Local

Attractions
EVENTS
Saturday in the Park - 4th of July
weekend
Art Splash - Labor Day weekend
Rivercade - mid-July
MUSEUMS AND
EDUCATIONAL CENTERS
Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center
Sioux City Public Museum
Sergeant Floyd Riverboat Museum
Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center
Sergeant Floyd Monument
SHOPPING
Historic 4th Street and Downtown
Southern Hills Mall
Lakeport Commons
Marketplace on Hamilton
Farmer’s Market
Sioux City,
Iowa
Local
Attractions
ARTS AND
ENTERTAINMENT
Orpheum Theatre
Sioux City Art Center
Tyson Events Center
Argosy Casino Sioux City
Sioux City Symphony
Sioux City Community Theater
OUTDOORS
Stone State Park
Sioux City Prairie
SPORTS
Sioux City Musketeers Hockey
Sioux City Explorers Baseball
Sioux City Bandits Football
More
information
Sioux City
Tourism Bureau
801 4th Street
(800) 593-2228
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Sioux City lies near the
northwestern corner of Iowa, border-
ing North Sioux City, South Dako-
ta, and South Sioux City, Nebraska.
The three cities together are known
as “Siouxland” or the tri-state area.
With a population of about 80,000,
Sioux City is at the navigational head
of the Missouri River.
Sioux City is the home of Morning-
side College, Briar Clif University,
St. Luke's College and Western
Iowa Tech Community College.
HISTORY
Native Americans and their ances-
tors lived in the Siouxland area for
thousands of years before any explor-
ers from Spain or France arrived.
The frst documented explorers to
record their travels through this area
were the Americans Meriwether
Lewis and William Clark during the
summer of 1804. The Lewis and
Clark Interpretive Center, shown
below, gives visitors a chance to learn
about the explorers’ journey through
the Siouxland area.
The Sergeant Floyd Monument
commemorates the burial site of
U.S. Army Sergeant Charles Floyd,
the only man to die on the Lewis and
Clark Expedition. It is a National
Historic Landmark, with its promi-
nent 100-foot (30 m) obelisk situated
on 23 acres of parkland, high on a
river bluf with a splendid view of the
Missouri River valley.
NATURE
Northwest Iowa features rolling
prairie grasslands through the Loess
Hills and forested valleys.
Stone State Park is in the northwest
corner of the city, overlooking the
South Dakota/Iowa border. Stone
Park is near the northernmost extent
of the Loess Hills, and is at the
transition from clay blufs and prairie
to sedimentary rock hills and bur oak
forest along the Iowa side of the Big
Sioux River. Popular for decades
with picnickers and day hikers, it has
been a local hot spot for mountain
biking since the late 1980s.
Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center is
a destination nature preserve for
Woodbury County, and is located
within the boundaries of Stone State
Park. The butterfy garden is unique
to the area; wild turkeys and white-
tail deer are commonly sighted from
the well-marked trails.
LANDMARKS
War Eagle Park is named for the
Yankton Sioux chief Wambdi Oki-
cize (d. 1851) who befriended early
settlers. An impressive monument
overlooks the confuence of the Big
Sioux and Missouri Rivers; the
sculpture represents the chief in his
role as a leader and peacemaker,
wearing the eagle feather bonnet and
holding the peace pipe.
Grandview Park, located north of
the downtown area, is the location of
the Municipal Bandshell. In sum-
mer, Sunday evening municipal band
concerts are a longstanding Sioux
City tradition. The Saturday in the
Park music festival is held there an-
nually. Behind the bandshell is an
extensive rose garden.
Known as the Castle on the Hill,
Central High School is a large sand-
stone building constructed in 1892 to
become the only high school at the
time. It was closed for many years,
only to re-open as low-income hous-
ing recently.
Downtown along Historic Fourth
Street, shown below, you may fnd
15 buildings dating from 1889 to 1915,
many of which are open for retail or
restaurant business.
Nearby, you may fnd the Farmers’
Market on Wednesdays and Sat-
urdays during the summer and fall.

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