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2011.

04
Japanese Aerospace Industry
Presented by The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies 2011
THE SOCIETY OF JAPANESE AEROSPACE COMPANIES (SJAC)
The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies
1-1-14 NOF Tameike Bldg. 2F
Akasaka, Minato-ku
Tokyo, Japan 107-0052
Telephone: (+81) 3-3585-0511
Facsimile: (+81) 3-3585-0541
http:/ / www.sjac.or.jp
www.sjac.or.jp
Tabl e of Cont ent s

Cont i nuous Ex pansi on of


J apanese Aer ospac e I ndust r y2
1. Signifcance of Aerospace Industry
2. Aircraft-Related Activities
3. Space-Related Activities
4. Japanese Aerospace Industry Sales

J apanese Ai r c r af t I ndust r y6
Ai r c r af t f or Nat i onal Def ense 6
1. Support Fighters of the Highest
Global Standards
2. Aircraft Development
Ci vi l Ai r c r af t f or St eady Gr ow t h
Ex pec t at i ons8
1. Increases in Demand for Passenger and
Transport Aircraft
2. Japans Role in Multinational
Development
3. Domestic Development of Civil Aircraft
Hel i c opt er s and St at e-of -t he-Ar t
Tec hnol ogi es 10
1. Civil Helicopters
2. Defense Aircraft
Ai r c r af t Engi nes 12
1. Civil Engines
2. Defense Engines
Japan' s Hi ghl y Rel i abl e Ai r c r af t
Equi pment 14
1. Hydraulic Systems
2. Cabin Pressure and Air Conditioning
Systems
3. Avionics and Flight Control Systems
4. Power Supply Systems
5. Landing Gear Systems
6. Other Systems
Cabi n and I nt er i or Syst ems f or
I n-Fl i ght Comf or t 16
Advanc ed Ai r c r af t Mat er i al s 17

J apanese Spac e I ndust r y 18


Wor l d-Cl ass Roc ket s 18
1. Liquid Propellant Rockets
2. Solid Propellant Rockets
3. Launch and Control Facilities
Sat el l i t e Devel opment 20
1. Weather Satellites
2. Communication & Broadcasting Satellites
3. Quasi-Zenith Satellite Systems
4. Remote Sensing
5. Other Projects
Cont r i but i on t o t he I nt er nat i onal
Spac e St at i on 22
1. International Space Station
2. H- B and HTV contribute to deliver
supplies to ISS

The Soc i et y of Japanese


Aer ospac e Compani es 24
1. Industrial Policies Promotion
2. Industrial Foundation Buildup and
Maintenance
3. Cooperation with Overseas Aerospace
Industries
4. Japan International Aerospace Exhibition
5. Other Activities
SJAC MEMBER COMPANI ES 28
Tabl e of Cont ent s

Cont i nuous Ex pansi on of


J apanese Aer ospac e I ndust r y2
1. Signifcance of Aerospace Industry
2. Aircraft-Related Activities
3. Space-Related Activities
4. Japanese Aerospace Industry Sales

J apanese Ai r c r af t I ndust r y6
Ai r c r af t f or Nat i onal Def ense 6
1. Support Fighters of the Highest
Global Standards
2. Aircraft Development
Ci vi l Ai r c r af t f or St eady Gr ow t h
Ex pec t at i ons8
1. Increases in Demand for Passenger and
Transport Aircraft
2. Japans Role in Multinational
Development
3. Domestic Development of Civil Aircraft
Hel i c opt er s and St at e-of -t he-Ar t
Technol ogi es 10
1. Civil Helicopters
2. Defense Aircraft
Ai r c r af t Engi nes 12
1. Civil Engines
2. Defense Engines
Japan' s Hi ghl y Rel i abl e Ai r c r af t
Equi pment 14
1. Hydraulic Systems
2. Cabin Pressure and Air Conditioning
Systems
3. Avionics and Flight Control Systems
4. Power Supply Systems
5. Landing Gear Systems
6. Other Systems
Cabi n and I nt er i or Syst ems f or
I n-Fl i ght Comf or t 16
Advanc ed Ai r c r af t Mat er i al s 17

J apanese Spac e I ndust r y 18


Wor l d-Cl ass Roc ket s 18
1. Liquid Propellant Rockets
2. Solid Propellant Rockets
3. Launch and Control Facilities
Sat el l i t e Devel opment 20
1. Weather Satellites
2. Communication & Broadcasting Satellites
3. Quasi-Zenith Satellite Systems
4. Remote Sensing
5. Other Projects
Cont r i but i on t o t he I nt er nat i onal
Spac e St at i on 22
1. International Space Station
2. H- B and HTV contribute to deliver
supplies to ISS

The Soc i et y of Japanese


Aer ospac e Compani es 24
1. Industrial Policies Promotion
2. Industrial Foundation Buildup and
Maintenance
3. Cooperation with Overseas Aerospace
Industries
4. Japan International Aerospace Exhibition
5. Other Activities
SJAC MEMBER COMPANI ES 28
2 3
3. Space-Related Activities
Japanese space-related projects are comparable to the
world standard. We have successfully developed launch
vehicles such as the M- and H-A, and also in the
satellite feld, we have contributed to the development of
various engineering test satellites, observation satellites,
global navigation satellites, etc. The development
technologies of H-A were transferred to a private
sector. The company has received a commercial
order to launch South Korean satellite on an H-A
rocket: expectations are mounting for launch of more
commercial satellites in the future. Meanwhile, the H-
B rocket, an upgrade model of the H-A, has been
developed. It was first production used in a successful
launch of the H-Transfer Vehicle (HTV) in September
2009. The HTV, an unmanned cargo transporter, carries
supplies to the International Space Station (ISS).
The second launch of H-B was also successful in
January 2011.
In recent years, space exploration and usage have
become a major part of the overall industry activities.
Japanese producers now strive to increase reliability and
reduce costs in order to compete in the global market.
Launch of H-B NO.1 (JAXA)
Wideband InterNetworking engineering test and Demonstration
Satellite "KIZUNA" (WINDS) (JAXA)
Advanced Land Observing Satellite "DAICHI" (ALOS) (JAXA)

Cont i nuous Ex pansi on of


J apanese Aer ospac e I ndust r y
After the end of the Second World War, expansion of the aerospace industry in Japan
steadily relied for its defense demands on other countries, and in recent years, international
joint development of civil aircraft has further increased. In space operations, development of
transportation and satellite systems has been promoted and increased. In this way, the Japanese
aerospace industry is being continually advanced to stand alongside those in the US and EU.
1. Signifcance of Aerospace Industry
The aerospace industry is characterized by the following
strategic components.
By integrating advanced technologies with high-grade
materials and components, the aerospace industry
utilizes a wide range of supporting industries, and
its technology also spreads to other industries, thus
benefting the economy as a whole.
Through hi gh- speed t ranspor t at i on, di sast er
prevention and other similar activities, this industry
contributes to improve the daily lives of the people of
Japan.
As one of the most important components of defense,
the aerospace industry is directly linked to national
security.
2. Aircraft-Related Activities

For a certain period after the end of the war, Japan was
forbidden from any activities related to the development
and production of aircraft, and our aerospace industry
thus fell behind those of the US and Europe. Starting
with the licensed production of defense aircraft, national
development and production systems have grown. The
development and manufacture of defense aircraft was
the base of the Japanese aerospace industry, and in
recent years the F-2 fighter (a joint Japan-US project),
the OH-1 observation helicopter, the T-7 trainer US-2
amphibious search & rescue flying boat have been
successfully developed and produced in this country.
The P-1 Fixed-Wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft is being
delivered.
Delivery of the XC-2 Next-Generation Transport Aircraft
will start in 2011.
With a steady increase in passenger transportation,
Japanese producers are fur ther devel opi ng and
manufacturing civil aircraft, and the importance of this
industry has thus risen. In the 1960s, Japan focused on
the YS-11 transport aircraft and other similar projects.
More recently, international joint development has
become main stream due to the enlargement of the
airline industry in general, which has gone global, and
thus the risks have increased as well. Currently, Japan is
participating in the development of aircraft such as the
B767, B777 and B787, and engines such as the V2500,
TRENT1000, GEnx, etc.
V2500 Turbofan Engine (Japanese Aero Engines Corporation)
T-4 Intermediate Jet Trainer (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
Memorial First Shipment of B787 Dreamliner Components from Centrair
Airport in Nagoya (Boeing)
2 3
3. Space-Related Activities
Japanese space-related projects are comparable to the
world standard. We have successfully developed launch
vehicles such as the M- and H-A, and also in the
satellite feld, we have contributed to the development of
various engineering test satellites, observation satellites,
global navigation satellites, etc. The development
technologies of H-A were transferred to a private
sector. The company has received a commercial
order to launch South Korean satellite on an H-A
rocket: expectations are mounting for launch of more
commercial satellites in the future. Meanwhile, the H-
B rocket, an upgrade model of the H-A, has been
developed. It was first production used in a successful
launch of the H-Transfer Vehicle (HTV) in September
2009. The HTV, an unmanned cargo transporter, carries
supplies to the International Space Station (ISS).
The second launch of H-B was also successful in
January 2011.
In recent years, space exploration and usage have
become a major part of the overall industry activities.
Japanese producers now strive to increase reliability and
reduce costs in order to compete in the global market.
Launch of H-B NO.1 (JAXA)
Wideband InterNetworking engineering test and Demonstration
Satellite "KIZUNA" (WINDS) (JAXA)
Advanced Land Observing Satellite "DAICHI" (ALOS) (JAXA)

Cont i nuous Ex pansi on of


Japanese Aer ospac e I ndust r y
After the end of the Second World War, expansion of the aerospace industry in Japan
steadily relied for its defense demands on other countries, and in recent years, international
joint development of civil aircraft has further increased. In space operations, development of
transportation and satellite systems has been promoted and increased. In this way, the Japanese
aerospace industry is being continually advanced to stand alongside those in the US and EU.
1. Signifcance of Aerospace Industry
The aerospace industry is characterized by the following
strategic components.
By integrating advanced technologies with high-grade
materials and components, the aerospace industry
utilizes a wide range of supporting industries, and
its technology also spreads to other industries, thus
benefting the economy as a whole.
Through hi gh- speed t ranspor t at i on, di sast er
prevention and other similar activities, this industry
contributes to improve the daily lives of the people of
Japan.
As one of the most important components of defense,
the aerospace industry is directly linked to national
security.
2. Aircraft-Related Activities

For a certain period after the end of the war, Japan was
forbidden from any activities related to the development
and production of aircraft, and our aerospace industry
thus fell behind those of the US and Europe. Starting
with the licensed production of defense aircraft, national
development and production systems have grown. The
development and manufacture of defense aircraft was
the base of the Japanese aerospace industry, and in
recent years the F-2 fighter (a joint Japan-US project),
the OH-1 observation helicopter, the T-7 trainer US-2
amphibious search & rescue flying boat have been
successfully developed and produced in this country.
The P-1 Fixed-Wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft is being
delivered.
Delivery of the XC-2 Next-Generation Transport Aircraft
will start in 2011.
With a steady increase in passenger transportation,
Japanese producers are fur ther devel opi ng and
manufacturing civil aircraft, and the importance of this
industry has thus risen. In the 1960s, Japan focused on
the YS-11 transport aircraft and other similar projects.
More recently, international joint development has
become main stream due to the enlargement of the
airline industry in general, which has gone global, and
thus the risks have increased as well. Currently, Japan is
participating in the development of aircraft such as the
B767, B777 and B787, and engines such as the V2500,
TRENT1000, GEnx, etc.
V2500 Turbofan Engine (Japanese Aero Engines Corporation)
T-4 Intermediate Jet Trainer (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
Memorial First Shipment of B787 Dreamliner Components from Centrair
Airport in Nagoya (Boeing)
4 5
Engine Component Plant (IHI CO.) Large CFRP Structure Manufacturing Plant (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
Autoclave for CFRP Structure Manufacturing (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Japan
61 62 62 55 52 42 47 46
United States
47 54 45 45 44 43 44 44
United Kingdom
45 50 51 54 48 48 50 52
France
28 33 32 33 29 27 24 24
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Dependence of Defense Contracts on Major Countries
4. Japanese Aerospace Industry Sales
The aerospace industry in Japan has steadily increased
to a total of 1,356 billion yen (with aircraft-related
activities accounting for 1,086 billion yen and space-
related activities accounting for 270 billion yen). As of
2009, a total of 31,561 persons were employed in this
industr y, with 25,220 and 6,341 persons involved in
aircraft-related and space-related activities respectively.
A recent and slight decrease in employment numbers
can be attributed to an increase in overall ef ficiency.
The propor ti on of defense ai rcraft stood at one
time between 80% and 90% of total sales, and export
components of civil aircraft have increased since the
late 1990s along with the promotion of multinational
development projects. Consequently, defense-related
products currently are around 50% of total sales. The
Japanese aerospace industry is compared with those of
foreign countries in the chart right. The United States
is over whelmingly large, and various EU countries,
Canada and Japan follow.
When compared with the automobile, home electric,
computer and other industries in Japan, the aerospace
industr y is still relatively small. Much is therefore
expected of Japanese producers over the coming years.
The trade balance has been in deficit due to the large
amount of airlines procurement of aircraft from abroad.
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
1975 1985 1995 2009
(Units:Billion yen)
Space
Aircraft (civil)
Aircraft (defense)
United States United Kingdom France Canada Germany Japan
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
(Units:Billion dollars)
189
33
46
19.4
33
14.5
Japanese Aerospace Industry Sales (FY1975-FY2009)
Aerospace Revenue of Major Countries (2009)
Trade Balance of Major Aerospace Industries (2009)
United States France Japan
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
(Units:Billion dollars)
23.7
4.8
56
(%)
4 5
Engine Component Plant (IHI CO.) Large CFRP Structure Manufacturing Plant (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
Autoclave for CFRP Structure Manufacturing (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Japan
61 62 62 55 52 42 47 46
United States
47 54 45 45 44 43 44 44
United Kingdom
45 50 51 54 48 48 50 52
France
28 33 32 33 29 27 24 24
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Dependence of Defense Contracts on Major Countries
4. Japanese Aerospace Industry Sales
The aerospace industry in Japan has steadily increased
to a total of 1,356 billion yen (with aircraft-related
activities accounting for 1,086 billion yen and space-
related activities accounting for 270 billion yen). As of
2009, a total of 31,561 persons were employed in this
industr y, with 25,220 and 6,341 persons involved in
aircraft-related and space-related activities respectively.
A recent and slight decrease in employment numbers
can be attributed to an increase in overall ef ficiency.
The propor ti on of defense ai rcraft stood at one
time between 80% and 90% of total sales, and export
components of civil aircraft have increased since the
late 1990s along with the promotion of multinational
development projects. Consequently, defense-related
products currently are around 50% of total sales. The
Japanese aerospace industry is compared with those of
foreign countries in the chart right. The United States
is over whelmingly large, and various EU countries,
Canada and Japan follow.
When compared with the automobile, home electric,
computer and other industries in Japan, the aerospace
industr y is still relatively small. Much is therefore
expected of Japanese producers over the coming years.
The trade balance has been in deficit due to the large
amount of airlines procurement of aircraft from abroad.
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
1975 1985 1995 2009
(Units:Billion yen)
Space
Aircraft (civil)
Aircraft (defense)
United States United Kingdom France Canada Germany Japan
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
(Units:Billion dollars)
189
33
46
19.4
33
14.5
Japanese Aerospace Industry Sales (FY1975-FY2009)
Aerospace Revenue of Major Countries (2009)
Trade Balance of Major Aerospace Industries (2009)
United States France Japan
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
(Units:Billion dollars)
23.7
4.8
56
(%)
6 7
1. Support Fighters of the Highest Global Standards
Next-generation Fixed-wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft
and Transport Aircraft to be used as successor models
for the P-3C and the C-1, and simultaneous development
activities began in 200l.
By making use of multi-utilization to the utmost, it is
expected that there will be a reduction in the overall
devel opment cost. Next- Generati on Fi xed- Wi ng
Maritime Patrol Aircraft succeeded in the first flight
in September 2007 and delivery to the base started in
2008. Next-Generation Transport Aircraft successfully
completed its frst fight in January 2010 and delivery to
the base will start in 2011.
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
The Ministr y of Defense is currently developing
unmanned aerial vehicles. Studies to evaluate conversion
of the F-104 Fighter for pilotless operation are underway.
The ministry is also developing an unmanned aircraft
research system whose autonomous flight function
enables automatic landing.
Trainers
The Ministry of Defense is designing and developing
trainers such as the T-4 and T-7 indigenously in Japan.
Both the airframe and engine of the T-4 intermediate
trainer are fully developed and produced in this country.
Making the most of its excellent agility, the aerial-
combat research aircraft (nicknamed Blue Impulse)
appeals to people at airs shows held at various air bases
throughout Japan.
Fur thermore, the outspread applications of such
technical advances not only contributes to the design
and manufacture of civil aircraft, but it also has helped to
form strong technical foundation in other industries.
Advanced Technology Demonstrator (ATD)
In the ATD program, high maneuvering stealth prototype
will be made with advanced technologies such as stealth
form, high maneuvering flight control and advanced
composite material. It will be used to verify the stealth
technology in actual fight environment and establish the
performance needed for the future fghter jet.
P-1 Fixed-Wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft (Kawasaki Heavy Industries. Ltd.)
XC-2 Next-Generation Transport Aircraft (Kawasaki Heavy Industries. Ltd.) Advanced Technology Demonstrator (Full Scale RCS Test Model)

J apanese Ai r c r af t I ndust r y
Ai r c r af t f or Nat i onal Def ense
Japans defense aircraft industry was reborn in 1952 with aircraft such as the F-86F and
T-33 manufactured under license from the United States, in 1958, Japans first jet trainer
was developed and produced. Many significant steps in the advancement of the design and
manufacturing technologies have followed. Today, Japanese aircraft manufacturers have their own
capability to develop, produce and maintain a wide range of defense aircraft, such as fghters,
transporters, patrol planes, trainers and search & rescue vessels, which has thus contributed to
the national defense.
Developed jointly by Japan and the United States, the F-2
support fghter is used in multiple roles, such as tactical
air support and maritime operations, close air support
and defensive counter-air operations. Highly regarded
both at home and overseas, this fghter features a host of
advanced technologies developed indigenously in Japan.
Co-cured composite wings
In order to achieve lightweight aircraft, co-cured
composite material technology was applied for the
first time in wing construction. This technology has
subsequently been transferred to the United States,
and some wings are now produced by American
manufacturers utilizing this technology.
Digital fy-by-wire
Digital fly-by-wire technologies have been adopted to
achieve higher agility - the heartbeat of todays fghter
- and by combining these technologies with lightweight
wings, the worlds highest standards of maneuverability,
acceleration and many other agility-related factors
have been achieved. The carefree digital flight control
allows the F-2 to automatically prevent dangerous fying
conditions, and this has contributed to increase flight
safety.
Active phased-array radar
Radar provides a fighter with eyes, and the F-2 is the
frst fghter in the world to feature active phased-array
radar technology. Thanks to this type of system, it has
been possible to achieve standoff and anti-ship attack
capabilities of the highest standard.
2. Aircraft Development

Japan Ministry of Defense is currently developing, and


delivering following types of aircraft.
Search & Rescue Flying Boat
In l996, development of a successor to the US-1A was
started, and its frst fight was successfully completed in
December 2003. US-2 (former US-1A kai) delivery to the
base started in March 2007.
F-2 Support Fighter (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.) US-2 Amphibious Search & Rescue Flying Boat (ShinMaywa Industries, Ltd.)
T-7 Primary Trainer (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
Unmanned Aircraft Research System (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
6 7
1. Support Fighters of the Highest Global Standards
Next-generation Fixed-wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft
and Transport Aircraft to be used as successor models
for the P-3C and the C-1, and simultaneous development
activities began in 200l.
By making use of multi-utilization to the utmost, it is
expected that there will be a reduction in the overall
devel opment cost. Next- Generati on Fi xed- Wi ng
Maritime Patrol Aircraft succeeded in the first flight
in September 2007 and delivery to the base started in
2008. Next-Generation Transport Aircraft successfully
completed its frst fight in January 2010 and delivery to
the base will start in 2011.
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
The Ministr y of Defense is currently developing
unmanned aerial vehicles. Studies to evaluate conversion
of the F-104 Fighter for pilotless operation are underway.
The ministry is also developing an unmanned aircraft
research system whose autonomous flight function
enables automatic landing.
Trainers
The Ministry of Defense is designing and developing
trainers such as the T-4 and T-7 indigenously in Japan.
Both the airframe and engine of the T-4 intermediate
trainer are fully developed and produced in this country.
Making the most of its excellent agility, the aerial-
combat research aircraft (nicknamed Blue Impulse)
appeals to people at airs shows held at various air bases
throughout Japan.
Fur thermore, the outspread applications of such
technical advances not only contributes to the design
and manufacture of civil aircraft, but it also has helped to
form strong technical foundation in other industries.
Advanced Technology Demonstrator (ATD)
In the ATD program, high maneuvering stealth prototype
will be made with advanced technologies such as stealth
form, high maneuvering flight control and advanced
composite material. It will be used to verify the stealth
technology in actual fight environment and establish the
performance needed for the future fghter jet.
P-1 Fixed-Wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft (Kawasaki Heavy Industries. Ltd.)
XC-2 Next-Generation Transport Aircraft (Kawasaki Heavy Industries. Ltd.) Advanced Technology Demonstrator (Full Scale RCS Test Model)

Japanese Ai r c r af t I ndust r y
Ai r c r af t f or Nat i onal Def ense
Japans defense aircraft industry was reborn in 1952 with aircraft such as the F-86F and
T-33 manufactured under license from the United States, in 1958, Japans first jet trainer
was developed and produced. Many significant steps in the advancement of the design and
manufacturing technologies have followed. Today, Japanese aircraft manufacturers have their own
capability to develop, produce and maintain a wide range of defense aircraft, such as fghters,
transporters, patrol planes, trainers and search & rescue vessels, which has thus contributed to
the national defense.
Developed jointly by Japan and the United States, the F-2
support fghter is used in multiple roles, such as tactical
air support and maritime operations, close air support
and defensive counter-air operations. Highly regarded
both at home and overseas, this fghter features a host of
advanced technologies developed indigenously in Japan.
Co-cured composite wings
In order to achieve lightweight aircraft, co-cured
composite material technology was applied for the
first time in wing construction. This technology has
subsequently been transferred to the United States,
and some wings are now produced by American
manufacturers utilizing this technology.
Digital fy-by-wire
Digital fly-by-wire technologies have been adopted to
achieve higher agility - the heartbeat of todays fghter
- and by combining these technologies with lightweight
wings, the worlds highest standards of maneuverability,
acceleration and many other agility-related factors
have been achieved. The carefree digital flight control
allows the F-2 to automatically prevent dangerous fying
conditions, and this has contributed to increase flight
safety.
Active phased-array radar
Radar provides a fighter with eyes, and the F-2 is the
frst fghter in the world to feature active phased-array
radar technology. Thanks to this type of system, it has
been possible to achieve standoff and anti-ship attack
capabilities of the highest standard.
2. Aircraft Development

Japan Ministry of Defense is currently developing, and


delivering following types of aircraft.
Search & Rescue Flying Boat
In l996, development of a successor to the US-1A was
started, and its frst fight was successfully completed in
December 2003. US-2 (former US-1A kai) delivery to the
base started in March 2007.
F-2 Support Fighter (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.) US-2 Amphibious Search & Rescue Flying Boat (ShinMaywa Industries, Ltd.)
T-7 Primary Trainer (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
Unmanned Aircraft Research System (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
8 9
Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) (Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation)
Japan produced the YS-11 60-seater transport aircraft
in 1964 as the first civil aircraft of independent
development The MU-2, FA-200, FA-300 and MU-300
business jets followed during the period until 1980. Full-
fledged development of the Mitsubishi Regional Jet
(MRJ) 70-90 seater, which will have a technological edge
in environmental performance, economical ef ficiency
and the cabin comfort, is proceeding since 2008.
Ci vi l Ai r c r af t f or St eady Gr ow t h Ex pec t at i ons
Aiming at risk reduction and being market oriented, the development of civil aircraft is carried out
in multinational projects. Japan is proactive in the joint development of the B777, B787, and other
models.
The development of the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) applying the state-of-the-art technologies
is progressing in Japanese business sector.
1. Increases in Demand for Passenger
and Transport Aircraft

Worldwide demand for passenger aircraft expanded at


a record pace from 2005 after recovering from a low
following the September 11 terror attacks. The demand
was boosted by China, India and other rapidly growing
emerging economies, and by good performance of low-
cost carriers around the world. The demand plunged
again in the aftermath of the global financial crisis in
2008, then, recovering again world wide demand for
passenger aircraft from 2010.
2. Japans Role in Multinational
Development

Japanese companies are active in projects such as those


shown in the following
table, and they play an important role in the global
production of aircraft. Participation in the B767 project
began with the detailed design phase, and Japanese
manufacturers were assigned with responsibility for
the fuselage structure and other components (with a
15% share). In recent projects, such as the B787, Japan
began to participate in the conceptual design phase and
has been assigned with responsibility for the wings and
other complicated components. It has also extended
beyond design and manufacture to the level of testing
and TC acquisition (achieving a 35% share).
The First Flight of the B787 (Boeing)
A380 (Airbus Industries)
Participation in International Projects
Project Area of participation Scope of participation
Boeing B767
Forward fuselage, aft fuselage, main landing
gear door, etc.
15% program partner
Boeing B777
Center section, center fuselage, aft fuselage,
etc.
21% program partner
Boeing B787 Wings, center wings, front fuselage, etc. 35% program partner
Global Express Wings and central fuselage RSP
CRJ 700 / 900
Tail fuselage, nose and main landing gear
system
RSP
Embraer 170 / 190 Wings and center wings RSP
Hawker 4000 Wing structure system RSP
Eclipse Wings RSP
Gulfstream Flaps and landing gear operation devices, etc. Supplier
Airbus A380
Cargo doors, verti cal stabi l i zer structure
material, titanium sheets, carbon fiber, water
tanks, etc.
Supplier
B787 Industrial Participation (Japan Aircraft Development Corporation)
A380 Industrial Participation (Airbus Industries)
3. Domestic Development of Civil Aircraft
Kawasaki Heavy
Industries
forward fuselage
Wheel well
Main wing fxed trailing
edge
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
main wing box
Fuji Heavy Industries
center wing box
integration of center wing box with
wheel well
(Parts Supplier)
GS Yuasa/Thales (Lithium-ion Battery System)
JAMCO (lavatories, galleys, fight deck door & bulkhead assembly, fight
deck interior panel, storage box)
Sumitomo Precision Products (APU oil cooler)
Tamagawa Seiki (angle sensor, small DC brushless motor)
Toray (TORAYCA, prepreg composites)
Nabtesco/Hamilton Sundstrand (power distribution unit)
Panasonic Avionics (cabin services system, in-fight entertainment system)
Bridgestone (tires)
Boeing 787
8 9
Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) (Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation)
Japan produced the YS-11 60-seater transport aircraft
in 1964 as the first civil aircraft of independent
development The MU-2, FA-200, FA-300 and MU-300
business jets followed during the period until 1980. Full-
fledged development of the Mitsubishi Regional Jet
(MRJ) 70-90 seater, which will have a technological edge
in environmental performance, economical ef ficiency
and the cabin comfort, is proceeding since 2008.
Ci vi l Ai r c r af t f or St eady Gr ow t h Ex pec t at i ons
Aiming at risk reduction and being market oriented, the development of civil aircraft is carried out
in multinational projects. Japan is proactive in the joint development of the B777, B787, and other
models.
The development of the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) applying the state-of-the-art technologies
is progressing in Japanese business sector.
1. Increases in Demand for Passenger
and Transport Aircraft

Worldwide demand for passenger aircraft expanded at


a record pace from 2005 after recovering from a low
following the September 11 terror attacks. The demand
was boosted by China, India and other rapidly growing
emerging economies, and by good performance of low-
cost carriers around the world. The demand plunged
again in the aftermath of the global financial crisis in
2008, then, recovering again world wide demand for
passenger aircraft from 2010.
2. Japans Role in Multinational
Development

Japanese companies are active in projects such as those


shown in the following
table, and they play an important role in the global
production of aircraft. Participation in the B767 project
began with the detailed design phase, and Japanese
manufacturers were assigned with responsibility for
the fuselage structure and other components (with a
15% share). In recent projects, such as the B787, Japan
began to participate in the conceptual design phase and
has been assigned with responsibility for the wings and
other complicated components. It has also extended
beyond design and manufacture to the level of testing
and TC acquisition (achieving a 35% share).
The First Flight of the B787 (Boeing)
A380 (Airbus Industries)
Participation in International Projects
Project Area of participation Scope of participation
Boeing B767
Forward fuselage, aft fuselage, main landing
gear door, etc.
15% program partner
Boeing B777
Center section, center fuselage, aft fuselage,
etc.
21% program partner
Boeing B787 Wings, center wings, front fuselage, etc. 35% program partner
Global Express Wings and central fuselage RSP
CRJ 700 / 900
Tail fuselage, nose and main landing gear
system
RSP
Embraer 170 / 190 Wings and center wings RSP
Hawker 4000 Wing structure system RSP
Eclipse Wings RSP
Gulfstream Flaps and landing gear operation devices, etc. Supplier
Airbus A380
Cargo doors, verti cal stabi l i zer structure
material, titanium sheets, carbon fiber, water
tanks, etc.
Supplier
B787 Industrial Participation (Japan Aircraft Development Corporation)
A380 Industrial Participation (Airbus Industries)
3. Domestic Development of Civil Aircraft
Kawasaki Heavy
Industries
forward fuselage
Wheel well
Main wing fxed trailing
edge
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
main wing box
Fuji Heavy Industries
center wing box
integration of center wing box with
wheel well
(Parts Supplier)
GS Yuasa/Thales (Lithium-ion Battery System)
JAMCO (lavatories, galleys, fight deck door & bulkhead assembly, fight
deck interior panel, storage box)
Sumitomo Precision Products (APU oil cooler)
Tamagawa Seiki (angle sensor, small DC brushless motor)
Toray (TORAYCA, prepreg composites)
Nabtesco/Hamilton Sundstrand (power distribution unit)
Panasonic Avionics (cabin services system, in-fight entertainment system)
Bridgestone (tires)
Boeing 787
10 11
2. Defense Aircraft

OH-1 Light Observation Helicopter


The OH-1 is the frst helicopter fully developed in Japan.
And, it has been honored with the Howard Hughes
Award by the American Helicopter Society. Featuring an
all-composite, bearing-less rotor system, it benefts from
extremely high maneuverability.
SH-60K Anti-Sub Patrol Helicopter
In addition to a newly developed high-performance
rotor system and a ship-landing assist system, the SH-
60K features a longer fuselage, and despite being an
upgrade, it represents almost a complete redevelopment
of the SH-60J.
AH-64D Fighting Helicopter
The AH-64D, which has distinguished information and
fghting capabilities, is the successor model to the AH-
IS, and it is expected to be the core of the combat of the
network-centered type in the future.
Under License Production.
MCH-101 Airborne Mine Countermeasures missions
and transportation Helicopter
The MCH-101 is the successor of the current MH-53E,
and it is based on the EH-101. It is used for Airborne
Mi ne Count er measures (AMCM) mi ssi ons and
transportation.
Under License Production.
In addition, Japanese manufacturers produce helicopters
under license, such as for the CH-47 (Boeing, heavy
transpor t helicopter) and the UH- 60J (Sikorsky,
multipurpose helicopter).
SH-60K (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
OH-1 (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
MCH-101 (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
AH-64D (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
Hel i c opt er s and St at e-of -t he-Ar t Technol ogi es
As the largest user of helicopters after the US and three other countries, Japan develops and
manufactures fuselages, engines and all other helicopter components. The technologies used
in fuselage and transmission production in this country have an excellent reputation throughout
the world. The rotor system is the most important part of these components, and Japan has
successfully developed and produced a composite-material, bearing-less version of this system
that makes full use of cutting-edge technologies. The Japanese aerospace industry is also
proactively participating in multinational development projects.
1. Civil Helicopters
BK117
The BK117 has been developed jointly with MBB of
Germany (now part of Eurocopter). A best-seller in both
domestic and overseas markets, this helicopter is used
in fre fghting, fying medical services and many other
applications.
Japanese companies are currently participating in the following multinational development projects.
BA609 (Bell / Agusta)
Participation in design and development of the
fuselage (RSP)
The worlds frst civil, tail-rotor helicopter
MD902 (MD Helicopter) Production of the transmission
BK117C-2 (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
S-92
The Sikorsky S-92 is a 19-seat, double-engine, large
helicopter developed in an international collaboration
project led by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation of the
United States. Japan, China, Spain, Brazil and Taiwan
are part of the project. Dubbed the Helibus, the aircraft
is used for commuting and offshore oil development.
S-92 (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
10 11
2. Defense Aircraft

OH-1 Light Observation Helicopter


The OH-1 is the frst helicopter fully developed in Japan.
And, it has been honored with the Howard Hughes
Award by the American Helicopter Society. Featuring an
all-composite, bearing-less rotor system, it benefts from
extremely high maneuverability.
SH-60K Anti-Sub Patrol Helicopter
In addition to a newly developed high-performance
rotor system and a ship-landing assist system, the SH-
60K features a longer fuselage, and despite being an
upgrade, it represents almost a complete redevelopment
of the SH-60J.
AH-64D Fighting Helicopter
The AH-64D, which has distinguished information and
fghting capabilities, is the successor model to the AH-
IS, and it is expected to be the core of the combat of the
network-centered type in the future.
Under License Production.
MCH-101 Airborne Mine Countermeasures missions
and transportation Helicopter
The MCH-101 is the successor of the current MH-53E,
and it is based on the EH-101. It is used for Airborne
Mi ne Count er measures (AMCM) mi ssi ons and
transportation.
Under License Production.
In addition, Japanese manufacturers produce helicopters
under license, such as for the CH-47 (Boeing, heavy
transpor t helicopter) and the UH- 60J (Sikorsky,
multipurpose helicopter).
SH-60K (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
OH-1 (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
MCH-101 (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
AH-64D (Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd.)
Hel i c opt er s and St at e-of -t he-Ar t Technol ogi es
As the largest user of helicopters after the US and three other countries, Japan develops and
manufactures fuselages, engines and all other helicopter components. The technologies used
in fuselage and transmission production in this country have an excellent reputation throughout
the world. The rotor system is the most important part of these components, and Japan has
successfully developed and produced a composite-material, bearing-less version of this system
that makes full use of cutting-edge technologies. The Japanese aerospace industry is also
proactively participating in multinational development projects.
1. Civil Helicopters
BK117
The BK117 has been developed jointly with MBB of
Germany (now part of Eurocopter). A best-seller in both
domestic and overseas markets, this helicopter is used
in fre fghting, fying medical services and many other
applications.
Japanese companies are currently participating in the following multinational development projects.
BA609 (Bell / Agusta)
Participation in design and development of the
fuselage (RSP)
The worlds frst civil, tail-rotor helicopter
MD902 (MD Helicopter) Production of the transmission
BK117C-2 (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
S-92
The Sikorsky S-92 is a 19-seat, double-engine, large
helicopter developed in an international collaboration
project led by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation of the
United States. Japan, China, Spain, Brazil and Taiwan
are part of the project. Dubbed the Helibus, the aircraft
is used for commuting and offshore oil development.
S-92 (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.)
12 13
2. Defense Engines
Regarding the Ministr y of Defense, both the F3-
IHI-30 turbofan engine and the TS1-M-10 turbo shaft
engine that were developed in Japan are used in the
T-4 intermediate jet trainer and the OH-1 observation
helicopter respectively. Research and development
ef forts on the XF5-1 demonstration engine, an after-
burning fan engine with a low bypass ratio and capable
of 5,000 kg of thrust with a thrust weight ratio of 8, have
made this engine rival any of the advanced engines in
the US and Europe. Furthermore, the F7-IHI-10 fan
engine, with a bypass ratio of between 8 and 9, has
been selected for use in the Fixed-Wing Maritime
Patrol Aircraft P-1. The engine is being mounted on the
aircraft.
F7 (IHI CO.) F3-30 Engine (IHI CO.)
International Joint Development for Civil Aircraft Engine
Engine Aircraft Components developed Level of participation
TRENT1000 B787
Mid-pressure modules, combustor modules,
low-pressure turbine vanes
RSP 16%
GEnx B787
Low-pressure turbines, high-pressure
compressors, shafts and combustor cases
RSP 15% and
subcontract
TRENT900 A380
Low-pressure turbines vanes, mid-pressure
compressor cases
Subcontract
TRENT500 A340
Mid- & low-pressure turbine vanes,
compressor cases, turbine cases, etc.
RSP 20%
CF34-8/10
CRJ700/900,
EMBRAER170/190,
ARJ21
Low-pressure turbine module, high-
pressure compressor rear stages, fan
rotors, gearboxes, etc.
RSP 30%
PW4000 A310/330/340
Low-pressure turbine vanes, disk,
combustor, active clearance control, etc.
RSP 11% and
subcontract
GE90 B777
Low-pressure turbine rotor vanes disks,
long shafts, etc.
RSP 10%
TRENT700/800 A330, B777
Low-pressure turbine vanes, disks, long
shafts, low-pressure turbine disks, turbine
cases, etc.
RSP 8 to 9%
V2500 A320, MD90
Fans, low-pressure compressors, fan
cases, etc.
Program partner 23%
Ai r c r af t Engi nes
For the development of civil aircraft engines, Japan plays key roles in international joint
development projects for such engines as the CF-34, TRENT 1000, GEnx, etc.
For the development of both defense and civil engine, several national projects are underway with
the focus on developing advanced technology applications.
1. Civil Engines
Engine development requires an enormous amount
of t i me, money and i ncr easi ng ri sks of bei ng
outperformed against growth requirements. Because
of such difficulties for any single company to endure,
these projects very often become international joint
development projects.
Since the participation in the V2500, we have continued
to be involved in and a key player in these international
collaborative projects, like the GE90, PW4000, TRENT
series and CF-34.
The status of participation has grown: In V2500 - design
of the fan, and in GE90, PW4000, CF34-8 and CF34-10
extended to compressor, combustor, turbine, and
in TRENT series, including design of FADEC (Full
Authority Digital Electronics Control).
Japans technical expertise has been implemented in
almost every area of the engine. Japanese companies
play an important role in the global joint development
of the TRENT 1000, GEnx and other engines for the
B787. Independent research and development of civil
engines within Japan began in 197l with the FJR710, and
an R&D project for environmental compliance engines
for small-sized aircraft started in 2003. With the project
for environmental compliance small-sized aircraft,
participation grows a great deal in R&D projects for both
the fuselage and engine.
TRENT 1000 (Rolls-Royce) Artists Rendition of GEnx (GE)
Artists Rendition of TRENT XWB (Rolls-Royce)
12 13
2. Defense Engines
Regarding the Ministr y of Defense, both the F3-
IHI-30 turbofan engine and the TS1-M-10 turbo shaft
engine that were developed in Japan are used in the
T-4 intermediate jet trainer and the OH-1 observation
helicopter respectively. Research and development
ef forts on the XF5-1 demonstration engine, an after-
burning fan engine with a low bypass ratio and capable
of 5,000 kg of thrust with a thrust weight ratio of 8, have
made this engine rival any of the advanced engines in
the US and Europe. Furthermore, the F7-IHI-10 fan
engine, with a bypass ratio of between 8 and 9, has
been selected for use in the Fixed-Wing Maritime
Patrol Aircraft P-1. The engine is being mounted on the
aircraft.
F7 (IHI CO.) F3-30 Engine (IHI CO.)
International Joint Development for Civil Aircraft Engine
Engine Aircraft Components developed Level of participation
TRENT1000 B787
Mid-pressure modules, combustor modules,
low-pressure turbine vanes
RSP 16%
GEnx B787
Low-pressure turbines, high-pressure
compressors, shafts and combustor cases
RSP 15% and
subcontract
TRENT900 A380
Low-pressure turbines vanes, mid-pressure
compressor cases
Subcontract
TRENT500 A340
Mid- & low-pressure turbine vanes,
compressor cases, turbine cases, etc.
RSP 20%
CF34-8/10
CRJ700/900,
EMBRAER170/190,
ARJ21
Low-pressure turbine module, high-
pressure compressor rear stages, fan
rotors, gearboxes, etc.
RSP 30%
PW4000 A310/330/340
Low-pressure turbine vanes, disk,
combustor, active clearance control, etc.
RSP 11% and
subcontract
GE90 B777
Low-pressure turbine rotor vanes disks,
long shafts, etc.
RSP 10%
TRENT700/800 A330, B777
Low-pressure turbine vanes, disks, long
shafts, low-pressure turbine disks, turbine
cases, etc.
RSP 8 to 9%
V2500 A320, MD90
Fans, low-pressure compressors, fan
cases, etc.
Program partner 23%
Ai r c r af t Engi nes
For the development of civil aircraft engines, Japan plays key roles in international joint
development projects for such engines as the CF-34, TRENT 1000, GEnx, etc.
For the development of both defense and civil engine, several national projects are underway with
the focus on developing advanced technology applications.
1. Civil Engines
Engine development requires an enormous amount
of t i me, money and i ncr easi ng ri sks of bei ng
outperformed against growth requirements. Because
of such difficulties for any single company to endure,
these projects very often become international joint
development projects.
Since the participation in the V2500, we have continued
to be involved in and a key player in these international
collaborative projects, like the GE90, PW4000, TRENT
series and CF-34.
The status of participation has grown: In V2500 - design
of the fan, and in GE90, PW4000, CF34-8 and CF34-10
extended to compressor, combustor, turbine, and
in TRENT series, including design of FADEC (Full
Authority Digital Electronics Control).
Japans technical expertise has been implemented in
almost every area of the engine. Japanese companies
play an important role in the global joint development
of the TRENT 1000, GEnx and other engines for the
B787. Independent research and development of civil
engines within Japan began in 197l with the FJR710, and
an R&D project for environmental compliance engines
for small-sized aircraft started in 2003. With the project
for environmental compliance small-sized aircraft,
participation grows a great deal in R&D projects for both
the fuselage and engine.
TRENT 1000 (Rolls-Royce) Artists Rendition of GEnx (GE)
Artists Rendition of TRENT XWB (Rolls-Royce)
14 15

(2) Navigation Systems
Navigation systems locate the exact position of aircraft
in flight and direct them to their destinations safely,
quickly and without fail. Japanese manufacturers
produce inertial navigation systems and GPS receivers.
(3) Flight Deck Systems
A fight deck system consists of fight instrumentation,
attitude displays and audio and visual warning systems.
Installed in a cockpit, the system is operated by pilots.
Japanese makers supply liquid crystal displays for the
Next-Generation Flight Deck Systems for the B787 and
A380.
4. Power Supply Systems

Power supply systems for todays aircraft require high


voltage and large capacity to meet diversifying needs
and to keep pace with technological advancement in the
industry. Japanese manufacturers have teamed up with
Hamilton Sundstrand to develop power distribution units
for the B787.
5. Landing Gear Systems

The landing gear systems for the Bombardier CRJ700


and CRJ900 have been jointly developed by Japanese
manufacturers and Goodrich. Japanese manufacturers
also supply radial tires for the B777, B787 and A380.
6. Other Systems

Japanese compani es are cur rentl y acti ve i n the
development and production of simulators.
Landing Gear (Sumitomo Precision Products Co., Ltd.)
Flight Conrol Hydraulic System (Nabtesco Corporation)
Japans Hi ghl y Rel i abl e Ai r c r af t Equi pment
Along with the fuselage structure, a wide range of reliable equipment is required for the
construction of an aircraft. In defense applications, Japanese manufacturers provide radar
systems, digital control systems and other products, all of which make use of advanced
technologies. For civil use, Japanese products, which are highly reliable in quality and delivery,
have been well received by overseas OEM and customers. To participate in the international
development project for the B777, Japans parts manufacturers, competing with overseas
manufacturers, have taken orders for actuators, valves and many other types of equipment.
1. Hydraulic Systems

Hydraulic systems are used in flight controls, high-lift


devices and landing gear for remote control operations.
Japanese manufacturers supply B777 electronic flight
control actuation systems, flap drive systems for the
B747-8 and fight control actuation systems.
Head-up Display (Shimadzu Corporation)
2. Cabin Pressure and
Air Conditioning Systems

Cabin pressure and air conditioning systems protect


passengers, crews and on-board equipment from
changes in cabin pressure and temperature, and enable
safe and comfortable fights. The cabin pressure and air
conditioning systems for the Embraer 170 regional jet
have been jointly developed by Japanese manufacturers
and Hamilton Sundstrand.
3. Avionics and
Flight Control Systems

(1) Flight Systems


Modern aircraft deploy flight controls based on active
control technology and a flight management system
that uses advanced electronics. The mainstream flight
control system is an electrically signaled control system
called fly-by-wire. In Japan, the P-1 Next-Generation
Fixed-Wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft has been equipped
with an optically signaled control system called fly-by-
light.
Aerospace Instruments (Yokogawa Electric Corporation)
Cockpit Display(Yokogawa Electric Corporation) Flap Drive System (Shimadzu Corporation) Air Conditioning System (Sumitomo Precision Products/Hamilton Sundstrand)
14 15

(2) Navigation Systems
Navigation systems locate the exact position of aircraft
in flight and direct them to their destinations safely,
quickly and without fail. Japanese manufacturers
produce inertial navigation systems and GPS receivers.
(3) Flight Deck Systems
A fight deck system consists of fight instrumentation,
attitude displays and audio and visual warning systems.
Installed in a cockpit, the system is operated by pilots.
Japanese makers supply liquid crystal displays for the
Next-Generation Flight Deck Systems for the B787 and
A380.
4. Power Supply Systems

Power supply systems for todays aircraft require high


voltage and large capacity to meet diversifying needs
and to keep pace with technological advancement in the
industry. Japanese manufacturers have teamed up with
Hamilton Sundstrand to develop power distribution units
for the B787.
5. Landing Gear Systems

The landing gear systems for the Bombardier CRJ700


and CRJ900 have been jointly developed by Japanese
manufacturers and Goodrich. Japanese manufacturers
also supply radial tires for the B777, B787 and A380.
6. Other Systems

Japanese compani es are cur rentl y acti ve i n the
development and production of simulators.
Landing Gear (Sumitomo Precision Products Co., Ltd.)
Flight Conrol Hydraulic System (Nabtesco Corporation)
J apans Hi ghl y Rel i abl e Ai r c r af t Equi pment
Along with the fuselage structure, a wide range of reliable equipment is required for the
construction of an aircraft. In defense applications, Japanese manufacturers provide radar
systems, digital control systems and other products, all of which make use of advanced
technologies. For civil use, Japanese products, which are highly reliable in quality and delivery,
have been well received by overseas OEM and customers. To participate in the international
development project for the B777, Japans parts manufacturers, competing with overseas
manufacturers, have taken orders for actuators, valves and many other types of equipment.
1. Hydraulic Systems

Hydraulic systems are used in flight controls, high-lift


devices and landing gear for remote control operations.
Japanese manufacturers supply B777 electronic flight
control actuation systems, flap drive systems for the
B747-8 and fight control actuation systems.
Head-up Display (Shimadzu Corporation)
2. Cabin Pressure and
Air Conditioning Systems

Cabin pressure and air conditioning systems protect


passengers, crews and on-board equipment from
changes in cabin pressure and temperature, and enable
safe and comfortable fights. The cabin pressure and air
conditioning systems for the Embraer 170 regional jet
have been jointly developed by Japanese manufacturers
and Hamilton Sundstrand.
3. Avionics and
Flight Control Systems

(1) Flight Systems


Modern aircraft deploy flight controls based on active
control technology and a flight management system
that uses advanced electronics. The mainstream flight
control system is an electrically signaled control system
called fly-by-wire. In Japan, the P-1 Next-Generation
Fixed-Wing Maritime Patrol Aircraft has been equipped
with an optically signaled control system called fly-by-
light.
Aerospace Instruments (Yokogawa Electric Corporation)
Cockpit Display(Yokogawa Electric Corporation) Flap Drive System (Shimadzu Corporation) Air Conditioning System (Sumitomo Precision Products/Hamilton Sundstrand)
16 17
Advanc ed Ai r c r af t Mat er i al s
Composite materials, such as carbon fber reinforced plastic (CFRP) in particular, are expanding
and are becoming widely used.
JAPAN accounts for 70% of the world carbon fber products for CFRP and supplies main wings
and center wing box etc. for B787, which consists of 50% of composite materials.
Titan alloys are also expanding and are becoming widely used following back of the composite
materials, which is used for jet engine components, such as fan casing and turbine blade.
These components are manufactured with the Japanese excellent precision forging and casting
technologies.
The Mitsubishi Regional Jet is under development fully utilizing these advanced aircraft materials.
Carbon Fiber Materials (Toray Industries) Carbon Fiber Materials (Toray Industries)
V2500 Turbofan Engine
V2500 Fan Case (KOBELCO)
Cabi n and I nt er i or Syst ems f or I n-Fl i ght Comf or t
In the field of cabin and interior systems, Japanese manufacturers respond to customer
requirements and apply the latest technologies in the development of the worlds best products.
Japanese manufacturers of products, such as galleys, lavatories, aircraft seats and in-fight AV
systems that optimally match the passengers needs, have an excellent reputation with a large
worldwide market share. Japanese manufacturers can continue to lead the world in terms of
technical achievements for cabin and interior systems.
Aircraft Lavatory (JAMCO Corporation) Aircraft Galley (JAMCO Corporation)
MRJ Interior Mock-up (Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation)
The composite main spar of the vertical stabilizer for MRJ (actual size test
component) (Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation)
16 17
Advanc ed Ai r c r af t Mat er i al s
Composite materials, such as carbon fber reinforced plastic (CFRP) in particular, are expanding
and are becoming widely used.
JAPAN accounts for 70% of the world carbon fber products for CFRP and supplies main wings
and center wing box etc. for B787, which consists of 50% of composite materials.
Titan alloys are also expanding and are becoming widely used following back of the composite
materials, which is used for jet engine components, such as fan casing and turbine blade.
These components are manufactured with the Japanese excellent precision forging and casting
technologies.
The Mitsubishi Regional Jet is under development fully utilizing these advanced aircraft materials.
Carbon Fiber Materials (Toray Industries) Carbon Fiber Materials (Toray Industries)
V2500 Turbofan Engine
V2500 Fan Case (KOBELCO)
Cabi n and I nt er i or Syst ems f or I n-Fl i ght Comf or t
In the field of cabin and interior systems, Japanese manufacturers respond to customer
requirements and apply the latest technologies in the development of the worlds best products.
Japanese manufacturers of products, such as galleys, lavatories, aircraft seats and in-fight AV
systems that optimally match the passengers needs, have an excellent reputation with a large
worldwide market share. Japanese manufacturers can continue to lead the world in terms of
technical achievements for cabin and interior systems.
Aircraft Lavatory (JAMCO Corporation) Aircraft Galley (JAMCO Corporation)
MRJ Interior Mock-up (Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation)
The composite main spar of the vertical stabilizer for MRJ (actual size test
component) (Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation)
18 19
2. Solid Propellant Rockets

Space of fers mankind the opportunity of unlimited


adventure and knowledge. Japan has developed the
world maximum class M- solid propellant rocket as a
transportation means to support research in the feld of
space science, and this vehicle has achieved success on
a global scale through the launch of solar observation
satellites, astronomical obser vation satellites, etc.
Development of Epsilon Launch Vehicle as a successor
to the M- is currently underway.
3. Launch and Control Facilities

Satellite tracking, command and control in Japan are


carried out at three communication centers and three
tracking centers, the most important of which are the
launch facilities at the Tanegashima Space Center
and the Tsukuba Space Center. Furthermore, these
installations represent a complete system for the launch,
command and control of satellites.
Launching of H-B NO.2 (JAXA)
Tanegashima Space Center Launch Control Room (JAXA)
Tanegashima Space Center (JAXA)

J apanese Spac e I ndust r y


Wor l d-Cl ass Roc ket s
Japan is currently developing a range of different launch vehicles is order to facilitate the
independent development and utilization of space.
Currently, JAPAN operates the H-A, which rivals any of the worlds top-class liquid propellant
rockets, and the M-V, which ranks among the worlds largest solid propellant rockets.
Japans 1st space experiment was conducted in 1955
with the testing of a 20-cm pencil rocket. Since then, we
have fully applied our technical strengths, and this effort
has allowed Japan to take its place among the worlds
leading space-exploration nations.
1. Liquid Propellant Rockets

In 1975, Japan successfully launched the N-with
the assistance of the United States. Following this,
development of the N- and H-was advanced with
the aim of improving both performance and the level
of domestic production; accordingly, 1994 saw the
successful launch of the H- a launch vehicle that was
produced completely in Japan. Using liquid hydrogen as
fuel and liquid oxygen as an oxidizing agent, this rocket
s engine offered extremely high levels of performance.
In 2001,the Japanese H-A was successfully launched,
and in the process, it became this countr ys main
launch vehicle. This rocket was developed by the Japan
Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and the launch
business were transferred to private companies in 2007.
It is expected that the reliability and cost factors will
improve so that thus allowing Japan to continue to be
active on the global stage.
The first H-B, an upgraded version of the H-A was
successfully launched in September 2009 with the H-
transfer vehicle designed to support the transportation of
supplies to the International Space Station. The second
H-B was also successfully launched in January 2011.
Artists Rendition of Epsilon Launch Vehicle (JAXA)
Principal Japanese Launch Vehicles
No. Specifcations H-A H-B M-
1 Length 53m 57m 30.8m
2 Diameter 4.0m 5.2m 2.5m
3 Gross weight 289t 531t 137.5t
4 LEO launch capability 10t 16.5t 1.85t
5 GTO launch capability 4.0t 9t
Gross weight: Not include payload weights
LEO: Low earth orbit
GTO: Geostationary transfer orbit
18 19
2. Solid Propellant Rockets

Space of fers mankind the opportunity of unlimited


adventure and knowledge. Japan has developed the
world maximum class M- solid propellant rocket as a
transportation means to support research in the feld of
space science, and this vehicle has achieved success on
a global scale through the launch of solar observation
satellites, astronomical obser vation satellites, etc.
Development of Epsilon Launch Vehicle as a successor
to the M- is currently underway.
3. Launch and Control Facilities

Satellite tracking, command and control in Japan are


carried out at three communication centers and three
tracking centers, the most important of which are the
launch facilities at the Tanegashima Space Center
and the Tsukuba Space Center. Furthermore, these
installations represent a complete system for the launch,
command and control of satellites.
Launching of H-B NO.2 (JAXA)
Tanegashima Space Center Launch Control Room (JAXA)
Tanegashima Space Center (JAXA)

Japanese Spac e I ndust r y


Wor l d-Cl ass Roc ket s
Japan is currently developing a range of different launch vehicles is order to facilitate the
independent development and utilization of space.
Currently, JAPAN operates the H-A, which rivals any of the worlds top-class liquid propellant
rockets, and the M-V, which ranks among the worlds largest solid propellant rockets.
Japans 1st space experiment was conducted in 1955
with the testing of a 20-cm pencil rocket. Since then, we
have fully applied our technical strengths, and this effort
has allowed Japan to take its place among the worlds
leading space-exploration nations.
1. Liquid Propellant Rockets

In 1975, Japan successfully launched the N-with
the assistance of the United States. Following this,
development of the N- and H-was advanced with
the aim of improving both performance and the level
of domestic production; accordingly, 1994 saw the
successful launch of the H- a launch vehicle that was
produced completely in Japan. Using liquid hydrogen as
fuel and liquid oxygen as an oxidizing agent, this rocket
s engine offered extremely high levels of performance.
In 2001,the Japanese H-A was successfully launched,
and in the process, it became this countr ys main
launch vehicle. This rocket was developed by the Japan
Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and the launch
business were transferred to private companies in 2007.
It is expected that the reliability and cost factors will
improve so that thus allowing Japan to continue to be
active on the global stage.
The first H-B, an upgraded version of the H-A was
successfully launched in September 2009 with the H-
transfer vehicle designed to support the transportation of
supplies to the International Space Station. The second
H-B was also successfully launched in January 2011.
Artists Rendition of Epsilon Launch Vehicle (JAXA)
Principal Japanese Launch Vehicles
No. Specifcations H-A H-B M-
1 Length 53m 57m 30.8m
2 Diameter 4.0m 5.2m 2.5m
3 Gross weight 289t 531t 137.5t
4 LEO launch capability 10t 16.5t 1.85t
5 GTO launch capability 4.0t 9t
Gross weight: Not include payload weights
LEO: Low earth orbit
GTO: Geostationary transfer orbit
20 21
4. Remote Sensing

The importance of remote sensing missions such as


global observation and resource surveying is expected
to become ever more important. In terms of the latter,
the monitoring of global surface temperature, heat
radiation and other characteristics is carried out by
the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and
Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) flying on NASA s
Terra Satellite, and this imaging instrument has been
providing extremely valuable data since 2000. As
part of multinational monitoring activities for global
climate change, the Advanced Land Observing Satellite
"DAICHI" (ALOS) was launched in January 2006, The
Satellite equipped with the sensor PALSAR etc. which
have been widely used for mapping, global observation,
determining the status of disasters, etc.
The Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite "IBUKI"
(GOSAT) lifted off in January 2009. It is monitoring the
distribution of carbon dioxide and methane, which are
considered greenhouse gases.
5. Other Projects

Japan is also actively involved in ef forts related to


satellites for the observation of astronomical bodies
and the verification of various technologies. In l995,
the Space-Flyer Unit (SFU) carried out a host of
measurements and experiments in space before being
recovered by a Japanese astronaut riding on the Space
Shuttle. The Selenological and Engineering Explorer
"KAGUYA" (SELENE) was launched in September 2007.
It is part of the largest lunar mission since the Apollo
Program. The explorer was put in regular operation
in October of that year. It ended its mission in June
2009 after completing 15 obser vation missions. The
Asteroid Explorer "HAYABUSA"(MUSES-C) launched
in May 2003 successfully landed on Itokawa asteroid in
November 2005 and came back to Earth in June 2010
after travelling over 6 billion kilometers. It ended its
mission with a brilliant achievement after releasing the
capsule containing the asteroid surface sample.
Rising Earth from "KAGUYA" (SELENE) (JAXA / NHK)
Fuji at Night (PALSAR) (METI / JAXA)
"HAYABUSA" Capsule heat Shield (JAXA)
Sat el l i t e Devel opment
The most imperative usage of space is to assure national security, social peace and activities. In
1970, Japan launched its frst satellite, Oosumi, becoming the fourth spacefaring nation to launch
a domestically manufactured satellite using a rocket of her own. Then in 1977, Japan successfully
launched a geosynchronous orbit satellite. With technical capabilities rating among the best in the
world, Japan is currently involved in the development and production of satellite systems, onboard
sensors and components.
1. Weather Satellites

The frst satellite launched for practical use by Japan was


the Himawari weather satellite of l977. Following this, a
total of four weather satellites were put into operation,
allowing valuable weather-related information to be
supplied domestically and throughout the Asian region.
Furthermore, projects have launched Multi-Purpose
Transportation Satellites (MTSAT) as successors to
these earlier satellites for weather monitoring and air-
traffc control.
MTSAT No.1 and 2 were launched in February 2005 and
February 2006, and they are currently in operation.
2.Communication & Broadcasting Satellites

In addition to launching its Sakura series of satellites


for communication and its Yuri series for broadcasting,
Japan has also developed the technologies required to
make practical use of these satellites capabilities. As a
result of the delivered benefts, Japan has also established
technologies for satellite communication and broadcasting;
furthermore, we currently supply satellite systems to
overseas operators of communication systems. Satellites
made in foreign countries used to dominate the Japanese
market, however successes like the receipt of orders for
the Superbird 7 satellite, which is made by a Japanese
company, help to advance Japans competitiveness in
the international market. Currently, the Wideband
InterNetworking engineering test and Demonstration
Satellite "KIZUNA" (WINDS) is being operated. It
performs essential technical demonstrations in order to
speed up and enlarge the capacity of information networks.
Also, Verifying Tests are underway on the Engineering
Test Satellite "KIKU No. 8" (ETS-), which is equipped
with a large deployable antenna in order to achieve high-
speed mobile communication technology.
3. Quasi-Zenith Satellite Systems

Positioning information as presented by vehicle


navigation systems is currently being put to practical
use in a wide range of social fields, and the range of
this usage is expected to increase even further over the
coming years. The Quasi-Zenith Satellite-1 "MICHIBIKI"
was launched in September 2010 and the verifying tests
are underway.
Quasi-Zenith Satellite-1 " MICHIBIKI" (JAXA) Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite "IBUKI" (GOSAT) (JAXA)
"HAYABUSA" (Sample catching) Image CG (JAXA)
20 21
4. Remote Sensing

The importance of remote sensing missions such as


global observation and resource surveying is expected
to become ever more important. In terms of the latter,
the monitoring of global surface temperature, heat
radiation and other characteristics is carried out by
the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and
Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) flying on NASA s
Terra Satellite, and this imaging instrument has been
providing extremely valuable data since 2000. As
part of multinational monitoring activities for global
climate change, the Advanced Land Observing Satellite
"DAICHI" (ALOS) was launched in January 2006, The
Satellite equipped with the sensor PALSAR etc. which
have been widely used for mapping, global observation,
determining the status of disasters, etc.
The Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite "IBUKI"
(GOSAT) lifted off in January 2009. It is monitoring the
distribution of carbon dioxide and methane, which are
considered greenhouse gases.
5. Other Projects

Japan is also actively involved in ef forts related to


satellites for the observation of astronomical bodies
and the verification of various technologies. In l995,
the Space-Flyer Unit (SFU) carried out a host of
measurements and experiments in space before being
recovered by a Japanese astronaut riding on the Space
Shuttle. The Selenological and Engineering Explorer
"KAGUYA" (SELENE) was launched in September 2007.
It is part of the largest lunar mission since the Apollo
Program. The explorer was put in regular operation
in October of that year. It ended its mission in June
2009 after completing 15 obser vation missions. The
Asteroid Explorer "HAYABUSA"(MUSES-C) launched
in May 2003 successfully landed on Itokawa asteroid in
November 2005 and came back to Earth in June 2010
after travelling over 6 billion kilometers. It ended its
mission with a brilliant achievement after releasing the
capsule containing the asteroid surface sample.
Rising Earth from "KAGUYA" (SELENE) (JAXA / NHK)
Fuji at Night (PALSAR) (METI / JAXA)
"HAYABUSA" Capsule heat Shield (JAXA)
Sat el l i t e Devel opment
The most imperative usage of space is to assure national security, social peace and activities. In
1970, Japan launched its frst satellite, Oosumi, becoming the fourth spacefaring nation to launch
a domestically manufactured satellite using a rocket of her own. Then in 1977, Japan successfully
launched a geosynchronous orbit satellite. With technical capabilities rating among the best in the
world, Japan is currently involved in the development and production of satellite systems, onboard
sensors and components.
1. Weather Satellites

The frst satellite launched for practical use by Japan was


the Himawari weather satellite of l977. Following this, a
total of four weather satellites were put into operation,
allowing valuable weather-related information to be
supplied domestically and throughout the Asian region.
Furthermore, projects have launched Multi-Purpose
Transportation Satellites (MTSAT) as successors to
these earlier satellites for weather monitoring and air-
traffc control.
MTSAT No.1 and 2 were launched in February 2005 and
February 2006, and they are currently in operation.
2.Communication & Broadcasting Satellites

In addition to launching its Sakura series of satellites


for communication and its Yuri series for broadcasting,
Japan has also developed the technologies required to
make practical use of these satellites capabilities. As a
result of the delivered benefts, Japan has also established
technologies for satellite communication and broadcasting;
furthermore, we currently supply satellite systems to
overseas operators of communication systems. Satellites
made in foreign countries used to dominate the Japanese
market, however successes like the receipt of orders for
the Superbird 7 satellite, which is made by a Japanese
company, help to advance Japans competitiveness in
the international market. Currently, the Wideband
InterNetworking engineering test and Demonstration
Satellite "KIZUNA" (WINDS) is being operated. It
performs essential technical demonstrations in order to
speed up and enlarge the capacity of information networks.
Also, Verifying Tests are underway on the Engineering
Test Satellite "KIKU No. 8" (ETS-), which is equipped
with a large deployable antenna in order to achieve high-
speed mobile communication technology.
3. Quasi-Zenith Satellite Systems

Positioning information as presented by vehicle


navigation systems is currently being put to practical
use in a wide range of social fields, and the range of
this usage is expected to increase even further over the
coming years. The Quasi-Zenith Satellite-1 "MICHIBIKI"
was launched in September 2010 and the verifying tests
are underway.
Quasi-Zenith Satellite-1 " MICHIBIKI" (JAXA) Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite "IBUKI" (GOSAT) (JAXA)
"HAYABUSA" (Sample catching) Image CG (JAXA)
22 23
Artists Rendition of H-B (JAXA)
Second Stage LH2 Tank
Second Stage Engine LE-5B
Second Stage Lox Tank
First Stage Lox Tank
First Stage LH2 Tank
F
a
i
r
i
n
g
S
e
c
o
n
d

S
t
a
g
e
F
i
r
s
t

S
t
a
g
e
S
R
B
-
A
First Stage Engine LE-7A
The H-B, an upgrade model of the H-A, has been
developed. It was first production used in a successful
launch of the H-Transfer Vehicle (HTV) in September
2009. The HTV "KOHNOTORI", an unmanned cargo
transporter, carries supplies to the International Space
H- Transfer Vehicle (HTV) (JAXA)
Cont r i but i on t o t he I nt er nat i onal Spac e St at i on
By maintaining and implementing its capabilities for rocket launching, satellite tracking, command
and control, etc., Japan retains the ability to explore and utilize space in an independent manner.
Accordingly, we have participated in the International Space Station project from its inception,
making signifcant contributions to its completion.
1. International Space Station
As an active participant in the International Space
Station (ISS) project, which began in 1984 in response
to a proposal made by U.S. President Reagan, Japan
has developed the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM,
Kibo). In specifc terms, JEM is a pressurized module
4.2 meters in diameter and 11.1 meters in length that
comprises an experiment logistics module, an extra-
International Space Station (ISS) (NASA) Astronaut Noguchi by the window of "Kibo" (NASA)
Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo" (NASA)
vehicular pallet, an extra-vehicular experiment platform
and a robot arm. Capable of creating environments not
possible on earth, Kibo is intended for use in a diverse
range of experimental programs dealing with materials,
technology, life science, etc. Kibo was docked at the
ISS in 2008.
Station (ISS). After that, the next HTV was launched
in January 2011 and one or two HTVs are scheduled
for launch every year. Total Seven HTVs will deliver
supplies to the ISS.
2. H-B and HTV contribute to deliver supplies to ISS

Launch of H-B NO.2 (JAXA)
22 23
Artists Rendition of H-B (JAXA)
Second Stage LH2 Tank
Second Stage Engine LE-5B
Second Stage Lox Tank
First Stage Lox Tank
First Stage LH2 Tank
F
a
i
r
i
n
g
S
e
c
o
n
d

S
t
a
g
e
F
i
r
s
t

S
t
a
g
e
S
R
B
-
A
First Stage Engine LE-7A
The H-B, an upgrade model of the H-A, has been
developed. It was first production used in a successful
launch of the H-Transfer Vehicle (HTV) in September
2009. The HTV "KOHNOTORI", an unmanned cargo
transporter, carries supplies to the International Space
H- Transfer Vehicle (HTV) (JAXA)
Cont r i but i on t o t he I nt er nat i onal Spac e St at i on
By maintaining and implementing its capabilities for rocket launching, satellite tracking, command
and control, etc., Japan retains the ability to explore and utilize space in an independent manner.
Accordingly, we have participated in the International Space Station project from its inception,
making signifcant contributions to its completion.
1. International Space Station
As an active participant in the International Space
Station (ISS) project, which began in 1984 in response
to a proposal made by U.S. President Reagan, Japan
has developed the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM,
Kibo). In specifc terms, JEM is a pressurized module
4.2 meters in diameter and 11.1 meters in length that
comprises an experiment logistics module, an extra-
International Space Station (ISS) (NASA) Astronaut Noguchi by the window of "Kibo" (NASA)
Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo" (NASA)
vehicular pallet, an extra-vehicular experiment platform
and a robot arm. Capable of creating environments not
possible on earth, Kibo is intended for use in a diverse
range of experimental programs dealing with materials,
technology, life science, etc. Kibo was docked at the
ISS in 2008.
Station (ISS). After that, the next HTV was launched
in January 2011 and one or two HTVs are scheduled
for launch every year. Total Seven HTVs will deliver
supplies to the ISS.
2. H-B and HTV contribute to deliver supplies to ISS

Launch of H-B NO.2 (JAXA)
24 25
SJAC, participating in such international exhibitions that
take place in Paris and Farnborough, holds meetings
for interaction with the U.S., EU and other foreign
Major Aerospace Industrial Associations in the world
Countries / Regions Industrial Associations
World
Internati onal Coordi nati ng Counci l of Aerospace Industri es
Associations (ICCAIA)
U.S.A. Aerospace Industries Association of America (AIA)
Europe Aerospace and Defense Industries Association of Europe (ASD)
U.K. Advancing UK Aerospace Defence and Security Industries (A
|
D
|
S)
France French Aerospace Industries Association (GIFAS)
Canada Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (AIAC)
Japanese Space Industry Research Delegation in Brazil (Aug. 2010)
SJAC-AIA Reception (July 2010) Paris Air Show (June 2009)

The Soc i et y of
J apanese Aer ospac e Compani es
The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies (SJAC), founded in 1952 as the Japanese
aerospace industry was reborn, has contributed to the growth of our aerospace industry through
its various activities, as listed below.
1. Industrial Policies Promotion

Par ticipation and suppor t in reviewing Japan s


aerospace administration.
Negotiation with relevant government ministries
and departments with respect to budget and system
reviews for Japans aerospace industry.
2. Industrial Foundation Buildup and
Maintenance

Wide range of sur vey, research and development


activities
Investigation of the domestic and overseas aerospace
industries status quo
Search of trends in aerospace technology
Research and development of future aeronautic
technologies
Review of technical standards (i.e., JIS, ISO, IAQG, etc.)
SJAC operates as the aerospace evaluation branch
of Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). Also through
SJAC, the Japan Aerospace Quality Group (JAQG)
operates as an implementation monitor for quality
assurance systems in compliance with IAQG, the de
facto standards of the aerospace industry.
Management of EDI (Electric Data Interchange)
centers
SJAC-managed electric procurement ordering systems
are now used by approximately 275 companies in the
Japanese aerospace industry.
SJAC-GIFAS SST Workshop Meeting in Tokyo (Nov. 2010)
SJAC General Meeting (May 2010)
ISO/TC61/SC13 Meeting in Bangkok (Sep. 2010)
General Assembly
Regular members: 90
Associated members: 49
Total members: 139
Board of Directors
Comprises the Chairman,
Vice-Chairman, Directors,
and Supervisors
Branches and Committees
Branch: 1
Committees: 6
Extra committees: 12
Secretariat
Pr esi dent and Seni or
Vice Presidents and staff
members: 37
Organization
*A total of 139 member companies are involved in the development,
production, maintenance and trading of devices, materials and
related services for aircraft, rockets, satellites.
Farnborough Air Show (July 2010)
industries, thus promoting international cooperation in
the aerospace industry.
3. Cooperation with Overseas Aerospace Industries
24 25
SJAC, participating in such international exhibitions that
take place in Paris and Farnborough, holds meetings
for interaction with the U.S., EU and other foreign
Major Aerospace Industrial Associations in the world
Countries / Regions Industrial Associations
World
Internati onal Coordi nati ng Counci l of Aerospace Industri es
Associations (ICCAIA)
U.S.A. Aerospace Industries Association of America (AIA)
Europe Aerospace and Defense Industries Association of Europe (ASD)
U.K. Advancing UK Aerospace Defence and Security Industries (A
|
D
|
S)
France French Aerospace Industries Association (GIFAS)
Canada Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (AIAC)
Japanese Space Industry Research Delegation in Brazil (Aug. 2010)
SJAC-AIA Reception (July 2010) Paris Air Show (June 2009)

The Soc i et y of
J apanese Aer ospac e Compani es
The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies (SJAC), founded in 1952 as the Japanese
aerospace industry was reborn, has contributed to the growth of our aerospace industry through
its various activities, as listed below.
1. Industrial Policies Promotion

Par ticipation and suppor t in reviewing Japan s


aerospace administration.
Negotiation with relevant government ministries
and departments with respect to budget and system
reviews for Japans aerospace industry.
2. Industrial Foundation Buildup and
Maintenance

Wide range of sur vey, research and development


activities
Investigation of the domestic and overseas aerospace
industries status quo
Search of trends in aerospace technology
Research and development of future aeronautic
technologies
Review of technical standards (i.e., JIS, ISO, IAQG, etc.)
SJAC operates as the aerospace evaluation branch
of Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). Also through
SJAC, the Japan Aerospace Quality Group (JAQG)
operates as an implementation monitor for quality
assurance systems in compliance with IAQG, the de
facto standards of the aerospace industry.
Management of EDI (Electric Data Interchange)
centers
SJAC-managed electric procurement ordering systems
are now used by approximately 275 companies in the
Japanese aerospace industry.
SJAC-GIFAS SST Workshop Meeting in Tokyo (Nov. 2010)
SJAC General Meeting (May 2010)
ISO/TC61/SC13 Meeting in Bangkok (Sep. 2010)
General Assembly
Regular members: 90
Associated members: 49
Total members: 139
Board of Directors
Comprises the Chairman,
Vice-Chairman, Directors,
and Supervisors
Branches and Committees
Branch: 1
Committees: 6
Extra committees: 12
Secretariat
Pr esi dent and Seni or
Vice Presidents and staff
members: 37
Organization
*A total of 139 member companies are involved in the development,
production, maintenance and trading of devices, materials and
related services for aircraft, rockets, satellites.
Farnborough Air Show (July 2010)
industries, thus promoting international cooperation in
the aerospace industry.
3. Cooperation with Overseas Aerospace Industries
26 27
The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies holds an
international exhibition almost every four years with the
participation of the worlds major aerospace companies
and authorities. This is one of the kinds of showcases
for the aerospace industries in Japan, and it contributes
to promote business and to better acknowledge the
industries capabilities.
The 12th Japan International Aerospace Exhibition
(JA2008) was held for five days from October 1 to 5,
2008 at Pacifico Yokohama. 529 exhibiting companies
and organizations from 22 countries and regions*
1

presented their technical, productive capabilities and
attractive, appealing services.
Seminars and symposiums, demo flights and public
events were presented, and International Aerospace
Quality Group (IAQG*
2
) Meeting 2008 was also held at
the same time as one of the concurrent events.
The plan calls for next event to be held in 2012 in Port
Messe Nagoya (NagoyaInternational Exhibition Hall)
and Central Japan International Airport (CENTRAIR).
*1) 22 countries and regions:
Japan, Belgium, India, Netherlands, Turkey, Canada,
Ireland, New Zealand, EU, Israel, Romania, UK, France,
Italy, Russia, USA, Germany, Korea, Singapore, Hong
Kong, Mexico, Taiwan
*2) IAQG: International Aerospace Quality Group
Event overview:
From the 1st (1966) until 7th (1983), the exhibitions were held in Japan Air Self-Defense Force Base featuring the
displays of real aircrafts. Each event had around 300,000-500,000 visitors.
Title Dates of Exhibition Venue Country Demo Visitors
8th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition91
February 14-18,
1991
Nippon Convention Center
(Makuhari Messe)
10
No
80,000
9th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition95
February 15-19,
1995
21 84,000
10th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition 2000
March 22-26,
2000
Tokyo International Exhibition
Center (Tokyo Big Sight)
24 110,000
11th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition 2004
October 6-10,
2004
Pacifco Yokohama 24 Yes
*3
110,000
12th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition 2008
October 1-5,
2008
Pacifco Yokohama 22 Yes
*3
42,000
*4
*3) Mainly demonstrated helicopters *4) Modifed as the number of unique attendees, not total visitors
5. Other Activities
SJAC regul arl y communi cates wi th the rel evant
government of fices, and it also maintains a good
relationship with the public through the publishing of
superior publications. SJAC also publishes publicity
materials such as the monthly magazine Aviation and
Space (Japanese) and Japanese Aerospace Industry
(Japanese and English), to introduce the aerospace
industries of Japan, Aerospace Industries in Japan
(Japanese and English), Aerospace Industries in the
World and more. SJAC also owns the website (www.
sjac.or.jp), and it is operated, transmitted and updated by
SJAC.
In addition, SJAC communicates with and accommodates
rel evant gover nment mi ni st ri es, depar t ment s,
universities, laboratories, groups, etc.
4. Japan International Aerospace Exhibition

26 27
The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies holds an
international exhibition almost every four years with the
participation of the worlds major aerospace companies
and authorities. This is one of the kinds of showcases
for the aerospace industries in Japan, and it contributes
to promote business and to better acknowledge the
industries capabilities.
The 12th Japan International Aerospace Exhibition
(JA2008) was held for five days from October 1 to 5,
2008 at Pacifico Yokohama. 529 exhibiting companies
and organizations from 22 countries and regions*
1

presented their technical, productive capabilities and
attractive, appealing services.
Seminars and symposiums, demo flights and public
events were presented, and International Aerospace
Quality Group (IAQG*
2
) Meeting 2008 was also held at
the same time as one of the concurrent events.
The plan calls for next event to be held in 2012 in Port
Messe Nagoya (NagoyaInternational Exhibition Hall)
and Central Japan International Airport (CENTRAIR).
*1) 22 countries and regions:
Japan, Belgium, India, Netherlands, Turkey, Canada,
Ireland, New Zealand, EU, Israel, Romania, UK, France,
Italy, Russia, USA, Germany, Korea, Singapore, Hong
Kong, Mexico, Taiwan
*2) IAQG: International Aerospace Quality Group
Event overview:
From the 1st (1966) until 7th (1983), the exhibitions were held in Japan Air Self-Defense Force Base featuring the
displays of real aircrafts. Each event had around 300,000-500,000 visitors.
Title Dates of Exhibition Venue Country Demo Visitors
8th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition91
February 14-18,
1991
Nippon Convention Center
(Makuhari Messe)
10
No
80,000
9th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition95
February 15-19,
1995
21 84,000
10th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition 2000
March 22-26,
2000
Tokyo International Exhibition
Center (Tokyo Big Sight)
24 110,000
11th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition 2004
October 6-10,
2004
Pacifco Yokohama 24 Yes
*3
110,000
12th
Japan International Aerospace
Exhibition 2008
October 1-5,
2008
Pacifco Yokohama 22 Yes
*3
42,000
*4
*3) Mainly demonstrated helicopters *4) Modifed as the number of unique attendees, not total visitors
5. Other Activities
SJAC regul arl y communi cates wi th the rel evant
government of fices, and it also maintains a good
relationship with the public through the publishing of
superior publications. SJAC also publishes publicity
materials such as the monthly magazine Aviation and
Space (Japanese) and Japanese Aerospace Industry
(Japanese and English), to introduce the aerospace
industries of Japan, Aerospace Industries in Japan
(Japanese and English), Aerospace Industries in the
World and more. SJAC also owns the website (www.
sjac.or.jp), and it is operated, transmitted and updated by
SJAC.
In addition, SJAC communicates with and accommodates
rel evant gover nment mi ni st ri es, depar t ment s,
universities, laboratories, groups, etc.
4. Japan International Aerospace Exhibition

28 29
SUMIJYU PRECISION FORGING CO., LTD.
SUMITOMO LIGHT METAL INDUSTRIES, LTD.
SUMITOMO METAL INDUSTRIES, LTD.
SUMITOMO PRECISION PRODUCTS CO., LTD.
TAKATA CORPORATION
TAMAGAWA SEIKI CO., LTD.
TERAUCHI MANUFACTURING CO., LTD.
TOHO TENAX CO., LTD.
TOKYO AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT CO., LTD.
TORAY INDUSTRIES, INC.
TOSHIBA CORPORATION
TOSHIBA ELECTRO-WAVE PRODUCTS CO., LTD.
TOKYO KEIKI INC.
YAMAHA MOTOR CO., LTD.
YOKOGAWA DENSHIKIKI CO., LTD.
YOKOGAWA ELECTRIC CORPORATION
THE YOKOHAMA RUBBER CO., LTD.
YOSHIMITSU INDUSTRIES INC.

ASSOCIATED MEMBERS 49 Companies
ADMAT CO., LTD.
ALERIS ALUMINIUM JAPAN, LTD.
ASAHI AIR SUPPLY INC.
BAE SYSTEMS (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED
BARCO CO., LTD.
BODYCOTE JAPAN K.K.
CHUDEN CTI CO., LTD.
CHURYO ENGINEERING CO.,LTD.
CSP JAPAN, INC.
DELOITTE TOHMATSU CONSULTING CO., LTD.
EARTH REMOTE SENSING DATA ANALYSIS CENTER
EXCALIBUR K.K.
EXPLORER CONSULTING JAPAN INC.
FUJI INDUSTRIES CO., LTD.
HIGH-RELIABILITY ENGINEERING & COMPONENTS CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT FUND
INTERNATIONAL TASK FORCE LTD.
ITOCHU AVIATION CO., LTD.
ITOCHU CORPORATION
JAPAN AEROSPACE CORPORATION
JAPAN AEROSPACE PARTS ASSOCIATION
JAPAN MANNED SPACE SYSTEMS CORPORATION
JAPAN SPACE FORUM
JUPITOR CORPORATION
KANEMATSU CORPORATION
KANSAI ELECTRONIC INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT CENTER
KYOKUTO BOEKI KAISHA
MARUBENI AEROSPACE CORPORATION
MARUBENI CORPORATION
MARUBUN CORPORATION
MIKUNI SHOKO COMPANY, A DIVISION OF MIKUNI CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.
MITSUI BUSSAN AEROSPACE CO., LTD.
MITSUI & CO., LTD.
MORIMURA BROS., INC.
NAGOYA RYOJU ESTATE CO., LTD.
NIPPON AIRCRAFT SUPPLY CO., LTD.
NTK INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
OKI ENGINEERING CO., LTD.
SATELLITE POSITIONING RESEARCH AND APPLICATION CENTER
SHINTOA CORPORATION
SOJITZ AEROSPACE CORPORATION
SOJITZ CORPORATION
SORUN CORPORATION
SPACE ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT CO., LTD.
SUMITOMO CORPORATION
TOKIO MARINE & NICHIDO FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD.
TOKYO BIG SIGHT INC.
REGULAR MEMBERS 90 Companies
AERO ASAHI CORPORATION
ALL NIPPON AIRWAYS CO., LTD.
AT GIKEN CO., LTD.
CHIYODA ADVANCED SOLUTIONS CORPORATION
CHUBU NIHON MARUKO CO., LTD.
COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE COMPANY
DAICEL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES, LTD.
DAIDO STEEL CO., LTD.
EAGLE INDUSTRY CO., LTD.
FUJI HEAVY INDUSTRIES LTD.
FUJIKIN INCORPORATED
FUJITSU LIMITED
THE FURUKAWA BATTERY CO., LTD.
FURUKAWA-SKY ALUMINUM CORP.
FURUNO ELECTRIC CO., LTD.
GH CRAFT LTD.
GS YUASA TECHNOLOGY LTD.
HARADASEIKI CO., LTD.
HIROBO LIMITED
HITACHI, LTD.
HITACHI KOKUSAI ELECTRIC INC.
HITACHI METALS, LTD.
HODEN SEIMITSU KAKO KENKYUSHO CO., LTD.
HONDA MOTOR CO., LTD.
ICS CORPORATION
IHI AEROSPACE CO., LTD.
IHI CORPORATION
JAMCO CORPORATION
JAPAN AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
JAPAN AIRLINES INTERNATIONAL CO., LTD.
JAPAN AVIATION ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY, LTD.
JAPAN RADIO CO.,LTD.
THE JAPAN STEEL WORKS, LTD.
JAPANESE AERO ENGINES CORPORATION
JTEKT CORPORATION
KANTO AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT CO.,LTD.
KAWANISHI AERO PARTS PRODUCTS CO., LTD.
KAWASAKI HEAVY INDUSTRIES, LTD.
KAYABA INDUSTRY CO., LTD.
KOBE STEEL, LTD.
KOITO INDUSTRIES, LTD.
MEIRA CORPORATION
MINEBEA CO., LTD.
MITSUBISHI AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI HEAVY INDUSTRIES, LTD.
MITSUBISHI MATERIALS CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI PRECISION CO., LTD.
MITSUBISHI SPACE SOFTWARE CO., LTD.
MITSUI SEIKI KOGYO CO., LTD.
MOOG JAPAN, LTD.
NABTESCO CORPORATION
NACHI-FUJIKOSHI CORP.
NEC AEROSPACE SYSTEMS, LTD.
NEC CORPORATION
NEC TOSHIBA SPACE SYSTEMS, LTD.
NGK SPARK PLUG CO., LTD.
NIHON PALL LTD.
NIKKISO CO., LTD.
NIPPI CORPORATION
NIPPON AVIONICS CO., LTD.
NOF CORPORATION
NSK LTD.
NTN CORPORATION
SAKURA RUBBER COMPANY LIMITED
SHIMADZU CORPORATION
SHINMAYWA INDUSTRIES, LTD.
SHOUNAN SEIKI CO., LTD.
SHOWA AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY CO., LTD.
SINFONIA TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.
SOGO SPRING MFG CO., LTD.
SUGINO MACHINE LTD.
SJAC MEMBER COMPANI ES (As of April 1, 2011)
28 29
SUMIJYU PRECISION FORGING CO., LTD.
SUMITOMO LIGHT METAL INDUSTRIES, LTD.
SUMITOMO METAL INDUSTRIES, LTD.
SUMITOMO PRECISION PRODUCTS CO., LTD.
TAKATA CORPORATION
TAMAGAWA SEIKI CO., LTD.
TERAUCHI MANUFACTURING CO., LTD.
TOHO TENAX CO., LTD.
TOKYO AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT CO., LTD.
TORAY INDUSTRIES, INC.
TOSHIBA CORPORATION
TOSHIBA ELECTRO-WAVE PRODUCTS CO., LTD.
TOKYO KEIKI INC.
YAMAHA MOTOR CO., LTD.
YOKOGAWA DENSHIKIKI CO., LTD.
YOKOGAWA ELECTRIC CORPORATION
THE YOKOHAMA RUBBER CO., LTD.
YOSHIMITSU INDUSTRIES INC.

ASSOCIATED MEMBERS 49 Companies
ADMAT CO., LTD.
ALERIS ALUMINIUM JAPAN, LTD.
ASAHI AIR SUPPLY INC.
BAE SYSTEMS (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED
BARCO CO., LTD.
BODYCOTE JAPAN K.K.
CHUDEN CTI CO., LTD.
CHURYO ENGINEERING CO.,LTD.
CSP JAPAN, INC.
DELOITTE TOHMATSU CONSULTING CO., LTD.
EARTH REMOTE SENSING DATA ANALYSIS CENTER
EXCALIBUR K.K.
EXPLORER CONSULTING JAPAN INC.
FUJI INDUSTRIES CO., LTD.
HIGH-RELIABILITY ENGINEERING & COMPONENTS CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT FUND
INTERNATIONAL TASK FORCE LTD.
ITOCHU AVIATION CO., LTD.
ITOCHU CORPORATION
JAPAN AEROSPACE CORPORATION
JAPAN AEROSPACE PARTS ASSOCIATION
JAPAN MANNED SPACE SYSTEMS CORPORATION
JAPAN SPACE FORUM
JUPITOR CORPORATION
KANEMATSU CORPORATION
KANSAI ELECTRONIC INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT CENTER
KYOKUTO BOEKI KAISHA
MARUBENI AEROSPACE CORPORATION
MARUBENI CORPORATION
MARUBUN CORPORATION
MIKUNI SHOKO COMPANY, A DIVISION OF MIKUNI CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.
MITSUI BUSSAN AEROSPACE CO., LTD.
MITSUI & CO., LTD.
MORIMURA BROS., INC.
NAGOYA RYOJU ESTATE CO., LTD.
NIPPON AIRCRAFT SUPPLY CO., LTD.
NTK INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
OKI ENGINEERING CO., LTD.
SATELLITE POSITIONING RESEARCH AND APPLICATION CENTER
SHINTOA CORPORATION
SOJITZ AEROSPACE CORPORATION
SOJITZ CORPORATION
SORUN CORPORATION
SPACE ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT CO., LTD.
SUMITOMO CORPORATION
TOKIO MARINE & NICHIDO FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD.
TOKYO BIG SIGHT INC.
REGULAR MEMBERS 90 Companies
AERO ASAHI CORPORATION
ALL NIPPON AIRWAYS CO., LTD.
AT GIKEN CO., LTD.
CHIYODA ADVANCED SOLUTIONS CORPORATION
CHUBU NIHON MARUKO CO., LTD.
COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE COMPANY
DAICEL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES, LTD.
DAIDO STEEL CO., LTD.
EAGLE INDUSTRY CO., LTD.
FUJI HEAVY INDUSTRIES LTD.
FUJIKIN INCORPORATED
FUJITSU LIMITED
THE FURUKAWA BATTERY CO., LTD.
FURUKAWA-SKY ALUMINUM CORP.
FURUNO ELECTRIC CO., LTD.
GH CRAFT LTD.
GS YUASA TECHNOLOGY LTD.
HARADASEIKI CO., LTD.
HIROBO LIMITED
HITACHI, LTD.
HITACHI KOKUSAI ELECTRIC INC.
HITACHI METALS, LTD.
HODEN SEIMITSU KAKO KENKYUSHO CO., LTD.
HONDA MOTOR CO., LTD.
ICS CORPORATION
IHI AEROSPACE CO., LTD.
IHI CORPORATION
JAMCO CORPORATION
JAPAN AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
JAPAN AIRLINES INTERNATIONAL CO., LTD.
JAPAN AVIATION ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY, LTD.
JAPAN RADIO CO.,LTD.
THE JAPAN STEEL WORKS, LTD.
JAPANESE AERO ENGINES CORPORATION
JTEKT CORPORATION
KANTO AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT CO.,LTD.
KAWANISHI AERO PARTS PRODUCTS CO., LTD.
KAWASAKI HEAVY INDUSTRIES, LTD.
KAYABA INDUSTRY CO., LTD.
KOBE STEEL, LTD.
KOITO INDUSTRIES, LTD.
MEIRA CORPORATION
MINEBEA CO., LTD.
MITSUBISHI AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI HEAVY INDUSTRIES, LTD.
MITSUBISHI MATERIALS CORPORATION
MITSUBISHI PRECISION CO., LTD.
MITSUBISHI SPACE SOFTWARE CO., LTD.
MITSUI SEIKI KOGYO CO., LTD.
MOOG JAPAN, LTD.
NABTESCO CORPORATION
NACHI-FUJIKOSHI CORP.
NEC AEROSPACE SYSTEMS, LTD.
NEC CORPORATION
NEC TOSHIBA SPACE SYSTEMS, LTD.
NGK SPARK PLUG CO., LTD.
NIHON PALL LTD.
NIKKISO CO., LTD.
NIPPI CORPORATION
NIPPON AVIONICS CO., LTD.
NOF CORPORATION
NSK LTD.
NTN CORPORATION
SAKURA RUBBER COMPANY LIMITED
SHIMADZU CORPORATION
SHINMAYWA INDUSTRIES, LTD.
SHOUNAN SEIKI CO., LTD.
SHOWA AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY CO., LTD.
SINFONIA TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.
SOGO SPRING MFG CO., LTD.
SUGINO MACHINE LTD.
SJAC MEMBER COMPANI ES (As of April 1, 2011)
2011.04
Japanese Aerospace Industry
Presented by The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies 2011
THE SOCIETY OF JAPANESE AEROSPACE COMPANIES (SJAC)
The Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies
1-1-14 NOF Tameike Bldg. 2F
Akasaka, Minato-ku
Tokyo, Japan 107-0052
Telephone: (+81) 3-3585-0511
Facsimile: (+81) 3-3585-0541
http:/ / www.sjac.or.jp
www.sjac.or.jp