2-6, Eric Gerberick 0-0-0, Jake Csukker 0-0-0. Totals 11-3-14/24-45.

ST. HENRY (46)

 

Tyler Schwieterman 3-0-9, Alex Evers 0-0-0, Jesse Evers 2-2-7, DJ Kunkler 0-0- 0, Caleb Bender 0-0-0, Jason Jacobs 3-2-10, Evan Prenger 21-5, AJ Niekamp 1-0-2, Justin Ahlers 4-5-13. Totals 9-6-

10/12-46.

Score by Quarters:

 

St. John’s 9 14 4

9

(5)

(4) - 45

St. Henry 12 5 10

9

(5)

(5) - 46

Three-point goals: St. John’s, Koester 2, Clark; St. Henry, Schwieterman 3,

Jacobs 2, J. Evers.

25-20. Senior Alex Clark picked up his second foul for the Jays at 6:29 and was
25-20.
Senior Alex
Clark picked up
his second foul for
the Jays at 6:29 and
was limited the rest
of the half.
St. Henry tried
to open up a big-
ger lead in the
third stanza, lead-
ing by as much
as eight — 30-22
Bockey

— early on a Stahl jumper from the right elbow at 5:50. The Jays had none of it. Though they continued to be off-target on their shoot- ing (6-of-17), they gained six offensive boards and forced four turnovers (1 of their own) to get more chances. When junior Curtis Geise (8 points, 7 boards, 4 assists) took a long rebound the length of the court to lay it in at the buzzer, the Jays were within 35-32. “Too many unforced errors cost us. We didn’t handle the ball well enough to have a chance to win on the road,” Elwer added. “We weren’t dribbling, passing or catching well enough to win here. We rebounded pretty well with them and got more chances but we didn’t take advantage of those, either.” The Jays were assessed 23 fouls to St. Henry’s 13 and will visit Shawnee tonight (6 p.m. junior varsity). The Redskins

PP IIGGSSKK IINN PP IICCKKSS
PP IIGGSSKK IINN PP IICCKKSS

All three of us pickers last week: Dave Boninsegna, Guest Picker Mike Wrasman and I; were middling in our assessments. Mike went 4-3 (2-1 in the bowl games and 2-2 in the NFL wild card) to improve that combined total to 141- 63 (70-29 college and 71-34

pros). Dave was 3-4 (as was I) and we both went 1-2 and

2-2.

Dave remains in front of me with marks of 147-78 (74-38 and 73-40) versus my slate of 139-84 (70-42 and 69-42). Unless I choose to have the college all-star games picked in the coming weeks (one might say NOT!), our college marks are our final ones of the 2011-12 gridiron season (sob! sob!! Parting is such sweet sorry!!) and we will be sad - dled forever with them — at least until August! I have asked Mike to return as GP and he agreed. What is he thinking?!

Here

are

the

games:

NFL

Playoffs:

all year — and can make enough big plays outside, San Fran will win. My pick says it happens. NEW ENGLAND: The Tim Tebow “thing” is a tremendous story, almost magical. The thing is, Bill Belichick ain’t going for it. The Pats already own a ‘W’ over the Broncos and played Tebow as well — and physi - cally — as anyone. Tom Brady is extremely motivat - ed to win this game because the Pats have struggled in the playoffs recently and Brady is a proud man and does not want to lose to Tebow. This is not a great NE defense by any stretch but it is getting better — healthier — and they have been able to rest and prepare. The Broncos secondary is beat up, with two backup safeties. With

that and my sus- picion that Denver won’t change much as far as its offensive game plan goes — ridic - ulously predictable — Patriots get win in Foxborough. BALTIMORE:

Another great

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, Jauuary 14, 2012 The Herald — 7 Redskins roll in 4th, rout Jays By

Metcalfe

story: Texans endure crippling injuries and are down to their third-team quarter - back and yet remain alive. However, though this is not the ravenous Ravens defense of the past, it’s still pretty ferocious; not good with a rookie quarterback. As well, Joe Flacco is angry; he feels disrespected with all the talk about Tebow, Brady, Brees, Eli Manning and Aaron Rodgers. Baltimore is also an entirely different team at home; guess where this game is at? In the end, Ravens roll. GREEN BAY: I have gone back and forth on this one. On one hand, Giants

New Orleans at San Francisco; Denver at New England; Houston at Baltimore; NY Giants at Green Bay.

JIM METCALFE

PROS:

SAN FRANCISCO: The Saints are simply not as good outdoors on natural grass as they are at home or in a dome. Plus, the 49ers have a tremendous defense that can slow down Drew Brees and Company. If there is a weakness on the Saints, it is a suspect defense. If Frank “Al” Gore gets 20-plus car - ries and Alex Smith does not make the big mistake — which he really hasn’t done

defensive line is back to its nasty, dominating self, especially rushing the pass- er. Eli and the crew are putting it together, espe - cially the offensive line and the running game — eerily similar to 2007-08, their last Super Bowl title. On the other hand, two words:

Aaron Rodgers. He is play - ing at a high level and is getting some important cogs back, especially his tackles in Chad Clifton and Bryan Bulaga, wideout Greg Jennings and running back James Starks. The defense

Look

for

this to

be a good

game but

the Ravens take

the next step towards Super

Bowl 46.

 

Green

Bay:

Green

Bay

has just

been so

good all

year

for

things

to

end this

weekend but don’t be sur -

prised if it does; the Giants destroyed the Falcons and could use that momentum to

carry them into the fro -

zen tundra. However, I like the Packers to head to their second

NFC Championship game in a row (possi - bly their second Super Bowl, also).

M

I

K

E

WRASMAN

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, Jauuary 14, 2012 The Herald — 7 Redskins roll in 4th, rout Jays By

has not lived up to

Boninsegna

NFL:

expectations but it is rested and does one thing well: force turnovers. I also think Clay Matthews and BJ

Raji are due for big games before the juiced-up Packer faithful on the “Frozen Tundra of Lambeau Field.” The last time they played was a 38-35 Packer win in the regular season. I see something similar this time.

DAVE BONINSEGNA PROS:

New Orleans: The 49ers really came out of nowhere this season but the seasoned Saints were suppose to be here. If this game comes down to quarterbacks, Drew Brees is the better of the two. I think this game comes down to that; the Saints win and move to the NFC Championship game. New England: I would really like it to be Tebow time again but it is hard to pull off two upsets in the playoffs; the Patriots will be ready and head to the AFC Championship contest. Baltimore: The Texans were very impressive against the Bengals, while the Ravens have been impres- sive most of the season.

New

Orleans:

Upset special #1: Saints sail

by 49ers. Niners aren’t that good. Denver: Upset special #2: Tebow’s troops troup by Patriots, ex-old-Browns’ coach. Miracle happens in New England (as opposed to the old 70s Barry Manilow tune “Weekend In New England”). Jim probably doesn’t remember that tune (Editor’s note: vaguely!) . Baltimore: Only Texas team left in the playoffs run ends against ex-Browns

in Baltimore (EN: and there were NO teams from Minnesota in the play -

offs!) . New Jersey Giants:

Upset special #3: Lambeau Field is a tough place to win for visitors. However, Jerseyites (who beat bum -

bling Cowboys; EN: what does that have to do with

anything?) will pull off tri - umph over the Green Gang. Giants and Pack don’t care for each other dating back to the 1920s. Pack hate the Giants almost as much as they hate the Bears. Giants hate the Pack almost as much as they hate the Cowboys.

Cougars (Continued from Page 6)

Bulldogs back ahead, 54-52, but Myers countered with a layup to tie the game at 54. Royster made a free throw to put Elida up one but a pair of Smith free throws and another basket by Reggie Phillips gave Van Wert a 58-55 lead with 1:13 to play. Royster countered with a free throw but Chadd Phillips extended the Van Wert lead to four, 60-56, with a layup. Mathias answered with a basket for the Bulldogs but Myers hit two more free throws to return the Cougar lead to four with 21.9 sec- onds to play. Myers was fouled again after a missed Elida shot

and again converted but a McAdams 3 with 8.9 seconds to go brought the Bulldogs within 64-61. Elida attempt- ed to call a timeout with none left and was issued a technical foul. Myers made both shots and the Cougars retained the ball and ran out the clock for the 66-61 win. The Cougars finished with game without the services of Hurless and Moonshower, as Hurless fouled out in the first overtime and Moonshower in the second. “We had a chance to fold when our lineups got a little bit altered but our guys came in and just made enough plays. We were fortunate to

steal one. We’ve got to put it in perspective and enjoy it a little bit, then move on to next week,” Froelich said. The Cougars will enjoy beating the league favorite — who falls to 9-2 after the loss, 2-1 in the WBL - in what most would call an upset even though the Cougars improve to 8-1 and 3-0 after the win. Van Wert was led by Myers,with 21 points. Reggie Phillips added 13 for the Cougars. McAdams recorded a game-high 24 points for the Bulldogs, Royster added 22. The Cougar junior varsity also won 53-38.

Elida visits Archbold (6:30 p.m.) tonight and Van Wert visits Bath Friday.

Elida (61)

Stratton 0-4 0-0 0, McAdams 8-22 6-9 24, Thompson 2-2 1-2 6, Mathias 2-9 2-2 7, Royster 7-11 8-12 22, McDonald 1-3 0-0 2.

Van Wert (66)

C. Phillips 3-5 2-2 8, Hurless 3-4 5-7 11, Myers 6-12 8-8 21, R.

Phillips 4-8 5-6 13, Moonshower 1-2 01 2, Smith 4-10 2-2 11, Markward

0-0 0-0 0, Wolford 0-0 0-0 0, Keber 0-0 0-0 0.

Score by Quarters:

Elida 13 19 6 8 4 11 -61

Van Wert 16 12 8 10 4 16 -66

Three-point goals: Elida 3-16

(Thompson 1-1,

McAdams 1-6,

Mathias 1-7, Stratton 0-2), Van Wert

2-9 (Myers 1-3, Smith 1-5, Hurless

0-1).

FISHING REPORT

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

AKRON — Many north- east Ohio anglers consider the combination of falling snow and dipping temperatures a rec- ipe for hanging up the fishing equipment until spring. There is a unique segment of the out- doorsmen and women, however,

who are eager to trek outside

and brave the cold in order to catch some fish, according to

ing good, non-cotton socks and loose waterproof boots. Boots that are a bit too big help circu- lation continue throughout your feet. Lastly, mittens are the best way to go to protect your hands from the icy water. Some winter anglers even wear thin, rubber gloves underneath mittens to allow flexibility. It doesn’t hurt to bring extra clothes, too! Be safe: No ice is safe ice! For one person and gear (approx, 200 pounds) at least four inches

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, Jauuary 14, 2012 The Herald — 7 Redskins roll in 4th, rout Jays By

the Ohio Department of Natural

of ice is

Always fish

Resources (ODNR), Division of

with a partner or in an area with

Wildlife. “More adventurous anglers

frozen water, you can be reeling

several other anglers

... Let others know exactly where

can catch a variety of fish, includ-

you are going and when you plan

ing yellow perch, sunfish like

to

Place a cell phone in

bluegill, red-ears and pumpkin-

a plastic bag to protect it from

seed, crappie, walleye and, in a

moisture in case you get

...

few places, even northern pike,”

Sprinkle sand around your feet

said Phil Hillman, fish manage-

for better traction on the

...

ment supervisor for Division of Wildlife in northeast Ohio.

Wear a life vest in case of an emergency or at least take along

Most lakes and ponds that

a PFD seat

Avoid

anglers fish in the warmer months are just as good in the winter, so with a little skill and knowledge about fishing on the

areas of feeder streams, springs, bridge pilings, docks and dam structures since ice is usually very thin What to do: If you fall into

in fish in no time. “Learning about the body of water to be fished, necessary equipment
in fish in no time.
“Learning about the body of
water to be fished, necessary
equipment to take along, how to
dress properly and, most impor-
tantly, knowing safety precau-
tions are all components of a
pleasant winter fishing experi-
ence,” noted Hillman.
Get to know the lake: To
begin learning about a certain
lake, free lake maps are available
through the Division of Wildlife.
These maps depict lake bound-
aries, good fishing spots, park-
ing locations and water depths.
Call Wildlife District Three in
Akron at (330) 644-2293 or visit
www.wildohio.com to obtain
a map of your favorite lake.
For panfish, Punderson Lake in
Geauga County, Pymatuning
the water, try to remain as calm
as
Slip your loose
boots off to better tread
...
Use ice awls to pull yourself out
of the
If no ice awls are
available, call for help and try
“swimming out”; let your body
rise up to firm ice and crawl out.
Stay flat, distributing your
Keep your
clothes on once out of the water.
This will keep you insulated ..
If someone else falls in, use
(call for help).
Anglers should call Wildlife
District Three in Akron at (330)
644-2293 with questions or con-
cerns before venturing out. View
an ice fishing safety chart.

Lake in Ashtabula County and

the Portage Lakes reservoirs in

Summit County are long-time producers. For walleye, Berlin Lake in Portage, Mahoning, and Stark counties, as well as Mosquito Lake in Trumbull County (also good for pike) or Pymatuning Lake in Ashtabula County are all excellent. Anglers should keep an eye on water lev- els fluctuating, though. Equipment: Some basic tools you will need before you hit the hard water: bait bucket, dip net, flashers, depth finders (or under-

water cameras to see what lies beneath the ice), gaff hook, hook disgorger, ice auger, ice chisel, ice fishing rods (short, with or without a spring-type bobber), jigging spoons or other similar lures (Rapala jigs, Sonars, Vibe- E’s) for predacious fish, live bait such as minnow (for larger fish) or wax worms (for smaller fish),

seat, skimmer, sled for transport-

ing equipment, “tip-ups” (trip- ping mechanisms which send up a flag on a strike) and “pin- mins” (small ice jigs that can be tipped with live bait). Other items to bring: extra clothes, energy-rich snacks and warm beverages, a coil of rope, first aid kit, waterproof matches, ice awls, floatation device, cell phone (in a sealed plastic bag). Dress for Success: Layering your clothes makes it much eas- ier to remove or add clothes depending on your comfort level. The first layer should be a good pair of thermal underwear that keeps perspiration away from the skin. The second layer should be wool, fleece or flan- nel, followed by a third layer of windproof or waterproof mate- rial. A warm, wool or fleece hat is also important! Avoid cotton altogether because it is a very poor insulator. Don’t forget to keep those toes toasty by wear-

Lake Erie

Regulations to Remember:

The daily bag limit for Lake Erie walleye is 6 fish. The mini- mum size limit is 15 inches. The daily bag limit for yellow

perch is 30 fish per angler on all Ohio waters of Lake Erie. The steelhead daily bag limit is 2 fish per angler with a mini- mum size limit of 12 inches. The Lake Erie black bass (lar- gemouth and smallmouth) daily bag limit is 5 fish and a mini- mum size limit of 14 inches. Walleye: With unseasonably warm weather (as of Tuesday), fish are still being caught in open water NW of the Huron River and also at night around Cleveland harbor. Trolling crankbaits in the top 15 feet of water has produced most of the

fish. ...

The water temperature is

36 degrees off of Toledo and 37

degrees off of Cleveland accord-

ing to the nearshore marine fore- cast.

Lake Erie Weather Forecast for waters beyond 5 nautical miles of shore on the lake Today: West winds 10-20 knots becoming southwest and diminishing to around 10 knots. Waves 2-4 feet subsiding to 1-3 feet. Tonight: Southwest winds 5-10 knots becoming west. Waves 1-2 feet. Sunday: West winds 5-15 knots becoming south 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet building to 2-4 feet. Monday: South winds 10-20 knots. A chance of snow show- ers, then snow showers likely. Waves 2-4 feet subsiding to 1-2 feet. Tuesday: West winds 15-25 knots becoming 20-25 knots. Rain likely. Snow likely in the afternoon, then a chance of snow showers. Waves 1-3 feet build- ing to 5-8 feet.

I N T E R E S T E D I N S P O R
I
N T E R E S T E D
I N S P O R T S ?
W O U L D Y O U L I K E
T O E A R N
S O M E E X T R A C A S H ?
The Delphos Herald is
looking for interested
applicants who enjoy
attending local sporting events
and would like to to cover them
for the Delphos Herald.
We we lc ome all applic ant s.
We c an wor k wit h your sc he dule !
C o nt a c t : J i m M e t c a l fe
4 1 9 - 6 9 5 - 0 0 1 5 ,
E x t e ns i o n 1 3 3
o r by e m a i l a t
j m e t c a l fe @de l pho s he r a l d. c o m

8 The Herald

Saturday, January 14, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Giving makes the body feel good

The warm and fuzzy feeling that arises when helping others is what drives many to donate mon- ey or do good for others. Studies show that altruism may actually have profound physiological ef- fects. Scientists have determined that the feelings of happiness associat- ed with doing good can be traced to a particular pleasure center of the brain that can be viewed and measured with brain scans. There are physical components to doing thoughtful or charitable things, according to a report in The New York Times. This bodes well for donations as the recession continues to hit the country in a big way. Individu- als who are facing layoffs or pay cuts may still dig deep into their pockets for charitable donations because they seek the high that donating provides. And it isn’t just financial dona- tions that make a person happy. Any type of goodwill toward oth- ers is a way to generate the endor- phins and mood-boosting proper- ties of altruism. That means there are plenty of opportunities that can

boost feelings of happiness.

• Visit seniors in a retirement

thinking of them and wanted to surprise them.

community or assisted living fa-

Take

in

the trash cans for

cility and sit and chat for a while.

your entire street, especially if the

weather is nasty.

 

• Knock on an elderly neigh-

bor’s door and find out if you can

help out with any chores around the house.

• Bring

a friend breakfast or

lunch simply because you were

Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy

• Tell a fast-food employee or

another hard worker that they’re doing a good job. Complaints come easy in the service industry, but praise is often hard to get.

• Volunteer to watch neighbor- hood children so other mothers and fathers can get a much-needed break.

• Don’t ignore a phone solici- tation from a charity organization. Get more information and do your best to donate.

• If you practice a religion, go

to your house of worship and par- ticipate in community together-

ness.

• Hold a door, smile at some-

one

or

offer

to

get

something

down from a tall shelf in a store.

It’s the little things that can bring pleasure.

Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy

• Share something you have

with another person who doesn’t. That may mean generator-supplied electric power during a power outage, a special snack at school lunch, a tool, a piece of clothing or

whatever you can think of.

There are so many ways to give to others, and one of the biggest

benefits is the smiles and positive

feelings giving provides.

Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy

Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.

Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Giving makes the body feel good The warm and fuzzy
   

Choir

Evening worship and Teens Alive

Committee.

 

6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday

Thursday - 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Blood

 

(grades 7-12).

Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.

Evening Prayer Meeting

A.C.T.S.

Drive @ Eagles; 4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-

 

7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible

NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor

Supper’s On Us Friday - 3:00 p.m. Mustard Seeds

vice. Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.

ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

VAN WERT VICTORY

Study. Thursday - Choir Rehearsal

 

Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader Contact: 419-695-3566 Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German

Rd., Delphos

 

MARION BAPTIST CHURCH 2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319

Have you ever wanted to preach the “Word of God?” This is your time to do it. Come share your love of Christ with us.

601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.; Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.; Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30

Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line - (419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379. Emergency - (419) 993-5855

Services:

Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and

6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.

Elida/lima/GomEr

a.m. - Communion Service; Friday

Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A

Time As This” All & Non Denominational

8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.

 

Tri-County Community Intercessory Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church

ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 331 E. Second St., Delphos

 

IMMANUEL UNITED

 

CHURCH OF GOD

 

FAITH MISSIONARY

 

(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -

419-695-4050

METHODIST CHURCH

10698 US 127S., Van Wert

BAPTIST CHURCH

Everyone Welcome.

Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor

 

699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807

(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)

DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH

(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,

Youth Study

Nursery available for all services.

 

Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons

 

Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberlin Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45

Tommy Sandefer, lead pastor Ron Prewitt, sr. adult pastor

Road U, Rushmore Pastor Robert Morrison

Sunday – 10 am Church School;

Mary Beth Will, Liturgical

a.m. contemporary

Sunday worship & children’s minis-

11:00

Church

Service;

6:00

p.m.

Pastor Terry McKissack 302 N Main, Delphos

Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council

NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER

try - 10:00 a.m. www.vwvcoh.com

Evening Service Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening

Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423 Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School

 

President

Celebration of the Sacraments

2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673 Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor

facebook: vwvcoh

Service

Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;

Sunday

10

a.m.

Worship.

 

ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA

 

6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service

Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,

Wednesday

7

p.m.

Evening ser-

 

TRINITY LUTHERAN

 

CATHOLIC CHURCH

Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,

 

11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on Sunday bulletin.

vice.

 

303 S. Adams, Middle Point Rev. Tom Cover

512

W. Sycamore, Col. Grove Office 419-659-2263

Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday

CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH

Sunday–

9:30

a.m.

Sunday

Fax: 419-659-5202

 

FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN

of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to

2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida

School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.

Father Tom Extejt

CHURCH OF GOD

310 W. Second St.

419-692-5737

schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions. Reconciliation – Tuesday and

Phone: 339-3339

Rev. Frank Hartman

Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.; First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;

Pastor Harry Tolhurst

Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-

Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all

GRACE FAMILY CHURCH

Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30

Sunday: 11:00 Worship Service - Everyone Welcome Communion first Sunday of every month.

4:00 p.m. Anytime by request. Matrimony – Arrangements must be made through the rectory six months in advance. Anointing of the Sick – Communal

ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m. Evening Service. Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer Meeting. Office Hours: Monday-Friday,

634 N. Washington St., Van Wert Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor- ship with Pulpit Supply.

a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m., anytime by appointment.

Communion at Van Crest Health

celebration in May and October.

8-noon, 1-4- p.m.

 

18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer

 

Care Center - First Sunday of each

Administered upon request.

 

KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST

419-642-5264

Fax: 419-642-3061

month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and

ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

 

15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert

 

Rev. Mark Walls

 

assisted living.

   

Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,

Phone: 419-965-2771

 

Sunday

-

9:30 a.m.

Sunday

ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH

422 North Pierce St., Delphos

   

Elida

 

Pastor Chuck Glover

School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.

 

Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 10:25 a.m.

Phone 419-695-2616

Rev. Angela Khabeb

Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast Sunday-8:45 a.m. Sunday School; 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Monday - 5:00 p.m. Hall in use

 

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636 Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor Administrative aide: Rita Suever Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday. Sacrament of Reconciliation:

 

Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.

PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH 3995 McBride Rd., Elida

Phone 419-339-3961

Wednesday - Youth Prayer and

Bible Study - 6:30 p.m. Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m. Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.

HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor 7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m. Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.

Saturday.

LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD

TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH

Newcomers register at parish.

 

Elida - Ph. 222-8054

 

605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION

Wednesday - 9:00 a.m. Sewing Day Friday - 10:00 a.m. Newsletter

Deadline

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD

808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos

Marriages: Please call the parish house six months in advance. Baptism: Please call the parish. ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH

 

Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m. School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6 p.m. Sunday evening.

Ph: (419) 238-2788 Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;

CATHOLIC CHURCH Ottoville Rev. John Stites Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;

“Where Jesus is Healing Hurting Hearts!”

 

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH

 

9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,

SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.

p.m. Service for women at Van Wert

jail

Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,

Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

One block south of Stadium Park.

4750 East Road, Elida

Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,

419-692-6741

Senior Pastor - Dan Eaton

Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - “Celebration of

Worship” with Kids Church & Nursery provided.; 6:00 p.m. Youth Ministry at

The ROC

Monday - 7:00 p.m. Prayer in the

500 S. Canal, Spencerville

419-647-6202

Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation; 5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Mass.

 

Pastor - Brian McManus Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail- able. Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult

Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -

Choir.

Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00

Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding

ST. BARBARA CHURCH 160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827

419-488-2391

Fr. John Stites

Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH

Sanctuary

SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL 107 Broadway St., Spencerville

SPENCERVILLE CHURCH

 

Prayer Group in Fireside Room; 10-noon - Banquet Table Food

135

N. Water St., Ft. Jennings

 

Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.Discipleship

Pastor Charles Muter

 

GOMER UNITED CHURCH

 

Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends

Rev. Joe Przybysz

& Biuble Study in The Upper Level

Home Ph. 419-657-6019

OF CHRIST

419-642-2681

in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.

Phone: 419-286-2132

For more info see our website: www. delphosfirstassemblyofgod.com.

Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00 a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.

7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio

Women’s group in Room 108. Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small

Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.

DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish 470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940

Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser- vice.

OF THE NAZARENE

gomererucc@bright.net Rev. Brian Knoderer Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship BREAKTHROUGH 101 N. Adams St., Middle Point

Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.

groups, Discipleship Series in sanc- tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery, Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8 p.m. Worship Team rehearsal. Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet

ST. MICHAEL CHURCH Kalida Fr. Mark Hoying

Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,

9:30 Sunday School

317 West North St. - 419-296-2561

Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming

Table Food Pantry.

Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.

10:30 Sunday morning service. Youth ministry every Wednesday from 6-8 p.m.

Pastor Tom Shobe 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30

a.m. Morning

Worship;

7:00

p.m.

Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m, 6 p.m.

 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

 

Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m. Masses.

Children’s ministry every third

Wednesday Service

 

13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert

Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.

Saturday from 11 to 1:30.

TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

   

Ph. 419-238-0333 Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201

7:30 p.m.

ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST

Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville

 

Email: fbaptvw@bright.net

  • 335 S. Main St.

Delphos

Pastor - Rev. David Howell Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

Phone 419-647-5321

Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.

 

CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH 10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd. Van Wert, Ohio

419-238-9426

Pastor Steven A. Robinson Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.

DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH 11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES

Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor Sunday- 8:45 a.m. Friends and

Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA; 7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.

Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723 Pastor Wayne Prater

Spencerville Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor

Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School LIVE, 5 til 10 meet you at the Altar;

 
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723 Pastor Wayne Prater Spencerville Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday

Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15 a.m. Sunday School for all ages. Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and prayer meeting.

TRINITY UNITED

Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.

9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville

10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE Tuesday - 9:00-11:15 a.m. Mothers Uplifting Mothers Wednesday - 1:30 p.m. Adult Prayer & Bible Study; 6:45 p.m. Calvary

MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship

PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH

 
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15 a.m. Sunday School for all ages. Wednesday - 7 p.m.
 

Pastors Phil & Deb Lee Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-

HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Independent Fundamental)

  • 211 vice. Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study

E. Third St., Delphos

METHODIST CHURCH

Rev. David Howell, Pastor Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship Service/ Communion; 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible

Study; 9:30 a.m. Church School for all

YOUTH, Women’s Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Men’s Bible Study

SALEM UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

15240 Main St. Venedocia Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor Church Phone: 419-667-4142

Services; 7:00 p.m Worship. Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet- ing.

Pastors: Bill Watson Rev. Ronald Defore 1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891

Pastors Phil & Deb Lee Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser - HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Independent

ages; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 11:30

Deadline

Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial Rt. 2, Box 11550

Sunday

-

8:30 a.m.

-

Adult Bell

Phone (419) 238-5813

 

a.m. Radio Worship on WDOH; 1:30 p.m.

Spencerville 45887

Choir; 8:45 a.m.

 

Jr.

Choir;

9:30

Head Usher: Ted Kelly

/Communion at Nursing Home Monday - Office Closed - Marting

 

Rev. Robert King, Pastor

a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday

10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10

Worship at the

Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;

school;

6:30

p.m.

- Capital

Funds

a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30

Luther King Day; February Newsletter

10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.

 

a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class

church of your

Wednesday- 7:00 p.m. Chancel

We thank the sponsors of this page and ask you to please support them.

choice this weekend.

RAABE FORD LINCOLN 11260 Elida Road DELPHOS, OH 45833 Ph. 692-0055 Toll Free 1-800-589-7876
RAABE FORD LINCOLN 11260 Elida Road DELPHOS, OH 45833 Ph. 692-0055 Toll Free 1-800-589-7876

RAABE FORD LINCOLN

11260 Elida Road DELPHOS, OH 45833 Ph. 692-0055 Toll Free 1-800-589-7876

130 N. MAIN ST. DELPHOS PHONE 419-692-0861 •CARPET •FURNITURE Daily 9-5:30 Sat. 9-4, Sun. 12-4 Lehmann’s
130 N. MAIN ST.
DELPHOS
PHONE
419-692-0861
•CARPET
•FURNITURE
Daily 9-5:30
Sat. 9-4, Sun. 12-4
Lehmann’s

HARTER & SCHIER FUNERAL HOME

209 W. 3rd St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

419-692-8055

PITSENBARGER

SUPPLY

Professional Parts People

PITSENBARGER SUPPLY Professional Parts People 234 N. Canal St. Delphos, O. Ph. 692-1010

234 N. Canal St. Delphos, O. Ph. 692-1010

Vanamatic

Company

AUTOMATIC AND HAND SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS

701 Ambrose Drive

Delphos, O.

www.delphosherald.com

Saturday, January 14, 2012

The Herald —9

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9

St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency

St. John’s Elementary School fifth-graders are par - ticipating in the e3smart SM program, a major out - reach in innovative ener - gy efficiency education. The e3smart SM program is offered to students in grades 5-12 within the 61 county AEP Ohio service territory and is designed to bring math and science learning into students’ homes to reduce energy demands and usage. e3smart SM uses a home to school model to edu - cate families about energy conservation and energy efficiency. Students use energy efficiency devices to learn about required ener - gy benchmarks in the state science standards. Students take home the items used in the classroom and apply what they learned in the classroom in their home, ultimately installing the devices. For example, stu - dents use CFLs to learn about electricity, efficiency, heat, energy transforma - tions, and other science prin - ciples. They collect data, graph, and identify trends in data-all the best practices in science education. Then, they take home the CFLs, share their new knowledge, and install them with their families. Each participat - ing student receives a kit of energy saving devices for use at home and activi - ties for family participation. Once installed, these elec - tricity and fuel-saving mea - sures provide the opportu - nity to see how low-cost and no-cost measures can effec - tively lower energy use. Science teacher Diana Wrasman attended an exten - sive professional develop -

ment training as part of the project. “With e3smart SM , our students will learn at school about energy forms, trans - formation and conserva - tion. They will study the five major uses of energy in the home, and will be encouraged to apply what they learn at home to help their families save energy and money,” said Diana Wrasman. The e3smart SM program is part of the AEP Ohio gridSMART SM initiative. This cost effective pro - gram will help the company meet its targets for reduc - ing electricity consumption enacted by the state of Ohio in Senate Bill 221. The schools and families incur no cost to participate in the program. Last year par - ticipating students report - ed installing over 70,000 CFL light bulbs, replacing existing incandescent bulbs. The students also reported installing outlet and switch gaskets, weather stripping, door sweeps, and low-flow showerheads. In addition, they adjusted their thermo - stats to a more efficient set - ting and lowered their water heating setting. “e3smart SM continues AEP’s long-standing tra - dition of enriching energy efficiency education in schools,” said Jon Williams, manager, Energy Efficiency/ Demand Response. “OEP’s success with energy educa - tion over more than 20 years and their continued inno - vation with both teacher training and with the earlier pilot project made them the natural choice to implement e3smart SM . We are educat - ing the next generation of

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.

Photo submitted

St. John’s fifth-graders are learning about innovative energy efficiency through the e3smart SM program through AEP Ohio. Each participating student receives a kit of energy saving devices for use at home and activities for family participation.

AEP Ohio customers about

implemented

four

years

used multiple times since

The Ohio Energy Project

how they can save energy

ago

with

the

support of

then in districts throughout

(OEP), an award-winning

for lighting, electronics and

an Ohio EPA grant and

Ohio. As a nonprofit orga -

energy education organiza -

appliances, space heating

then

awarded

the

dis -

nization, The Ohio Energy

tion, is administering the

and cooling, building enve -

tinction

of

“Outstanding

Project is dedicated to serv -

project. During the last

lope (insulation and fenes -

Environmental

Education

ing teachers and offering

school year, the program

tration) and water heating.”

Project of

the

Year

in

the

the best energy education

reached over 15,900 stu -

Ohio Energy Project’s

State of Ohio” by the Ohio

materials available to teach -

dents and their families in

original initiative was

EPA in 2008.

It has been

ers and students in Ohio.

schools throughout Ohio.

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.

Wishing Well

Pediatrics

*Certified with The

American Board

of Pediatrics Since 1992

*Accepting New Patients

*Most Insurances

Accepted Including Medicaid

*Complete

ADHD Evaluation

and Treatment Provided

Wishing Well Pediatrics *Certified with The American Board of Pediatrics Since 1992 *Accepting New Patients *Most
Wishing Well Pediatrics *Certified with The American Board of Pediatrics Since 1992 *Accepting New Patients *Most

Celeste Lopez, M.D.

154 W. Third Street,

Delphos, Ohio

(419) 692-WELL

(9355)

www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
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www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, January 14, 2012 The Herald —9 St. John’s fifth-graders learning innovative energy efficiency St.

10 – The Herald

Saturday, January 14, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Classifieds www.delphosherald.com New Year New Beginnings New Home
Classifieds
www.delphosherald.com
New Year
New Beginnings
New Home

2 Bedroom Apartments

$ 399/mo

+ $87.50 Deposit SPECIAL

(with approved conditions) + 6,000 shopping points

Contact office for details.

Deer Creek Apartments

1000 Lima Ave. Delphos, OH 45833 www.YourNextPlaceToLive.com

419-692-9996

419-692-SOLD 419-453-2281 Check out all of our listings at: WWW.TLREA.COM $45,000-$75,000 $101,000-$150,000 303 W. 5th, Delphos:
419-692-SOLD
419-453-2281
Check out all of our listings at: WWW.TLREA.COM
$45,000-$75,000
$101,000-$150,000
303
W. 5th, Delphos: 3 BR, 1
Bath. Affordable Living!!! $55K
Tony: 233-7911.
414
W. 6th, Delphos: 3 BR,
Fenced Yard. Lynn: 234-2314.
OPEN SATURDAY 1:00-3:00
40 W 4th, Ft. Jennings:
Ex-
390
Wayne, Ottoville: 3 BR,
cellent 3 BR with big open
Remodeld. Reduced to $65K.
basement. Updated nicely
Tony: 233-7911.
throughout. Tony: 233-7911.
240
E. Canal, Ottoville: 4BR,
406 Ottawa, Kalida: 3 BR,
Huge 28’ x 60 Garage. Asking
2
Bath,
Huge Garage,
Patio.
$75K. Tony
Very nice. Tony: 233-7911.
$76,000-$100,000
$150,000 +
710
S. Main, Delphos: 5 BR,
2 Bath. Very Affordable BIG
home! Lynn: 234-2314.
828
N. Main, Delphos: 4 BR,
Newer shingles. Nice interior.
Owner wants offer. Tony: 233-
7911.
337 Walnut, Ottoville: RE-
229
Douglass, Delphos: Re-
duced. 4 BR, 1 Bath; Seller will
DUCED! 3 BR, 2 Bath, Up-
dated throughout. Fish Pond,
Garage & Stg Bldg. Owners
help with closing costs. Gary
re-locating. Tony: 233-7911.
692-1910.
309
4th St., Ottoville: Move-in
15631 17-N, Kalida: 3 BR, 2 ½
Baths. 4 Car Garage & Heated
condition. Bsmt, Garage. Ask-
Shop.
2.86 Acres, Fenced
ing $90’s. Tony.
Yard, Fin Bsmt. EXCELLENT!
OPEN SUNDAY 2:00-4:00
Tony: 233-7911
466
Dewey, Delphos: Beauti-
LOTS
ful 2 BR on dead-end street.
Take a look! Gary: 692-1910.
932 N. Washington, Delphos:
GO TO: WWW.TLREA.COM
for color photos and full
descriptions of all of these fine
properties. Then, call the agent
listed to arrange a
viewing of your new home!!!
Lynn: 234-2314.
OTTOVILLE SUBDIVISION
LOTS: Next to school. Call
Tony for details: 233-7911.
KALIDA GOLF COURSE: 2
available. Tony: 233-7911.
You can afford more house than ever before. Take advantage of
this AWESOME opportunity TODAY!!!
10 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Classifieds www.delphosherald.com New Year New Beginnings New

001

Card Of Thanks

OUR HEARTFELT thanks

to our families, relatives,

friends and neighbors for their support throughout

Homer’s life. Your prayers, flowers, cards, memorials

and food offerings are deeply appreciated. Our

thanks

to

Harter

and

Schier

Funeral

Home,

Pastor

John

Medaugh,

Pastor David Howell and The Meadows of Kalida

for the outstanding care

you

gave

dad

the last

1-1/2 years. Lastly, thank you hospice for keeping him comfortable. We

thank God for allowing 98 years together.

 

The Family of

 

Homer Baumgartner

010

Announcements

ADVERTISERS: YOU can

place a 25 word classified

ad in more than 100 news-

papers with over one and

a half million total circula-

tion across Ohio for $295.

It's easy

...

you

place one

order and pay

with one

check through Ohio

Scan-Ohio Statewide

Classified Advertising Net-

work. The Delphos Herald

advertising dept. can set

this up for you. No other

classified

ad

buy

is

sim -

pler or more cost effective.

Call 419-695-0015, ext

138.

040

Services

 
 

HOUSECLEANING

 

IN DELPHOS

21 yrs. experience

Honest, hardworking,

 

and reliable.

 

Good References.

 

Call (419)692-1305

 

LAMP REPAIR

 

Table or floor.

 

Come to our store.

 

Hohenbrink TV.

419-695-1229

080

Help Wanted

10 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Classifieds www.delphosherald.com New Year New Beginnings New

PART-TIME office help

needed. Office duties in-

clude filing, multi-line

phones, mail, and other

misc.

tasks.

Microsoft

Word/Excel experience

preferred.

Send replies to

Box 160 c/o Delphos Her-

ald, 405 N. Main St., Del-

phos, OH 45833

 

www.DickClarkRealEstate.com

 
 

OPEN HOUSES SUNDAY, JAN. 15

 

1:00-2:30 p.m.

3:00-4:30 p.m.

Dick CLARK Re a l Est a t e

D i c k C L ARK R e a l E s t a t
D i c k C L ARK R e a l E s t a t
D i c k C L ARK R e a l E s t a t
D i c k C L ARK R e a l E s t a t
D i c k C L ARK R e a l E s t a t

425 N. Clay St.

3480 Providence Circle

3680 S. Amblewood Circle

Dick CLARK Re a l Est a t e

Delphos • $139,000

Elida • $99,900

Shawnee • $149,000

Dick Clark 419-230-5553

Kim Eilerman 419-303-3013

Kim Eilerman 419-303-3013

Don’t make a move without us! View all our listings at

Don’t make a move without us!

View all our listings at

Don’t make a move without us! View all our listings at

dickclarkrealestate.com

 
       
 

675 W. Market St., Suite 120, Lima, OH 312 N. Main St. Delphos, OH

Phone: 419-879-1006 Phone: 419-695-1006

 

BUYER

AAP St. Marys

Corp. .

is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-

num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady employment. We now have an opportunity for an individual to perform the fol- lowing duties:

• Selects vendors and negotiates specifications, price, and delivery for wide

variety of purchased commodities

• Maintains supplier performance rating system, working with vendors to

achieve quality, price and delivery objectives • Compiles various reports, files, and records for expenditures, stock item in- ventories, and for regulatory compliance

The successful candidate must have excellent organizational skills and at least two years of relevant project engineering experience--preferable in a high-vol- ume manufacturing operation. Proven experience in the use of project manage- ment software, CAD tools, blueprints, and schematics is also required. Bachelor

degree in a related engineering field, or equivalent, is strongly preferred.

In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil- ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va- cation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career opportunity with a growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:

BUYER AAP St. Marys Corp. . is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast

AAP ST. MARYS CORP.

  • 1100 McKinley Road

St. Marys, OH 45885

Attention: Human Resources

PROJECT ENGINEER

AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi- num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady em- ployment. We now have a unique opportunity for a Project Engineer to perform the following duties:

• Creates detailed specifications and cost justifications for machinery and

equipment purchases and capital improvement projects • Prepares project budgets, schedules, and documentation and assists in sourc- ing and negotiating contracts with suppliers • Ensures project compliance with relevant building codes, safety rules/regula- tions, and Company policies/procedures • Monitors project from inception through production release; oversees testing,

run-off, installation, and advance planning for equipment operation, mainte- nance, and repair

The successful candidate must have excellent organizational skills and at least

two years of relevant project engineering experience--preferable in a high-vol- ume manufacturing operation. Proven experience in the use of project manage- ment software, CAD tools, blueprints, and schematics is also required. Bachelor

degree in a related engineering field, or equivalent, is strongly preferred.

In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil- ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va- cation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career opportunity with a growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:

PROJECT ENGINEER AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast

AAP ST. MARYS CORP.

  • 1100 McKinley Road

St. Marys, OH 45885

Attention: Human Resources

080 Help Wanted
080 Help Wanted
080 Help Wanted
080 Help Wanted
10 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Classifieds www.delphosherald.com New Year New Beginnings New
10 – The Herald Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Classifieds www.delphosherald.com New Year New Beginnings New
080 Help Wanted 290 Wanted to Buy DANCER LOGISTICS Raines Services LLC, 900 Gressel Drive, Delphos,
080 Help Wanted
290
Wanted to Buy
DANCER LOGISTICS
Raines
Services LLC,
900 Gressel Drive,
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Jewelry
We have an opening for a
Local, Home Everyday
Cash for Gold
driver – Modern Equip
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
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ment
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Haul and Team drivers
may also apply – We also
welcome Owner Opera -
tors to
apply – Health,
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Lima
(419) 229-2899
Dental and Vision benefits
offered – Qualifications
are a good MVR, Class A
360
Building Materials
CDL and two years OTR
experience – Call Shawn
at 888-465-6001 ext. 806
STEEL
BUILDINGS-
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PEST
shipping. Display savings
also! Call 866-352-0469.
CONTROL
590
House For Rent
TECHNICIAN
415 N. Clay
BUCKEYE
2
story,
3
BR,
1 1/2
BA,
EXTERMINATING
basement,
gas
heat.
is adding full-time &
seasonal Service
Technicians for
pesticide application
work. Vehicle, tools,
training & uniforms
provided. DFWP
enforced. Insurance, profit
sharing, retirement plan,
vacation, attendance
bonuses etc. Applications
are being accepted.
$600/mo. +
Deposit &
Utilities. No pets. Available
2/1/2012. (419)692-9663
600
Apts. for Rent
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room,
No pets.
$400/month, plus deposit,
water included.
320
N.
24018 US 224, Box 246
Ottoville, OH 45876
419-453-3931 or
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
1-800-523-1521
ONE BDRM Apt., 537 W.