AGENCY GUIDE 2012

Park Cities People
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Park Cities People Oak Cliff People PrestonHollowPeople
From Highland Park to Kessler Park, People Newspapers covers Dallas’ most desirable
neighborhoodslikenoothermediaoutlet.EachFriday,readersturntoPark Cities People,
Preston Hollow People,andOak Clif Peopletofndoutwhat’sgoingonintheircommuni-
ties.
Eachnewspaperistightlyfocusedonitsnamesakearea.Whileotherpublicationsflltheir
frontpageswithstoriesfromaroundtheglobe,ourfrontpagesareflledwithstoriesfrom
aroundthecorner.Whenabelovedbusinesscloses,wefndoutwhy.Whenazoningissue
dividesaneighborhood,wetalktobothsides.Whenitistimeforanelection,weresearch
eachlocalcandidate.Andwhenastudentdoessomethingworthyofrecognition,weput
theminthespotlight.
Insidethepapers,readersfndQ&Aswiththeirneighbors,calendarsofupcomingevents,
extensivecoverageofhighschoolsports,andthemostdetailedpolicereportsintown.
Thosereportsincludeour“SkulduggeryoftheWeek,”ahilarioushighlightofthecraziest
crimesandoddestoutlaws.
Ourreadersalsocontributetoourpapers.TheysendusstoriesandphotosoftheirBoy
Scouttroops,schoolfunctions,churchsocials,etc.Inotherwords,thepeoplewholivein
Dallas’nicestneighborhoodswanttobeseeninPeopleNewspapers.
COMMENTARY
Before Gateway rezoning,
revisit Bishop Davis [ 7A ]
SPORTS
Canterbury repeats
as state champs [ 11A ]
Oak Cliff
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 NEWS FROM YOUR SI DE OF THE RI VER VOL. 6, I SSUE 45 50 CENTS
28 50 100 150 200
Oak Clif People has received 28 subscription renewals linked to
Rosemont. If we get 200, the school will get $1,000. [ 10A ]
SUPPORT ROSEMONT
2
Oa
VOTE!
Find your ballot on page 6A
oakclifpeople.com
or vote online at
BY JOANNA ENGLAND
Staf Writer
A task force last week
gave a thumbs up to a pro-
posed apartment building
at Rosemont Avenue and
Davis Street. If all goes
according to plan, the
Landmark Commission
could approve the design
as soon as Dec. 5.
It’s a complete turn-
around for the project,
whichdrewthe ire of a few
Winnetka Heights resi-
dents last month.
The structure, designed
by Good Fulton & Farrell
architects, raised a few
eyebrows during a Dallas
Landmark Commission
meeting on Oct. 3. The
commission voted to deny
the project’s certificate of
appropriateness because
much of the structure
would be clad in Hardie
Plank siding, a material
verboten by the Winnetka
Heights Historic District’s
preservation ordinance.
Architect Larry Good
was against changing the
exterior , saying at the
Oct. 3 meeting that his
firm would not “engage in
design by committee.”
However, that’s exactly
what happened.
“[Wood Partners] rec-
ogni zed that my hi gh
standards for our design
weren’t conducive to a
successful compromise
with those who chose to
criticize it,” Good said in a
Nov. 15 email. “Therefore,
we reassigned the project
to my very talented and
much more tactful part-
ner, Evan Beattie. He was
able to make changes to be
responsive to our neigh-
bors, and I think we have
an agreement for support
at Landmark.”
Concessions include the
addition of columns and
changes to the trim that
Apartments’ Façade Redesigned
Rosemontsidechanged
toplacateneighborhood
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
When the bell rings at
Lida Hooe Elementary
School, Michelle Ramirez
races out the back door
wearing her black and
white uniform. On this
day, however, Ramirez has
added a bit of flair to her
ensemble.
Pulled up over one leg
of her black slacks, she’s
wearing an argyle sock
wi th bri ghtl y col ored
patches on her right foot.
On the other, she’s don-
ning a sock with fluoures-
cent peace signs. Another
student is wearing one
black sock with a skull-
and-crossbones motif and
another of a stripedvariety.
No, this isn’t an outra-
geous socks contest. It’s the
students’ pledge against
bullying — part of a dis-
trict-wide “Band Against
Bullying Week.” Through
their crazy socks, the Lida
Hooe students are saying
it’s OKto be different.
Bes i des t he s oc ks ,
this week students were
Lida Hooe
Socks it
To Bullies
Studentsdress
oddlytosend
unitedmessage
T
here is no doubt
that Oak Cliff is
now“cool.”Every
week bri ngs a
new opening for
another restaurant, gallery, or
trendy retail store. Yet for many
“old timers” (those who lived
here before 1990), Oak Cliff has
had its share of “hip moments”
well before Bolsa, Hattie’s, and
the Bishop Arts area ever opened
their doors.
On Nov. 10, an old Oak Cliff
landmark celebrated its rebirth
with a night of classic blues-rock
in a venue that was reborn by
the new urban pioneers. Jimmie
Vaughan and his Tilt-a-Whirl
Band played to a packed Texas
Theatre, laying down classic
blues rock with a digital intro-
duction. It was a night of the old
meeting the new, and everyone
enjoying themselves.
The showopened with a panel
discussion on Oak Cliff then and
now, featuring Gayla Brooks
Kokel, Charles Kitch, and Scott
Phares. Their comments were
augmented by digital images of
old Oak Cliff landmarks (Austin’s
Barbecue) and hometown heroes
(Jimmie and Stevie Ray Vaughan
at their Oak Cliff house), then
shifted gears to the live perfor-
mance. If anything, the night
showed that the old and the new
canco-exist here, andeventhrive
if given the right opportunity.
Vaughan
Revs Up
Time Machine
TexasTheatreshowbridgedgap
betweennewandoldOakCliff
KIRBYF. WARNOCK
kirby@bigbendquarterly.com
PHOTO: ALEX HOLLAND
Jimmie Vaughan plays his guitar during his Nov. 10 homecoming concert at the Texas Theatre.
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
Michael Satarino suc-
cinctly summed up the
School for the Talented
and Gifted’s secret for suc-
cess.
“We have teachers who
are passionate about teach-
ing, students who are pas-
sionate about learning, and
parents who are support-
ive of the process,” he said.
“And besides being gifted
intellectually, our students
are heavily involved in
community service.”
While Satarino, princi-
pal of DISD’s TAG mag-
net for 15 years, said these
standards are the normfor
his students, he and other
school officials are espe-
cially proud after receiving
a $25,000 grant from the
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
Bishop Dunne Catholic
School is hosting a spe-
cial guest — someone who
showed up uninvited, but
has already left quite the
footprint.
“ I f e e l s o l u c k y, ”
exclaimed maintenance
director Isabel Arista, one
of just a few people on
campus to say they’ve seen
a mountain lion — whose
presence, for the record,
can’ t be confi rmed by
Texas Parks and Wildlife
without photos or other
evidence. At any rate, said
Arista, the encounter hap-
pened Nov. 11 as she drove
north on Rugged Drive,
near the school’s softball
field.
The cat, which “looked
just like pictures you’d see
in National Geographic,”
was headedintothewoods.
“It’s like I was watching
it in slow motion,” said
Arista, who immediately
stopped “and just watched
for a fewseconds, taking in
School For Gifted
Gets $25,000 Gift
Mountain Lion
Haunts Dunne
StevensPark
familyhelped
securefunding
Schoolworks
sightingsinto
curriculum
CONSPIRACY THEORISTS
PHOTO: NIKKI COTTEN
Alberto Vega, Stephen Hill, Hollis Wakefield, and Amber Van
Galder attended Art Conspiracy 7. See more photos on Page 4A.
STAFF PHOTO: ALANA HARRISON
Lida Hooe students donned odd
socks Monday as part of “Band
Against Bullying Week.”
See WINNETKA, Page 9A
See LION, Page 9A
See TAG, Page 10A
See BULLYING, Page 10A
See VAUGHAN, Page 9A
What: Wildlife information
session with safety tips for
mountain lion encounters
When: 9:30 a.m. Dec. 1 and
Dec. 6
Where: Bishop Dunne
auditorium, 3900 Rugged Drive
RSVP: Call 214-339-6561,
ext. 286
If YouGo
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
It’s hard to think of a
more American-sounding
restaurant than Liberty
Burger. But Mariel Street
traces her patriotic patties’
roots to the South Pacific.
Mariel, the only daugh-
ter of famed Dallas restau-
rateur Gene Street, was a
Peace Corps volunteer in
Vanuatu, where her father
woul d send her dehy-
drated hamburgers.
The nati ves enj oyed
them so much, Mariel
started thinking about how
to improve upon the all-
American classic. While
you might think getting
into the family business
would be a good thing,
Gene wasn’t too keen on
the idea of his daughter
following in his footsteps.
“My whole life my dad’s
been trying to talk me
out of it,” she said. “But I
always came back to it. It’s
in my blood. It’s howI was
raised, and there’s nothing
else I’d rather do.”
Gene worried about the
long hours and lack of holi-
days that come standard
with the restaurant life.
But he’s found his peace
with Mariel’s decision.
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Although a jury handed
down $9.2 million in dam-
ages against the Episcopal
Sc hool of Da l l a s i n
September, the plaintiffs
are now seeking only $6.7
million.
“Rarelydoyouget ajudg-
ment for the entire amount
of the verdict,” said attor-
ney Charla Aldous, who
represents the Doe family.
John Doe, Jane Doe, and
Jane Doe II sued ESD for
damages related to his-
tory teacher John Nathan
Campbell’s sexual rela-
tionship with Jane Doe II
and her subsequent sepa-
ration fromthe school.
Judge D’Metria Benson
heard a variety of motions
related to the final judg-
ment and sanctions against
ESD on Nov. 1 0, but
deferred ruling on any of
themuntil a later date.
Fi f t e e n a t t or ne y s ,
including a handful of
newly acquired appellate
counsel from Haynes &
Boone, attended the hear-
ing on behalf of ESD. The
school sought to have the
j udgment t hrown out
entirely, but offered an
award of about $3 million
should its first request fail.
ESD attorney George
Bramblett urged Benson to
delay ruling on the plain-
tiffs’ proposed sanctions
against Locke, Lord, Bissell
&Liddell.
“There’s no reason, your
honor, to rush to judg-
ment on such an impor-
tant thing,” said Bramblett,
who was named the 2011
Malpractice Lawyer of the
Year by the organization
Best Lawyers in America.
On Nov. 2, the plaintiffs
filed additional sanctions
against lead ESD counsel
Chrysta Castañeda as well
as her firm, Locke Lord,
NEIGHBORS
Get acquainted with
Jennifer Sampson [ 3A ]
SPORTS
Parish’s champs
already ousted [ 4A ]
MYSWEET CHARITY
Dubya pops in at Folsom
Award patron party [ 11A ]
Judge Defers Ruling on ESD Damages
SanctionssoughtbyDoes
returncasetocourtroom
See ESD, Page 2A
Preston Hollow
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 ALSO SERVI NG BLUFFVI EW, DEVONSHI RE, AND GREENWAY PARKS VOL. 7, I SSUE 46 ONE QUARTER
PHOTOS: LAURA MOUNTJOY
Tim Weber, Bruce Shaw, and other members of the Covenant School community shovel the first piles of dirt for the Carson Leslie
Center on Nov. 11. Leslie (top) was a longtime Covenant student who succumbed to cancer in January 2010 at the age of 17.
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
T
here’s no question
Carson Leslie left a
mark on his family
and friends. Now, the school
he called home for 12 years
will have a physical reminder
of the boy, who died in 2010
fromcancer.
On Nov. 11, the Covenant
School of Dal l as broke
ground on the Carson Leslie
Center. The athletic and
fine arts complex will be
the first permanent building
on Covenant’s Valley View
Lane campus, which opened
in 1993. The rest of the K-12
school is housed in upscale
temporary buildings.
Unlike most tributes, the
center was conceived while
Carson was still alive, and he
was able to participate in the
design and other aspects of
the project.
“He named it, humbly,
the Carson Leslie Center,”
his mother, Annette, said to
laughter during the ground-
Covenant Gets Permanent
CarsonLeslie’sfriendsandfamily
breakgroundfornamesake
structureathisalmamater
RENDERING: THREE ARCHITECTURE
Covenant’s basketball teams will play in the newcenter.
Trains Arrive
At NorthPark
See COVENANT, Page 9A
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Most Preston Hollow
families own at least two
cars, maybe even a boat or
a plane, but the Balls have
the titles to half a dozen
trains.
“We’ve bought one every
year since our daughter
Hannah was born,” Barrett
Ball said.
Starting Saturday, one of
the Balls’ models will be
among the dozens featured
inTheTrains at NorthPark,
the mall’s 13th annual holi-
day exhibit benefiting the
Ronald McDonald House
of Dallas.
Ball and fellow Preston
Hollow resident Laura
Thomason are the 2011 co-
chairs of TheTrains, which
is sponsored by Bank of
Texas. They’ve worked
on securing sponsorships,
selling trains, and organiz-
ing the exhibits since June.
“It’s really been a fun
experience,” Thomason
said. “I’ve had a lot of fun
doing it.”
Painted and customized
railcars will windtheir way
Annualholidayexhibitraises
moneyforMcDonaldHouse
PHOTO: COURTESY OF KRISTINA BOWMAN
TW Design crafted each model train in this year’s exhibit.
See TRAINS, Page 13A
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Mariel Street followed in her dad’s footsteps against his wishes.
Quest For a Better Burger Bonds Family
Streets’ children
ringinopening
ofLibertycafe
See LIBERTY, Page 9A
THE TRAINS AT
NORTHPARK
Where: NorthPark Center,
Level 2 between Barneys
New York and Nordstrom
When: Saturday
through Jan. 1 (closed on
Thanksgiving and Christmas)
Cost: $6 for adults, $3 for
children and senior citizens
VOTE!
Find your ballot on page 7A
prestonhollowpeople.com
or vote online at
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
Same song, different
verse.
Highland Park officials
expect additional delays
in the Town Hall reno-
vation process, as issues
with temporary loca-
tions for communication
equipment and office
space have cropped up.
Officials have had dif-
ficulty coordinating the
seven different vendors
needed to relocate the
Department of Public
Safety’s communication
apparatus, DPS Chief
Chris Vinson said during
Monday’s Town Council
meeting, possibly delay-
ing its relocation by 60 to
90 days. It was scheduled
for Dec. 8.
The dispatch center
will be housed in tem-
porary contai ners, to
be stored at the town’s
maintenance facility on
Holland Avenue.
“I think, when this is
completed, we’re going to
look at these as the dark
days,” Vinson told the
council.
The $14.3 million proj-
ect has been delayed over
the course of the past
year, as council members
andstaffers have explored
the ins and outs of vari-
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
It’s hard to think of a
more American-sounding
restaurant than Liberty
Burger. But Highland Park
Hi gh School graduate
Mariel Street traces her
patriotic patties’ roots to
the South Pacific.
Mariel, the only daugh-
ter of famed Dallas restau-
rateur Gene Street, was a
Peace Corps volunteer in
Vanuatu, where her father
woul d send her dehy-
drated hamburgers.
The nati ves enj oyed
them so much, Mariel
started thinking about how
to improve upon the all-
American classic. While
you might think getting
into the family business
would be a good thing,
Gene wasn’t too keen on
the idea of his daughter
following in his footsteps.
“My whole life my dad’s
been trying to talk me
out of it,” she said. “But I
always came back to it. It’s
in my blood. It’s howI was
raised, and there’s nothing
else I’d rather do.”
Gene worried about the
long hours and lack of holi-
days that come standard
with the restaurant life.
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Although a jury handed
down $9.2 million in dam-
ages against the Episcopal
School of Dal l as i n
September, the plaintiffs
are nowseeking only $6.7
million.
“Rarely do you get a
judgment for the entire
amount of the verdict,”
sai d at t orney Charl a
Aldous, who represents
the Doe family.
John Doe, Jane Doe,
and Jane Doe II sued
ESD for damages related
to history teacher John
Nathan Campbell’s sexual
relationship with Jane
Doe II and her subse-
quent separation fromthe
school.
Judge D’Metria Benson
heard a variety of motions
related to the final judg-
ment and s anct i ons
against ESD on Nov. 10,
but deferred ruling on any
of themuntil a later date.
Fi f t een at t or neys,
including a handful of
newly acquired appel-
late counsel fromHaynes
& Boone, attended the
hearing on behalf of ESD.
The school sought to have
the judgment thrown out
entirely, but offered an
award of about $3 million
should its first request
fail.
ESD attorney George
Bramblett urged Benson
to delay ruling on the
plaintiffs’ proposed sanc-
tions against Locke, Lord,
Bissell &Liddell.
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
On April 6, 2010, Will
Seale sat in his University
Park home, brainstorming
ways to raise money for
Highland Park schools.
The di stri ct needed
more revenue streams, he
knew, to combat the effects
of Robin Hood.
“And then I thought,
‘Gosh, we should get our
own license plate,’ ” he
recalled. “Those things
will sell like crazy.”
Two days later, while
watching the news, he saw
that Southlake Carroll had
just announced its license
plate. The race for a “Go
Scots” plate was on.
After 18 months of fina-
gling, applying, anddesign-
ing, Highland Park ISD
will finally have its own
customlicense plate, avail-
able to the public in May.
The plate was designed by
2011 Highland Park grad
Catherine Taylor, and will
cost drivers $55 per year.
The district receives a 10
COMMUNITY
UP hatches ideas
for chicken laws [ 5A ]
COMMENTARY
Fans will heal in time
for Opening Day [ 5A ]
SPORTS
Scots roll into
second round [ 1B ]
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 CELEBRATI NG 30 YEARS VOL. 31, I SSUE 46 ONE DOLLAR
Town Hall
Redo Hits
New Snag
Temporary
spaceproves
hardtofind
See PLATES, Page 14A
Support Scots
Via Your Plates
Specialtytags
tobeavailable
bynextspring WANT ONE?
If you’d like to be notified when the Highland Park license plate
becomes available for sale in May, visit myplates.com/go/hp
and enter your email address.
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Mariel Street followed in her dad’s footsteps against his wishes.
Quest For a Better Burger Bonds Family
Street’schildren
ringinopening
ofLibertycafe
VOTE!
Find your ballot on page 7A
parkcitiespeople.com
or vote online at
See TOWN HALL, Page 14A
Ruling Deferred
On ESD Damages
Judgemulling
Does’ request
forsanctions
See ESD, Page 2A
See LIBERTY, Page 14A
CLASS 4A STATE CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIP
BY CHUCK COX
Staf Writer
R
OUND ROCK —
Anot her week,
another 13th state
championship.
S e v e n d a y s a f t e r
Highland Park’s tennis
team captured its record
13th Class 4A title, the
Lady Scots grabbed cross
country state champion-
ship No. 13 on a windy but
pleasant Saturday morn-
ing at Old Settlers Park.
Hi ghl and Park’s gi rl s
already owned the record
for most state titles.
Without a single senior
runner, the Lady Scots also
repeated as Class 4A state
champions. The Running
Scots, meanwhile, finished
in 10th place. Both teams
won Class 4A Region II
titles to advance to state.
However, the outcome
was still in doubt after the
unofficial results were
posted.
“ It comes down t o
team,” Highland Park girls
coach Jerry Sutterfield
LADY SCOTS DEFEND TITLE
PHOTOS: ERICH SCHLEGEL
Gabrielle Crank and Becky Ketch embrace as the Highland Park girls celebrate their victory at the state cross country meet Saturday.
Girlscruisetovictorywithout
anyseniorsortop-10runners
See SCOTS, Page 4A
Mary Beth Hamilton’s time of 11:42 — the best of any Highland Park
Lady Scots runner — put her in 14th place at Saturday’s race.
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Park Cities People Oak Cliff People PrestonHollowPeople
Top 5 Reasons to
Advertise with
People Newspapers
REPUTABLE
For over 30 years People Newspapers has cultivated a reputation
for trustworthiness. Readers rely on our papers as “The Source
for News” because we cover neighborhood news and events, the
good and the not-so-good, in an honest, timely fashion. People
Newspapers are branded by the communities we serve.
CREDIBLE
The Texas Press Association has named Park Cities People
the “Best Weekly Newspaper” in the state for the past 13
years. Suburban Newspapers of America has recognized the
newspapers repeatedly for excellence in nationwide competitions.
COMMUNITY CENTRIC
People Newspapers focus on hyperlocal news. People read our
papers to learn about things happening around the corner or
down the block and that’s what we deliver!
INFLUENTIAL
The average household income of a People Newspapers reader
is $301,340 with an average market value of $719,589 for their
primary residence. These are the people who care about fne
things, who have the leisure time to enjoy them and the disposable
income to aford them. These are the most afuent citizens in our
readership area.
TIMELY
A weekly newspaper, by its very nature, will have more
impressions, or more exposure because it stays around the
house longer than a daily. The news it contains will be fresher,
more up-to-date, more current than what is found in a magazine.
With weekly newspapers, advertisers can have a choice between
image ads or call to action advertising.
1
2
3
4
Top 5 Reasons to
Advertise in Dallas
DESTINATION
The Dallas area is the No. 1 visitor destination for business and
leisure in Texas. DFW is the largest airport in the state and sixth
busiest in the world.
POPULATION
Dallas is one of the ten largest cities in the country. With a
population well over fve million, Dallas is the largest market in the
Southern United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Dallas Arts District,ofers the best of performing and visual
arts, including the Dallas Museum of Art and the A T & T Performing
Arts Center, among others. Dallas has more restaurants per
capita than any other city in the United States and is the third
highest rated for dining out.
FASHION
Dallas has the highest number of shopping centers per capita
in the United States. NorthPark Center draws in more revenue
per unit area than any other retail complex in the United States,
and is home to the number one grossing Neiman Marcus, Dillard’s,
and Foley’s.
GROWTH
The Dallas-Fort Worth region has added more residents in the
past decade than any other city in the United States. Dallas-Fort
Worth has grown by 25% in the last nine years.
5
1
2
3
4
5
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Park Cities People
Oak Cliff People
PrestonHollowPeople
TheTexasPressAssociationTexasBetterNewspaperContestreceived1,784
entriessubmittedby176newspapers.Thecontestwasbrokendowninto10divi-
sionsinwhichnewspaperscompetedagainstpapersofsimilarcirculationsize.
Park Cities Peoplewashonoredwithnumerousawardsinthe2011TexasBetter
NewspaperContest.
SweepstakesWinner
1stPlaceGeneralExcellence
1stPlacePageDesign
1stPlaceSportsPhoto
2ndPlaceFeatureWriting
2ndPlaceBlueMoonSpecialSection
4thPlaceHeadlineWriting
4thPlaceNewsWriting
4thPlaceNewsPhoto
TPA Awards
Park Cities People Oak Cliff People PrestonHollowPeople
EDITORIAL
2009
Park Cities People - 1stPlace-Tie
BestSportsWriting
Oak Cliff People - 3rdPlace
BestHeadline
2008
Park Cities People - 1stPlace
BestEditorialPage
Park Cities People - 2ndPlace
BestFrontPage
Park Cities People - 3rdPlace
BestEditorialWriting
ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS
2010
Park Cities People-2ndPlace
BestROPAdvertisingSection
Park Cities People-HonorableMention
BestShoppingAreaPromotionSpecialSection
PeopleNewspapers-1stPlace
BestCoverDesign
2009
PeopleNewspapers-1stPlace
BestHomesPublicationorHomes
SpecialSection
NEWSPAPER OF THE YEAR/GENERAL EXCELLENCE
2009
Park Cities Peoples - 2ndPlace
JUDGE’SCOMMENTS:
Editorial:“Storiesareagoodvarietyofnews,featuresandentertainmentand
designhelpsreadernavigatehierarchy.”
Typography:“Fontsarecleanandsimple.”
Advertising:“Goodlocalcontenttosupportcommunity.”
SNA Awards
Park Cities People
Oak Cliff People
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December
2012 ISSUE DATE CALENDAR
Park Cities People
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COMMUNITYProfiles
UnitedbytheirsupportfortheexcellentschoolsofHighlandParkISD,
thepeopleofHighlandParkandUniversityParktreasuretheirsmall
townsintheheartofDallas.Statelyoldmansionsandahostofnew
constructionsetamongspectaculartree-linedstreetsmakethe
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amidstthehubbubofthebigcity.
BoastingeverythingfromNorthDallas’bestshopping,tobighouses
onbiggerlots,tothecity’smostprestigiousprivateschools,Preston
Hollow,Bluffview,Devonshire,andGreenwayParksarehometomany
ofthecity’smostprominentandactivecitizens.Theseremarkable
neighborhoodsdemonstratethecommitmentoftheirresidentsto
supportvibrantschools,churches,businesses,andcivicgroups.The
changingfaceofthearea’shomesunderscoresitcontinuously
renewingvitality.
Onceitsowntownandstillfiercelyindependent,OakCliffcanboastnot
onlyofitsproudhistoryanditsdiversity,butalsoofthehillystreetsand
exposedlimestonethatmakeitsterrainanythingbuttheusualprairie.
NorthOakCliff,theoriginalsettlement,ishometoartists,architects,
musicians,andprofessionalsofallkinds.Beautifulhomes,oldandnew,
overlookStevensParkGolfClub,whichopenedin1922.Thethriving
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becomeamagnetforvisitorsfromallpartsofthecity.
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DEMOGRAPHIC Profiles
Park Cities People
Male
Female
AverageAge
Childrenathome
47%
53%
36
57%
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HHI: $410,472
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15%
85%
Single
Married
Marital Status:
SOURCE:Datadrawnfromreadersurvey
andClaritasMarketAudit
Male
Female
AverageAge
Childrenathome
49%
51%
41
66%
Gender/Age:
HHI:$335,163
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO: $813,526
HOME VALUE: $769,515
27%
73%
Single
Married
Marital Status:
SOURCE:Datadrawnfromreadersurvey
andClaritasMarketAudit
PrestonHollowPeople
Oak Cliff People
Male
Female
AverageAge
Childrenathome
44%
56%
49
30%
Gender/Age:
HHI: $158,385
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO: $368,951
HOME VALUE: $384,913
48%
52%
Single
Married
Marital Status:
SOURCE:Datadrawnfromreadersurvey
andClaritasMarketAudit
CIRCULATION Map
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BY CHUCK COX
Staf Writer
When it comes to the
subject of “how I spent
my summer vacation,” the
competition can be pretty
fierce at Highland Park
High School.
However, wi nni ng a
national championship
would have to rank right
up there with even the
loftiest of trips, jobs, and
internships.
Several members of
the Scots football team
are hoping to be able to
make that claim after the
Red Bull Game Breakers
national 7-on-7 finals,
whi ch are t oday and
Saturday at SMU’s Ford
Stadium .
Highland Park qualified
for the double-elimina-
tion tournament by win-
ning the Dallas qualifier
at Cedar Hill on June 17.
The Scots join 15 other
regional qualifiers all vying
to win the second annual
tourney. New Orleans San
Augustine beat Houston
Cy Fair, 31-14, to win last
year’s title at the Cotton
Bowl.
“It’s going to be great,”
FRI DAY, JULY 15, 2011

CELEBRATI NG 30 YEARS
VOL. 31, I SSUE 28
ONE DOLLAR
Scots Focus on 7-on-7 Finals
Red Bull Game Breakers national championship starts today
Alley Project Gets
Town’s Clearance
Plaintiffs in sex
case call move
‘quite unsual’
See SCOTS, Page 10A
I’ve never been a person that
fits neatly into a box anyway.”
— KAREN WATSON (Page 7A)
30 YEARS, 30 STORIES
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
I s it H
ip
to
b
e
S
q
u
a
re
?
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
I
t’s not a utility closet, a tool shed, or
a portable classroom. It’s not a dou-
ble-stacked, double-wide trailer, a
sheet-metal shanty, or the remnants
of a Cold War-era bunker.
The structure at 3809 Mockingbird Lane
is, plain and simple, a house. A house with
four walls, a roof, and a garage that can fit
two cars comfortably.
And for Lin Lim and Gerard Goh, it’s
their dream home.
“We’ve always had a fascination with
architecture, and always wanted some-
thing a little different than what you’d find
in Dallas, like McMansions,” Goh said. “It’s
gotten to the point where it’s a little over-
done.”
So the couple set out to create something
out of nothing, forging a bold, simplistic
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Highland Park’s Ian Hayashi and Chris McDade down a W.T. White
player during a 7-on-7 football game at Jesuit on Monday.
Few people can agree
on the house rising at
3809 Mockingbird
STAFF PHOTO: CHRIS MCGATHEY
There couldn’t be a bolder juxtaposition on Mockingbird Lane: a gleaming, modernist two-story home alongside a brick, turreted castle-style residence.
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
Alleys.
They’re public space;
governments maintain
them, fix them when they
crack, slope them when
water starts pooling.
So what happens when
a resident — with govern-
ment consent — makes
improvements to an alley,
to the chagrin of his neigh-
bors? Who’s on the hook?
As two homeowners
found out Monday, maybe
nobody.
The Hi ghl and Park
Town Council agreed to
allow a continuance of
construction for a drain
Defense
Counsel
Enlists
Senator
EPISCOPAL
SCHOOL OF DALLAS
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Just weeks after polish-
ing off a contentious leg-
islative session, state Sen.
Royce West
added a new
i tem to hi s
already brim-
ming plate of
responsibil-
ity: co-coun-
sel f or t he
Ep i s c o p a l
School of Dallas.
John Doe, Jane Doe
I, and Jane Doe II are
suing ESD in a civil law-
suit relating to a teacher’s
alleged affair with Jane
Doe II, a longtime student
at the school. West, who
has represented everyone
from Dez Bryant to DISD,
joined the defense team on
July 8, the same day a new
trial date was set.
The case was originally
scheduled to go to trial
June 6 in the county court
of Judge D’Metria Benson.
It was delayed due to the
defense’s request to move
See ESD, Page 11A
ROYCE
WEST
See ALLEY, Page 11A
Privately funded
drain draws ire
from neighbors
Water Polo Making
Year-Round Splash
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
Water polo, says a little
paper sign near the St.
Mark’s natatorium, is “a
high-energy mix of full-
contact basketball and
wrestling, with a bit of
kickboxing, played one-
handed, while swimming
over a mile in 8-feet-deep
water.”
The ball itself looks
l arge, wi th an easi l y-
gripped surface — ideal for
whacking it into the float-
ing nets guarded by goal-
ies, and tallying points on
par with those in basket-
ball. Everyone’s treading
water the entire time.
‘Lightning’ unites
St. Mark’s, Jesuit,
Ursuline students
See LIGHTNING, Page 13A
STAFF PHOTO: CHRIS MCGATHEY
Elizabeth Crowling listens as Lightning coach Dave Hammack
goes over drills at St. Mark’s on July 6.
NEIGHBORS
Meet Highland Park’s
Wendi Messmann [ 3A ]
MY SWEET CHARITY
Mayor Mike and wife Micki
team up for Trinity Trust [ 6A ]
COMMUNITY
Scouts Troop 518
conquers Philmont [ 9A ]
Some call it a:
‘Storage room’
‘Railroad car’
‘White board’
Others call it:
‘Super mod’
‘Contemporary’
‘Out of the box’
See HOUSE, Page 11A
COMMENTARY
Mind control for the
hottest month [ 3A ]
SCHOOLS
Hyer preschool kids
make a splash [ 4A ]
SPORTS
Eager Scots open
football practice [ 8A ]
FRI DAY, AUGUST 12, 2011

CELEBRATI NG 30 YEARS
VOL. 31, I SSUE 32
ONE DOLLAR
We knew we weren’t going to be a
band in college.” — JACKSON MORGAN (Page 5A)
30 YEARS, 30 STORIES
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
Highland Park ISD is
under investigation by
the U.S. Department of
Education, after a com-
plaint was filed alleging
the district discriminated
against a student on the
basis of disability.
The department’s Office
of Civil Rights visited the
district earlier this sum-
mer to investigate the com-
plaint, which also alleged
the di stri ct retal i ated
against the child’s family,
said department spokes-
man David Thomas.
In addition to the first
two allegations, the com-
plainant claims “the school
district had a policy and
practice of not evaluating
students as required by
Section 504; and had not
designated a compliance
coordinator or adopted
grievance procedures as
required by Section 504,”
Thomas wrote in an email.
Sect i on 504 of t he
Rehabi l i t at i on Act of
1973 is a civil rights law
designed to eliminate dis-
crimination on the basis of
disability in any program
that receives federal finan-
cial assistance. The law
requires appropriate edu-
cational services for chil-
dren with disabilities.
The compl ai nt al so
alleges the district failed
to evaluate the educational
needs of students with dis-
abilities on an individual-
ized basis, as required by
Section 504.
“The District cannot
comment on any mat-
ter involving confidential
student information,” dis-
trict spokeswoman Helen
Williams said in a state-
ment Wednesday. “There
are strict laws protecting
student privacy, begin-
ning at the federal level
wi t h FERPA ( Fami l y
Educational Rights and
Privacy Act) and rein-
forced by Texas law (Public
Inf ormat i on Act ) and
HPISD policy. We believe
Fed
s P
ro
b
e
S
p
ecia
l E
d
P
ro
g
ra
m
See HPISD, Page 12A
Office of Civil Rights looks at
possible discrimination in HP
Swann accused
of lying about
prior incidents
Other
Af fairs
Alleged
At ESD
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Testimony in a family’s
lawsuit against Episcopal
School of Dal l as has
focused on alleged sexual
encounters between other
students and teachers.
The lawsuit was brought
by a family identified in
court as John Doe, Jane
Doe, and Jane Doe II. Jane
Doe II, who enrolled at
ESD as a kindergartner,
was expelled in January
2010, as an 11th-grader,
following an alleged affair
with teacher J. Nathan
Campbell.
Charla Aldous, an attor-
ney for the family, has
asked Father Stephen
Lady Scots Fall in Season Opener
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Highland Park volleyball players Eleanor Watson, Emily Clow, Elizabeth Lee, and Maya Lloyd celebrate after winning their fi rst set against Lake Highlands on Tuesday at
Pearce. The Lady Scots eventually lost to Lake Highlands and Red Oak, but they hope to rebound in the Duncanville Tournament of Champions. (See Page 9A.)
See ESD, Page 13A
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
For most, high school
is a collaborative
experi ence: you
work side-by-side
on class projects,
perform together
in musicals, or pass
t he bal l t o each
other on the basket-
ball court.
Kyle Anderson took a
different route.
More l i kel y to keep
t o hi msel f, Anderson
eschewed the “all-for-one,
one-for-all” mentality, yet
the results were stunning.
Both in the classroom
— Highland Park salu-
tatorian in 2007 — and
on the wrestling mat —
2007 UIL state champion
— Anderson surpassed
nearly everyone.
So it was no surprise to
his former teachers when
An d e r s o n wa s
named the Henry
Ford II Scholar at
Stanford University
in June, an award
given to the student
graduating from
the school’s engi-
neering program
with the highest GPA.
“There are many Kyles
out t her e, but none
truly like him,” said Jeff
Bar rows, Ander s on’ s
HPHS physics teacher.
“And for him to achieve
at the levels he has, that
quality is hard to put into
proper perspective.”
HP Grad Anderson
Excels at Stanford
See ANDERSON, Page 12A
BY CHUCK COX
Staf Writer

FRISCO — SMU’s wom-
en’s soccer season doesn’t
open until next Friday in
Arkansas.
However, five Mustangs
— Jessica Bartol, Katie
Bass, Mal l ory Baum,
Shel by Redman, and
Courtney Smith — have
already brought a national
championship to Dallas .
The qui ntet hel ped
Dallas Texans Red ’ 92
win its second U.S. Youth
Soccer Association title on
July 31 in Phoenix. It was
the second national cham-
pionship for the team in
the final year for the SMU
players to compete for the
Texans.
“It was such a l ong
journey to get there,” said
Redman, a redshirt fresh-
man forward. “We’d have
SMU practi ces i n the
morning and Texans prac-
tice in the afternoon. It
was a lot of work, but we
supported each other and
carpooled and did every-
thing we could.”
Redman was huge in
the tournament, netting
the game-winning penalty
kick in the 111th minute
of the finals against Real
Colorado National 91/92.
Smith scored the first
goal for the Texans, who
came away with a 2-1 win
in overtime. The Texans,
who also included 2010
Highland Park graduate
Margaret Gottsacker, bat-
tled all the way back after
losing their first game
of the tourney, 1-0, to
Woodbury Inferno from
Minnesota.
“We thought we’d go
out on top,” said Smith,
a sophomore defender.
“Ryan Higginbotham, our
[Texans] coach, said it’s a
SMU Players Have Title Pedigree
Mustangs help Dallas Texans ’92 win second championship game
COURTESY PHOTO
SMU soccer players (from left) Shelby Redman, Courtney Smith,
Mallory Baum, Jessica Bartol, and Katie Bass recently won a
national title as part of Dallas Texans ’92.
See SMU, Page 9A
KYLE
ANDERSON
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
Darcy Zarubiak has a lot
on his plate, not least of
which is his three daugh-
ters — all under 27 months
old — waiting for him at his
house in the 5000 block of
Airline Road.
That house sits 10 feet
away from the site of the
old Mrs Baird’s Bread fac-
tory, a piece of land now
owned by SMU. Those
three daughters may soon
be a lesser concern.
SMU and Oncor want
to build an electric substa-
tion and install four, 100-
foot transmission poles
on the site, to help power
new dormitories, tennis
facilities, and an IT build-
ing. Zarubiak and dozens
of other Highland Park
residents jammed into a
standing-room only Town
Council meeting Monday
morning to express their
displeasure with the plan,
which is still in the prelim-
inary stages.
“We have uni t ed i n
opposition,” said Beth
Huddleston, who lives in
the 3100 block of Beverly
Drive. “It is not what the
neighbors envisioned of
the border of east Highland
Park and the entrance to
the Katy Trail.”
The subst at i on and
transmission poles are
necessary to power the five
new dorms expected along
the east side of the univer-
sity’s campus by August
2014, said SMU attorney
Paul Ward. He said the
substation will be par-
tially underground, fully
enclosed, and designed to
match SMU’s Georgian
SPORTS
Mustangs bounce
back with win [ 5A ]
SCHOOLS
Alumni teachers
make the grade [ 9A ]
COMMUNITY
Students observe
9/11 anniversary [ 17A ]
FRI DAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011

CELEBRATI NG 30 YEARS
VOL. 31, I SSUE 37
ONE DOLLAR
Surprise
Wit ness
Called in
ESD Case
School facing
more claims of
sexual abuse
QUOTABLE
We’re going to score no matter
who we’re facing.”— BRADY BURGIN (Page 6A)
WEATHER
SUN
SAT
FRI
Isolated showers
HI 91 F / LO 72 F
Scattered storms
HI 97 F / LO 73 F
Isolated showers
HI 96 F / LO 73 F
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Despite both sides offi-
cially resting their cases,
t he ci vi l sui t agai nst
the Episcopal School of
Dallas rages on.
A family known as the
Does is suing the private
school for $10 million in
damages related to a teach-
er’s sexual relationship
with their daughter. John
Nathan Campbell, 35, has
been charged with sexual
assault and improper stu-
dent-educator relationship
and awaits a criminal trial.
Meanwhile, the civil trial
against the school began
on July 25, and the plain-
tiffs rested a month later.
After calling about 10 wit-
nesses, the defense rested
on Sept. 8. However, both
sides continue to call wit-
nesses on rebuttal.
The j ury, whi ch has
been on duty for more
than seven weeks, showed
See ONCOR, Page 19A
O
ncor P
lan U
psets SM
U
N
eighbors
HP residents pack meeting
of powerless Town Council
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
J
ohn Sargent is a 2007 Highland Park
graduate, and proud of it. But he’s
seen enough Scots shirts, at least
from a marketing standpoint.
After the 22-year-old Texas A&M alum-
nus learned to design apparel for a club in
college, he started pondering the concept of
Highland Park — the town itself — as a wear-
able brand. Seaside, Fla., for instance, churns
out “Seaside, Florida” tees, and folks in the
Park Cities sport them constantly, Sargent
explained.
“They’re obviously tourist-centered,” he
said of the shirts, “but nonetheless, they’ve
branded their community. They’ve put a geo-
graphic location to their brand.”
Of course, one can also buy clothes embla-
zoned with “Dallas,” and items repping other
locales across the U.S.
“To me,” said Sargent, “there’s a personal-
ity in the Park Cites that no one has put on a
T-shirt yet, or a clothing brand.”
Sm
ells L
ike T
ee Spirit
HP grad Sargent markets wearable ode to Highland Park
PHOTO: COURTESY OF JOHN SARGENT
Kelly Gillespie, Sydney Muller, Ashley Bybee, Kristin Josephs, Allie Duncan, and Chloie Johnson model shirts produced by Highland Park Apparel.
See ESD, Page 14A
See SARGENT, Page 8A
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
2 p.m., Aug. 31: Dan
Koller approaches my
desk. I assume he’s going
to ask me to do some kind
of last-minute assignment
for the Sept. 2 edition,
so I’m delighted when
he asks, “Have you had
chicken-fried steak since
you’ve been in Texas?”
I think about it for a
second, remember the
chicken-fried steak sand-
wich I had at a diner in
Tennessee, remember
the Tweety Bird tattoo on
that waitress’ arm, and,
lying a little bit, (he said in
Texas!) I said no.
The story was on. After
30 weeks of stories cele-
brating Park Cities People’s
anniversary, I would eat
chicken-fried steak, in
Texas, for my one-year
anniversary. I girded my
loins.
12:20 p.m., Sept. 13: We
picked Bubba’s, since it
First CFS Makes
W
riter Say OMG
See STEAK, Page 8A
STAFF PHOTO:
CHRISTINA BARANY
Bradford Pearson sizes up
his monochromatic order of
chicken-fried steak at Bubba’s.
Luthy Soars With Eagle Project
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
Ryan Albers was in line
to be an Eagle Scout — the
Boy Scouts’ highest rank,
and a title very few actually
earn — when Highland Park
junior Preston Luthy was
still in middle school. Luthy
had always looked up to
Albers, a kind-hearted older
boy apt to treat younger
scouts like his equal.
About five years ago,
Albers’ world changed.
While visiting Colorado
on a church trip, the teen
suffered tragic brain inju-
ries from a skiing accident,
leaving him nonverbal and
able to eat only with a feed-
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Inspired by a Scouting mentor, Preston Luthy renovated the Life
Skills lab at Highland Park High School for his Eagle Scout project.
See LUTHY, Page 19A
New York native waits a year
for chicken-fried experience
HP junior’s fixes
to life-skills room
are ‘the bomb’
ADVERTISING INFORMATION2012
SurroundedbythecityofDallas,HighlandParkandUniversityParkareproudlyindependentcommunities
withtheirowncitygovernments,policeandfiredepartments,andpossiblythefinestpublichighschoolin
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ZIP CODES REACHED:
75205,75225,75209,75201,75204,75219
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Pete Chapasko really
knows how to take one
for the team. One of three
finalists for DISD Principal
of The Year, Chapasko
is self-effacing about his
sacrifices for education,
which include holding
Saturday tutoring and
changing his name.
While the former is part
of his strategy as prin-
cipal of Preston Hollow
Elementary, the latter
occurred when he was just
a student in the first grade.
With two of his peers also
named David, the young
Chapasko agreed to go by
his middle name, Peter.
“It’s stuck since first
grade,” he said.
Chapas ko’ s can- do
a t t i t u d e ha s t r a n s -
formed Preston Hollow
Elementary, where he’s
been at the helm for four
years. The former mid-
dle school football coach
has led the Title I school
to a number of victories,
including its first “exem-
plary” rating from the
Texas Education Agency in
2010.
“The bottom l i ne i s
t ea mwor k, ” he s a i d.
“That’s the whole reason
we’re successful.”
Chapas ko r uns t he
school much like a football
team, dressing the faculty
in jerseys for special occa-
BY CHUCK COX
Staf Writer
Wi t h no of f ense t o
Cleveland, Sam Acho sure
got the better end of the
weather deal when he was
drafted by the Arizona
Cardinals.
Acho said Cardinals
coach Ken Whisenhunt
cal l ed hi m Sat urday
during the NFL Draft,
while the Browns
were still on the
clock. If Cleveland
di dn’ t pi ck hi m,
Whisenhunt said,
Arizona would.
That sounded
fine to Acho.
“We played Ohio State
in the Fiesta Bowl my
sophomore year at Texas,”
said Acho, a former St.
Mark’s standout. “I was
there [Arizona] for
a week and loved
it .”
The Cardi nal s
selected Acho with
the 103rd overall
pick in the fourth
round of the draft
early Saturday afternoon.
After playing defensive
end the last two years
for the Longhorns, Acho
will move to outside line-
backer in Arizona’s 3-4
defense. Acho, whose
brother Emmanuel will
be a senior at Texas next
season and will likely go
in next year’s NFL Draft,
did play linebacker his
first two years at Texas,
though.
“Arizona got a great deal
getting Sam in the fourth
SPORTS
Lady Panthers roll
past Adamson, 8-4 [ 4A ]
MY SWEET CHARITY
It’s a fashion wonderland at
the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party [ 6A ]
WEATHER
QUOTABLE
I write because I must.” ’
— LAURA STARKS (Page 7A)
SUN
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HI 83 F / LO 63 F
Partly Cloudy
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Partly Cloudy
HI 85 F / LO 68 F
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FRI DAY, MAY 6, 2011
ALSO SERVI NG BLUFFVI EW, DEVONSHI RE, AND GREENWAY PARKS VOL. 7, I SSUE 18
ONE QUARTER
Former St. Mark’s standout will move to linebacker
Preston Hollow Elementary principal competes for district-wide honor
Acho Drafted By Cardinals
G
R
EA
S
E IS
TH
E W
O
R
D
STAFF PHOTOS: CHRIS MCGATHEY
Trinity Christian students Addison Heritage, Alex Stiegler, Willam Gilbert, and Alexander Baldwin pour extra biofuel into a drum.
MOTHER’S DAY MAKEOVER
Isn
’t S
h
e

L
o
v
e
ly
?
The new Amy Westbrook,
courtesy of this newspaper
Amy Westbrook was
shocked to hear that she’d
won our Mother’s Day
Makeover contest. In fact,
this was the first time the
Preston Hollow mother of
two had won anything. But
honestly, we couldn’t be
less surprised after read-
ing her daughter Emily’s
heartfelt nomination.
Accordi ng to Emi l y,
Amy’s sacrifices and fam-
ily obligations are pretty
incredible, and she attends
to everything “without
a complaint and with a
smile.” On top of that,
Emily said, her mother has
been so committed to eat-
ing healthy and working
out that she’s almost to her
goal weight.
“This most definitely
calls for a celebration,”
Emily said, “and I can’t
think of a better way to
celebrate than with a new
wardrobe!”
We totally agree, and
we hope Amy enjoys her
$500 gift certificate to
Clotheshorse Anonymous.
— Joanna England
Hair and makeup:
Gary D Salon,
Preston Royal
Southwest
Crochet tunic:
Theory,
Clotheshorse
Anonymous,
Preston Forest
Village
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
I
t i sn’ t easy bei ng
green. The best-laid
plans can create more
environmental harm
than good when perpe-
trated via a gas-guzzling
bus. But Trinity Christian
Academy is taking green-
house gases out of the
equation, for a few tanks at
least.
On April 26, seventh-
grade science students at
the Addison school fueled
a bus with 15 gallons of
homemade bi odi esel ,
which will be used for sci-
ence field trips.
The process to convert
the cafeteria’s used cook-
ing oil into biodiesel took
about two weeks.
“It’s a fairly simple, one-
step reaction,” science
teacher David Zeiger said.
“It doesn’t actually take a
lot of time.”
Trinity Christian gives cooking oil a new purpose
See BIODIESEL, Page 2A
BEFORE
STAFF PHOTOS: CHRISTINA BARANY
PETE
CHAPASKO
SAM
ACHO
See CHAPASKO, Page 2A
See ACHO, Page 2A
Trinity Christian student Zach McCutchen fi lls a school bus with
biodiesel that he and his classmates made from cooking oil.
C
hapasko Lauded For Leadership
BY DAN KOLLER
Staf Writer
Jesuit announced its
newest principal last week,
and he’s someone
who is plenty famil-
iar with the prep
school.
Tom Ga r r i s on
gr a dua t e d f r om
Jesuit in 1992, and
he’s been on the fac-
ulty there since 1997.
But he’s been a fixture
on campus since he was
a third-grader at neigh-
boring St. Rita Catholic
School.
Garrison was living in
Lake Highlands at the time,
and his mother arranged
for two Jesuit students
from that neighborhood to
drive her young son to and
from school.
“I would get to
spend some time
in the hallways of
Jesuit, because St.
Rita got out before
they did, so you can
imagine a third-
grader roami ng
the halls of Jesuit in the
afternoon,” Garrison said.
“I was just wide-eyed and
hooked.”
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
O
n March 10, the audito-
rium at Hillcrest High
School demonstrated its
potential as a multi-purpose facil-
ity. It hosted a jazz concert, a game
of ninja Ping-Pong, and a Barack
Obama impersonator.
The senior class displayed its
vast array of talents at the annual
Mr. Hillcrest High School pageant.
A dozen senior boys competed for
a $500 scholarship from the PTSA,
as well as a fuzzy crown and scep-
ter, with judges Diana Gallego,
DISD theater coordinator, and
Mark Donald, editor of the Dallas
Observer and a ’68 Hillcrest grad,
deciding their fates. In addition to
an opening “tux walk,” the boys
competed in individual and group
talent categories, and an interview
portion.
Although the Mr. HHS pageant
is a long-standing tradition, spec-
tators said the show never gets old.
And this year did not disappoint.
Part of the beauty of high school
is how immediately trends take
NEIGHBORS
David Lind answers
our new Q&A [ 3A ]
SPORTS
Jesuit is of to
a solid start [ 6A ]
MY SWEET CHARITY
Ebby rings in 100th birthday
with circus fanfare [ 5A ]
WEATHER
QUOTABLE
Kids in our society today are getting too
many calories and too little exercise. ’ ”
— ARCHIE MANNING (Page 7A) SUN
SAT
FRI
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HI 83 F / LO 63 F
Partly Cloudy
HI 80 F / LO 60 F
Partly Cloudy
HI 79 F / LO 63 F
D
ISD
’s D
ata
O
n Staffing
G
ets Edited
Focus of potential layoffs
switches to ‘core teachers’
See HILLCREST, Page 9A
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FRI DAY, MARCH 18, 2011
ALSO SERVI NG BLUFFVI EW, DEVONSHI RE, AND GREENWAY PARKS VOL. 7, I SSUE 11
ONE QUARTER
MR. HILLCREST HIGH SCHOOL
Let’s H
ear It
For The Boys
Pageant’s champion
has all the right moves
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
When compared with
DISD’s first version of pro-
posed campus reductions,
the round of cuts discussed
by trustees on March 10
seem to save many school
employees from the chop-
ping block. However, the
two versions are far from
an apples-to-apples com-
parison.
The initial cuts suggested
for each campus were lev-
ied against all full-time
employees, including fine-
arts teachers, coaches, and
administrative positions.
These cuts were based on a
projected shortfall of $253
million.
In the second version
of cuts, which took into
account a $150 million
shortfall for DISD, only
full-time “core teachers”
were included in the num-
bers. A core teacher is an
academic instructor in
classes such as math, sci-
ence, or English.
For example, in the first
STAFF PHOTOS: CHRISTINA BARANY
Above: Patrick Crowling,
seen performing to
“Cotton-Eyed Joe,”
took top honors.
Inset: Emmanuel Sandoval
choreographed his own
hip-hop routine.
Garrison Sent to
Principal’s Office
WE HAVE BLASTOFF!
PHOTO: WILEY WILLIAMS
Parish Episcopal School third-grade teacher Jenn Makins (left) coordinates liftof in the Bottle-
Rocket Launch competition on March 11. Makins worked 15 months with NASA and continues to
participate in educational projects that include the No Boundaries program and Hubble telescope.
See DISD, Page 7A
See GARRISON, Page 9A
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
Seems Bette Davis’ big
famous eyes had a little
help.
“The reason she had
those gorgeous eyes is she
wore three pairs of brown
eyelashes,” says historian
Jane Guzman.
Guzman is full of facts
like these.
Joan Crawford, Davis’
off-screen rival, “always
s cared me,” t he
Pres t on Hol l ow
resident added with
a laugh. “And they
really, really hated
each other.”
Even so, she’ll dis-
cuss both women in
turn on Wednesday
for “Drama Divas,” a free
lecture at the Preston
Royal Library about the
two starlets’ lives, rifts, and
Hollywood appeal. Based
on biographies available to
anyone with a library card,
the program is part promo-
tion, part “edu-tainment.”
“They’ re hoping it ’ ll
draw people into
the library,” said
Guzman, “and that
a whole bunch of
peopl e wi l l rent
Whatever Happened
to Baby Jane?”
Gu z ma n , 6 9,
“grew up watching
these people in the mov-
ies,” she explained, “and I
think that’s why we’re get-
ting such a good response”
to the idea.
“I think one reason there
Preston Hollow Historian Shines
Spotlight on Golden-Age Starlets
See GUZMAN, Page 7A
Jesuit graduate hired to lead
alma mater’s administration
TOM
GARRISON
JANE
GUZMAN
Jane Guzman
talks Bette Davis,
Joan Crawford
BY CHUCK COX
Staf Writer
When Josh Bell was 3
years old, his father (the
appropri at el y named
Earnest) started teach-
ing him to hit a Wiffle ball
with a Mark McGwire
foam bat. Two years later,
he had Bell taking cuts
from each side of the plate
every other at-bat.
“I didn’t really know
[why],” Bell said. “It was
fun. It was baseball. It was
just swinging from the
other side.”
It turns out Bell was
quite the apt pupil. As he
wraps up his stellar high
school playing career at
Jesuit, the hulking (6-3,
205) senior center fielder
has emerged as one of the
top high school prospects
in the country, a five-tool
switch hitter projected
to be a first-round pick
in June’s Major League
Baseball amateur draft.
“It’s not too strong of a
phrase,” Jesuit head coach
Brian Jones said of Bell.
“That’s one thing that I’m
throwing out there: He’s a
once-in-a-lifetime type of
kid and a once-in-a-life-
time talent — especially
for a coach.”
After playing on the
varsity as a freshman and
putting up some gaudy
numbers as a starter the
last two seasons, Bell has
raised the bar even higher
this year. Heading into
Tuesday’s game against
Sunset, Bell was hitting
.589 with nine home runs,
34 RBI, and 12 stolen bases
to help Jesuit (20-4, 6-0)
to first place in the District
9-5A standings.
“This year has definitely
been a lot of fun, coming
SCHOOLS
Dealey kids display
gifts and talents [ 8A ]
SPORTS
Jesuit falls to
Mesquite Horn [ 5A ]
MY SWEET CHARITY
Fresh Faces of Fashion
make debut at fundraiser [ 7A ]
WEATHER
QUOTABLE
I was born with 12 fingers and 12
toes. ... Better too much of a good
thing than too little.”— CHRISTY KIDWELL (Page 3A)
SUN
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HI 83 F / LO 67 F
Partly Cloudy
HI 85 F / LO 89 F
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FRI DAY, APRI L 8, 2011 ALSO SERVI NG BLUFFVI EW, DEVONSHI RE, AND GREENWAY PARKS
VOL. 7, I SSUE 14
ONE QUARTER
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
A
lfonso Llamas has
been caring for
Sam Fuhrman at
least once a month since
2007. Sam, confined to a
wheelchair, looks younger
than hi s 14 years. He
doesn’t speak, but he does
have a few hand signs to
show when he’s thirsty,
for example, or ready to
move from one activity to
another. Llamas knows
all these signals, and the
unconscious ones too —
when Sam scratches his
arms, say, because he’s
amped up about one thing
or another.
Llamas is a volunteer
at Night Lights, a free,
twice-monthly program
at Lovers Lane United
Methodist Church for spe-
cial-needs children and
their siblings. “And Sam’s
my boy,” he’ll exclaim as
he sends a shower of bub-
bles — one of Sam’s favor-
ite things — into the child’s
open arms. Sam squeals.
He’s clearly thrilled.
Llamas knows Sam’s
basic needs and wants,
and what to do if some-
thi ng goes wrong. So
do the nurses who mill
around at every Night
Lights meeting.
Ask Llamas about Sam’s
diagnosis, though, and
you’ll get a blank look.
“Oh,” he says, pursing
his lips a bit. “I guess that’s
in his file somewhere.”
Point being? It doesn’t
matter. At Night Lights,
Sam’s just a kid being a
kid.
A
Sh
ining Star For
Special-N
eeds Fam
ilies
LOVERS LANE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
PHOTOS: MARIA JARAL
Josh Seeley gets a kiss from a canine visitor to Night Lights, a free babysitting program for special-needs kids at Lovers Lane UMC.
Night Lights volunteers keep free childcare program afloat
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
As the due date for the
state budget draws nearer,
at least one Dallas ISD
school has already done its
homework.
On Sat urday, Harry
C. Withers Elementary
will host “Taste of The
Neighborhood,” a fund-
raiser aimed at generating
$75,000 for added class-
room materials. Seven area
restaurants — including
Cantina Laredo, Fish City
Grill, Prego Express, and
Nothing Bundt Cakes — are
donating food to the event
at the Sparkman Club.
During last year’s inau-
gural tasting, the Parent
Teacher Organi zati on
raised $40,000 through an
auction, raffle, and dona-
W
ithers Has
Fundraising
Plan in Place
Elementary school’s event
aims to offset budget cuts
Sam Fuhrman enjoys time with volunteer Alfonso Llamas.
Shearith Israel
Marks Milestone
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
For a first anni-
versary, it’s paper.
For the 50th, it ’s
gold. But what do
you get for the 125th
anniversary?
At Congregation
Shearith Israel, it’s a three-
day festival full of music,
worship, and food. The
synagogue actually has 13
more reasons to celebrate,
as Rabbi William Gershon
is commemorating his own
significant anniversary.
“We’re not a showy syn-
agogue,” program director
Mona Allen said. “We’re a
synagogue of action. We
don’t celebrate every two
minutes.”
In fact, this weekend-
long festival is one
of only a handful
of times Shearith is
simply celebrating
itself. Generally, the
congregation com-
memorates the life
cycles of its mem-
bers, such as birth,
coming of age at 13, and
marriage. But Gershon’s
13th year as head rabbi —
coupled with the passing
of more than 125 years as
a synagogue — merited a
Congregation
also celebrating
rabbi’s 13 years
WILLIAM
GERSHON
See WITHERS, Page 8A
See SHEARITH, Page 11A
See LIGHTS, Page 11A
Jesuit Hitter Rings
MLB Scouts’ Bells
Senior slugger
likely to become
first-round pick
STAFF PHOTO: CHRIS MCGATHEY
Jesuit’s Josh Bell is “a once-in-a-lifetime type of kid and a once-
in-a-lifetime talent,” according to his head coach, Brian Jones.
See JESUIT, Page 8A
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
When I joined the staff at
Preston Hollow People, my
boss referred to my fluent
Ukrainian as “a real asset.”
His comment was tongue-
in-cheek, but in six months
I’ve written three articles
that were enhanced by this
skill . It’s not like I’m beg-
ging people to pitch me
stories about Ukraine. It
just keeps happening. And
I welcome it.
I feel a strong connec-
tion to Ukraine after my
Peace Corps service there,
so when my boss asked if
I was interested in attend-
ing a Ukrainian Easter egg
workshop at the Museum
of Biblical Art, we both
Ukrainian Art Makes
An Eggcellent Custom
Museum’s class
offers taste of
the old country
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Claire St. Amant applies wax to
a dyed egg during a workshop
at the Museum of Biblical Art.
See EGGS, Page 10A
PrestonHollowPeople
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ADVERTISING INFORMATION2012
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Per
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ADVERTISING IN MAIN SECTION (NET):
8x 1x 12x 26x 52x
$464
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$913
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$3,654
$4,872
$7,308
$440
$550
$660
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$1,155
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$2,640
$3,465
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$360
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COMMENTARY
Before Gateway rezoning,
revisit Bishop Davis [ 7A ]
SPORTS
Canterbury repeats
as state champs [ 11A ]
O
a
k
C
liff
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011
NEWS FROM YOUR SI DE OF THE RI VER


VOL. 6, I SSUE 45
50 CENTS
28 50 100 150 200
Oak Clif People has received 28 subscription renewals linked to
Rosemont. If we get 200, the school will get $1,000. [ 10A ]
SUPPORT ROSEMONT
2
Oa
V
O
T
E
!
Find your ballot on page 6A
oakclifpeople.com
or vote online at
BY JOANNA ENGLAND
Staf Writer
A task force last week
gave a thumbs up to a pro-
posed apartment building
at Rosemont Avenue and
Davis Street. If all goes
according to plan, the
Landmark Commission
could approve the design
as soon as Dec. 5.
It’s a complete turn-
around for the project,
which drew the ire of a few
Winnetka Heights resi-
dents last month.
The structure, designed
by Good Fulton & Farrell
architects, raised a few
eyebrows during a Dallas
Landmark Commission
meeting on Oct. 3. The
commission voted to deny
the project’s certificate of
appropriateness because
much of the structure
would be clad in Hardie
Plank siding, a material
verboten by the Winnetka
Heights Historic District’s
preservation ordinance.
Architect Larry Good
was against changing the
exterior , saying at the
Oct. 3 meeting that his
firm would not “engage in
design by committee.”
However, that’s exactly
what happened.
“[Wood Partners] rec-
ogni zed that my hi gh
standards for our design
weren’t conducive to a
successful compromise
with those who chose to
criticize it,” Good said in a
Nov. 15 email. “Therefore,
we reassigned the project
to my very talented and
much more tactful part-
ner, Evan Beattie. He was
able to make changes to be
responsive to our neigh-
bors, and I think we have
an agreement for support
at Landmark.”
Concessions include the
addition of columns and
changes to the trim that
A
p
artm
ents’ Façade R
edesig
ned
Rosemont side changed
to placate neighborhood
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
When the bell rings at
Lida Hooe Elementary
School, Michelle Ramirez
races out the back door
wearing her black and
white uniform. On this
day, however, Ramirez has
added a bit of flair to her
ensemble.
Pulled up over one leg
of her black slacks, she’s
wearing an argyle sock
wi th bri ghtl y col ored
patches on her right foot.
On the other, she’s don-
ning a sock with fluoures-
cent peace signs. Another
student is wearing one
black sock with a skull-
and-crossbones motif and
another of a striped variety.
No, this isn’t an outra-
geous socks contest. It’s the
students’ pledge against
bullying — part of a dis-
trict-wide “Band Against
Bullying Week.” Through
their crazy socks, the Lida
Hooe students are saying
it’s OK to be different.
Bes i des t he s oc ks ,
this week students were
Lida Hooe
Socks it
To Bullies
Students dress
oddly to send
united message
T
here is no doubt
that Oak Cliff is
now “cool.” Every
week bri ngs a
new opening for
another restaurant, gallery, or
trendy retail store. Yet for many
“old timers” (those who lived
here before 1990), Oak Cliff has
had its share of “hip moments”
well before Bolsa, Hattie’s, and
the Bishop Arts area ever opened
their doors.
On Nov. 10, an old Oak Cliff
landmark celebrated its rebirth
with a night of classic blues-rock
in a venue that was reborn by
the new urban pioneers. Jimmie
Vaughan and his Tilt-a-Whirl
Band played to a packed Texas
Theatre, laying down classic
blues rock with a digital intro-
duction. It was a night of the old
meeting the new, and everyone
enjoying themselves.
The show opened with a panel
discussion on Oak Cliff then and
now, featuring Gayla Brooks
Kokel, Charles Kitch, and Scott
Phares. Their comments were
augmented by digital images of
old Oak Cliff landmarks (Austin’s
Barbecue) and hometown heroes
(Jimmie and Stevie Ray Vaughan
at their Oak Cliff house), then
shifted gears to the live perfor-
mance. If anything, the night
showed that the old and the new
can co-exist here, and even thrive
if given the right opportunity.
V
aughan

R
evs U
p

T
im
e M
ach
ine
Texas Theatre show bridged gap
between new and old Oak Cliff
KIRBY F. WARNOCK
kirby@bigbendquarterly.com
PHOTO: ALEX HOLLAND
Jimmie Vaughan plays his guitar during his Nov. 10 homecoming concert at the Texas Theatre.
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
Michael Satarino suc-
cinctly summed up the
School for the Talented
and Gifted’s secret for suc-
cess.
“We have teachers who
are passionate about teach-
ing, students who are pas-
sionate about learning, and
parents who are support-
ive of the process,” he said.
“And besides being gifted
intellectually, our students
are heavily involved in
community service.”
While Satarino, princi-
pal of DISD’s TAG mag-
net for 15 years, said these
standards are the norm for
his students, he and other
school officials are espe-
cially proud after receiving
a $25,000 grant from the
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
Bishop Dunne Catholic
School is hosting a spe-
cial guest — someone who
showed up uninvited, but
has already left quite the
footprint .
“ I f e e l s o l u c k y, ”
exclaimed maintenance
director Isabel Arista, one
of just a few people on
campus to say they’ve seen
a mountain lion — whose
presence, for the record,
can’ t be confi rmed by
Texas Parks and Wildlife
without photos or other
evidence. At any rate, said
Arista, the encounter hap-
pened Nov. 11 as she drove
north on Rugged Drive,
near the school’s softball
field.
The cat, which “looked
just like pictures you’d see
in National Geographic,”
was headed into the woods.
“It’s like I was watching
it in slow motion,” said
Arista, who immediately
stopped “and just watched
for a few seconds, taking in
School For Gifted
Gets $25,000 Gift
M
ountain Lion
Haunts Dunne
Stevens Park
family helped
secure funding
School works
sightings into
curriculum
CONSPIRACY THEORISTS
PHOTO: NIKKI COTTEN
Alberto Vega, Stephen Hill, Hollis Wakefi eld, and Amber Van
Galder attended Art Conspiracy 7. See more photos on Page 4A.
STAFF PHOTO: ALANA HARRISON
Lida Hooe students donned odd
socks Monday as part of “Band
Against Bullying Week.”
See WINNETKA, Page 9A
See LION, Page 9A
See TAG, Page 10A See BULLYING, Page 10A
See VAUGHAN, Page 9A
What: Wildlife information
session with safety tips for
mountain lion encounters
When: 9:30 a.m. Dec. 1 and
Dec. 6
Where: Bishop Dunne
auditorium, 3900 Rugged Drive
RSVP: Call 214-339-6561,
ext. 286
If You Go
NEIGHBORS
How well do you know
Luis Olvera Jr.? [ 4A ]
COMMUNITY
Rosemont dads host
golf tournament [ 3A ]
O
a
k
C
liff
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011
NEWS FROM YOUR SI DE OF THE RI VER


VOL. 6, I SSUE 46
50 CENTS
V
O
T
E
!
Find your ballot on page 6A
oakclifpeople.com
or vote online at
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staf Writer
The boards of three Oak
Cliff tax increment financ-
ing districts will soon have
a new, city-mandated panel
to deal with.
Beginning in February,
Dallas is implementing a
peer review panel to aug-
ment the approval and dis-
cussion of projects’ designs
in the city’s 18 TIF districts.
In Oak Cliff, that includes
the Fort Worth Avenue,
Davis Garden, and Oak
Cliff Gateway districts.
“It makes a lot of sense
to our staff, in that we’re
likely to get some senior
architects and landscape
architects to join,” said
Karl Stundins, an area
redevelopment manager
for the city. “It helps give
a level of review that has
been lacking.”
TI F d i s t r i c t s a r e
designed to stimulate new
investment and enhance
real estate values in cer-
tain areas. Developers can
apply for public subsi-
dies to offset construction
and maintenance costs
N
ew
P
anel
To O
versee
TIF B
oards
Experts to review plans
in all 18 Dallas districts
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
Paul Maute calls his
Winnetka Heights house a
“four-square on steroids.”
The 5,600- square-foot,
three-story behemoth sits
on half an acre at the cor-
ner of Jefferson Boulevard
and Montclair Avenue —
and has served as a beacon
of the neighborhood since
the early 20th century.
Maute and hi s wi fe,
Cindy, lived elsewhere
in Winnetka Heights for
more than 15 years, but
they were always intrigued
by the Montclair mansion.
“After our two older kids
went off to college, the
home came up for sale. And
I thought my life was over,”
Paul said. “Cindy loved the
place. If I told her it was
for sale, we’d be the own-
ers of a major project. But
if I kept the news from her,
I knew she’d find out, and
I’d have to live with that.”
Paul did tell Cindy, and
they purchased the home
in 2004. Next weekend,
it will be featured on the
Winnetka Heights Holiday
Home Tour.
“When we should have
been downsi zi ng, we
supersized,” Paul joked.
“But, really, we wanted
to save the house. It was
pretty much in complete
disrepair. At some point in
its history, the home had
served as a boarding house
and was sectioned off into
Montclair
Mansion
Hits Tour
Couple restores
Winnetka home
with rich story
STAFF PHOTO: ALANA HARRISON
This second-story hall space,
which leads to a terrace, main-
tains many original details.
E
ven though the assas-
sination of President
John F. Kennedy hap-
pened more than five years
before I was born, the events of
that dreadful November after-
noon have always fascinated
me. Of course, there’s the whole
conspiracy thing that makes the
assassination intriguing to many
Americans nearly 50 years after
it happened. But there’s also the
fact the assassination occurred
in a city I have called home for
more than 11 years of my life.
Heck, I pass by Dealey Plaza
every day on my way to work.
And the Texas Theatre, where
assassin Lee Harvey Oswald
was arrested, is just a couple
of miles from my house in Oak
Cliff. It really is living history
that’s always there.
So, when I picked up my
copy of Entertainment Weekly
about a month ago and found
an excerpt from Stephen King’s
latest novel, 11/22/63, I was
drawn in hook, line, and sinker.
I have always been an enor-
mous fan of King. In fact, I have
read more of his novels than any
other author’s work, by a long
shot. I was doing book reports
on this guy’s novels when I was
in high school. To think he was
working with a subject I’ve
always been interested in made
his new book a must-read for
me. All I had to do was wait for
the Nov. 8 release date, which
seemed to take forever to get
K
ing T
akes on

D
allas H
istory
Texas Theatre travels back in time
STAFF PHOTO: CHRIS MCGATHEY
On Tuesday, the 38th anniversary of the JFK assassination, the Texas Theatre reran its lineup
from the day Lee Harvey Oswald was captured there, prompting Lea Langford to snap a photo.
CHUCK COX
chuck.cox@peoplenewspapers.com
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
For Mario Ortiz, cob-
bling has been a way of
life. He began learning the
shoe-repair trade at the
age of 9 in his hometown
of Rioverde San Luspotos,
Mexico, from his stepfa-
ther.
Two decades ago, the
family moved to North
Texas and worked in a
store in North Dallas, but
ultimately opened their
own shop in Oak Cliff,
because they loved the
community and the peo-
ple. Mario said he plans to
stay in front of the Fiesta
on Jefferson Boulevard as
long as he can .
“I love my work,” the
shy Mario said. “I like see-
ing my customers happy.
When I see a smile on their
face, I’m pleased.”
Manuel Ortiz, Mario’s
younger brother by five
years, learned the trade
from both Mario and their
stepfather, Angel Aguilar.
While Manuel doesn’t have
ownership in the store the
family has maintained for
15 years, he works almost
full-time with his brother .
Shoe Repair is
A Fam
ily Affair
Cobbler learned
from stepfather,
who taught wife
STAFF PHOTO: ALANA HARRISON
Expert cobbler Mario Ortiz works at his tiny shop, Eagle Stone, in
front of the Fiesta grocery store on Jef erson Boulevard.
See WINNETKA, Page 10A
See COBBLER, Page 11A
See TIF, Page 10A
See BOOK, Page 11A
GIFTS & GREETINGS
Local shops have what
you need this season [ 8A ]
G
y
COMMUNITY
Home tour breaks
fundraising records [ 7A ]
SPORTS
Redesigned golf course
makes its debut [ 5A ]
NEIGHBORS
How well do you know
Darla McCalib? [ 8A ]
WEATHER
QUOTABLE
Just what is it about Oak Cliff that
produced so many talented musicians?”
— KIRBY WARNOCK (Page 6A) SUN
SAT
FRI
Sunny
HI 85 F / LO 58 F
Sunny
HI 86 F / LO 63 F
Sunny
HI 85 F / LO 60 F
O
a
k
C
liff
FRI DAY, OCTOBER 14, 2011


NEWS FROM YOUR SI DE OF THE RI VER

VOL. 6, I SSUE 40
50 CENTS
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staf Writer
North Oak Cliff will
get an overhaul in 2013 if
a new City Council map
is approved by the U.S.
Justice Department.
Drafted on Oct. 5 and
passed that same night by
a 9-6 council vote, the map
got a big “no” from council
members Delia Jasso and
Scott Griggs, who com-
plained of split neighbor-
hoods, a jilted Hispanic
community, and plans that
were — said Griggs, after
an 11th-hour recess meet-
ing from which he was
excluded — “not democ-
racy, and heavy-handed.”
With a northern bound-
ary bumped up to 1nter-
state 30 and a southern
one that ends at Illinois
Avenue, District 1 would
absorb a big swath of cur-
rent District 3 neighbor-
hoods, including Kessler
Park, East Kessler Park,
Wes t Kes s l er, Ki ngs
Highway, Stevens Park
Est at es, St evens Park
Village, Winnetka Heights,
and Wynnewood North.
Griggs, who represents
District 3, lives in Stevens
Park Estates. Jasso resides
in Kidd Springs, which
would remain in District 1.
“So two people most of
us really like are going to
be opponents,” said Old
Oak Cliff Conservation
League president Michael
Amonett. “Nobody wants
to see that.”
And nei ther counci l
member seems inclined
N
ew
C
ouncil M
ap U
nites N
orth O
C

District 1 now includes
homes of Griggs, Jasso
See COUNCIL, Page 11A
District 1 has been moved north to encompass all of Kessler Park,
Stevens Park Estates, Winnetka Heights, and Kings Highway.
Installations reflect city’s past and future
STAFF PHOTOS: ALANA HARRISON
John Marcucci lies in sand, crepe myrtle buds, and paper shreds in the Hope For the Future installation at the “Connections” exhibit.
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
About three years ago,
developer Brent Jackson
began working on his appli-
cation for Sylvan Thirty.
When he stood before the
City Plan Commission on
Oct. 6, he felt the weight of
all those years.
“I’m a marathon runner,
and there’s a reason for me
telling you this,” Jackson
said, “This is truly a mara-
thon case, and I respect
your endurance so far. …
We are truly at the 26th
mile. ”
T h e c o mmi s s i o n
approved plans for the
multi-use development,
which will go up along the
east side of Sylvan Avenue
between Interstate 30 and
Fort Worth Avenue, with
all staff recommenda-
tions and one caveat. The
maximum building height
was set at 70 feet, a com-
promise between the city
staff ’s proposal (60 feet)
and Jackson’s (79 feet).
Bef ore t he commi s-
sion reached its decision,
David Lyles, president of
the Fort Worth Avenue
Development Group, quib-
bled with Jackson over the
duration of the case.
“I, too, run marathons,”
he said. “I believe we are
on about the 20th mile
here.”
Lyles put his seal of
approval on all staff rec-
ommendations, emphasiz-
ing the height limit.
Sylvan Thirty
Zoning Passes
Commission
caps buildings’
height at 70 feet
E
xh
ibit C
on
nects
D
allas’ D
ual Sides
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
While the looming Margaret
Hunt Hi l l Bri dge adds a
unique element to Dallas’ sky-
line, its overarching purpose is
to connect the two sides of the
Trinity .
John Marcucci, director of
the Haley-Henman gallery,
saw an artistic opportunity in
the bridge’s opening celebra-
tion — a collaboration among
local artists to create a series
of installations reflecting the
cultural, historical, and eco-
nomic factors that link Dallas’
dichotomized sectors.
The bridge’s opening has
been delayed until March, but
Marcucci and his fellow art-
ists decided to proceed with
their project, fittingly named
“Connections.”
“In many ways, the bridge
BY DAN KOLLER
Staf Writer
For She r i Ma t hi s ,
breast-cancer awareness
is a family affair.
In 2007, just after her
sister finished the chemo-
surgery-radiation gamut,
Mathis was inspired to
get a mammogram. The
Stevens Park Estates resi-
dent said the test detected
a tumor four years earlier
than it would have been
found otherwise.
“It was so little, I didn’t
feel it,” Mathis said. “I
didn’t know it was there.
Even with the surgery, it
was so small they weren’t
sure they got it.”
To ensure that others
benefit from the same
early detection, Mathis
is co-chairing Volley 4A
Cure for the third straight
year. The two-day festival
of volleyball and breast-
cancer awareness will be
held today and Saturday
at Canterbury Episcopal
School in DeSoto.
“I’m just that little yap-
ping dog that tells every-
one,” Mathis said. “I’m the
mammogram poster girl.”
When Volley 4A Cure
began in 2009, Mathis
chaired the event with
her daughter Erin, then a
senior on the Canterbury
volleyball team. After Erin
graduated, she was suc-
ceeded by her brother
Tyler.
Wi t h Tyl er s t udy-
ing engineering at the
BY ALANA HARRISON
Staf Writer
By Jan. 1, you should
be able to bicycle from
the Bishop Arts District
t o Mocki ngbi rd
St a t i on vi a t he
Trinity Trail — a
combination of on-
street bike lanes
and a nine-mile, off-
road stretch .
Jason Robert s
a nd t he Be t t e r
Block Project are
heading efforts to raise
$75,000 to complete the
trail before the end of
the year. With support
from the city, the Trinity
Trust, the Dal l as Off-
Road Bicycle Association,
and Groundwork Dallas,
the project will collect
donations via the Dallas
Foundation’s Dallas Parks
Foundation Fund.
Roberts said City Hall
asked Better Block to help
bring activity to the Trinity
River and park area.
“We wanted to do a proj-
ect that would provide
people access to the park
and connect com-
munities,” Roberts
said. “We looked
at two areas that
were already ‘des-
tinations’ — places
where people want
to go — that were
roughly the same
distance on both
sides of the Trinity. And
we came up with the Katy
Trail connection and the
Bishop Arts District.”
The money raised will
M
athis W
ants M
ore Aw
areness
Trinity Trail Aims
To Traverse City
See SYLVAN, Page 10A
See CONNECTIONS, Page 10A
Another part of Hope For the Future
JASON
ROBERTS
See MATHIS, Page 4A
See TRAIL, Page 4A
Roberts’ group
raising money
for $75k project
Mom’s aim is to
promote early
mammograms
Onceitsowntownandstillfiercelyindependent,OakCliffcanboastnotonlyofitsproudhistoryanditsdiversity,butalso
ofthehillystreetsandexposedlimestonethatmakeitsterrainanythingbuttheusualprairie.NorthOakCliff,theoriginal
settlement,ishometoartists,architects,musicians,andprofessionalsofallkinds.Beautifulhomes,oldandnew,overlook
StevensParkGolfClub,whichopenedin1922.ThethrivingBishopArtsDistrict,withrestaurantslikeHattie’sandVeracruz
Café,shopsandnightspots,hasbecomeamagnetforvisitorsfromallpartsofthecity.
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COMMENTARY
Before Gateway rezoning, revisit Bishop Davis [ 7A ] SPORTS
Canterbury repeats as state champs [ 11A ]
O
ak
C
liff
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 NEWS FROM YOUR SI DE OF THE RI VER VOL. 6, I SSUE 45
50 CENTS
28 50 100 150 200
Oak Clif People has received 28 subscription renewals linked to
Rosemont. If we get 200, the school will get $1,000. [ 10A ]
SUPPORT ROSEMONT 2
Oa
VO
TE!
Find your ballot on page 6A
oakclifpeople.com
or vote online at
BY JOANNA ENGLAND Staf Writer
A task force last week gave a thumbs up to a pro- posed apartment building at Rosemont Avenue and
Davis Street. If all goes according to plan, the Landmark Commission could approve the design as soon as Dec. 5.
It’s a complete turn- around for the project,
which drew the ire of a few Winnetka Heights resi- dents last month.
The structure, designed by Good Fulton & Farrell architects, raised a few eyebrows during a Dallas Landmark Commission meeting on Oct. 3. The commission voted to deny the project’s certificate of appropriateness because
much of the structure would be clad in Hardie Plank siding, a material verboten by the Winnetka Heights Historic District’s preservation ordinance. Architect Larry Good was against changing the exterior , saying at the Oct. 3 meeting that his firm would not “engage in design by committee.”
However, that’s exactly what happened.
“[Wood Partners] rec- ogni zed that my hi gh standards for our design weren’t conducive to a successful compromise with those who chose to criticize it,” Good said in a Nov. 15 email. “Therefore, we reassigned the project to my very talented and
much more tactful part- ner, Evan Beattie. He was able to make changes to be responsive to our neigh- bors, and I think we have an agreement for support at Landmark.”
Concessions include the addition of columns and changes to the trim that
Apartments’ Façade Redesigned
Rosemont side changed to placate neighborhood
BY ALANA HARRISON Staf Writer
When the bell rings at Lida Hooe Elementary School, Michelle Ramirez races out the back door wearing her black and white uniform. On this day, however, Ramirez has added a bit of flair to her ensemble.
Pulled up over one leg of her black slacks, she’s wearing an argyle sock wi th bri ghtl y col ored patches on her right foot. On the other, she’s don- ning a sock with fluoures- cent peace signs. Another student is wearing one black sock with a skull- and-crossbones motif and another of a striped variety. No, this isn’t an outra- geous socks contest. It’s the students’ pledge against bullying — part of a dis- trict-wide “Band Against Bullying Week.” Through their crazy socks, the Lida Hooe students are saying it’s OK to be different. Bes i des t he s oc ks , this week students were
Lida Hooe
Socks it
To Bullies
Students dress
oddly to send
united message
T
here is no doubt that Oak Cliff is now “cool.” Every week bri ngs a new opening for another restaurant, gallery, or trendy retail store. Yet for many “old timers” (those who lived here before 1990), Oak Cliff has had its share of “hip moments” well before Bolsa, Hattie’s, and the Bishop Arts area ever opened their doors.
On Nov. 10, an old Oak Cliff landmark celebrated its rebirth with a night of classic blues-rock in a venue that was reborn by the new urban pioneers. Jimmie Vaughan and his Tilt-a-Whirl Band played to a packed Texas Theatre, laying down classic blues rock with a digital intro- duction. It was a night of the old meeting the new, and everyone enjoying themselves. The show opened with a panel
discussion on Oak Cliff then and now, featuring Gayla Brooks Kokel, Charles Kitch, and Scott Phares. Their comments were augmented by digital images of old Oak Cliff landmarks (Austin’s Barbecue) and hometown heroes (Jimmie and Stevie Ray Vaughan at their Oak Cliff house), then shifted gears to the live perfor- mance. If anything, the night showed that the old and the new can co-exist here, and even thrive if given the right opportunity.
Vaughan
Revs Up
Time Machine
Texas Theatre show bridged gap between new and old Oak Cliff
KIRBY F. WARNOCK kirby@bigbendquarterly.com
PHOTO: ALEX HOLLAND
Jimmie Vaughan plays his guitar during his Nov. 10 homecoming concert at the Texas Theatre.
BY ALANA HARRISON Staf Writer
Michael Satarino suc- cinctly summed up the School for the Talented and Gifted’s secret for suc- cess.
“We have teachers who are passionate about teach- ing, students who are pas-
sionate about learning, and parents who are support- ive of the process,” he said. “And besides being gifted intellectually, our students are heavily involved in community service.” While Satarino, princi- pal of DISD’s TAG mag- net for 15 years, said these standards are the norm for his students, he and other school officials are espe- cially proud after receiving a $25,000 grant from the
BY GEORGIA FISHER Staf Writer
Bishop Dunne Catholic School is hosting a spe- cial guest — someone who showed up uninvited, but has already left quite the footprint .
“ I f e e l s o l u c k y, ” exclaimed maintenance director Isabel Arista, one of just a few people on campus to say they’ve seen a mountain lion — whose presence, for the record, can’ t be confi rmed by Texas Parks and Wildlife without photos or other evidence. At any rate, said Arista, the encounter hap-
pened Nov. 11 as she drove north on Rugged Drive, near the school’s softball field.
The cat, which “looked just like pictures you’d see in National Geographic,” was headed into the woods. “It’s like I was watching it in slow motion,” said Arista, who immediately stopped “and just watched for a few seconds, taking in
School For Gifted
Gets $25,000 Gift
Mountain Lion
Haunts Dunne
Stevens Park
family helped
secure funding
School works
sightings into
curriculum
CONSPIRACY THEORISTS
PHOTO: NIKKI COTTEN
Alberto Vega, Stephen Hill, Hollis Wakefi eld, and Amber Van
Galder attended Art Conspiracy 7. See more photos on Page 4A.
STAFF PHOTO: ALANA HARRISON Lida Hooe students donned odd socks Monday as part of “Band Against Bullying Week.”
See WINNETKA, Page 9A
See LION, Page 9A
See TAG, Page 10A
See BULLYING, Page 10A
See VAUGHAN, Page 9A
What: Wildlife information session with safety tips for mountain lion encounters When: 9:30 a.m. Dec. 1 and Dec. 6
Where: Bishop Dunne auditorium, 3900 Rugged Drive RSVP: Call 214-339-6561, ext. 286
If You Go
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
It’s hard to think of a
more American-sounding
restaurant than Liberty
Burger. But Mariel Street
traces her patriotic patties’
roots to the South Pacific.
Mariel, the only daugh-
ter of famed Dallas restau-
rateur Gene Street, was a
Peace Corps volunteer in
Vanuatu, where her father
woul d send her dehy-
drated hamburgers.
The nati ves enj oyed
them so much, Mariel
started thinking about how
to improve upon the all-
American classic. While
you might think getting
into the family business
would be a good thing,
Gene wasn’t too keen on
the idea of his daughter
following in his footsteps.
“My whole life my dad’s
been trying to talk me
out of it,” she said. “But I
always came back to it. It’s
in my blood. It’s how I was
raised, and there’s nothing
else I’d rather do.”
Gene worried about the
long hours and lack of holi-
days that come standard
with the restaurant life.
But he’s found his peace
with Mariel’s decision.
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Although a jury handed
down $9.2 million in dam-
ages against the Episcopal
Sc hool of Da l l a s i n
September, the plaintiffs
are now seeking only $6.7
million.
“Rarely do you get a judg-
ment for the entire amount
of the verdict,” said attor-
ney Charla Aldous, who
represents the Doe family.
John Doe, Jane Doe, and
Jane Doe II sued ESD for
damages related to his-
tory teacher John Nathan
Campbell’s sexual rela-
tionship with Jane Doe II
and her subsequent sepa-
ration from the school.
Judge D’Metria Benson
heard a variety of motions
related to the final judg-
ment and sanctions against
ESD on Nov. 1 0, but
deferred ruling on any of
them until a later date.
Fi f t e e n a t t or ne y s ,
including a handful of
newly acquired appellate
counsel from Haynes &
Boone, attended the hear-
ing on behalf of ESD. The
school sought to have the
j udgment t hrown out
entirely, but offered an
award of about $3 million
should its first request fail.
ESD attorney George
Bramblett urged Benson to
delay ruling on the plain-
tiffs’ proposed sanctions
against Locke, Lord, Bissell
& Liddell.
“There’s no reason, your
honor, to rush to judg-
ment on such an impor-
tant thing,” said Bramblett,
who was named the 2011
Malpractice Lawyer of the
Year by the organization
Best Lawyers in America.
On Nov. 2, the plaintiffs
filed additional sanctions
against lead ESD counsel
Chrysta Castañeda as well
as her firm, Locke Lord,
NEIGHBORS
Get acquainted with
Jennifer Sampson [ 3A ]
SPORTS
Parish’s champs
already ousted [ 4A ]
MY SWEET CHARITY
Dubya pops in at Folsom
Award patron party [ 11A ]
Judge Defers Ruling on ESD Damages
Sanctions sought by Does
return case to courtroom
See ESD, Page 2A
Preston H
ollow
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 ALSO SERVI NG BLUFFVI EW, DEVONSHI RE, AND GREENWAY PARKS VOL. 7, I SSUE 46 ONE QUARTER
PHOTOS: LAURA MOUNTJOY
Tim Weber, Bruce Shaw, and other members of the Covenant School community shovel the fi rst piles of dirt for the Carson Leslie
Center on Nov. 11. Leslie (top) was a longtime Covenant student who succumbed to cancer in January 2010 at the age of 17.
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
T
here’s no question
Carson Leslie left a
mark on his family
and friends. Now, the school
he called home for 12 years
will have a physical reminder
of the boy, who died in 2010
from cancer.
On Nov. 11, the Covenant
School of Dal l as broke
ground on the Carson Leslie
Center. The athletic and
fine arts complex will be
the first permanent building
on Covenant’s Valley View
Lane campus, which opened
in 1993. The rest of the K-12
school is housed in upscale
temporary buildings.
Unlike most tributes, the
center was conceived while
Carson was still alive, and he
was able to participate in the
design and other aspects of
the project.
“He named it, humbly,
the Carson Leslie Center,”
his mother, Annette, said to
laughter during the ground-
Covenant Gets Permanent
Carson Leslie’s friends and family
break ground for namesake
structure at his alma mater
RENDERING: THREE ARCHITECTURE
Covenant’s basketball teams will play in the new center.
Trains Arrive
At NorthPark
See COVENANT, Page 9A
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
Most Preston Hollow
families own at least two
cars, maybe even a boat or
a plane, but the Balls have
the titles to half a dozen
trains.
“We’ve bought one every
year since our daughter
Hannah was born,” Barrett
Ball said.
Starting Saturday, one of
the Balls’ models will be
among the dozens featured
in The Trains at NorthPark,
the mall’s 13th annual holi-
day exhibit benefiting the
Ronald McDonald House
of Dallas.
Ball and fellow Preston
Hollow resident Laura
Thomason are the 2011 co-
chairs of The Trains, which
is sponsored by Bank of
Texas. They’ve worked
on securing sponsorships,
selling trains, and organiz-
ing the exhibits since June.
“It’s really been a fun
experience,” Thomason
said. “I’ve had a lot of fun
doing it.”
Painted and customized
railcars will wind their way
Annual holiday exhibit raises
money for McDonald House
PHOTO: COURTESY OF KRISTINA BOWMAN
TW Design crafted each model train in this year’s exhibit.
See TRAINS, Page 13A
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Mariel Street followed in her dad’s footsteps against his wishes.
Quest For a Better Burger Bonds Family
Streets’ children
ring in opening
of Liberty cafe
See LIBERTY, Page 9A
THE TRAINS AT
NORTHPARK
Where: NorthPark Center,
Level 2 between Barneys
New York and Nordstrom
When: Saturday
through Jan. 1 (closed on
Thanksgiving and Christmas)
Cost: $6 for adults, $3 for
children and senior citizens
VOTE!
Find your ballot on page 7A
prestonhollowpeople.com
or vote online at
BY BRADFORD PEARSON Staf Writer
Same song, different verse.
Highland Park officials expect additional delays in the Town Hall reno- vation process, as issues with temporary loca- tions for communication equipment and office space have cropped up. Officials have had dif- ficulty coordinating the seven different vendors needed to relocate the Department of Public Safety’s communication
apparatus, DPS Chief Chris Vinson said during Monday’s Town Council meeting, possibly delay- ing its relocation by 60 to 90 days. It was scheduled for Dec. 8.
The dispatch center will be housed in tem- porary contai ners, to be stored at the town’s maintenance facility on Holland Avenue.
“I think, when this is completed, we’re going to look at these as the dark days,” Vinson told the council.
The $14.3 million proj- ect has been delayed over the course of the past year, as council members and staffers have explored the ins and outs of vari-
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT Staf Writer
It’s hard to think of a more American-sounding restaurant than Liberty Burger. But Highland Park
Hi gh School graduate Mariel Street traces her patriotic patties’ roots to the South Pacific.
Mariel, the only daugh- ter of famed Dallas restau- rateur Gene Street, was a Peace Corps volunteer in Vanuatu, where her father woul d send her dehy- drated hamburgers. The nati ves enj oyed them so much, Mariel
started thinking about how to improve upon the all- American classic. While you might think getting into the family business would be a good thing, Gene wasn’t too keen on the idea of his daughter following in his footsteps. “My whole life my dad’s been trying to talk me out of it,” she said. “But I always came back to it. It’s
in my blood. It’s how I was raised, and there’s nothing else I’d rather do.” Gene worried about the long hours and lack of holi- days that come standard with the restaurant life.
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT Staf Writer
Although a jury handed down $9.2 million in dam- ages against the Episcopal School of Dal l as i n September, the plaintiffs are now seeking only $6.7 million.
“Rarely do you get a judgment for the entire amount of the verdict,” sai d at t orney Charl a Aldous, who represents the Doe family.
John Doe, Jane Doe, and Jane Doe II sued ESD for damages related to history teacher John Nathan Campbell’s sexual relationship with Jane Doe II and her subse-
quent separation from the school.
Judge D’Metria Benson heard a variety of motions related to the final judg- ment and s anct i ons against ESD on Nov. 10, but deferred ruling on any of them until a later date. Fi f t een at t or neys, including a handful of newly acquired appel- late counsel from Haynes & Boone, attended the hearing on behalf of ESD. The school sought to have the judgment thrown out entirely, but offered an award of about $3 million should its first request fail.
ESD attorney George Bramblett urged Benson to delay ruling on the plaintiffs’ proposed sanc- tions against Locke, Lord, Bissell & Liddell.
BY BRADFORD PEARSON Staf Writer
On April 6, 2010, Will Seale sat in his University Park home, brainstorming ways to raise money for Highland Park schools. The di stri ct needed
more revenue streams, he knew, to combat the effects of Robin Hood.
“And then I thought, ‘Gosh, we should get our own license plate,’ ” he recalled. “Those things will sell like crazy.” Two days later, while watching the news, he saw that Southlake Carroll had just announced its license plate. The race for a “Go Scots” plate was on. After 18 months of fina-
gling, applying, and design- ing, Highland Park ISD will finally have its own custom license plate, avail- able to the public in May. The plate was designed by
2011 Highland Park grad Catherine Taylor, and will cost drivers $55 per year. The district receives a 10
COMMUNITY
UP hatches ideas for chicken laws [ 5A ]
COMMENTARY
Fans will heal in time for Opening Day [ 5A ]
SPORTS
Scots roll into
second round [ 1B ]
FRI DAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 CELEBRATI NG 30 YEARS VOL. 31, I SSUE 46
ONE DOLLAR
Town Hall
Redo Hits
New Snag
Temporary
space proves
hard to find
See PLATES, Page 14A
Support Scots
Via Your Plates Specialty tags
to be available
by next spring
WANT ONE?
If you’d like to be notifi ed when the Highland Park license plate
becomes available for sale in May, visit myplates.com/go/hp
and enter your email address.
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Mariel Street followed in her dad’s footsteps against his wishes.
Quest For a Better Burger Bonds Family
Street’s children
ring in opening
of Liberty cafe
VO
TE!
Find your ballot on page 7A
parkcitiespeople.com
or vote online at
See TOWN HALL, Page 14A
Ruling Deferred
On ESD Damages Judge mulling
Does’ request
for sanctions
See ESD, Page 2A
See LIBERTY, Page 14A
CLASS 4A STATE CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIP
BY CHUCK COX Staf Writer
R
OUND ROCK — Anot her week, another 13th state championship.
S e v e n d a y s a f t e r Highland Park’s tennis team captured its record 13th Class 4A title, the Lady Scots grabbed cross country state champion- ship No. 13 on a windy but pleasant Saturday morn- ing at Old Settlers Park. Hi ghl and Park’s gi rl s already owned the record
for most state titles. Without a single senior runner, the Lady Scots also repeated as Class 4A state champions. The Running Scots, meanwhile, finished in 10th place. Both teams won Class 4A Region II titles to advance to state. However, the outcome was still in doubt after the unofficial results were posted.
“ It comes down t o team,” Highland Park girls coach Jerry Sutterfield
LADY SCOTS DEFEND TITLE
PHOTOS: ERICH SCHLEGEL
Gabrielle Crank and Becky Ketch embrace as the Highland Park girls celebrate their victory at the state cross country meet Saturday.
Girls cruise to victory without any seniors or top-10 runners
See SCOTS, Page 4A
Mary Beth Hamilton’s time of 11:42 — the best of any Highland Park
Lady Scots runner — put her in 14th place at Saturday’s race.
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TREE TRIMMING
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Intro to Bridge
First Lesson Is Free!
Starting March 2nd
(8 Wks) 10:00am - 12:00pm
Play-N-Learn
Tuesdays & Saturdays
10:00am - 12:00pm
Mini-Lesson at 9:30am
New Playes Welcome!
Want to learn more?
Bidding, play and defense
courses offered for all levels.
Want to play bridge?
BAND has daily games
for all levels of players.
~ Social & Duplicate ~
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE
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12250 INWOOD RD. SUITE 8,
DALLAS, TX 75244 * 972.960.6700
info@bridgeacademyofnorthdallas.com
And ToTo 2
Petsitting
andtoto2.com
214-263-5104
References Provided
Mark Williamson
Arborist
Consultation/Diagnosis
(214) 317-1862
ISA# TX - 0995
www.NorthTexasArborist.com
Love to Entertain?
Great at sales?
Part time commission ad sales
Contactus@EntertaininginDallas.com
Experience preferred
BERETTA EELL
20 Gauge - English Stock
Over/Under
New in Box $6,500.00
214-704-0608
Longstreet Interior Design
Give your home a “Face Lift”
by using your own furniture/
accessories, re-arranged and
coordinated to give you an
entirely professional new look.
Call 214-333-3593
Ruth Taylor Estate Sales
Saturday and Sunday
Feb. 12 - 13, 2011
9:30am to 5:00pm
6911 MeadowRd. • Dallas 75230
Mapsco 25L
*Be Aware City Parking Signs
on Meadow*
RuthTaylorEstateSales.com
CEDAR CREEK
LAKE
126A W. MAIN STREET
GUN BARREL CITY, TX 75156
CEDAR CREEK LAKE (903) 887-5658
DALLAS METRO (972) 287-3047
T 123
$300,000 #62395
Superb 3/2/2 lake escape on open water offers open and spa-
cious foor plan, all season roomperfect for second living area,
gameroom, or huge bedroom, brick WBFP, and breakfast room.
Breathtaking water view, private boathouse with two lifts.
$599,000 #62495
Remarkable 4/3/2 on exceptional lot with 220 ft. waterfrontage.
Very private, open living/dining concept, tile foors, granite
counters, raised covered wood deck, stone frepit, manicured
grounds, and superb boathouse with extra PWC lift and top deck.
“Serving Cedar Creek Lake
and Surrounding Areas for
over 25 Years”
www.mcateerealty.com
Back House / Garage Apt.
Highland Park grad,
back in town after college.
No pets.
Stable and dependable.
Jonathan, 214-212-0679
WindowCraft
Largest Selection
Lowest Prices
Call for FREE estimate
940/726-5008
www.windowcraft.biz
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February is
National Heart
Awareness
Month
Choose red. Red lipstick. Red dress. Eat
a red apple, tomato, or cherry. Go red
any way you want. Make a pledge to let
February be the month that you begin
living and maintaining a more heart-
healthy lifestyle. Promise to do something
heart-healthy for the ones you love.
Currently, nearly eight million women
in the U.S. are living with heart disease,
yet only one in six women believe heart
disease is her greatest health threat. In
fact, 90 percent of women have one or
more risk factors for developing heart
disease. February is filled with educational
events and activities, and is geared to
educate everyone, regardless of age, in the
local community about the effects of heart
disease and stroke. Go Red for Women
is nationally sponsored by Macy’s and
Merck, and locally sponsored in North
Texas by Texas Health Resources. For local
information please visit www.heart.org/ northtexasgoesred.
Go Red for Women is the American Heart
Association’s movement that celebrates
the energy, passion and power of women to
band together and wipe out heart disease.
The cornerstone of this movement is the
Go Red for Women Luncheon Event,
an empowering event that focuses on
preventing heart disease and stroke by
promoting healthy lifestyles and raising
money to support awareness, education
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W
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Reasons to Make It Your Mission Heart disease and stroke are the greatest health threats to women
of all ethnic backgrounds, but only 21 percent realize it.
Consider these facts:
• Heart disease is still the No. 1 killer of women age 20 and older, killing about

one woman every minute. • More women die of cardiovascular disease than the next four causes of death

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cardiovascular disease. • Ninety percent of women have one or more risk factors for


developing heart disease. • Eighty percent of cardiac events in women could be prevented if women

made the right choices for their hearts involving diet, exercise and abstinence

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• Hispanic women are likely to develop heart disease 10 years


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• African-American females are at greater risk and have higher death rates

from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases than white

females.
SPECIAL CONTENT OVERVIEW 2012
SCHOOLS & EDUCATION
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affluent,educatedreaderswhoplacehigh
importanceontheeducationoftheirchildren.
•60%ofourreadershaveschool-agedchildrenat
home.
•AppearsinPark Cities People, Preston Hollow
PeopleandOak Clif People.
Issue Dates: Jan.13,Sept.14,Oct.5,Nov.2
PARK CITIES FOOTBALL TAB
•Sectionwillintroduce2012players,schedule,
andgame-by-gameanalysisofwhattoexpectas
theScotspushforanotherstatetitle.
•InsertedintoPark Cities Peopleandalsodistributed
attheScotsfrsthomegame.
Issue Date: Aug.31
12Beautiful
Bouquets
p.5
Creative
CakeToppers
p.11
Bridesmaid
GiftIdeas
p.16
I Do!
Picture
Perfect
Dallas' BestStudio
Photographers
p.3
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ParkCitiesPeople
PrestonHollowPeople
I DO!
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Issue Date: Oct.26

PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM FEBRUARY 27, 2012 | 1B
H ome s & Desig n
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
W
h a t d o
you do if
you’re an
a d mi r e r
of old-world French architec-
ture, but the demands of your
burgeoning Dallas-area busi-
ness have kept you fromever
visiting European soil?
Rather thantouring famous
castles abroad, Joel Anderson
decided to build one of his
own.
Located on the heavily traf-
ficked intersection of Preston
Road and Waggoner Drive,
it’s hard to miss the home’s
signature white turret peak-
ing out into the skyline.
Anderson and his wife, Lana,
have been building the home
for two years and moved in
the day before Thanksgiving.
The timing was perfect.
“We were so thankful to
God,” Lana said.
When the pair acquired
the property, the plan was to
make a French, formal home
withas muchEuropean—and
as little American —influence
as possible. Inspired by the
chateaus of the 1500s, Joel
went to work.
“I wanted something as old
as I could make it and still be
new,” he said. “I didn’t want
American traditional.”
Joel, who owns two gold-
and silver-exchange jew-
elry stores in Frisco and
Richardson, has a penchant
for making the old look new
again. He also has a pref-
erence when it comes to
precious metals. Although
French style predicates gold,
Joel didn’t want to make
that a theme throughout the
home. He limited its influ-
ence to one powder room on
the first floor. The rest of the
home uses silver accents.
Bon Appetit!
TuckedawayinaFrenchturretedlandmark isa
kitchensograndit would’vemadeJuliaChildcry
REAL ESTATE • FURNISHINGS • LANDSCAPING • REMODELING • ENTERTAINING • ANTIQUES
TheKitchenEdition Shopping
PHOTOS: CHRISTINA BARANY
A stainles steel gourmet stove features two ovens, three sets of burners and turbo exhaust fan concealed by ornate cabinetry.
Fleuron accents and a darkwood dining set are so, so
French. C’est magnifique!
MIDEASTFLAIR
Doessunsetchaseyoufromyouroasis?
GardenlanternsfromBarthHomeatThe
PlazaatPrestonCentercanhelp lightup
theway. Page4B
Architecture
OUTDOORART
Someofthebiggestandmostexpensive
pursuitsamongcollectorsneverseethe
insideofahouse. Page6B
See KITCHENS, Page 8B
P E OPLE’S CHOICE RUNNER UP 201 1
HOMES & DESIGN
•Reachthemostaffluentreaderswho
havethemeanstopurchasethefnestinhomes,
furnishings,andhome-relatedservices.
•Publishedfourtimesayear,andinsertedintoPark
Cities People, Preston Hollow PeopleandOak Clif
People.
Issue Dates: Feb.17,May18,Sept.21,
Nov.9
CAMPS
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readers,whosendtheirchildrentothefnest
campsavailable.
•InsertedintoPark Cities People, Preston Hollow
PeopleandOak Clif People
Issue Dates: Feb.24,March30,April20
PARTNERS CARD
•BeapartoftheoffcialsectionofTheFamily
Place’sPartner’sCard.
•ThissectioneducatesreadersofTheFamily
Place’smissionandshowcaseslocalshops
participatingintheyear’sfundraiser.
•InsertedintoPark Cities People, Preston Hollow
PeopleandOak Clif People,
Issue Date: Oct.19
AARON BROTHERS ART & FRAMING
BAG’N BAGGAGE*
BETWEEN SCENE*
BIJOUX*
BLINC*
COLLECTORS COVEY*
GAP*
GAPKIDS*
GIGI’S CUPCAKES*
HAUTE BABY*
HIATUS SPA + RETREAT*
SHOP INWOODVILLAGE DURING
PARTNERS CARDWEEK
October 28 - November 6, 2011
*The Partners Card is available for purchase at any of these
Inwood Village stores for $60 and entitles the cardholder to a 20%
discount at more for a ten-day period - October 28 - November 6, 2011.
Inwood Village is a proud supporter
of TheFamilyPlaceandencourages
you to shop at these unique stores
and receive 20% off when you use
your Partners Card.
WƆɄIOVERSɄƎɄINWOODɄƌɄDAIIASɄƌɄINWOODVIIIAGEƆCOM
JOHNNY RODRIGUEZ
LE CREUSET*
MARY CATES & CO.*
PAPER & CHOCOLATE*
RICH HIPPIE*
RIGHT START*
ST. BERNARD SPORTS*
SUSAN SAFFRON FINE JEWELRY*
TURTLETIQUE*
find us follow us
lMCREDlBLE EYEWEAR * DEPEMDABLE EYECARE
SPECIAL PARTNERS CARD HOURS!
OPEN SUNDAY 10/30 & 11/6
12-4PM
10/28 Chanel
10/29 Theo/Kirk Originals
10/31 Mykita
11/01 IC! Berlin
11/02 Orgreen
11/03 Anne et Valentin
11/04 PARTNER’S CARD, ART SHOW, &
10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY!!
6 - 9 PM
Oliver Peoples / Paul Smith / Mykita
11/05 Barton Perreira

2
0
%
*

O
F
F

W
I
T
H

P
A
R
T
N
E
R
S

C
A
R
D
o
cto
b
e
r 2
8
- n
o
ve
m
b
e
r 6
Now accepting most major
vision insurances!
*Some restrictions apply. Not valid with insurance.
2504 Codor Springs º 214.º53.3º3Z
www.uptownvisiondallas.com
2011
TRUNK SHOW
LINEUP
UPTOWN VISION
Dr. Bill Henderson,
Optometrist
On the heels of raising a record-breaking $1 million in 2010, The Family Place is ready for Partners Card 2011 to make a
difference in thousands of lives again this year. Use your $60 Partners Card during the 10-day shopping extravaganza for a
20-percent discount at more than 750 shops and restaurants in the greater Dallas area. One hundred percent of proceeds
fromthe sale of Partners Cards directly benefit The Family Place and offer life-saving shelter and support for victims of
family violence. Since its launch in 1993, Partners Card has become the largest fundraiser for The Family Place, raising
more than$11 millionfor NorthTexas’ longest serving family violence agency. For more information, call the Partners Card
Hotline at 214-443-7754, email partnerscard@familyplace.org, or visit partnerscard.org.
What a
Difference
A Card
Makes!
Partners Card
PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM OCTOBER 28, 2011 | 7A
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PARENTING
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PeopleandOak Clif People.
Issue Dates: March16,June8,Aug.10,
Dec.14
N
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IN
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2
SUMMER ACTIVITY GUIDE
• Thissectionwillhighlightthebestplacesfor
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Issue Date: July13
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Social Season
PEOPLENEWSPAPERS.COM OCTOBER 28, 2011 | 1B
DOUBLE
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ParkCities’
AnneMurtha
donsgownsfor
twoballs 2B
JuniorLeaguetomark90years 6B
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Issue Dates: Feb.10,Aug.31
PEOPLE’S CHOICE
•FromOctobertoDecemberreaders
votedontheirfavoriterestaurants,shops,people
andplaces.Thisissuewillshowcasethewinners
ineachcategory.
•AppearsinPark Cities People, Preston Hollow People
andOak Clif People.
Issue Date: Jan.27
CRYSTAL CHARITY BALL
•Effectivelyreachourreadersthroughthissectionwhich
supportsoneofDallas’mostprestigiouscommunity
serviceprojects,TheCrystalCharityBall.
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children’sorganizations.
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societysections.
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People.
Issue Date: Dec. 7
PEOPLENEWSPAPERS.COM DECEMBER 2, 2011 | 1B
Cr ystal Char i t y Ball
ETIQUETTE 101
Howtomake the most
of your ball experience
Jeanne Prejean offers tips on
howto dress and prepare
PAGE 4B
most
rience
tips on
pare
SILENT AUCTION
‘Priceless’ items on
the blockfor charity
Win coaching fromNBAstars
or a real breakfast at Tiffany’s
PAGE 8B
750NORTHST.PAULSTREET•SUITE2100•DALLAS,TX75201•PH:214.739.2244•FAX:214.594.5779
WWW.PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM•WWW.PRESTONHOLLOWPEOPLE.COM•WWW.OAKCLIFFPEOPLE.COM
Schools&Education
People’sChoice
TheSocialSeason
Homes&Design
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SummerActivityGuide
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PCFootballTAB
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January13
January27
February10
February17
February24
March16
March30
April20
May4
May18
June8
July13
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September14
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October5
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November2
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Formaterialdeadlines,seemechanicalrequirements.
PleasenotethatbecauseweuseadifferentprinterforIDo!,thedeadlinesdonotmatchthedeadliensforallotherspecailsections.
GIFTS & GREETINGS
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Greetingsgivesreadersacomprehensivelookat
wheretogo,whattodo,andwhattobuythis
holidayseason.
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PeopleandOak Clif People
Issue Date: Nov.23
December30,2011
January13
January27
February3
February10
March2
March16
April6
April9
May4
May25
June29
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December14
SOCIETY SECTIONS OVERVIEW2012
Park Cities People PrestonHollowPeople
750NORTHST.PAULSTREET•SUITE2100•DALLAS,TX75201•PH:214.739.2244•FAX:214.594.5779
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CATTLE BARON’S BALL
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Issue Date: October26
Social Season
PEOPLENEWSPAPERS.COM OCTOBER 28, 2011 | 1B
DOUBLE
DIP
ParkCities’
AnneMurtha
donsgownsfor
twoballs 2B
JuniorLeaguetomark90years 6B
Idlewildpreparesfor124thball 7B
DOUBLE
DIP
10 BEST DRESSED
•SectiondistributedatPatronPartytheevening
beforethe10BestDressedLuncheon.
Issue Date: September7
THE SOCIAL SEASON
•Areviewofthe2012societyseason.
Issue Date: February10,August31
CRYSTAL CHARITY BALL
•Fundsrasiedfromthiseventbeneftsevenlocal
chidren’sorganizations.
•SectionincludedinTheCrystalCharityBallpressbags
distributedbythevalets.
Issue Date: December7
PEOPLENEWSPAPERS.COM DECEMBER 2, 2011 | 1B
Cr ystal Char i t y Ball
ETIQUETTE 101
Howtomake the most
of your ball experience
Jeanne Prejean offers tips on
howto dress and prepare
PAGE 4B
most
rience
tips on
pare
SILENT AUCTION
‘Priceless’ items on
the blockfor charity
Win coaching fromNBAstars
or a real breakfast at Tiffany’s
PAGE 8B
SocietycoveragewillappearinPark Cities People and.Preston Hollow People
Totalcirculation:20,616
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$576
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PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM FEBRUARY 27, 2012 | 1B
H ome s & Desig n
BY CLAIRE ST. AMANT
Staf Writer
W
h a t d o
you do if
you’re an
a d mi r e r
of old-world French architec-
ture, but the demands of your
burgeoning Dallas-area busi-
ness have kept you fromever
visiting European soil?
Rather thantouring famous
castles abroad, Joel Anderson
decided to build one of his
own.
Located on the heavily traf-
ficked intersection of Preston
Road and Waggoner Drive,
it’s hard to miss the home’s
signature white turret peak-
ing out into the skyline.
Anderson and his wife, Lana,
have been building the home
for two years and moved in
the day before Thanksgiving.
The timing was perfect.
“We were so thankful to
God,” Lana said.
When the pair acquired
the property, the plan was to
make a French, formal home
withas muchEuropean—and
as little American —influence
as possible. Inspired by the
chateaus of the 1500s, Joel
went to work.
“I wanted something as old
as I could make it and still be
new,” he said. “I didn’t want
American traditional.”
Joel, who owns two gold-
and silver-exchange jew-
elry stores in Frisco and
Richardson, has a penchant
for making the old look new
again. He also has a pref-
erence when it comes to
precious metals. Although
French style predicates gold,
Joel didn’t want to make
that a theme throughout the
home. He limited its influ-
ence to one powder room on
the first floor. The rest of the
home uses silver accents.
Bon Appetit!
Tucked away in a French turreted landmark is a
kitchen so grand it would’ve made Julia Child cry
REAL ESTATE • FURNISHINGS • LANDSCAPING • REMODELING • ENTERTAINING • ANTIQUES
TheKitchenEdition Shopping
PHOTOS: CHRISTINA BARANY
A stainles steel gourmet stove features two ovens, three sets of burners and turbo exhaust fan concealed by ornate cabinetry.
Fleuron accents and a darkwood dining set are so, so
French. C’est magnifique!
MIDEAST FLAIR
Doessunsetchaseyoufromyouroasis?
GardenlanternsfromBarthHomeatThe
PlazaatPrestonCentercanhelp lightup
theway. Page4B
Architecture
OUTDOOR ART
Someofthebiggestandmostexpensive
pursuitsamongcollectorsneverseethe
insideofahouse. Page6B
See KITCHENS, Page 8B
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CAMPS 2012
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PARKCI TI ESPEOPLE.COM
APRIL 1, 2011 | 13A
The Me n’ s S o c c e r
Program at SMU would
like to invite players of all
levels who have the desire
to improve and develop
their talent within a fun
envi ronment. We are
committed to helping each
player reach their per-
sonal best through the use
of challenging instruction
and competitive games.
Located on the beautiful
campus of SMU, promis-
ing players will be given
a firsthand look of what
it is like to be a Division I
athlete at one of the finest
institutions in the country.
To ensure that we iden-
tify the individual needs of
every player, we have put
together an experienced
staff made up of some
of the best college, high
school, and club coaches
from around the country.
We ho pe t ha t y o u
choose to join us this sum-
mer!
To learn more please
visit www.smumustangs.
com/ s occer academy,
emai l smusocceracad-
emy@gmail.com or call
214-642-1738.
Soccer All Summer
MCCLEMENT’S SOCCER
SPECIAL ADVERTISING CONTENT
BY JOANNA ENGLAND
Staf Writer
P
erhaps one of the most stressful things
a parent can do is pack their child for
weeks away at camp.
For Debbie Kittleson, though, it’s the
second-most stressful.
After Kittleson went to the trouble of buy-
ing, organizing, and labeling everything for her
daughter’s two weeks at Pine Cove camp last
August, someone snatched the purple trunk
from the curb of her University Park home
minutes before the family was due to depart.
“My neighbors were a huge help,” Kittleson
said. “Within an hour and a half, we were ready
to go.”
Kittleson managed to borrow most every-
thing that was taken. And despite the circum-
stances, her daughter managed to keep her
cool.
“My daughter did not totally freak out about
not having her own things with her at camp,”
Kittleson said. “But I was a little panicked
about getting things back to people.”
One of Ki t t l eson’ s nei ghbors, Ann
Yarborough, helped her through the missing-
trunk crisis. Yarborough is not just a neighbor,
Packing
W
ithout
T
ears
After a camp trunk
goes missing, a friendly
neighborhood luggage
expert comes to the rescue
STAFF PHOTO: JOANNA ENGLAND
See PACKING, Page 16A
STAFF PHOTO: JOANNA ENGLAND
Eva Semrad, a sixth-grader at Greiner Middle School, has honed
her sewing skills during Make Shop and Studio’s summer camp
classes. She not only made her own messenger bag, but she also
crocheted her own vest (pictured).
Fashion Camp
Turns Fierce
BY JOANNA ENGLAND
Staf Writer

What if you could com-
pete on Project Runway
without the fear of being
“auf ’d”?
For campers si gned
up for Julie McCullough
Kim’s weeklong Project
Make, it’s a dream come
true — and one without the
possibility of being sent
packing with an “auf wie-
dersehen” from host Heidi
Klum.
“All of the kids love to
watch [Project Runway], so
it’s really fun to be able to
build a camp around that,”
said McCullough Kim, the
owner of Make Shop and
Studio . The camp, open to
ages 13 to 18, is challenge-
based and covers several
aspects of the fashion
industry.
If your child isn’t an
expert seamstress, don’t
get discouraged.
“Some of the kids come
in with experience, and
some of t hem don’ t ,”
McCullough Kim said, “so
we spend the first half of
the first day kind of getting
everyone on the same level
as far as sewing and their
skill set.”
Eva Semrad has always
been crafty. And while she
owned a sewing machine
before her mother, Sarah
Jane Semrad, signed her
up for a camp class at
Make, she didn’ t have
much experience using it.
But with the help of
McCul l ough Ki m, the
Greiner Middle School
sixth-grader was soon a
sewing dynamo, stitching
up everything from purses
and pouches to stuffed ani-
mals. After the class, Eva
was hooked.
“I really like making
things, so it was fun for
me,” Eva said. “I made two
bags and a pouch, but we
had time to make whatever
we wanted. I also learned
how to screen print.”
Si nce then, Eva has
taught herself how to cro-
chet and has launched
a business with a friend
repurposing oddball socks
into stuffed toys.
“I keep telling her, you
need to open your own
Etsy shop,” Sarah Jane
said.
Eva just shrugs.
For McCullough Kim,
though, the 12-year-old is
a shining example of how
Make’s summer programs
can ignite a passion for
fashion.
Project Make helps girls
live their runway dreams
See MAKE, Page 16A
After umpteen years of packing
camp trunks, Ann Yarborough has
developed a litany of do’s and don’ts
for parents new to the process.
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PARKCI TI ESPEOPLE.COM
MARCH 4, 2011 | 11A
Southern Methodist University will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, or veteran status.
SMU Summer Youth Programs bridge the gap between spring and fall with
weeklong camps in writing, technology, arts, LEGOs, math, science and more.
SMU is proud to present a summer youth camp in conjunction with the Trinity Trust
and in celebration of the October 2011 opening of the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge.
SMU Dallas, 6116 N. Central Expressway, Dallas, TX 75206
SMU-in-Plano, 5236 Tennyson Parkway, Plano, TX 75024
214.768.5437 or www.smu.edu/youth.
Future Visionaries Wanted.
Calatrava Colossal Constructors, LEGO® Mindstorms: Apprentice Droids, Battlebots, Fashion Sketching*,
LEGO Crazy Contraptions, Movie Makers, LEGO Mania, LEGO Car Rally,
CSI, Academic Enhancement*, Exploring History with American Dolls,* Allakhazam Magic
*Plano only
2011 Dallas and Plano Programs
JUNE 2006 Letter No. 1
Dear Mom and Dad, I forgot to write on you the 6th Day!
Yesterday I was O.D. Swo was Caroline!
I got 30 merrits [sic]! I got my 2nd year gift! It was a pillow! I do
every activity! The care package came with
a foam finger, smelly markers, glitter puff
ball, dog coin holder, old maid, and a wiggle
ball! I am reading Nancy Drew every day
during quiet time! Olivia Clayton from my
last year cabin got camp fire lighter! I try to
always get in front of a camera!
Love you!
Love,
Brooks
Letter No. 2
Dear Mom and Dad, I am having a great time! We have hoss
[sic] this week! I asked for a slow fat horse.
And I got what I asked for. My horse’s name
is Brownie. He is brown. We have gone on
two trails. First we went on the totem pole
trail. Then we went on Billy Boley trail.
I have finished two books. Nancy Drew:
Missing and Nancy Drew: Once Upon a
Crime. I just started reading Flush. I have
enjoyed my string a lot. Caroline, one of my
counselors, taught me how to make a really
cool bracelet. Geuss [sic] what … I made it
in to the fiesta swim! (for Backstroke)
Letters from campers are little treasures to parents
A
Q
U
IC
K
N
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B
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K
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BY JOANNA ENGLAND Staf Writer
N
ow 13, Brooks Hamilton has been attending
Camp Longhorn every summer since 2005.
Brooks’ mother, Margot Keller, admitted
sending her daughter to camp the first couple of years
“was pretty gut wrenching.”
The only thing that kept Margot from dissolving
into a pool of worry over sending her only child off
to Inks Lake was the prospect of getting letters from
Brooks describing camp life.
Besides the letters, the photos posted by counselors
every day on the Camp Longhorn website helped, too.
The camp, which focuses on building kids’ self-
esteem, has earned a loyal following. Including Margot
and Brooks, of course. “She fully intends to go for 10 years and then become
a counselor,” Margot said.
JUNE 2005 Letter No. 1
Hey mom and dad I am at camp!!!
And I am having so much fun. Today is June 19
and today I am getting a big sister after lunch chow!
I will tell you about her after lunch!
So far I have 12 chip merits!
Here is a cheer! Lets get a little bit loopy! L Oow. Oo. Woo P Y!
Thank you for the mail. I love it!
My big sis is aja. Love,
Brooks
Letter No. 2
While camp is only three weeks long, there was
such a lengthy gap between letters from her daugh-
ter, Margot decided to send a “quiz” to Brooks,
which she filled out and mailed back. Letter No. 3
Hi mommy and daddy. Dance night was awe-
some! So is camp! How are Scout and Rascal [the
family cats] doing? Like 14 boys asked me to dance. I said no to two
of them. The first one and second one.
Thank you for the book!
And do you want to know something really cool
you can write on the wall!
I love you!
Love,
Brooks
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PARENTING 2012
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FOOTBALL TAB 2012
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Scots Starting Defense
10 10 20 20 30 30 40 40 50
2011 Football Varsity Roster
#72 Tanner Stone
6-6, 255, Sr.
LT
#63/95 Barker Carlock
6-1, 191, Sr.
LG
#55 Coleman Glass
5-10, 237, Sr.
C
#51 WilliamBarns
6-2, 240, Jr.
RG
#56 Claiborne Myers
6-1, 268, Jr.
RT
#83 WilliamMorris
6-0, 153, Sr.
WR
#9 Hunter Halpin
5-8, 160, Sr.
WR
#6 Brady Burgin
6-2, 195, Sr.
QB
CB
#17 Philip Pinkston
5-9, 147, Sr.
FS
#14 Hayden Greer
6-0, 175, Jr.
SS
#5 Luke Utley
5-10, 175, Sr.
P
#29 Nick Rose
6-2, 185, Sr.
LB
#42 Guy TomKellogg
6-0, 175, Jr.
DE
#48 Thomas Perry
6-3, 210, Sr.
NG
#33 Bradfield Biggers
5-11, 186, Sr.
DE
#80 Clay Crews
6-2, 200, Sr.
CB
#30 Matt Bannon
5-11, 162, Jr.
LB
#22 Mason Shaw
5-10, 170, Sr.
LB
#43 Mac Hartley
5-10, 180, Sr.
LB
#41 Alex Andrade
5-10, 191, Sr.
#7 Preston Miller
5-8, 170, Sr.
RB
#29 Nick Rose
6-2, 185, Sr.
K
#86 Charles Hubbard
6-1, 163, Jr.
WR
#26 Dalton Stogner
6-4, 193, Sr.
WR
2011 Football Varsity Roster
Head coach: Randy Allen
Assistant coaches: Grayson Wells (assistant head
coach), Mark Howeth (defensive coordinator), Tom
Callahan (defensive line), Don Woods (secondary), Jim
Randall (linebackers), Clif Prier (kickers, secondary),
Randall Hugg (quarterbacks), Todd John (receivers),
James Farnsley (ofensive line), Jef Hale (running
backs), Tristan Webber (wide receivers), Jason Jaynes
(running backs), Charles Wheeler (linebackers).
Scots Starting Ofense
10B | AUGUST 26, 2011 PARKCI TI ESPEOPLE.COM AUGUST 26, 2011 | 11B
No. . Name .......................Class ... Pos.......Ht. ...... Wt.
2 ...... Chris Cannon................Jr............ DB .........5-11 ...... 148
2 ...... Colby Carpenter ...........Jr............ QB .........6-3....... 202
3...... David Hughes ...............Sr. .......... DB .........5-9....... 140
4...... Trevor Sullivan..............Sr. .......... DB .........5-8 ....... 152
5...... Luke Utley.....................Sr. .......... DB .........5-10 ..... 175
6 ..... Brady Burgin ................Sr. .......... QB .........6-2 ....... 195
7 ...... Preston Miller ...............Sr. .......... RB .........5-8 ....... 170
8...... Travis Alford.................Jr............ LB ..........6-0 ....... 182
8...... Jet Tuma .......................Jr............ QB .........6-2 ....... 174
9 ..... Hunter Halpin ...............Sr. .......... WR.........5-8 ....... 160
10 .... Christian Munoz............Sr. .......... DB .........6-2 ....... 154
11 ..... Scott Ellerman..............Sr. .......... QB .........6-2 ....... 173
12 .... Zach Weber..................Sr. .......... WR.........5-8 ....... 157
13.... Tyler Rentfro.................Sr. .......... QB ........6-3....... 208
14 .... Hayden Greer ...............Jr............ DB .........6-0 ....... 175
14 .... Kevin Sullivan................Jr............ WR.........5-11 ...... 155
15 .... Jack Walter...................Sr. .......... LB ..........6-0 ....... 177
16.... Reed Farmer ................Sr. .......... WR.........5-8 ....... 129
17 .... Philip Pinkston..............Sr. .......... DB .........5-9....... 147
18 .... Carter Gibson...............Sr. .......... DB .........5-10 ..... 150
19.... Will Guerriero................Sr. .......... WR.........5-10 ..... 152
20 ... Will Tillery .....................Sr. .......... LB ..........6-0 ....... 167
21 .... Luke Walter ..................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-11 ...... 155
22 .... Mason Shaw................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-10 ..... 170
23.... Charlie Mitchell .............Sr. .......... LB ..........6-1 ....... 162
24 .... Jackson Hauser............Sr. .......... RB .........5-9....... 174
25.... Costa Kell .....................Sr. .......... WR.........5-7 ....... 136
26.... Dalton Stogner .............Sr. .......... WR.........6-4 ....... 193
27 .... Chris McDade...............Sr. .......... DB .........5-8 ....... 170
28.... Stephen Modory...........Sr. .......... LB ..........5-8 ....... 186
29 ... Nick Rose.....................Sr. .......... K ............6-2 ....... 185
30 ... Matt Bannon.................Jr............ DB .........5-11 ...... 162
30 ... Mickey Landon .............Jr............ RB .........5-10 ..... 145
31 .... Alex Keeton...................Sr. .......... RB .........5-7 ....... 151
32 .... Ian Hayashi ...................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-9....... 178
33 ... Bradfield Biggers..........Sr. .......... DL..........5-11 ...... 186
34.... Nick Grant ....................Jr............ DB .........5-9....... 159
34.... Parker Nef ...................Jr............ K ............5-8 ....... 175
35 ... Andrew Richardson......Jr............ WR.........6-1 ....... 175
35 ... Ben Salinaro.................Jr............ LB ..........6-1 ....... 176
36 ... Connor England............Sr. .......... DB .........5-7 ....... 147
36 ... Michael Thomas ...........Jr............ WR.........5-10 ..... 165
37 .... Hayden Fields...............Jr............ DB .........5-9....... 160
37 .... Hank Howard ...............Jr............ RB .........5-9....... 144
38 ... Rankin Grote.................Jr............ RB .........6-1 ....... 188
38 ... Sam Landess................Jr............ RB .........6-0 ....... 184
39 ... Cash Manning...............Sr. .......... DB .........5-10 ..... 179
39 ... Parker Van Dyk.............Jr............ RB .........5-9....... 155
40 ... Greg Hise......................Sr. .......... DL..........6-1 ....... 168
41 .... Alex Andrade ................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-10 ..... 191
42 .... Guy Tom Kellogg............Jr............ LB ..........6-0 ....... 175
43 ... Mac Hartley..................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-10 ..... 180
44 ... Tony Perez....................Sr. .......... DL..........5-10 ..... 210
45 ... Hardy Davis..................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-10 ..... 182
46 ... Mason Juhl ...................Sr. .......... K ............5-10 ..... 165
46 ... Rob Williams.................Jr............ RB .........6-0 ....... 175
47 .... Mickey Bryant ..............Jr............ DB .........5-7 ....... 157
47 .... Harrison Jones.............Jr............ DL..........6-0 ....... 210
48 ... Thomas Perry...............Sr. .......... DL..........6-3....... 210
49 ... Luke Ross ....................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-10 ..... 179
49 ... Will Vanderstraaten ......Jr............ WR.........6-1 ....... 164
50 ... Jack Bjork ....................Jr............ OL..........6-0 ....... 170
50 ... Walker Shirley ..............Jr............ DL..........5-11 ...... 175
51 .... William Barns................Jr............ OL..........6-2 ....... 240
No. . Name .......................Class ... Pos.......Ht. ...... Wt.
52.... Evan Farley...................Sr. .......... DL..........6-0 ....... 220
53 ... Sam Boyd.....................Jr............ OL..........6-1 ....... 190
53 ... Gage Shorter................Jr............ DL..........6-0 ....... 190
54 ... Tim Robinson................Sr. .......... DL..........6-2 ....... 244
55 ... Coleman Glass..............Sr. .......... OL..........5-10 ..... 237
56 ... Claiborne Myers ...........Sr. .......... OL..........6-1 ....... 268
57 .... Huntington Biggers.......Jr............ DL..........5-11 ...... 200
58 ... Drew Stephens.............Sr. .......... DL..........5-9....... 209
59 ... Jordan Akiyoshi ............Jr............ OL..........5-10 ..... 171
59 ... Austin Mooney..............Jr............ DL..........6-1 ....... 189
60 ... Miller Gill .......................Jr............ OL..........6-2 ....... 180
60 ... Nick Salinaro ................Jr............ DL..........6-0 ....... 206
61 .... Jacob Sarracino...........Jr............ DL..........6-0 ....... 220
62.... Spence Feigl .................Sr. .......... LB ..........5-10 ..... 179
63 ... Barker Carlock .............Sr. .......... OL..........6-1 ....... 191
64 ... Josh Williams................Sr. .......... OL..........6-0 ....... 210
65 ... Nathan Langhenry........Jr............ DL..........5-10 ..... 155
65 ... Charlie McKenzie..........Jr............ OL..........6-3....... 210
66 ... Jonathan Fisher............Jr............ DL..........6-0 ....... 166
66 ... Hilton Kennignton..........Jr............ OL..........6-4 ....... 210
67 .... Hunter Holmes .............Jr............ K ............6-1 ....... 170
67 .... Jackson Tittle ...............Jr............ DL..........6-3....... 170
68 ... Bryce Green.................Jr............ LB ..........6-0 ....... 180
70 .... Jack Ceverha ................So. ......... DL..........5-11 ...... 186
70 .... David Greene................Jr............ DL..........6-1 ....... 195
71 .... Teddy Daniels ...............Jr............ DB .........5-8 ....... 150
71 .... Brent Jans....................Jr............ DL..........6-1 ....... 180
72.... Tanner Stone................Sr. .......... OL..........6-6....... 255
73.... Alex Dorris....................Jr............ DL..........5-10 ..... 175
74.... Henry Ceverha .............Jr............ OL..........6-3....... 245
75 .... Bennett Campbell .........Jr............ OL..........6-2 ....... 225
75 .... Brother Nastri ..............Jr............ LB ..........5-7 ....... 160
76.... Tanner Hutt...................Sr. .......... OL..........6-4 ....... 241
77 .... Ethan Beasley ..............Jr............ OL..........6-2 ....... 245
78 .... Jack Howard ................Jr............ OL..........6-1 ....... 260
78 .... Jonathan Snider ...........Jr............ LB ..........6-0 ....... 160
79.... Brooks Alexander .........Sr. .......... DL..........6-0 ....... 174
80 ... Clay Crews...................Sr. .......... DL..........6-2 ....... 200
81 .... Jordan Gargiulo ............Sr. .......... WR.........6-1 ....... 145
82.... Kase Coyle ...................Jr............ WR.........6-0 ....... 163
82.... Mark Gottsacker...........Sr. .......... DB .........5-10 ..... 175
83.... William Morris...............Sr. .......... WR.........6-0 ....... 153
85 ... Anthony Vallera ............Jr............ WR.........5-9....... 157
85 ... Russell Rice..................Jr............ DL..........5-11 ...... 195
86 ... Peter Cathey ................Jr............ DB .........5-10 ..... 168
86 ... Charles Hubbard ..........Jr............ WR.........6-1 ....... 163
87.... Hunter Feagans............Jr............ WR.........5-9....... 154
87.... John Hubbard...............Jr............ DB .........5-11 ...... 165
88 ... Jack Campbell ..............Sr. .......... WR.........5-11 ...... 163
89 ... Harrison Cooper...........Jr............ DB .........5-8 ....... 145
89 ... Greyson Fewin .............Jr............ WR.........5-9....... 130
90 ... Will Clarke.....................Sr. .......... DL..........6-1 ....... 200
91 .... Wade Browne...............Sr. .......... DL..........5-11 ...... 183
92 .... Tom Robinson...............Sr. .......... DL..........5-11 ...... 210
93 ... Will Cohn ......................Jr............ WR.........6-0 ....... 155
94 ... Matthew Hoover...........Jr............ WR.........5-10 ..... 146
94 ... Christopher Mitchell .....Jr............ LB ..........6-3....... 180
95 ... Barker Carlock .............Sr. .......... OL/TE.....6-1 ....... 191
96 ... Michael Barnes.............Jr............ WR.........6-0 ....... 163
96 ... Austin Bertrand............Jr............ DB .........5-8 ....... 161
97 .... Songbo Cao..................Jr............ DL..........6-0 ....... 176
98 ... Dylan Thompson...........Jr............ LB ..........6-1 ....... 200
99 ... Robert Graham.............Jr............ LB ..........6-0 ....... 180
99 ... William Hubbard ...........Jr............ WR.........5-10 ..... 130
2011 Highland Park Football
T
h
e
B
r
a
d
y

B
u
n
c
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Quarterback Brady Burgin leads a bunch of returning starters
PARKCI TI ESPEOPLE.COM
AUGUST 26, 2011 | 7B
h|ChLAN0 PARK
8P0RT8 6LUß
Funds raised by membership dues and other activities are used to make gifts of athletic and related equip-
ment to the Highland Park Independent School District, as well as contributions to the three scholarship funds
managed by the Sports Club; the Doak Walker Scholarship, Christianne Beshara and Past-HPSC Presidents
Scholarship available for individual students based on need and the Ronnie Marks Scholarship available for
the children of coaches.
Highland Park Sports Club is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Your contribution is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.
2011-2012 h|ChLAN0 PARK 8P0RT8 6LUß BLUE - $75 SILVER - $150 GOLD - $300 NAME:
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OPPONENT/DATE
CAPSULE
PREVIEW
Friday, Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m. at WYLIE PIRATES
Friday, Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m. at PEARCE MUSTANGS
Friday, Oct. 21, 7:30 p.m. McKINNEY NORTH
BULLDOGS
Friday, Oct. 28, 7:30 p.m. at ROCKWALL-HEATH
HAWKS
Friday, Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m. McKINNEY LIONS
Head coach: Bill Howard 2010 record: 11-4 (5-2) Returning starters: 9 (3 off., 6 def.) 2010 vs. HP: SCOTS 24, Wylie 21 Series: HP leads, 13-0
Head coach: Randy Robertson 2010 record: 4-7 (3-4) Returning starters: 9 (2 off., 7 def.) 2010 vs. HP: SCOTS 35, Pearce 28 Series: HP leads, 11-4
Head coach: Mike Fecci 2010 record: 5-5 (3-4) Returning starters: 10 (6 off., 4 def.) 2010 vs. HP: SCOTS 49, McKinney North 0 Series: HP leads, 3-0
Head coach: Mickey Moss 2010 record: 5-5 (2-5) Returning starters: 15 (7 off., 8 def.) 2010 vs. HP: SCOTS 49, Heath 21 Series: HP leads, 4-1
Head coach: Jeff Smith 2010 record: 4-6 (3-4) Returning starters: 9 (4 off., 5 def.) 2010 vs. HP: SCOTS 42, McKinney 24 Series: HP leads, 25-5
Wylie came very close to beating Highland Park for the first time in 13 tries last season, dropping a
tough 24-21 decision at Highlander Stadium. It turned out there was a good reason the Pirates played
the Scots so tough. Wylie made it all the way to the Class 4A Division I state semifinals before losing to
Denton Ryan, 25-20. ... The Pirates were hit hard by graduation on offense. Wylie will have just three
starters back on that side of the ball.
It’s been tough sledding for Pearce against its biggest rival, Highland Park. The Mustangs have not
beaten the Scots since 2001, although they played Highland Park to within seven points, 35-28,
last season. ... Like Wylie, Pearce was decimated by graduation on offense. Head coach Randy
Robertson’s team will have only two starters returning on offense, but Pearce has seven starters
back on defense. ... Former Pearce assistant Brandon Hickman is the new head coach at Jesuit.
After starting off district play with a 3-1 record last season, McKinney North could not manage another
win in the final three weeks. As a result, the Bulldogs missed out on the playoffs. ... Running back Devin
Smith is one of six returning starters on offense for McKinney North, rushing for 919 yards and 10 TD’s
last year. ... McKinney North was the only team Highland Park shut out last season, rolling past the
Bulldogs, 49-0. ... With 1,446 students, McKinney North is the smallest school in District 10-4A.
Rockwall-Heath saw its run of consecutive playoff appearances halted at two last season. The
Hawks never could re-gain their footing after starting the season with four straight wins. Heath lost
five out of six to close the season including three losses by a combined 10 points. ... The Hawks are
the last team to beat Highland Park in a district contest. In 2008, Heath closed the regular season
with a 38-31 overtime win over the Scots to end Highland Park’s district winning streak at 45.
McKinney is coming off a down year in which the Lions struggled with consistency. Still, head coach
Jeff Smith’s team had some solid outings, including a three-point loss to Wylie. ... Dual-threat junior
quarterback Robert Somborn is back after throwing for 1,372 yards and 14 touchdowns and rushing
for 281 yards and five touchdowns in 2010. He is one of four starters back on offense. The Lions have
four returning starters on defense, including LB Marquez Husband, who had 103 tackles last season.
Ask about
Park Cities People
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Schools & Education
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SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 | 9A
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MATH REVIEW
Tues., Sept. 20 - 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.
If you could go back in
time and tell your teenage
self that she would end up
working at Providence,
what would she say? I
knew I wanted to be a
teacher, and I knew I
loved Providence, but I
wouldn’t have thought
that I would have taught
there.

Since your days at
Providence, what has
changed the most? The
campus has changed and
expanded for the better as
we now have a permanent
campus, a new gym, and
fifth-through-eighth-
grade classrooms all in
the same area. When I
attended Providence, we
met at a Jewish synagogue
on Walnut Hill Lane — a
place the school was
renting at the time.
What hasn’t changed at all?
In Class Three, nothing
has changed, and I love
that aspect. The tried-
and-true curriculum at
Providence has remained
the same. The leadership
has also remained
wonderful.
What’s it like to work
alongside the people who
taught you? It’s so sweet
to see so many faces
have remained the same.
Initially, it was so hard
calling them by their first
names. It’s wonderful
having those wise
individuals who poured
into me as my co-workers
and peers.

What’s your favorite
memory of being a student
at Providence? I have
several favorite memories:
1. The eighth-grade trip to
Washington, D.C., was one
of my highlights.
2. Mrs. Koons — who
taught me in fourth,
seventh, and eighth grades
— brought life to literature
and history.
3. My closest friends
to this day are friends
I made in third grade
at Providence, my first
year at the school.
Those friendships have
blossomed over the years.
4. Finally, I was Tom
Sawyer in the fifth-grade
play.
How are today’s students
different from you and
your peers? Life was not
as busy as it is for my
students today.
What’s the biggest
advantage of working at
your old school?
I am familiar with the
classical Christian
curriculum because
it’s based on tried-and-
true methods. Also, I
am familiar with the
mission of the school,
which is to provide
intelligent students with
a challenging education
to help them know, love,
and practice that which is
true, good, and excellent,
and to prepare them to
live purposefully and
intelligently in the service
of God and others.

What’s the biggest
disadvantage of working
at your old school? I can’t
think of anything, because
I have the world’s best job.
Megan Turner
Employer/alma mater: Providence Christian School
Position: Class Three teacher
Year she graduated: Providence goes through eighth
grade, and I graduated from there in 1999.
STAFF PHOTO: CHRIS MCGATHEY
BACK IN
CLASS
About This Section
Megan Turner has a unique perspective
at Providence Christian School. She’s
the only member of the faculty who was
once a student there. At the other end
of the spectrum are Jesuit — which has
35 alumni on staff, including principal
Tom Garrison — and its sister school,
Ursuline, which employs more than 20
alumnae, including president Margaret
Ann Moser. We asked teachers and
administrators from several campuses
to discuss what’s it like to work at one’s
alma mater.
BACK IN
CLASS
ALUMNI TEACHERS MAKE THE GRADE
ALUMNI TEACHERS MAKE THE GRADE
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SCHOOLS & EDUCATION 2012
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ABOUT THIS SECTION: At a
public school in a small town,
it’s not uncommon for teachers
to see two generations of
the same family. But in those
cases, attendance is dictated
by geography, and there is no
charge for children to enroll.
Urban private schools are
another matter. A graduate
who opts to pay tuition so her
children can attend her old
school must have a strong
affection for her alma mater.
To find out why, we talked to
several such families.
FA
M
ILY
L
E
G
A
C
Y
A NEW GENERATION
OF SCHOOL TRADITION
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Hockaday graduate Jenna Woodberry has sent all four of her daughters — Haley, Abby, Margaret, and Emma — to her alma mater.
HOCKADAY SCHOOL
W
hen Haley Woodberry
walks into the Hockaday
School’s graduation this
spring, something will
set her apart from the majority of her
classmates.
It probably won’t be her college of
choice or her GPA, or the city she grew
up in. It will be the color of her gradu-
ation cap.
While most of her classmates will
don white caps, decorated with their
favorite flowers, Woodberry, 17, will
rock a blue number.
“It’s really cool actually,” she said.
“There are a lot of legacy traditions at
Hockaday, and wearing your mom’s
hat is one of them.”
Since Woodberry’s mother, Jenna,
graduated from the school in 1982,
the hat is all hers. And since Haley
has three other siblings coming up
through the Hockaday ranks — Emma,
in ninth grade, Margaret, in fifth grade,
and Abby, in kindergarten — the hat
will presumably get a lot of use in the
next 12 years.
Jenna didn’t have the same kind of
legacy that her daughters now hold.
Raised in Harlingen, Texas, she was
a boarder at Hockaday, after spend-
ing time at a private school in Indiana.
Her aunt and three cousins attended
the school, so she was drawn to Dallas.
After graduation and college, she knew
she wanted her daughters to have the
same experience.
“They really strive there to bring
the class together, and have each girl
appreciate each other girl’s differ-
ences,” Jenna said. “It’s appreciated
instead of ‘Oh, she’s different, so I don’t
need to be around her.’ They encour-
age the girls.”
In addition to the family legacy,
Jenna has also passed down some of
her old teachers. History teacher Steve
Kramer, she said, started at Hockaday
the same year she did, and eventually
taught Haley.
“They stay around a long time, and
they’re just great, inspirational lead-
ers,” Jenna said.
Haley said that continuity — and her
mother’s experience at the school —
has helped during the hard times.
“Even when were having one of
those days where we don’t really like
Hockaday, it’s nice to have someone
who knows what we’re going through,”
she said. “There’s someone who can
tell us it’s worth it.”
— Bradford Pearson
W
oodberry Girls Take Root at Hockaday
After boarding at Hockaday, the former Jenna Brasch has
turned the all-girls school into a home away from home.
One after another, Daisies keep sprouting from single household
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OCTOBER 7, 2011 | 1B
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PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM NOVEMBER 4, 2011 | 11A
s c h o o l
Greenhill
Find out more and RSVP:
www.greenhill.org admission@greenhill.org
972-628-5910
Join us for an Admission Preview
and see what sets Greenhill apart.
Middle School (5th–8th)
Saturday, Nov 5, 9 am – 12 pm
Upper School (9th–12th)
Saturday, Nov 12, 9 am – 12 pm
Love learning.
WHYDIDYOUWANT TO
REPRESENT THE SCHOOL
THIS WAY?
Patrick Garvin: I sawthe
guys last year, and what
they would do. Howthey
performat pep rallies, and
I thought, “I want to do
that.”
Chris Smith: My
personality has always
been real outgoing and
performance-based.
I’ve always been kind of
goofy, so this really fits my
personality.
WHAT IS YOUR
TRADEMARK?
Patrick: Definitely the
skits. I guess it’s just the
school spirit. We are the
guys that have the most
school spirit.
Chris: Most people
recognize us as Scotsmen.
WHAT IS IT LIKE TOBE A
SCOTSMAN?
Patrick: It’s a lot of work.
Monday through Friday,
me and the guys, we meet
at my house. Most days
we meet from7 to 11 p.m.
So it is a lot of work, but
the reward outweighs
the work. Performing our
skits, and being out there
in front of the students
and hearing themlaugh. is
awesome.
WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PERK
TOBEINGASCOTSMAN?
Patrick: The commitment
to the school during the
pep rally. We do five-to-
10-minute skits in front of
the entire student body.
Like I said, it’s a lot of
work, but it’s worth it.
WHAT’S THE FUNNIEST/
MOST AWKWARDTHING
THAT HAS HAPPENEDTO
YOUAS SCOTSMEN?
Patrick: I would say, pretty
much, everything that the
Scotsmen do, compared to
an average person, would
be awkward.
Chris: Any moment where
we’re trying to be funny
and we’re not.
MASCOT
MEMORIES
Schools & Educat ion
Schoolmascotsstealthesceneatgamesandpeprallies. Theyarethevoiceofastudentbody, adiversion
duringdowntime, andanambassadorandsymbolforcampuses. Buthaveyoueverwonderedwhen
HighlandParkHighSchoolbecamethe“FightingScots?”OrmaybeyouwerepuzzledbyUrsuline
Academy’sbearmascot?WhydidtheEpiscopalSchoolofDallaschooseaneagle?AndwhoisParish’s
PetePanther? Readontolearnmoreaboutthesemascotsandthestudentswhofilltheircostumes.
Highland Park High School
H
ighland Park High School’s Fighting Scot
first appeared in 1949. Before that, the mas-
cot was a Scottish terrier. In fact, Highlander
Stadiumused to sport a picture of such a dog outside.
The powers-that-be decided to change the official
mascot froma “Scottie” to a “Scot” and then later to a
“Fighting Scot.” The Scotsmen are the school’s spirit
leaders who run the flags down the field after touch-
downs. They also perform skits during pep rallies.
Potential Scotsmen are interviewed by faculty and
students, who judge them on leadership, character,
and academic achievements. Those who pass that
portion do a video skit, which is voted on by the stu-
dent body.
STAFF PHOTO: CHRISTINA BARANY
Whenever the Highland Park Fighting Scots score a touchdown, the Scotsmen take the field with flags in hand.
The 2011-12 Scotsmen are Patrick Garvin, Chris Smith, Scott Christopherson, Clif Davis, and Sterling Gomez.
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2011 Chi Omega
Christmas Market
Schedule:
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First Call Shopping 9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Thursday, November 17
1:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. General Admission Thursday, November 17
10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Friday, November 18
Opening Gala 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. Wednesday, November 16
10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m Saturday, November 19
2011 Beneficiaries:
Beneficiaries: Child Abuse Prevention Center, Chi Omega Scholarships,
Girls Scouts of Northeast Texas, Make-A-Wish Foundation® of North Texas, Mercy Street
NewFriends NewLife, Parkland Foundation, The Elisa Project
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•Spacereservation:Twoweekspriorto
publicationdateby12:00p.m.
•Insertsduetoprinter:Mondaytheweekthe
insertrunsby12:00p.m.
*Numbersincludenecessaryspoilage.Insertswillnotbeplacedin
mailedcopiesorstorecopies.
INSERTS MUST BE DELIVERED TO:
Attn:JeffGramer
FortWorthStarTelegram
685JohnB.SiasMemorialParkway
FortWorth,TX76134
phone:817.215.2151
750NORTHST.PAULSTREET•SUITE2100•DALLAS,TX75201•PH:214.739.2244•FAX:214.594.5779
WWW.PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM•WWW.PRESTONHOLLOWPEOPLE.COM•WWW.OAKCLIFFPEOPLE.COM
*Multiple-pageinsertsand/orhigherfrequencyquotes
availableuponrequest.
•Insertsofunusualsize,shapeorcontentmaybesubject
toahigherrate.
•PeopleNewspapersinsertformsmustbeattachedto
outsideofbox(es)ofinserts/preprints.
For more information, please contact your marketing consultant at 214.739.2244 or e-mail advertising@peoplenewspapers.com.
STICKY NOTES 2012
$1,525
$2,050
$2,575
$3,475
$1,775
$2,363
$2,950
$3,995
$2,650
$3,550
$4,450
$6,100
$3,150
$4,175
$5,200
$7,100
$4,400
$6,050
$7,700
$10,850
$5,400
$7,300
$9,200
$12,850
3” x 3” STANDARD STICKY NOTE RATES (NET):
SPECIAL SHAPE STICKY NOTE RATES (NET):
12,500
12,500
25,000
25,000
50,000
50,000
1Color
2Color
3Color
Process
1Color
2Color
3Color
Process
COLOR
COLOR
GET NOTICED:
•Premiumfrontpagelocation.
•Lastingreferencethatcanberemovedandplacedinahandylocation,
extendingthelifeofyourad.
•Guaranteedexclusivityonfrontpageforcommittedweek(s).Only
onestickynotepermittedonthefrontpageeachweek.
•Thefrontpageisthemostwidelyreadpageofthepaper.
•Extremelyhighlevelofcustomerawareness.
STICKY NOTE MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS:
•3”x3”NoteSize:Printedfrontsideonly.
•ImageArea:2.875”x2.875”(Ifartworkbleeds:3.125”x3.125”)
•Material:CoatedFaceSheet,RepositionableAdhesive.
•Convertingtypetooutlinesispreferred.
•Allpositivetypemustbe4pointorlarger.Reversetype6point
orlarger.
•Allpositivelinesmustbe1/2pointorlarger.Reverselines1point
orlarger.
•CorrectPMScolorsmustbeestablishedinthecolorspalettefor
spotcolorrunjobs.
•Additionaltemplatesavailableuponrequest.
•Addanadditional8¢perpieceforapplicationtoinsidesections.
STICKY NOTES ARE IDEAL FOR:
•Specialoffers/sales
•Openhouses
•Charitableevents
•Instantredeemablecoupons
•Directingcustomerstoexistingadsorinserts
•Publicserviceannouncements
•Gamesandcontests
•Creatingbrandawareness
•Buildingnamerecognition
•Holidaypromotions/announcements
•Sportingevents
STICKY NOTE SHAPES
Standard
•Square•Circle•Diamond
Special
•Car
•Tree
•DollarSign
•Heart
•PriceTag
•House
•Burst
•Tomato
•T-Shirt
•Butterfly
• Leaf
• Star
• Popcorn Box
• Turkey
• Snowman
• Shamrock
• Stop Sign
• Bus
• Flower
Park Cities People Oak Cliff People PrestonHollowPeople
750NORTHST.PAULSTREET•SUITE2100•DALLAS,TX75201•PH:214.739.2244•FAX:214.594.5779
WWW.PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM•WWW.PRESTONHOLLOWPEOPLE.COM•WWW.OAKCLIFFPEOPLE.COM
DEADLINES:
Space Reservation:Wednesday,twoweeksprior
toissuedate.
Camera Ready Artwork:Friday,twoweeksprior
toissuedate.
STICKY NOTE EXAMPLES
STANDARD SHAPES
Square Circle Diamond
SPECIAL SHAPES
Car DollarSigns Flower
House Leaf PriceTag
Star Shamrock T-shirt
ADDITIONAL OPTIONS (requires a separate quote)
Double-SidedPrinting Scratch&Sniff Scratch-Off Tear-OffCoupons
Park Cities People
Oak Cliff People
PrestonHollowPeople
750NORTHST.PAULSTREET•SUITE2100•DALLAS,TX75201•PH:214.739.2244•FAX:214.594.5779
WWW.PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM•WWW.PRESTONHOLLOWPEOPLE.COM•WWW.OAKCLIFFPEOPLE.COM
MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS:
DEADLINES:
ADVERTISING ACCEPTANCE:
DEFAULT ON PAYMENT
BILLING
MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS 2012
750NORTHST.PAULSTREET•SUITE2100•DALLAS,TX75201•PH:214.739.2244•FAX:214.594.5779
WWW.PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM•WWW.PRESTONHOLLOWPEOPLE.COM•WWW.OAKCLIFFPEOPLE.COM
Park Cities People
Oak Cliff People PrestonHollowPeople
BROADSHEET
STANDARD ADVERTISING SIZES
1/8
page
2x5
STANDARDIZED
ART CHARGES
ADS BUILT:
8-10” $25
11-20” $40
21-40” $60
41-60” $75
61-100” $90
101-126” $150
ADS IN SHELL*:
8-20” $15
21-60” $40
61-126” $75
*SHELLADSINCLUDE:
1.Adsthathaveshellsinwhich
photos/addresses,etc.needtobe
changed(i.e.realestate).
2.Builtadsthatrequiremorethan15
minutesinchanges.
3.Camera-readyadsthatrequiremore
than15minutesinadjustments.
Fullpage
1/2page
horizontal
10”x21”
(6col.x21”)
126col.”
10”x10.5”
(6col.x10.5”)
63col.”
4.941”x21”
(3col.x21”)
63col.”
10”x14”
(6col.x14”)
84col.”
1/2
page
vertical
2/3page
1/3page
horizontal
1/3
page
vertical
10”x7”
(6col.x7”)
42col.”
4.941”x16”
(3col.x16”)
48col.”
4.941”x10.5”
(3col.x10.5”)
31.5col.”
1/4
page
vertical 3x7
4.941”x7”
(3col.x7”)
21col.”
4.941”x5.25”
(3col.x5.25”)
15.75col.”
3.255”x7”
(2col.x7”)
14col.”
3.255”x5”
(2col.x5”)
10col.”
3.255”x6”
(2col.x6”)
12col.”
2x6
3x5
4.941”x5”
(3col.x5”)
15col.”
3.255”x4”
(2col.x4”)
8col.”
2x4
2x7
*Diagramsabovearenotdrawn
toscaleorexactplacement.
21-40” 41-60”
8-10”
61-100”
101-126”
11-20”
COLUMN SIZES
1column* 1.569”
2column 3.255”
3column 4.941”
4column 6.628”
5column* 8.314”
6column 10”
*1columnand5columnadsonly
availableinclassifieds
TAB SIZES STANDARDIZED
ART CHARGES
TABLOID ADS BUILT*:
1/4pg $30
1/2pghorizontal $50
1/2pgvertical $50
Fullpg $90

TAB ADS IN SHELL**:
1/4pg $15
1/2pghorizontal $25
1/2pgvertical $25
Fullpg $45
*PleaseaskaboutPurchasedSpecial
Sectionsartcharges
**SHELLADSINCLUDE:
1.Adsthathaveshellinwhich
photos/addresses,etc.needtobe
changed(i.e.realestate).
2.Builtadsthatrequiremorethan15
minutesinchanges.
3.Camera-readyadsthatrequiremore
than15minutesinadjustments.
10”x10”
10”x4.9415”
4.9415”x10”
4.9415”x5”
Fullpage
Halfpage
horizontal
Half
page
vertical
1/4
page
*Diagramsabovearenotdrawn
toscaleorexactplacement.
parkcitiespeople.com
AVERAGE PER MONTH
39,236visits
87,974pageviews
averageclicksperday-13.8
averageclickthroughrate-.10%
prestonhollowpeople.com
AVERAGE PER MONTH
19,823visits
53,815pageviews
averageclicksperday-5.37
clickthroughrate-.20%
oakcliffpeople.com
AVERAGE PER MONTH
4,518visits
9,694pageviews
averageclicksperday-1.28
clickthroughrate-.16%
WEBSITEStatistics
Park Cities People
Oak Cliff People
PrestonHollowPeople
750NORTHST.PAULSTREET•SUITE2100•DALLAS,TX75201•PH:214.739.2244•FAX:214.594.5779
WWW.PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM•WWW.PRESTONHOLLOWPEOPLE.COM•WWW.OAKCLIFFPEOPLE.COM
WEB RATES 2012
SIZE OPTIONS
Rectangle-400pxx80px
Banner-575pxx100px
Square-300pxx300px
Tower-300pxx600px
IMPRESSIONS COST
10,000
25,000
50,000
75,000
100,000
$210
$475
$850
$1,125
$1,200
ART CHARGES
Pricesdonotincludeartcharges,thereisa
$50adcreationfeeanda$25feeforads
thatneedtobeupdatedormodified.
ROTATION
ForaNONROTATINGadadd20%
ANIMATION
Add15%foranadwithanimation

ACCEPTED FILE FORMATS
DoubleClicktag,FLA(ActionScript2ONLY),
GIF,JPEG,PNG
REPORTING
Clientswillbeprovidedwithamonthly
statusreportuponrequest
SECTIONS
GoodNeighbor
People’sChoiceWinners
Weddings&Engagements
PhotoGallery
Subscribe
Classifieds
Schools
Worship
Obituaries
Planner
MeettheBloggers
About
RackLocations
SQUARE
300 px x 300 px
RECTANGLE
400 px x 80 px
BANNER
575 px x 100 px
TOWER
300 px x 600 px

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