Talking points, June 11,2007 Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund(s

)
The fund has paid for expenses incurred to date such as travel. funeral, groceries, medical, and memorial (eg obituaries) expenses. The funds

WILL

be used as

follows, urmong other possibilities...

For families of deceased victims: employee family health insurance, undergraduate education for children ofdeceased victims financial counseling mental health services

. o o o . r r

For those physically injured: Tuition and fees for tle coming year Unreimbursed medical costs. For all:

Full time family advocates to assist

MESSAGE: "The families of victims and the injured remain our highest priority. Our family liaisons are in almost daily contact. We share some of the frustrations."

With respect to issues:
The university has never actively solicited filnds. It was set up to respond to thousands of requests from concemed individuals who wished to contribute to help the healing process. The projected use of firnds was clearly articulated. It said the furds will be used for assistance to victims and their families, grief counseling, memorials, and comfort
expenses.

The university has NEVER solicited funds in the names of the victims. The wriversity produced memorial publications and a website to honor the victims. All the information and the images were cleared with each family through the liaisons and the dean of student's office.

The fund is HIGHLY accountable. We have been in daily contact with one of the premier accounting firms, KPMG, and with the IRS to advise us on how the funds can be disbursed.

;.

"We fully appreciate the stress and frustration among the families and many of us share those frustrations. We are working hard to ensure that HSMF is available but also that the families have access to other resources such as Virginia Victims Crime Fund.

Talking Points forthe 10 a.m. press briefing
1.
Burress Hall incident a. At 7:53 a.m. the University Operator received a threat against President Steger. Officers responded to his office in Burruss Hallto make him aware of the potential threat'

b.

Police presence in and around Bumtss Hallwas increased, which led to many rumors and false assumptions about what was going on. That led to an unwarranted report of suspicious person within the hall. responded and entered the building. The building was cleared and the report of a suspicious person was unfounded.

c. Officers immediately
d.

These kinds of reports are not uncommon in the wake of what has taken place in the past 48 hours on the Virginia Tech campus...which is one reason why we are maintaining high police visibility throughout the university.

2.

Contact the Virginia Tech Police has had with the Norris Hall gunman, CHO Seung-Hui (SOONG-WHE).

a.

Potentialstalking i. Once his identification was confirmed, records were reviewed and it was determined that there was contact with Cho in the fall of 2005. ii. ln November, Cho had made contact through phone calls and ih person with a female student. There was never any direct threat made to the student. The student notified Virginia Tech Police Department and officers responded. The student declined to press charges and referred to Cho's contact as "annoying." iii. However, the investigating officer referred Cho to the University disciplinary system, which is the Office of Judicial Affairs. The outcome of that referral is handled within the university and outside the scope of the police department. iv. In December, Cho instant messaged a second female student. Again, no threat was made against that student' She made a complaint to Virginia Tech Police and asked that Cho have no further contact with her. Officers followed up the next morning and spoke with Cho concerning this matter.

b.

Mental Health Concems for Cho i. Laterthat day police received a callfrom an acquaintance of Cho's who was concerned that Cho might have been suicidal. Officers again met with Cho and talked with him at length. ii. Out of concern for Cho, officers asked him to speak to a counselor. He went voluntarily to the police department. iii. Based on that interaction with the counselor, a temporary detention order was obtained and Cho was taken to a mental health facility.

c. Contact with English professor lt was also in the fall of 2005 that the Chair of the English Department, Dr. Lucinda Roy, expressed concerns regarding Cho and his course writing assignments. Her concerns were made to the previous chief and a detective. ii. These course assignments were for a creative writing course and the students were encouraged to be imaginative and artistic. iii. The writings did not express any threatening intentions or allude to any criminal activity. No criminal violation had taken place. iv. Dr. Roy chose to reach out to this student, out of concern for him and his mentalwellbeing.

i.

d. Other incidents Since those contacts in December of 2005...more than a year ago...we are not aware of any additional incidents or repofts made to the Virginia Tech Police Department for Cho.

i.

,

Panel Report Briefing by Larry Roberts

August 29, 2007

Structure of report

-

11 chapters:

1.

Summaryofkeyfindings
University setting and security Time line of events back to 1984 birth, year to year, month to month, and minute by minute

2.
3.

4.
5. 5. 7. 8. 9.

Mental health issue of Cho

-

health history and discussion of Virginia mental health laws

Discussions of information privacy laws Gun purchase and campus policies Discussion of double murder at west AJ Discussion of mass murder at Norris Hall

Emergency medical response

10. Office of chief medical examiner 11. lmmediate aftermath and long road to healing
Findings
a

nd conclusions:

The Governor is going to accept this report tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. and they want the main focus on the

Governor making the presentation.

Summary of Key findings:

What Cho did.
Governor appointing panel and description of Governo/s eipectations.

the life and mental history of state law, discussion of Virginia mental health, gun purchase, murders and response thereto, emergency medical care, chief medical examiner, services
Reviewed the following

:

provided to families, employees and caregivers,

Process they went through:

Cho exhibited signs of mental health issues that arose from childhood. After Columbine

shootings, teachers observed suicidal and homicidal ideation in writings. Cho received psychiatric counseling. Parents say they were aware he was troubled but claim to be unaware

of homicidal ideations. Received more intensive treatment in middle high school than in high school. Discussed treatment he received. Tech was not aware ofthese things and when he got to a large university setting it is hard to get individualized treatment like he had in Fairfax. ouring ciio's junior year at Tech

tl

University officiais oi jucjicial affairs, campus police, Cooks counsgling, a1d student aff,airs di{ noi cqmmunicate to Cho's parents citing FERPA. In fact, law does permit information sharing.

ianel's view that laws don't need'to be read as resirictively as they have been on coilege
cdrllpuSPS;

zi.

cook counseiin!''ienter and

trie ie;;T;iEd to'riiciliileii'iiii6if6d snijFoittd Ch'ffi fEin iiiii!'a';ii

spring 2006. System failed for lack of resources and incorrect interpretation of privacy laws, passivity, rggQrcis of Cho are missing at counseling center

5.

Commonwealth's mental health laws are flawed and services are inadequate. Involuntary commitment process challenged. Gaps in mental health system relative to short-term stabilization and comprehensive outpatient services. Barriers to open information between key professionals. lack of critical psychiatric data. short interview sessions don't reach out to roommates or campus police to gain information about the person

5. 7.
8. 9.

Widespread confusion about what privacy laws allow at federaland state levels. Federal laws governing health care records in an educational setting are confusing. Gun purchases- Cho purchased two guns in violation of federal law and his treatment had made

him ineligible to purchase gun under federal law.
VA is one of 22 states that report to federal data base

to have checks on gun purchase. not committed to an institution but he was treated as an outpatient.

Cho was

Some VA colleges and University are uncertain as to what to do about guns on Campus. VT has

one of the most strict policies (viewed favorably by Panel).

10. On 4/16 the W and Blacksburg police and rescue squads responded quickly and were well coordinated.

Sroup noflry campu

13. Senior university administrators faiied to notify campus of the West AJ shootings
co nflicted with written procedures.
1A

-

may have

The presence of large number of police at West AJ led to a fast response to the 911 call at Norris

15. Cho's motives of the shootings are unknown and the video and writings do not indicate motive. 16. The police response at Norris Hall was fast and so were the triage

units. There could have been better care some of the people hiding in closets, who were frightened by police actions of force

t7. Emergency medical care was provided timely onsite and off. An Emergency Communications Center at W could have improved communication.
18. Chief medical examiner properly responded but communication to family not handled 19.

Stateresources...

20. Universid esiablished a famiiy assistance center at the Inn but feii short. iack of leadership and' onsite coordinators. Lack of service providers. University volunteers stepped in but could not

luide famiiies
21. To advance public safety, colleges and universities need to worktogether
There were 70 recommendations to follow, but they are not discussed here.

Will be posted on 6:00 am tomorrow the report will be made available on web through back channel. website at 8 am to the the review panel website at 11 and there will be information on the Governo/s
public. familles will be briefed Briefing to the parents occurred - two meetlnts last week' And suruivors and tonight at 6 p.m. and 8pm for families of deceased. Nothing was redacted for security purposes.
Larry Hlnkcer indicated that conference format.

V| will remain silent until 2:30 and then wlll respond in a press

how our folks now will dig Governor will talk with some substance and will talk about next steps and in and make recommendations.

Chapter 2: Virginia Tech police department and university setting and security - number of acres and describe the including siren system' and how it works with other local police, building security and warning system

message content and authorization. Separate key finding in this chapter is the concern that the

emergency response plan did not include a shooting, place the police higher in the decision chain, and

the training for staff and students did not include a shooting incident. lt would be difficult to lock down campus, talks about alerting campus of danger, lack of security cameras, and lack of door locks (but controversial). Shootings at universities are rare events. fr risk analysis shouid be concjucted t6 determine what kinds oi riiks can be minimized. Blacksburg and Virginia Tech Police departments respondedwell together. Strongopinionthatthestateshouldnotimposelevel ofsecurity;rather,the
respective institutions should decide what level is needed.

Recommendations: should do a risii anaiysis and tirreat assessment and choose appropriaie aciion.

2. 3.
4. 5.

Tech shouid update emertency response plan

-

bring into compliance with federal and state

laws. Tech and other institutions should have an emergency threat assessment team. Should be empowered to investigate and obtain additional information if necessary Students, faculty, and staffshould be trained annually

University and colleges must comply with the Cleary Act. 'Timely notification" not defined.
Campus emergency communication systems must have multiple means of getting

out, not all nl8n-tecn
7.

;. ,

.

.

no

logy.

Emergency messages should be sent immediately and have clear information - greater sharing of detail about what took place so individuals can decide how to respond. Some discussion of

interplay between Morva and April 16'
Campus Police and administration officials should have ability to send emergency message
9.

The head of campus police should be a part of threat assessment team and emergency response

team, 10. Campuspolicechief shouldreportdirectlytosenioradministratorwithdecision-making

authority in emergencies
11, Must train for active shooters 12. Mission statement of campus polices should give primacy to law enforcement and crime prevention.

10. University to report all temporary detention orders to threat assessment team, counseling center, Parents. 11. Counseling center should report all . . .
1.2. State should study

what level of outpatient services needed and costs'

Mental health law issuers:

Time constraints

-VA standards for involuntary commitment concern that the code does not

lack

of

commitment between St. Albans and Cook.
Recommendations:

13 L4 15

Code change - Extend detention length

to permit evaluations

Code change - Authorize magistrate to issue TDO based on emergency evaluation

Clarify code for involuntary commitment Expanding number of crisis stability units in Virginia
Role and responsibilities of independent evaluators should be clarified in commitment hearings

15 17

18 What documents should be required

19 Prescreener at all

commitment hearings . . .

20 Independent evaluator should be available during commitment hearing

2I 22 23 24 25 26

Virginia health records should give a safe disclosing information in good faith.

harbor-protect mental health providers when

Health records privacy should be amended to provide full authorization to share information in

involuntary commitment Process.
Code changes relating to the outpatient . .
.

Health records. . . to repoft non compliance
Clerk of court should immediately send commitment info to federal criminal records exchange

Comprehensive review of code . . .

Chapter 5 - Information privacy laws
Law enforcement records judicial records, medical records,

Key find

Organization and institutions must be able to intervene if a student is harmful to oneself or

others must Participation of parents, court systems, groupeffortis need. Lacks of understanding about law, laws do need amending and clarification.

Recommendations:

1.
2. 3.

Accurate guidance should be developed by attorney general on interpretation/a pplication privacy laws.
Privacy laws should have safe harbor for good faith disclosure

of

Amend

to explain application to medical records and explicit exception for treatment recom mendations.
FERPA

4.
5.

Dept of Education to . . . FERPA . . . should allow more flexibility
Schools should ensure that Law enforcement and medical staff are designated as school

officials w an interest in school records.
6.

Commission on Mental Health Reform should study whether results of commitment hearings should be public.

7.

National of Higher Education Association should develop best practice protocols for

information sharing

Chapter6 -Gun policies
Gun ourchase: Addressed Cho's purchase of guns and ammunition as well as guns on campus
Key findings:

;.8-"

..

Cho was able

to purchase two guns with mental health history, Confusion on college campuses what rights they have in setting policies.

as

to

Reco m m end atio ns:

1.

back ground All states should report specified mental health information to data base for use in checks for gun Purchases.
VA background checks for all gun shows

2. 3.

Central criminal database

-

report all specified mental health information

4. 5. 6.

Existing attorney general's opinion regarding gun bans on campus should be clarified General assembly in 2008

-

adopt legislation to enable colleges and universities to regulate guns

if so desired. University and colleges should make clear policies on guns/weapons on campus

Chapter 7 Double murder at West AJ. Decision not to cancel classes or lock down and the impact of lock down or
close down.

What happened between two hours? Motivations for first killings:
Police departments responded and carried out in professional manner, but lead was not accurate. Police

did not have ability to use alert system. University administration failed to notify in timely manner.

Recommendations:

1.

Police should resist focusing on a single theory and leave

to decision makers

whaf they shoutd do (e.g.,

Recipients of emergency messages should be urged to inform others

5.

Plans to close campus should be included in university operation plan.

Chaoter 8
Mass murder at Norris Hall

What Cho did, barricading, shootings, 91-1, continued shootings, police response, university messages, other actions on 2 and 3 floors, action on first floor and the toll.

Overall the police from Tech and others responded quickly and cleared Norris Hall. Joint training of Virginia Tech and Blacksburg Police helped save lives.

cif'.lbt:rait io;'iWil teum'to

to use iilst respon{ers (as wts done:in trris instance). Sound of shotgun blast by police probably caused Cho to take own life. Cho had half
a'ssemble; need

Police did great job in assisting wounded. Several faculty members died heroically saving

students while some students jumped out of windows. Evacuation was not well organized.
Recom mendations:

1.

Campus police everywhere should train with local police on shooting incidents Dispatchers should be cautious giving advice by phone. Without knowing situation, cannot

2.
3.

dictate appropriate action
Police should escort survivors out of buildings where manpower is sufficient. Check hardware on exterior doors of all buildings Bomb threats need

4. 5.

to prevent chaining.

to be taken seriously

Chapter 9 - Emergency medical response
AJ, Norris Hall, EMF, Triage, Treatment

following triage, treatment, transportation of deceased, hospital

response, critical incident stress management. Emergency management the need for coordination, the need for a unified command center. Lack

of

interoperability of radios.
Key findings:

Positives: EMF occurred in timely manner, a number of life saving events, managed in a safe manner, local hospitals were ready, all patients who were alive at Norris Hall survived. EMF response was overall

excellent many lives were saved.
Areas for improvement: 4 minute delay in real life system on police radio and dispatch, stop duplication

of efforts, lack of radios, inappropriate means of transporting deceased, failure to open command post.
Recom mendations:

1. 2. 3.

Montgomery County needs county-wide command center for emergencies. Unified command center
Use national incident management procedures Emergency Op center Regional disaster drill on annual basis

4. 5. 6.
7. 8.

Medical control and regional operations updated Triage tags Hospital lists
Deceased should not be transported in emergency situations

9.

10. Psychological services available to EMS providers as necessary.

Chapter 10 - Office of chief medical examiner

Process took too

long. Families should be allowed to go to morgue to identify.

Positives: Medical examiner disaster plan as designed. Completed mandated tasks. Forensics services good. Performed duties well under stressful event. Public information poor and did not bring in outside help. Process of notify families was ineffective and not handled well--insensitive. Should have brought in outside help. Inadequate

training of PlOs gave stress to families. No one in charge of families who was trained.

Recom mendations:

1.

Chief medical examiner should not be one of the staff performing Chief medical should work with others to create

2.

3.
4.

Medical examiner should inform family members promptly Training should be developed for faculty, law enforcement, etc.
Need media expert

5.
6.

Virginia dept of criminal services
Drills Vdh should recruit to r Vdh should have severaltrained

7.
8.
9.

10. Commonwealth needs to revise . . . train volunteer staff

11. Emergency support for mass fatality
Chapter 11

-

lmmediate aftermath and long road to healing

Meetings visits and other communications with families, ceremonies, and memorial events,

communication with medical office.

Findings:

Time is critical in putting effective response. Meeting with family members need to communicate with quickly. Grief of the loss, and wounded spirit. Post traumatic stress for survivors and first responders. Family members have unique situations--co nfusion and frustration on communication.

Recom mendations:

L,

Emergency management plans include victims services to address homicide or other disaster in

overall Plan, effect on survivors

2.
3.
4.
5.

University and colleges should ensure adequate plans for joint info center with PIO during major events on campus When the family assistance center is created, victim advocates should be called immediately to
assist families Regularly scheduled briefings should be established for families

Short- and long-term counseling available to first responders, staff, students, faculty, university leaders.

6.

Training in crisis management is needed

for. ..
to respond to victims

Law enforcement agencies should ensure have a victims services section

of crime within department
8. 9.

State victims services section linked with local providers.

All crime is local

should start with local response plan linked to broader community. University should work with local government to devise plan

-

10. Universities should create victim assistance capability either in-house or in community to assure

victims are made aware of rights

DMFr 8/30i07

lulaza ?d
Q&A

d,a- 9D

,PP-/>4

/eza 7

Overall

1.

What has W learned ftom the tragedy? We have to be more rigorous in management of students at ris( and we're committed to doing that, Also, expectations for campus security and communication will be different in wake of this tragedy, not only for us but for the entire higher education community, Our new communications processes will enable alerts to be sent instantaneously through many channels. At the same time, I believe this process of review and investigaUon has shown us a community of people who acted responsibly and appropriately in light of what
was known at the time. The evidence does not suggest that different actions would have avoided this tragic outcome, Perhaps the saddest lesson for all of us is that senseless tragedy can visit even the most idyllic of places, like Blackburg, Va. Do you agree W made mistakes? We agree we have to be better in important ways

- we actnowledged that ln our own intemal rerviews, which 70 recommendations, including improving the way we idenUff and manage at-risk students. That have some said, the actions taken on the day of the errent were based on what all of those involved felt were best practices and appropriate response given what they knew. As the repoft itself makes clear, police followed standard protocols and made reasoned judgments based on experience. This was a highly unstable individual who had been troubled for most of his life, who was determlned to commit mass murder, and who did so in a viftually unprecedented way.
3.

Do you agrce tlrat the actions of polie and the unlverclty may have mst lives? The reporfs language about what"mighf'have happened under othercircumstances accurately reflecG the fact that hindsight requires a great deal of speculation. The report acknowledges that police followed standard protools for a homicide investigation and securing the campus on the morning when the first two shootings were discovered. While it wouldn't be appropriate to go into all of the details, the situation at AJ had all the hallma*s of a domestic violene event. I am not aware of anything they learned that would have indicated a mass murder was imminent. Indeed, the report notes that there was no similar event in U.S. history. The approach to alerting the campus was based on a reasoned judgment about the best interests of public safety. Nobody can say what would have happened if a different decision had been made - and indeed the outcome could have been even worse. As the panel recognized, there is no plausible scenario in which actions by the university could have prevented this horror once it began.

A

Do you agrce tfiat the 2-hour gap in notification was a mistake? Importan$, the report itself points ou! "The notion that there was a 2-hour gap...ls a mlsconceptlon. There were continuous actions and deliberations from the first event until the second and they made a material difference in the results of the second event." In other words, there was an aggressive response taking place, That is an octremely complex issue, and I think the repoft's language about what "mighf' have happened under other circumstances accurately reflects the fact that hindsight requires a great deal of speculation. Our understanding is that our police followed standard protocols for a homicide investigation and securing the campus. We believe that our people acted quickly and to the best of their abilities in the early hours of April 16 based on what we knew at the time,

5.

'a Do you agree with the panel's conclusion that W missed number of warning signs? Did he fall through the crad<s? There were signs that Cho was troubled, even suicidal, and those signs were identified, communicated and acted upon by our system. A number of steps were taken, and he did receive treatment. The key is that there was no indication that Cho was homicidal or a threat to others. Cho successfully concealed that from the people who were trying to help him, and we had no access to the treatment records from his high school years that would have brought it to light. We agree with the repoft that there is a larger systemic issue here at the state level that the legal and legislative system has to come to grips with and resolve.

6.

What about the paper that Cho wrote, about a student shooting up a school? That clearly telegraphed his inten$ didn't it?

Cho wrote a number of disturbing pieces with various themes. They were flagged by faculty and that's part of what led to some of the steps that were taken to try to help him - but as clear as it seems to be in hindsight, disturbing or violent writings typically don't lead to a conclusion that the wrlter is homicidal.

How do you explain Cho's missing records? Iaddshl-€euld-eghia, it. -They were lost quite some time ago, at least tvvo years. It's only three pages of the electronic records of all his contacts with the Cook Counseling Center - but it unfoftunate. The changes that are being made to strengthen the Counseling Center include much closer attention to record retention and other administrative issues.
Expectations have changed. We will be more rigorous in interdepartmental exchange of information regarding students at risk, And, communicaung imminent danger to the university community is paramount. We have already invested in communications technologies and protocols and likely wlll add more communications vehicles. We believe the o<pectation will be for near-instantaneous communicaUon with the community, despite some justifiable @ncern over the potential to communicate incomplete or premature information. That said, W as an instihrtion has not changed - and if anything is stronger for the tragedy that brought this

ffi*k't"ffi{'2"'-

community together.

9.

-

Does VT accept responsibility for the tragedy? The panel was very clear in its finding that Cho himself is the responsible party. Virginia Tech faculty, staff and students - indeed, our entire communlty - were and are victlms of this tragedy, We all lost respected colleagues, friends and especially our precious charges, our students. The responsibility for this tragedy lies solely with a severely disfurbed student who was determined to commit murder and who managed to conceal his intention from those who tried to help him.

10, Are you going to apologize? The person who should do that is the one who planned and carried out this horrendous crime, not his victims. And unfortunateV that apology will never come. All we can do now is help those who were touched by death or injury, pull together as a community and move forward better and stronger. 11. At his press confelence tlre Governor said that if some of the prcblems at VT hadn't existed, the tragedy might have been averted. Do you disagree with that? I think the report is very clear that Cho was an intensely troubled person who was intent on committing murder, who had suffered frcm serious mental illness his entire life, and who had concealed his homicidal intentions. It is incumbent on us to learn from this and to do whatever we can to keep such a horrific act from happening on another crmpus, but I don't believe the evidence tells us that different actions would have avoided a tragic outcome.

12. Do you agree tfiatVT's ultra-sHct interpretation of FERPA contributed to the lack of ability to manage his situation? Inconsistency in interpretation and understanding of privaey laws is an issue at Virginia Tech as it is around the country. In our own internal review we discuss the need for better training of our faculty on privacy laws, At the same time, it would be a mistake to conclude that this situation led or contributed to the tragic outcome in the Cho case; the facts don't support that.
13. Did

Ws misinterpretation of these laws keep Cho's parcnts from being informed that he had been admitted to a psychiatric hospital? That would have been the responsibility of the hospital rather than Virginia Tech - but also understand that Cho was 21 years old at the time and legally an adult. We support the report's call for a re-examination of privacy law to better balance privacy and public safety/welfare.
full

scope of the tragedy was clear, possibly to avoid panic. Should you have sent stronger language at that pointn especially since there could have been a second shooter? We had every intent of being stnightforward in those communications and I think they were quite strongly worded. The email in question stated that there had been a multiple shooting with multiple victims, that police were searching for a second shooter, that everyone was required to stay inside until further notice and that

14. The repoft criticizes VT for "sugarcoating" its communications to the campus even after the

.Tames

A. Hyatt

Executive Vice President
Operating Officer

&Chief

August 22,2007

SECURITY INFMSTRUCTURE GROUP
SPEAKING PO!NTS
PROCESS

.

r rn response to thetragic"events on the Virginia Tech campus on Monday' security lnfrastructure Aprit 16, 2007,;;"p;.*io"nt established the
Working GrouP.

'

.TheGroupwaschargedwithexamininotheuniversity'sexistingsecurity university's
enhance the systems and recomm-ending changes ttiat would

the campus community is jeopardized'

abilitytorespondquicklyandeff.ectivelyinsituationswherethesafetyof
decrease the The Group was also directed to identify strategies th"t i'glL consider not only probability of such situations occuning anO to . the behavior of individuals with technologicar ,rp".t" oiina i""u", but alsj regard to camPus securitY'

r

.

in turn aPPointed the I was aPPointed as Chairman of the Group and t
following core members'

for Information Technology ) Earving L. Blythe, Vice President campus security and chief of Police F Wendell R. Flinchurn,birector of 'Vice President for University Hin;il;;, Associate F Lawrence G. Relaiions Manager > .fa*"s V. McCoy, Capital ProjectCounsel served as an advisor to the F Kay K. Heidbreder,-Uniu"oiiy Group ih" 'erorp was staffed by Heidi McCoy' Director of Administrative > the Executive Vice President and Chief
Operations and Assistant to Operating Officer'

. o

asresources 9?*1d Staff from several campus units provided support Passporl Office to the Group, inctuding representatives from the Hokie and Residential Programs'

u{

current campus The Group also retained exiernal expeds to review
security policies and procedures'

.lnaddition,theGroupanditsadvisorsconductedsitevisiistotwomajor two private sector.corporations research universities and the campuses of national tne'irivJrsiiv,s-i"futitv infrastructure with other

to

benchmarr< leaders.

.

While the commissions and panels established by President Bush and Govemor Kaine r.,ere formed to consider security issues from a State and National policy perspective, this Group's focus was to exarnine security issues frcm the perspec'tive of a large research university.

The Grouo evaluated the strengths and weaknesses of the university's existing securifu systems and related infrastructure, and developed recommendations for how existing systemsiinfrastructure can be irnproved
and enhanced.

I

The Group also looked at how to address emergency situations that might arise in the future.

It is important to note that in order to meet the August 17, 2007 report deadline to the President, the group focused its analysis on the main
Blacksburg campus.

The Group, therefore, recommends that a follow-up study be conducted of security issues at the university's other campus sites, including Abingdon, Hampton Roads, Northern Virginia, Richmond, and Roanoke, as well as at all Agricultural Research and Experiment Stations (ARECs) and 4-H offices.
STRENGTHS ASSOCIATEDW]TH THE UNIVERSffTS CURRENT SECURITY PROGESSES:

. o :
-

Mutual aid agreements with local, regional and state law enforcement agencies and rescue squads enable the campus to respond in a prompt and coordinated manner to emergency situations.
response to the events of April 16, 2007 over 30 police and law enforcement agencies and 20 rescue units came to the aide of our campus police and rescue squad.

ln

r .

Ongoing joint training exercises with other law enforcement and emergency units allow the campus to prepare for possible emergencies.

The campus employs
multiple formats.

number of mass emergency communication systems including e-mail, an emergency web page, audible sirens, and telephone irees that enables it to get emergency information out in

a

.

July 2, 2007 a new mass communication system, W Alerts, was implemented that in the case of an emergency provides instant and text messaging to individual cell phones. As of last week approximately { 2'500 subscribers had signed up forthis service.

On

The campus also employs a robust communication infrastructure that in the event of an emetgency allows for pre-established call centers and the ability to respond to increased cell phone and other telecommunication
demands.

. All student residential facilities and
accessible through an electronic card residence halls are now on card key basis.)

some academic buildings are key access system. (Noie: All access on a 7 day and 24 hour

The campus has a nationally accredited campus police department.

It also has a documented campus emergency preparedness response plan that includes a process for establishing an incident commander, emergency response coordinator and emergency response team to coordinate and deploy appropriate resources and support services'
The campus benefits from the engagement of the president and key campus administrators in addressing campus emergencies (e'g. Policy
Committee).

'

ln the event of an emergency the campus benefits from the strong support of faculty, staff and students and the surrounding community.

FIVE AREAS TARGETED FOR ENHANCEMENT OR IMPROVEMENTS: PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

. ' .

Removal and replacement of the hardware mitigate the risk of doors being chained.

on all perimeter doors

to

lnstallation of interior locks on all general assignment classrooms and evaluating installation of locks on non-general assignment classrooms. Exploring the installation of a centrally controlled electronic card key access system for all key academic and administrative facilities. This system will be used to secure buildings during non working hours. In the eveni of an emergency such a system would allow individual and'groups

ofbui|dingstobe|ockedremote|ybythepo|icedepadment.

. '

a state of the art Public Safety Building that will enhance Virginia Tech Police and virginia Tech Rescue squad services by
Constructing
physically consolidaiing these units in a single facility'

Exploring the feasibility of deploying a centrally monitored closed circuit televisiori (CCTV) system using video surveillance cameras at key

COMMUNICATION

' ln

other environments where other systems may not provide adequate notification it is recommended that a simple electronic banner textual displays with audible alarms be installed in all classrooms'

order

to

provide mass notification

in

classrooms

and

Exploring the installaiion of LCD message boards within the entrances to key campus buildings, as well as outdoor illuminated message boards at major campus entrances. These displays would alert the campus to emergency situations and provide instructions on the appropriate actions to be taken.

.

creating an elec-tronic "people locator system" that members of the campus population could log on to after an ernergency to post their status
so that concemed relatives, friends and colleagues could receive updated information.

.

Developing pre-written templates"

to help communicators craft

emergency messages more expeditiously. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

. '

Updating the campus emergency preparedness response plan annual basis.

on

an

Preparing for potential emergencies by increasing the use of annual table top' or simulation exercises by key campus units'(e-9. police, rescue squad, physical plant, building coordinators, etc). Where appropriate these exercises should involve faculty, students and staff as well as law enforcement and public safety units from surrounding jurisdictions.

.

lmplementing a building coordinator program whereby a person in each UuitOing is ideniified as the responsible pafty in the event of an emergenoy. All coordinators will be trained in appropriate emergency response and security processes and procedures. Central coordination and training will be the responsibility of the campus police department'

.

Formally ideniifying backups to key Policy Committee members who are unable to physically respond to campus emergencies. Also enhancing communicaiions with key Policy Committee members who are off campus when an emergency occurs,

PROTOCOLS

'

Enhancing security protocols that will explicitly highlight what to do in the event of an emergency. This will include posted signs in all classrooms and student services facilities, as well as inclusion of such material as part of new employee and student orientations. Creating a security master plan for the campus and establishing a campus security planning committee.

' . .

IMPLEMENTATION In: order to implement the recommendations outlined'in this report the university should immediately initiate a program to fully cost and identify the funding sources necessary to implement the program. Possible fund sources could include increased state support as well as a possible mandatory life/safety fee.

FINAL WORDS

. c . . . .

Security planning must be an integral part of
preparedness plan.

a campus' emergency

Annual simulation or table top exercises involving multiple campus units and community agencies maintain a state of readiness to respond to
emergency situations.

Security Planning needs the support and participation leadership from the president to all levels of the University.
Ongoing training of faculty, students and siaff on how variety of emergencies situations is critical,

of

executive

to respond to

a

Communicaiion must be multi-layered and involve several different means of communicating with diverse populations.

Finally, it is important to note that this overview only highlights 15 of the27 recommendations listed in the Group's report'

DMF|- 8/19/07

Q&A

Overall

r. What has W learned from the tragedy?

Expectations for campus security and communication will be different in wake of this traqedy, not only for us but for the entire higher education community. We have to be more rigorous in interdepartmental exchange of information regarding students at risk. [And there will be lower thresholds and tolerances for certain behaviors which we believe we've addressed in some of these repofts.l At the same time, the review has shown us a community of people who acted responsibly and app-ropriately in light of what was known. The evidence does not suggest that different actions would have avoided this tragic outcome. Perhaps the saddest lesson for all of us is that senseless tragedy can visit even the most idyllic of places, like Blacksburg, Va'

Z. These repofts seem yety carcfully woded to avoid blaming anyone or anything. Isn't

there a need to idendfy things that truly went wrong and to hold the appropriate people accountable?
The purpose of these reviews was [insert language]. The reviews can't change what happened, but they can draw leamings from the tragedy and propose steps to make Virginia Tech better and stronger. I think these documents are o<tremely thoughtful and helpful, and the university will ultimately be better for them'

3.

Did \/f make mistakes? Wha! if anythlng, should you have done dlfferently? The actions taken on the day of the event were based on what all of those involved felt were best practices and appropriate response at the time. Even law enforcement expefts caution about the iimitations of hindsight. It is fair to say that ocpectations for campus security and communication witl now be different in wake of this tragedy, not only for us but for the entire higher education community. [And there will be lower thresholds and tolerances for certain behaviors which we believe we've addressed in some of these reports.] At the same time, the review has shown us a community of people who acted responsibly and appropriately in light of what was known. The evidence does not suggest that different actions would have avoided this tragic outcome'

4.

How has this tragedy changed VT? Expectations have changed, We will be more rigorous in interdepartmental exchange of information regarding students at risk And, communicating imminent danger to the university community is paiamount. We have already invested in communications technologies and protocols and likely will add more communications vehicles. We believe the expectation will be for near-instantaneous communication with the community, despite some justifiable concem over the potential to

communicate incomplete or premature informaUon. That said, W as an institution has not changed - and if anything is stronger for the tragedy that brought this community together,

Does W aooept responsibility for the tragedy? Virginia Tech faculty, staff and studenE - indeed, our entire community - were victims of this tragedy, We all lost respected colleagues, friends and especially our precious charges, our students. The responsibility for this tragedy lies solely with a severely disturbed student who was determined to commit murder and who managed to conceal his intention from those who tried to help him.

6.

Are you going

The person who should do that is the one who planned and carried out this horrendous crime, not his victims. And unfortunately that apology will never come. All we can do now is help those who were touched by death or injury, pull together as a community and move fonanrd better and stronger.

b

apologize?

Security

Inhstructurc

1.

per the recommendations of the Security fnfrastructure grouP' does the university plan b explore the same type of centrally-controlled remote locking system, as they use at U of Maryland and UC Berkeley? (or similar question re increased video surueillance, cardkey aaess to all buildings.) Many ofthe proposed steps are already underway, including changes to physical infrastructure (adding interior door locks, changing door mechanisms for octernal doors) and the new state'of-theart WAlerBsy*em that we were already pursuing before 4/16. We will be considering others based on a variety of factors. Remember, every measure has a tradeoff of some type - cost, inconvenience and so-on - so ifs impoftant to look at each on its own merits.
_

2.

Would you say that if some of the changes proposed in this report had been in place on 4/16, lives may have been saved? We knew we couldn't have that kind of crystal ball. Even law-enforcement experts warn against the limitations of hindsight. Our goal in these reviews was to look at what was in place and actions that were taken, learn from it and recommend any steps we felt would be prudent moving forward.
The repoft noEs that on 4lL6 the school was in the midst of hiring a Directorof Emergencry Management Do you think it would have made a differcnce had that peron been in place? No, I don't think so. This is an important position, though, and will be a focal point for the various changes in procedures and infrastructure as they are made. The repoft recommends charging students a "life and safety fee" to pay for security measures. Do other schools do that? Don'tyou think parcnts and students assume "life and safety" are paft of the basics that come with their tuition? We're not aware this specific approach at other schools, but it was proposed as a solution that particularly fits the situation in Mrginia and here at W. Under state law ceftain costs must be recouped through earmarked fues - bus service, sports, etc. - separate from tuition. The idea is that the proposed fee would assure a revenue stream for a crucial area of need, and I would hope studeng and their parents would find that reassuring.

s.

q

The report strongly urges better emergency preparcdness and training, noting that the school;s emergency plan didn't include this type of situation. Why wasn't that plan fixed afterthe Morua incident? First let me assure you that we did make changes after the Morua incident in terms of our policies and procedures for dealing with this type of situation. As for the revieu/s recommendations regarding the emergency response plan, we will certainly be considering those. Keep in mind that tha W emergency response plan doesn'tjust address specific scenarios; it lays out an overall structrre and process for managing a wide range of emergencies. The review noted that this structure and process worked well during the Cho incident. It also notes that our police force actively train for this type of shooting situation, so they were well prepared for it.
One of the appendices to the repoft is

policy. It clearly states that'any individual who believes there is an immediate danger to the health or safety of any members of the university community should call the W police at 911." Clearly the faculty member who found Cho's note did not do that. Will action be taken against that person?

Ws

Campus & Workplace Violence Prevention

TBD

AL,,\r""4 4*E' <''u

+

'''r,au' f

# d''4 3

7.

Why don't any of these reports address the 2-hour gap in alefting the campus to the AJ shootings? I think they do. The reviews [and the after-action repofts] include a close look at the decisions that were made surrounding the response to both the AJ and Norris situations. I expect Governor

Kaine's panel will have some additional perspecfive and we welcome that, What we're seeing is a collection of reasoned and appropriate decisions made on the basis of the best available knowledge at the time. Moving forward and engaging our new WAlerB st1*ern, our security committee and Police department are working together to determine the procedures that will be used to aleft the. -It seems clear the expectaUon is now for near-instantaneous 6aenrpus in a variety of scenarlos. some justifiable concem over the potential to communicate incomnlete

or

-l
I

b"rmrua;;*rffiBi,:
8. Isn't it possible that an earlier aleft to the campus would have saved llves? We knew we couldn't havelhat kind of crystal bell, Even law-enforcement experb warn against the -llfriiiffis of hindrfht. Alertlng a campus, for e---xample, can create other issues of concern, so you
can't simply draw a cause-effect relationship. After the police anived on the scene at AJ it took only about an hour for them to apprehend the most likely person of interest, and it was only another 3040 minutes before it became apparent that person may not have been involved and an alert was needed. Our goal in these reviews was to look at what was in place and actions that were taken, learn from it and recommend any steps we felt would be prudent moving forward. Ifs fair to say that expectations have changed as a result of the tragedy, and instantaneous communication is going to be a given.

9.

Why don't any of these rcpofts address the issue of the faculty member who found Cho's note but didn't rePort it?
TBD

Information & Communications Infrastructure

t.

How much of an issue was the lack of interoperability among first responderc? What impact did it have? We have no indication that it had any tangible impact on emergency response. But it is a concern overall (as it has been in 9/11 and in other situations around the country involving cooperative effofts among first responders) and as the review notes, it would be prudent to address it'
The report notes that cell phone circuits and land lines werc jammed during the initial response and calls were blocked. What impact did that have on emelgency response? We have no indication that it had any tangible impact on emergency response. But it is a concern and as the review notes, it would be prudent to address it.

?

This report recommends an ambitious'new campus information architecturc." Is going to haPPen?
rr

it

Evenbefore 4/L6 we had already begun looking at a totally integrated, internet-protocol fiber-optic backbone for all telecomm functions. Cost and timing are key factors but it is our goal to implement

lnterface'nternal Co--s

1.

You seem to be conceding that some of your people wer€ too strictly interprcting FERPA and/or HIPAA Is that accurate? What impact did that have on Cho's case specifically? Did it prevent actions that would have made a difference? The review clearly demonstrated some confusion among faculty about the application of privacy laws regarding patient records. And in fact, the IG's repoft refers to a survey of psychiatric professionals
qr:l:;,:t

generally that showed the same issue, so clearly it is not confined to us; these are complex laws open to various legal interpretations. We need to address that in terms of our own faculty and we will. At the same time, it would be a mistake to conclude that this situation led or contributed to the tragic outcome in the Cho case; the facts don't support that.

Did \rrt misinterpretation of these laws keep Cho's parcnts from being Informed that he had been admitted to a psychiatric hospital? ffBD - C. Flynnl The individuals who made those decisions at Virginia Tech followed the law with regard to Cho, who was 21 years old at the time. The

repot seems b support some of your critics'claims that VT let cracks. Would you agnee with that?
No. lThafs
a very simplistic assessment of what is a much more complex

Cho through the
an

story'] He was

*FeheV troubled young man who needed help, and he got that help. Somehow, during and after that counseling he continued to hide his homicidal urges. It is true that, as recommended in the review, we at W must be more rigorous in interdepartmental exchange of information regarding students at risk. As the review indicated, "silos" are an issue throughout academia and we need to show leadership in addressing it. At the same time, it would be a mistake to conclude that this situation led or contributed to the tragic outcome in the Cho case; the facts don't support that.
4.

The repoft talks about'information silos" preventing a full picture of Cho's satuataon to emerge. If that hadn't been the case, might this tragedy have been plevented? Clearly we must be more rigorous in interdepartmental o<change of information regarding students at risk. As the review indicated, "silos" are an issue throughout academia and we need to show leadership in addressing it. At the same time, it would be a mistake to conclude that this situation led or contributed to the tragic outcome in the Cho case; the facb don't suppoft that. The repoft says that the information about Cho that was plesented to the specialjustice at the commitment hearing was incomplete. Why was that?
TBD?

6.

is not clear whether or not Cho received follow-up treatment after the judge's evaluation; the IG report says Cho did request an appointment but that's where it leaves off, Was he trcated and if so, what were the findings? -

It

FBD-c.
7.

Flynnl

Z/*: .*A7r*2*.2 T a4q /Lr+

The report quotes the IG repoft as saying Ws system may be insufficient for handling high-risk students who need serious mental heatth seruices. Do you agree with that and' if so, can you fix it? W counseling center is no different from [the vast majority of college and university counseling centersl in that it is not intended to be the kind of frcility that can handle severely-mentally ill people, just as our health clinic, for o<ample, is not equipped to treat cancer or other serious diseases. We want to be the best facility possible for the level of treatment that is appropriate to provide our students, and we want to improve our intemal interface to be sure we are aware of studenb with more serious problems so we see that they are treated at a facility designed to serue
their more acute needs.

\W

fZ.t4t-^
Comments Charles W. Steger August 22,2007

Good afternoon and thank you for coming. As you know, it's been a bittersweet week for us at Virginia Tech: First, the very moving dedication of a memorial, which will forever remind us of our profound loss and of the 32 souls who will always be a part of this university... In the midst of that, a frightening off-campus incident that sent more than 20 ofour students to hospitals - although I'm happy and relieved to say no lives were lost [need to update].

But at the same time, we've seen the retum of ow students to campus, and all Of the enthusiasm, joy, and promise that comes with each new school year. I challenge anyone to spend a day on this campus and not come out an optimist

-

The reports that we have released today are also grounds for optimism - because they reconfirm the abiiity of this institution to examine itself, to leam and to evolve.

As you may recall, after April review processes.

l6 I called for

the creation of two different, but concurrent

One is an external review - essentially an investigative analysis ofthe hagedy from its genesis to its management and response. From the beginning, I felt this needed to be done by an objective, outside panel, backed by significant resources and expertise. I was very pleased that Govemor Kaine was of the same mind, and we look forward to seeing the results of his independent Virginia Tech Review Panel in the coming week. The other review is internal in structure and focus. This review is not intended to be an investigation or a forensic analysis, but rather a close look at the university's existing policies, processes, systems and resources through the new prism ofthe 4/16 tragedy.

In fact, many colleges and universities around the country are commencing similar intemal reviews, a recognition ttrat ttris type of senseless tragedy can happen anylvhere. But it didn't happen just anywhere, and it is certainly incumbent on us to extract any lessons that could make Virginia Tech stronger, safer, better equipped to fulfill our mission
We established three committees to undertake our review, and today you will hear brief presentations by each of the three committee chairs. As you've seen, the reports and their appendices are rather voluminous, so we felt these presentations would be helpful in distilling the findings. I thank all tlree of the committee chairs for their diligence and Ieadership.

-

Jim Hyatt, executive vice president and chiefoperating officer, led the review committee looking at campus security; Erv Blyttre, vice president for information technology, led the committee on communications infrastructure; Jerry Niles former dean of the college of liberal arts and human sciences, led the committee reviewing the interface and exchange of information across departments, including the intersections between the academic enterprise, counseling, our disciplinary system, the legal system, and the police.

'We

have also provided the report to the Govemor's panel this week, although I would add that virtually all ofthe information contained in them had already been discussed

with the panel during the course of its review.
The reports you received today are the same documents that were transmitted to me by the committee heads, but with some very limited redactions. These include proprietary business information that was given to us by vendors, and a few redactions that were necessary for safety and security reasons. For example, it would be inesponsible for us to publicly discuss the locations of critical communications infrastructure, or operation and placement of certain security systems. The redactions are indicated by X's, so it will be very clear to you where they occur. Let me emphasize that none of the redacted language had any significant impact on the findings or recommendations that are made in these reports.

Before our committee chairs make their presentatronr, t", some overall observations.
There is little doubt that

*" take the liberfy of making

education community. proposed in these reports reflect Virginia Tech's commitment to meet those expectations.
The recommendations for change can be divided into t}ree primary categories that conespond to the three review areas: The first part might be called physical secwity -- changes in facilities and procedures that are designed to protect the physical safety of everyone in our campus community.

16 has changed public expectations of the entire higher The adjusnnents in procedures, policies and resouces that are

April

For example, we have all heard about the concept of"lockdown" - the suggestion that a campus can be buttoned up instantaneously in an emergency. Our review-reflects the consensus of law-enforcement experts such as the Virginia Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators that such a "lockdown" is simply not feasible on a campus the size of a small city. However, it is certainly feasible to secure or "harden" individual buildings and other facilities, and the review addresses that approach.
The second part relates to improving emergency communications - the ffiastructure that facilitates communication into and out of the campus, directly to students and faculty, and among emergency responders. For example, the new WAlerts system, which was already being developed before April 16, is now firlly operational.

You will also hear discussion of a new, state-of-the-art "information architecture" that has great promise if implemented in coming years, This type of integrated, internetprotocol system was envisioned initially as a way to enhance the learning environment, but in fact it can enhance campus security as well.

Of course, these communication tools must be coupled with protocols that guide their use, while allowing enough flexibility to respond to each situation. The experts remind us that each emergency is unique and careful judgment must be applied in determining when and how campus alerts are issued.

The third category involves the flow of information across departments with regard to students. Simply put, we must have a more coordinated system for managing the needs of students at risk. This includes betGr interdepartmental communication and more consistent interpretation and applioation of privacy laws. The next steps

will

be for the university to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the

recommendations, including a cost-benefit analysis, to determine which recommendations will be adopted and whether there are other worthy recommendations that have not been identified; prioritized the recommendations; identify funding sources; and develop a timeline for implementation. Those we felt were immediate imperatives are already being implemented. We will be considering the others based on a variety of factors. Every good idea involves a tradeoff of some type - whether that's practicability, cost, or some type of unintended impact - so we have to look at each on its own merits. What the intemal reviews do not atlemptto do - and I urge you to bear this in mind - is to draw any conclusions about potential relationships between the actions taken or systems in place on April I 6 and the cause or outcome of the tragedy itself. Again, this process was not designed for that purpose. We at Virginia Tech have been forever changed by the crimes of one severely disturbed young man. He was determined to commit murder, planned his crime meticulously, and managed to conceal his homicidal urges from all of the law-enforcement authorities and the mental health experts who tied to help him and presumably even from his family.
The reviews before you propose a credible framework to help us meet the demands and expectations of our new reality. We will take whatever steps are needed to maintain the safefy, confidence and peace of mind of our students, faculty and tle entire Hokie

community.

As I invite our committee chairs to make their presentations, let me ask that you please hold your questions until all three presentations are complete. | rcalize this will mean a lot of information up front, but we feel it is the best way to lay out the key findings.
Jim Hyatt begins.

w#

I\E,WS
Offic€ of Univcrsity Relatioos 314 Burruss HaU (0253), Blacksbug, (540) 23l-5396 Fax: (540) 231-t885
httD

Vireinia T -"
lmlTedl VIRCINIA
POLYTBCHNIC INSTMUTE

*"

AND STATE UNTVERSTTY

Virgints%Ml

:/lwvw.udrcl.vt.cdu

The Virginia Tech Review Panel Comments by Charles W. Steger President Virginia Tech May 10,2007 Govemor Kaine, Colonel Massengill, and members of the commission.

Normally, I would address 6 sommissisn by saying that I am happy to have the opporrmity to appear before you. We know that is not true. Each of us appears here today with heavy heart, a most profound sense of sorrow...and yes, still to this day. . . disbelief.

A tenibly deranged young man.. ..one of our own students. . .visited unimaginable honor
upon our university, our bright young minds, our rising stars, and our caring and learned faculty. He took 32 precious lives and then his own. He worurded 25 more. In the process, he seriously injured an entire nation. As we have noted many times tlroughout this terrible ordeal, the fanilies of those who lost their lives and the injured have remained our highest priority, followed by the needs of our greater university community. We will do everything possible to assist with their recovery.

I have said time and again, that Virginia Tectl our commonwealth, atl of higher education, and indeed, the world must leam from this tagedy. I personally asked the governor foryou work.
We have been and will continue to cooperate frrlly with your review and findings. I have appointed a lead individual, a retired university executive with experience in many sectors including audit, to assist you with yow data gathering and be your liaison with any

office on campts.
Each one ofus and each sector ofour society that has been touched by this tragedy must welcome the inspection, intospection, and the scrutiny of a thorough analysis.

ASbiti"u-'rfi

If space pemits,

&s€

iqd$ftiu:nmiiiifi ltitfii"idfl irfi nZ;f i"eiVfaib e. VirgiDia Polytecbdc Institute and Stat€ Udvenity far or€ Jecondary rclen E2.

Page2 In our own
underway after-action reviews, which can inform your data be looking at three broad !utft.ri"g. in addition to understanding the incidents, we will ireas: tjecommunications infrastructrue, the physical infrastructure as it relates to safety *d s""urity, and most importantly, the intemal protocols for information exchange' I am putti"of*fy interested in tlose intersections between the academic enterprise, counseiing, our disciplinary systerq the legal systen, and tle police'
case we have

preliminary schedule calls for those reviews to be complete by late August, which I understand is within your study time-frame to be of use to you'
Or.n

in addition to our incident response, I know that you wili be looking spectrum of issues including policies, protocols, and the law'

at the broad

could I have read and heard other university presidents and plndits say that thistragedy observations' have happened on any campus in America. We draw no solace from such

My hope is that we - and every campfis throughout the nation:- can leam in the months un*a *itut happened and why...to the extent that rational conclusions can be drawn from irrational violence. we will leam and the world will leam from this.
health' There already is a vigorous national discourse underway on many issues- mental tt e iot"rptaybetrveen the righrc of individuals and the rights of societies and communitiis, the interaction between gun laws iurd privacy, czlmpus security and the underlying physical infrastructure, and much more'

we need to know how well our mental health system is performing. Is this country devoting the time, resources, and energy to helping those in need?
We need to know if privacy laws can or should change so that school administrators, court officials, or thJ mental health profession itself, has the information it needs to treat and handle those with mental illnesses on college campuses'
versus the Certainly, you will bump into ttre nexus of individual rights and privacy laws harm rights oia;ociety, a community, or a university to protect itself against possible from the mentally ill...or anyone else, for that matter'

procedwe in its We need to know if the university reacted in accordance with accepted police and rescue squad response to the murders within our residence hall. Our university from a bed within a reqponded within tluee minutes of a report that someone fell resid"nr. hall. within minutes thereafter, the police, then knowing of a gunshot fatality *J irrj"ty, seoured the residence hall, began investigating, andwithin one hour had a ;p;tr* oiinterest." Your analysis of this and the tenible events following is of crucial importance'

Page 3

My campus has 19 miies of public roads on its 2,600 acres and 153 mostly accessibie buiidings, On aay given day, we have about 35,000 people coming and going. How does an organization secure a university campus during an emergency? Or for that matter, what ievels ofsecurity are appropriate for norrnal operations?
We need to know about the preparedness - to the degree that any institution can prepare for horrible and irrational mass violence - of my university and other schools like ours for violence or other mass events that require an institutional response to protect the health, safety, an{ welfare of a campus community. We have multiple methods of emergency communications and have in the works implementation plans for more. We all need to know whether universities such as our can do more to protect and inform its populations and multiple audiences in emergencies.

Tomonow, Virginia Tech will celebrate its annual spring commencement. This is our time for celebration. Commencement" of course' means't}te beginaing." For our graduates, it is and will be the beginning of the next phases of their lives. We know that they will carry with them not only those treasured memories rurique to the college experience, but aiso the searing memory of the tragic events of April 16.
We owe it to them, we owe it to the injured we owe it the famiiies of the fallen... indeed, we owe it to all other schools and canipuses in this country to examine all these issues in

I

theirtotality....and findwaysofpreventinganythinglikethiseveragain.

-end-

August 15' 2007

Statement of Kenneth R. Feinberg Concerning the Announcement and Dlssemination of a Final Protocol for the Distribution of the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund.
Kenneth R. Feinberg, Consultant to the Mrginia Tech Administration for the design, implementation and administration of the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund, today announced the Final Protocol to be used in the distribution of approximately $7M dollars to the families and victims of the April 16 tragedy :"1 am grateful to the families and victims of the April 1 6 tragedy' and to President Charles Steger and other officials at Virginia Tech, for assisting me in designing a Final Protocol for the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund. During the past few weeks, I have benefited greatly from the input of all interested parties. I particularly thank President Steger for his leadership in coordinating this intense effort to fashion an appropriate and workable HSMF distribution plan." The Final Protocol differs in many substantial respects from the draft that was earlier disseminated to all interested parties:

1.

The amounts to be distributed to eligible claimants exceed in all categories amounts originally proposed.

2.

Victims wtro were the most seriously injured will receive both free tuition and a compensation payment. Free tuition will encompass the number of years needed for a student to complete his/her existing course of study.

3. 4. 5.

A summary accounting of the HSMF, requested by many families, is attached as part of the final protocol. All necessary Claim Forms for filing a claim with the HSMF are also attached. The HSMF deadline for contributions has been extended until the end of this year,
December 31 ,2007
.

Claims from eligible families and victims will be processed beginning immediately with a claim filing deadline of September 15,2007; "l will continue to work with eligible families and victims in providing assistance during the next 30 days as all claims are processed. lt is very important that claimants comply with the filing deadline. In order to meet this deadline my staff and I will work Wth Virginia Tech officials to make sure that all eligible claimants file a timely claim.' "My heart goes out to the families and victims of this tragedy.'

Update on Recovery Efforts as of August 7, 2007

Universitv-wide Effoft s:

.

New Office of Recovery and Support (1700 Kraft Drive, Suite 1100, Corporate Research
Center)

. . . . . .

Will coordinate universityt communication with internal and external constituencies and with families, and coordinate on-going recovery and response.

lay Poole, Director, 231-0065 (office).
Ellen Plummer, Assistant Provost and Deputy Director, 231-6300.

Several professionals will be hired
university community.

to

coordinate continued services

to

families and

Two major grants being submitted to Department of Education and Department of Justice to provide funds for continued counseling and support for the university community over next several years.

Changes to security and notification (selected)

. W Alerts notification system, comprised

can contact students, faculty, and staff: text messaging, instant messaging, calls to nonW phone numbers, emails to non-VT addresses. Subscribe at htto: //www ' alerts'vt.edu/.

of a variety of methods by which the university

.Lockstobeinsta||edonc|assroomdoors;chan9esto|ockingofoutsidedoors.
Norris Hall reopened after extensive cleaning, repainting, and new floors; Department of Engineering, Science, and Mechanics moved back in. Affected classrooms remain locked and unscheduled for now.

.

psychological assessment survey of all faculty, staff, and students to determine psychological impact and need for services, summer 2007 (Jones, Kessler, and Hughes).

Hokie Spirit Fund:

. . .

Kenneth Feinberg, 9/11 fund administrator, is now heading up disbursement of funds'

$7.1M contributed victims.

to 30+

funds, including scholarship funds in the names of deceased
be

plan for disbursement

to be finalized by mid-August, with anticipation that funds will

disbursed by mid-October.
Special Commemorative Eve nts:

.

Dedication invited.

of drillfield memorial, Sunday, August 19, noon; open to the public.

Families

. y1 Engage, October 16 special

dinner on the drillfield and (tentative) April 16 (1 year anniversary): The university community will come together to honor the students and faculty who were committed to service by urging many more people to engage in service to

communities and to individuals in need. Participants will be asked to pledge at least 10 hours of community service between October and April anniversary. Goal of 300,000 hours of community service pledged by faculty, staff, students, and members of community. Service may be to organizations (tocal, national, or international) or to individuals by choice of person
pledging. Conceft for

W,

September 6, Dave Matthews Band and others.

Pre-game ceremony for first football game.

Faculty Families:

Anna Beth Benningfield is case manager for faculty families and affected departments, 540267-6953 (cell).
Su

pport for families Continued health care benefits, either through continuation of employment will assume responsibility for premiums. Facilitated employment opportunities at

. . .

or university

w

for those spouses who wish to work,

Assisted with accessing life insurance, worker's compensation, social security, and other be nefits.

of sources. Some families eligible for tax-deferred college accounts funded by state; TIM-CREF has specifically donated funds for college accounts for deoendent children of
faculty.
Funeral and travel expenses, counseling or medical treatment, and financial advising have been covered by several sources.

Dependent children will have opportunities for funding for college education from a variety

Modified duties option offered to those eligible as well as other policies that could benefit those spouses who are also faculty members.
Hokie Spirit Fund cash payments and/or contribution to scholarship fund. Families of Deceased Students:

. . . .

Funeral, counseling, medical expenses covered by victims'crime fund, Red Cross, and Hokie
SDirit fu nd.

Received posthumous degrees, class rings universitv. maintain on-going communication.

at commencement; travel expenses covered

by

Case managers will continue contact with families

to identify needs that can be met by VT and

Hokie Spirit Fund cash payments and/or contribution to scholarship fund.

Iniured Students:

.

phone survey of injured students conducted by Victim Witness Assistance Program.

2

Physically injured students: 20 planning to return to campus; 12 will seek individual counseling; 16 seek group counseling; 10 want tour of Norris Hall' Students in Norris, but not injured: 71 returning to campus; 68yo seeking either or both individual or group counseling; 75olo want tour of Norris Hall.

Informal dinner for injured students with Vice President for Student Affairs scheduled for B/18, and another casual lunch check-in with her during second week of classes.
Assigned case manager for on-going needs and connection.

Facu

lty/Staff

Proo ra ms:

. . . . . . . . .

Anticipate three to five open presentations on "Responding to Disruptive or Threatening Student Behavior" by Dean of Students and Director of Cook Counseling, and several scheduled for specific groups or departments.
National experts on psychological first aid will present programs on working with distressed students, workshops for faculty/staff on self-care/ and train the trainer programs for mental health professionals.

Trainings offered

by outside experts on grief/trauma based recovery groups and eye

movement desensitization and reprocessing.

pathways to Resilience, August 30-31, hosted by Center for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (CEUT): Clinical psychologists Lennis Echterling and Anne Stewart will offer interactive workshops and discussions related to general concept of Posttraumatic Growth.
CEUT Brown Bag Lunch, August

8, 12:00

-

2:00.

Wine and Cheese, August 17, 3:00
Undergraduate Education, Hillcrest Hall.

-

5:00, hosted by CEUT, Honors, and Center for
August 22,4:00

First days of c/asses Dining Room.

-

how is

it going?

-

6:00, hosted by CEUT, Hillcrest

ValueOptions counseting available for employees, special programs for departments or other groups can be arranged as needed. Anticipate possible Faculty Resource Center (part of grant request).

Student Proorams (partial list onlv):

. . . . . .

Made some modifications special communiquds.

to summer orientation for new students and families; sent

several

Three help centers for first two days of cldsses in Squires, chapel, and drillfield tent.
Extended hours at Cook Counseling Center with walk in services during first week.

Anticipate adding three additional counselors to Cook Center staff. Programming in the residence halls, Anticipate
stu de nt-orga

nized programming when students return'

Dear Student:

With fall sanester rapidly approaching, and with the cenain knowled ge tbx 416 remains fresh in our collective memory, I wanted to underline some helping services avaiiable on campus.
The university has been in touch with students in close proximity to the tragic events of mid due to ties of fiiendship and club associations, even students far from Norris and West AJ, may have lost someone close and thus are dealing with special circumstances.

April. However,

People deal with the loss of friends and associates differently. Some tum to family and friends; some sort out feelings by journaling; and some find meditation heipful. However, as a person who oversees health and wellness at Virginia Tecb, I believe in the efEcacy of counseling. Therefore, I write to discuss briefly relevant sewices, and ask you think about what might be helpful. The range of counseiing services on qrmpus includes:
1 . Individual Counseline: Students might engage in grief counseling with a trained psychologist. One-on-one counseling might consist of a single or multiple sessions.

2. Grouo Counseiins: Some students prefer group counseling, or meeting with a few other students and a skilled faciiitator, in order to biend professional and peer support. 3. Pastoral Counseiing: students of a religious frame of mind might prefer a referral to someone skilled in spiritual matters.

4. Relaxation Skills: The Counseling Center and Recreation Sports have offerings that promote relaxation techniques to reduce stress.
5. Disability Counseling: if troubling evEnts result in diffrculties with concentratiorg sleep, or other life functions, the Offrce of Services for Students with Disabilities may be
a good place

to check.

if the events of 4/16 might interfere with academic progress, peftinent academic advisor can assist. referral to a
6. Academic Counseiurq: Please tbink about available resources and any ofyour own needs. Then, when back on campus, do feel free to call for assistance at one or more of the following offices:

r . o . .

IndividualiGroup Counseling, Cook Counseiing Center (540-231-6557) Pastorai Counseling, via the Dean of Students Office, (540-231-3787) Relaxation Skilis, Recreational Sports (540-231-6856) Disability Counseiing, Disability Services Office (540-231-3788) Academic Counseling, Ron Daniel, Associate Provost (540-23i-3341)

We hope you are having a good summer, and we look forward to your return to campus. Sincerely,

Richard J. Ferraro, Ph.D. Asst. V.P. for Student Affairs

\

The university has publicly stated that the university has approaching $8 million

or/vill incur

expenses

Virginia Tech has incurred or will incur exp6nses of about $8 million retJteO to the tragedy of April 16. Somefosts are known and exp-ensed, some are known and not yet expensed/and some are estimated future c0sts. Known costs would include the associated office rentai for families and resPonders; including police, PhYsical Pla measures such as classroom

expenses to restore Norris Hall; lost revenue at The Inn; lodging costs costs for hundreds of staffers many others; additional securitY
y'al

Known but not exPensed co ts would include new positions released to Cook Counseling Center, new Police units such as counselors i rational costs of the Recovery and Support positions, personnel and Office, or the constructlo costs to replace building door handles. Estimated future costs university review rePo contemplated but not clude new positions recommended in the waived tuition charges, new positions released.

HR/Value Options Detrrief session, Wednesday, April 18,2007
varue Attending: Amy Adams Pat Burton Tony Gambill Rosie Higdon Cathy Jacobs Bob Miller Beth Osborne Jennie Reilly Judy Ridinger

onsni

il:l':'

3n

4- Q, or4<-r a* a-'cr {\n cr,^'p "ut' --' U,trx),T4U

Pat Burton began the session by sharing experiences at the meeting she had attended during the day.

Civil Engneering meeting - 55 attended, Story telling, just some, Aff,rrmations of each other and
many questions about What to do when the sfudents return?
4th

meeting stafted at 3 pm and Heidi & Roy still there

Clarity is needed on expectations for these meetings. Need to establish with each department what they want, what we can offer, etc. and then making sure that the Value Options personnel have this information before they attend. Amy stated that HR was improving the communication with departments on tlis level and therefore hoped the process would be moving even smoother in the days to come.
There were numerous requests from staff and faculty members on how to talk to their young children about the recent events. Discuss from the group on creating some resources for the response to children and Cathy will be forwarding that information to Amy. There were also concerns from faculty & staff of the treatment of our Asian population here on campus. Discussed about setting up meeting and having a representative from Cranwell Intemational Center attend.
Pat Burton concluded by saying hats off to the Value Options folks this type of emotional response so often - it's exhausting!

-

don't know how you do

Bob Miller reported out on the sessions in Squires Student Center. They had a steady flow of folks. Some of these counselors were trying to coordinate among themselves to establish a protocol for faculty to use when refuming to class on Monday. They estimated a fairly even number of the various group (faculty, students and staff). They also decided to confer with each other quickly before letting folks leave.
Some discussion and report out on the sessions held at The Inn at Virginia Tech. Therefias some discussion about the Red Cross involvement and some unnamed persomel who hhd been difficult. More discussion about the various "helping" agencies getting together themselves for a meeting at The Inn tomorrow to make sure each agency knew their role and that they didn't step on each other's toes.

Bob Miller shared with us that he had gotten a phone call from the state police investigator role. Bob said he had never met Cho but commented that this type of just signifies they (media and the like) can always highlight the number of lives NOT inquiry saved by therapy but never the numbers of people that are SAVED by counselors. We see these folks in crisis weekly and monthly without the media at the front door. Hearing that there was a hospital assessment of Cho 2 years ago creates a suffering of our own trama as counselors!
because of Bob's previous

Jennie Reilly, Director of University ADA services shared that Intepreters are available for deaf employees in any of these sessions. The Services for Students with Disabilties office will provide as fast as possible, if a department chair or head has an employee who wants to speak with a counselor. Call SSD at 231-3788 Cathy Jacobs, Director of Family & Workllife said she is leaving tomorrow and if there are any additions to the list ofagencies/individuals, etc. who offer their services please forward those to Gloria Smith who is taking this task in Cathy's absence ggsrnith@vt.edu. Cathy shared that Montgomery County schools were coordinating services tonight. Group discussed sharing any information for children with the County. Discussed the option for counseling on-site for children and Sara from Value Options shared that this was not the best idea but would be able to come up with direct referrals for any parent concemed for therr children, etc. Judy Ridinger shared that someone who just came to work here had already received information from Radford University's counseling center on talking to your children. Concerns expressed for Graduate Students . Judy to contact Dean Karen DePauw. Another suggestion out of this discussion was to suggest department send a full tenured track professor into the classroom on Monday with any Graduate Student tasked with running a class by themselves on Monday. Need help to get that done. Other suggestions and info shared: Create a TIP sheet for 1't day of class (Sandy is working on this). Value Options are creating Wallet cards on dealing with trauma after a tragedy Suggestion that someone with an academic background review the TIP sheet for additional needs, etc. before publication. Discussed whether or not to try and set up a I hour info session here at Southgate. Thursday & Friday from Noon to 2 pm Brown bags luncheons will happen in the Center for Undergraduate Excellence - try to coordinate with Terry Wildman Decision about grades has been left up to the individual departments Communicate to the HRIS listserve that HR will work with a department to get time sheet entered and tlieir wage people paid, even if they don't have time cards on hand. Rosie worked with one client and used the approach - is their last check kinda like what they did for this one? We can always do adjustments later. Develop a presentation for remote faculty. Value Options asked about the ability to recording a presentaion iln#142 - we have the tools and resources - yes! What are the plan for the weekend? identify a local resources What are the house on the weekend at Cooks' Counseling Center Extend reservation at Squires through the weekend - both Saturday and Sunday, someone shared that the spring football garne had been cancelled but that people will still coming to campus With 2 people working * you may still need a greeter.

r . . . . . . .

r r o

Judy Ridinger shared that they had met with VT administrators today and agreed to come back to Bumrss. Schedule sessions within their separate sections. Thinking that we need to have probably 6 sessions, in various conference rooms, thing going on at the same time. The are wanting an Intact group to be met with. Debrief - let them talk about it and then go from there. Need at least 7 people. Bumrss has Police ofhcers EVERYWHERE! Need to consider the somewhat uncomfortable surroundinss.

Ittt
4.r9.07

Talking points, June 11,2007 Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund(s)
The fund has paid for expenses incurred to date such as travel, fimeral, groceries, medical, and memorial (eg obituaries) expenses. The funds

WILL be used

as

follows, among other possibilities...

For families of deceased victims: employee family health insurance, undergraduate education for children ofdeceased victims financial counseling mental health services

. . . .

For those physically injured: Tuition and fees for the coming year Unreimbursed medical costs.

. r r

For all:

Full time familv advocates to assist

MESSAGE: "The families of victims and the injured remain our highest priority. Our family liaisons are in almost daily contact. We share some of the frustations."

With respect to issues:
The university has never actively solicited funds. It was set up to respond to thousands of requests from concerned individuals who wished to contribute to help the healing process. The projected use of funds was clearly articulated. It said the funds will be used for assistance to victims and their families, grief counseling, memorials, and comfort
expenses.

The university has NEVER solicited funds in the names of the victims. The university produced memorial publications and a website to honor the victims. All the information and the images were cleared with each family through the liaisons and

the dean ofstudent's office.

HIGHLY accountable. We have been in daily contact with one of the premier accounting firms, KPMG, and with the IRS to advise us on how the funds
The fund is disbursed.

can be

The university family liaisons have been apprising the university of needs. For example, it was through this process that we have been addressing the need for educational expenses of children deceased faculty

"We fully appreciate the stress and frustation among the families and many of us share those frustrations. We are working hard to ensure that HSMF is available but also that the families have access to other resources such as Virsinia Victims Crime Fund.

Comments by Zenobia Lawrence llikes, Ed.D. Vice President for Student Affairs
to the Virginia Tech Review Panel

tvlay 21,2007

Report on Ifealing and Recovery Initiatives at

Virginia Tech Post-April
I. Introduction
Chairman Massengill and members of the Review Panel, I President for Student Affairs.

16

un

Zenobialawrence Hikes, Vice

The Virginia Tech community is one of exceptional resilience and compassion. Following the

honific events of April 16, our community of faculty, staff and students mobilized in countless
ways to provide support to grieving families, the injured and hospitalized, emolled students and the university at large. On behalf of the Office of the President, the Office ofthe Provost, the

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, the Division of Student Affairs, the
Graduate School, and Human Resources, I would like to share with you some of the collaborative

initiatives, support services, programs, and activities we employed to begin the healing and
recovery of our community.

Ceremonies In every culture, ceremonies play an important role in the process of healing and recovery. On
Tuesday immediately following the tragedy the university came together in a convocation held in Cassell Coliseum. Featured speakers included President George Bush, Govemor Tim Kaine,

University President Charles Steger, noted author and University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni, and leaders representing four major religions. The convocation was televised worldwide and served to signal the strength and unity of the Virginia Tech community in the wake
the tragic events of

of

April

16.

Approximately 10,000 were in attendance in the coliseum and an

additional 25,000 were accommodated in overflow seatins in Lane Stadium.

On the same evening as the convocation, the students of Hokies United organized a candlelight

vigil on the Drillfield. This event was attended by thousands ofstudents, alumni, faculty, staff,
and friends who came together to moum and pay their respects. It was for this Stones were first placed in a semicircle in front

vigil that Hokie

ofthe reviewing stand to honor the deceased

victims. Also initiated at the vigil were message boards on which moumers could write
condolences and expressions of grief. As the number of boards grew over several days, tents were
erected on tlre

Drillfield to protect them from the elements. Together with the Hokie Stones, the

message boards have come to serve as the focal point for the collective

griefofthe university

community and

as the

repository for flowers and other mementos symbolizing the loss of students

and faculty who were our dear friends and colleagues.

Throughout the days following the tragedy, the Memorial Chapel served as a place of quiet refuge
where members of the university community could go for a moment of reflection. Representatives from religious and faith-based organizations made themselves available at the
chapel to those who desired pastoral counseling.

Family Support A number of initiatives were directed specifically at meeting the needs of the families of Virginia
Tech students, and I would like to highlightjust a few ofthese. In an effort to respond to the high

volume of calls from families of Virginia Tech students concemed about their safety and welfare,
the university established a 24 hour call center that was staffed by university volunteers as well as representatives from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM). As the

volume of calls diminished, the Dean of Students Office assumed the call center responsibilities.

To support the grieving families who had tost students and faculty, individual family liaisons
were assigned, the majority of whom were from the Division of Student Affairs, the Graduate School, and the Provost Office. These individuals provided personalized services and information to assist families with processes such as the retrieval of student effects; removal of student

vehicles; access to benefits available from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Fund, the Red
Cross, and other community agencies; resolution of student accounts; and family participation in commencement ceremonies.

Individual liaisons were also assigned to injured students and their families to assist them with the
recovery process and reintegration to the academic community for those who were not graduating. President Steger, joined at times by Govemor Kaine and Attomey General

McDonnell, visited injured students in area hospitals to check on their welfare and let them know
that the university was concemed about them.

Deceased students were honored at the 2007 spring commencement by the awarding

of

posthumous degrees. Their families were invited as guests ofthe university to attend commencement to be recognized and accept their son's or daughter's diploma and class ring.

To remember and honor the victims of the tragic events of April 16, the Virginia Tech
Foundation established the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund to aid in the healing process. The fund

will

be used to cover expenses including but not limited to: assistance to victims and their

families, grief counseling, memorials, communication expenses, and comfort expenses. In addition, a general Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund as well as specific memorial funds in the name ofeach ofthe decedents have been established. Additional attention is being focused on the
school-age children of deceased faculty members.

II. Student Health and Wellness
Cook Counseling Center
In the days following the

April

16 tragedy many events and support activities were taking place to

facilitate the healing process. In the area of student health and wellness, the university's Cook
Counseling Center took the lead in terms ofproviding psychological assistance to students on campus. To meet anticipated demand for increased services, Cook Counseling Center extended its hours of operation and offered services both in the evenings and on the weekends. Counselors

worked closely with groups of students with special needs, such as residents of West Ambler
Johnston Residence Hall, surviving students who were in Norris Hall at the time of the incident, members of various student organizations and programs that had lost members, and roommates
deceased students. To date approximately 60 outreach presentations have been made to faculty,

of

staff, and student gloups, and the volume of appointments in the counseling center has increased
at least 50% over this time last year. Knowing that commencement would be an especially

difficult time for students and their families, Cook Counseling Center enlisted 50 mental health
professionals as volunteers to assist the regular staff. Counselors were present at each commencement exercise throughout the weekend.

Anticipating an increased need for psychological counseling in the upcoming montls and years,
the center staff completed several grant applications in an effort to help finance expanded services. The center is providing counseling for the students who

will remain in Blacksburg

during the summer. For students outside of Blacksburg during the summer, the center is also

facilitating counseling referrals.

Schiffert Health Center
The universiry's Schiffert Health Center also played an important role in the healing and recovery
process. Medical personnel from the center visited hospitals where injured victims were treated and then provided special follow-up wound care to a student who had suffered gun shot wounds.

To be sensitive to the psychological needs of students who may have experienced traum4

with medical personnel incorporated psychological screening questions into their conversations
students who presented for physical injuries.

Services for Students with Disabilities The Services for Student with Disabilities Office has taken the lead in providing accommodations

for any injured students who may need assistance in the classroom and anticipates that there will be an increased need to provide accommodations for students with psychological disabilities.

Recreational SPorts
Recreational Sports provided a valuable service to the university community by keeping its fitness facilities open during the week of authorized closing so that students and faculty could exercise and engage in stress relieving activities. In addition, they opened fitness classes to all students and families of the victims'

III. Faculty tnd StafrHealth

and Wellness

Concem for the health and wellness ofthe campus was not focused solely on student needs. Human Resources took the lead in addressing the needs of faculty and staff. Immediately upon

learning of the shootings on campus, Human Resources (HR) contacted ValueOptions, our employee assistance provider, to request assistance and crisis counselors were on campus by midaftemoon. Both small and large group employee sessions were scheduled to provide information related to common reactions to trauma and stress, as well as tips for self-care and recovery support. Squires Student Center was designated as the location for individual meetings with employees, with severat counselors assigned to that location throughout the day. Information was

provided to employees who are parents to assist them in communicating with their children. To

date,l27 group information sessions, reaching 2,980 participants, have been held with colleges' departments, and workgroups and over 800 individual sessions have been held as of May 15,
2007.

Numerous support resources were developed by ValueOptions and made available through group
sessions as well as one-on-one sessions including self-care tips and coping with trauma. This

material was disseminated to employees through University Relations and the university
websites.

Training programs are being developed, with the assistance ofexperts in the field, to help
supervisors effectively manage employee issues that may emerge from the events. Additional resource information focused on resilience and rebounding from trauma has been developed and
is being shared in hard copy and on the intemet.

W. Student Affairs and Academic Alfairs Collaboration
To meet our sfudents' needs and to provide a less stressful end to the semester, a number

of

measures were taken that involved collaboration between Student Affairs and Academic Affairs.

tr'lexible Options for Completing the Semester
On

April

18, the Office of the University Provost in collaboration

with the college deans,

provided three options for students to complete the semester. These options took into account the
education ofour students, as well as their physical and mental well-being realizing that various
students would react differently in the aftermath.

ClassesresumedonMonday, Apt'.l23,andstudentshadtheoptionofdesignating,onacourseby
course basis, how they wished the semester grade to be assigned by the faculty. Grades could be based on the following:

.

The materials which had already been submitted The material already submitted plus any other assigned material which the student chose

to submit

.

All the material which otherwise would

have been submitted

In support of the flexible options and to ericourage students to continue their educational
experience, the Division of Student Affairs supported students who decided to remain in their
residence halls. Housing and dining options were continued despite the student's choice

of

completing the semester. The college deans and the faculty were very helpful in advising students
and in facilitatins a successful end to the semester.

Deferred Academic Suspensions
To support our students further, the Office of the University hovost decided that there would be
no academic suspensions in the spring of 2007 . Students in academic difficulty were allowed an

additional probationary term without requiring academic appeals. This change will impact the
number of available residence hall rooms for the fall semester; however, the Division of Student

Affairs is in full support of this decision.

Classroom Support
When students retumed to classes, the university activated the largest known deployment mental health practitioners in U.S. history. The schedules of the victims and injured were
researched through the registrar's office and approximately 305 counselors attended these classes

of

to provide support for the faculty and students. Counselors were identifiable by purple arm bands.
Others who were available to provide general assistance and support were identifiable by yellow arm bands.

The Center for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (CEUT) held a number of workshops through the period of Wednesday,

April

18, to Friday,

April 20, to help faculty prepare for

resumption of classes on Monday, April 23. Among the workshop topics were: engaging the students in conversation surrounding the tragic events, responding to students who experience

difficulty with the discussions, and describing the grading options the faculty made available to
students for completing their individual courses.

Deferred Judicial Cases
During the days following the tragedy, Judicial Affairs also provided options for students with

pendingjudicial hearings. The office's most immediate focus forjudicial hearings was graduating
seniors and students with serious offenses.

Other students were given the option of resolving their cases before the end ofthe semester or in the fall.

V. Student Support Services

Dean of Students Oflice
The Dean of Students Office played a key role in coordinating the campus response to the tragedy. In collaboration with others, the offrce coordinated the work ofthe family liaisons and
served as the central clearing house for information related to the victims

ofthe tragedy. They

worked closely with the State Police to facilitate the retum of students' personal property from Norris Hall, provided an information hotline for students and parents, and processed a staggering volume of letters, cards, and remembrances for the victims.

Cranwell International Center
Cranwell lntemational Center responded to the special needs of international students that
resulted from the incidents of

April

16. Complimentary intemational telephone cards were

distributed to students who needed to contact their families abroad to assure them that they were
safe. To address the unique concems of Korean students, staff made telephone contact with each

undergraduate and many graduate students from Korea to offer assistance. In addition, the center
responded to departrnents that requested presentations on responding to the special needs

of

intemational students.

Multicultural Programs and Seryices
Multicultural Programs and Services worked closely with the leadership ofthe Asian American
Student Union and other campus leaders to address concems about potential retaliation and
requests from the press. The students were assured

ofthe university's concem for their safety.

Residence

Life

Residence Life has played a key role in the efforts to promote healing and recovery on campus.

Immediately following the events of April 16, resident advisors were deployed to personally
speak with each resident student on campus by Tuesday aftemoon and offer counseling resources.

As reports from concemed faculty and families were received, the professional stafffollowed up appropriately with individual students and met with student groups to facilitate their discussions
about lost friends or roommates. As residents returned to campus, counselors toured through the

buildings and were on call for staffto contact for residents. Exterior doors to all residence halls
remained locked to help ensure a sense ofsafety and well being among residents.

Housing and Dining Services
Housing and Dining Services provided complimentary on-cnmpus housing and meals for victim's families and friends during commencement weekend. To be sensitive to the special needs of these
guests, the housing arrangements included access to counseling services, security coverage, and

24hour a day guest services.

ra:ifat

qr,.

!,ir'rr.:

The Graduate School While the Division of Student Affairs provided support services to the general student population,
the Graduate School focused its efforts on the specific needs of graduate students. Initiatives included providing support to those who lost friends and faculty members, attending to the unique academic needs of graduate students, and assisting graduate assistants to carry out their teaching
and research responsibilities. The Graduate School maintained regular communication with all graduate students and opened the multipurpose room in the Graduate

Life Center as a place for
from other Asian

graduate students to gather and to take advantage of on-site counseling services. Specific outreach

efforts were directed at supporting Korean graduate students as well
countries.

as those

VI. Student Activities and Programs
Corps of Cadets
The Corps of Cadets participated in a number of ceremonial events related to the

April l6

tragedy. The cadet regiment provided the band, color guard, and ushers for the convocation and then provided buglers for Echo Taps during the candlelight vigil. In addition, the cadet regiment
served as honor guard for the memorial wreath at War Memorial Chapel and then at the cenotaph.

.

University Unions and Student Activities
University Unions and Student Activities served as a central gathering place and repository for
memorials during the weeks following the

April

16 incident. Also, the student centers have

displayed memorial tributes from around the world. Squires Student Center and the Graduate Life Center remained open throughout the entire week following the incident to provide counselors
and community support to assist those in distress. In addition, the various union facilities were used as venues for memorial services and commemorative events. Plans are currently underway

for a fall healing concert that will bring the campus community together to remember the victims.

Ilokies United
We are especially proud of the work of Hokies United, a student-driven volunteer effort organized to help respond to local, national, and intemational tragedies. As mentioned previously,

Hokies United banded together immediately after the tragedy occurred and was able to pull
together a candlelight vigil held on the Drillfield the evening of April 17. In addition, they organized a series of
a casino night

unifing activities

intended to bring the community together. These included

in War Memorial Gym and a picnic on the Drillfield that was attended by an

estimated 15,000 people. And on the first day back to classes, Hokies United organized once
again to hold a campus-wide moment of silence'

VII. Conclusion
Finally, the Virginia Tech campus community remains committed to the process of healing and
recovery as evidenced by the combined efforts ofour students and employees from across the

university in such departments as Physical Plant, Athletics, Human Resources, Student Affairs,
the Graduate School, the Provost Office, and academic departments, to name just a few.

ScENES tsALLlsrlcb-MniCrr AT Bo'rH cRIME
has confirmed the The Virginia Tech Police D-e:artment BLACKSBURG y',irnurtiple fatalities at Norris t-lall on identification ot tne gu#X; 16' 2t)07' tie Virginia Tech campus Monday' April as Clro Seung-Hui' 23' Cho was i"ln"ioLnt#iuO The individu"' siniory"il'T 1i Ery^l?h major at as an undergt;;;'t" student in nis enrolled as a resident aliien Korean native' wi's in the U'S' Virginia Tech' Cho' ".So'tn ch;Mlle' Va cho was living on campus in with a residen"" "rruoi'i'il;;'; H a rper Resrd;l:?J regoY?red f rorn un and Z2-catiber.t o,nd g un werg. ?: the "as sei::ed fr-om the Norris Hall and Norris Hall. Ballistic t".i, Jn in" evidence U'S' scenel; were conducted at the West Ambler Jonnston R"=iO"n"" Hall in Maryland' Lab ano exptosives (ATF) lab Bureau of Alcohol, in Norris Hall was u:;ed in confirmed that one of the two *""poniir"ized resurts

NOR'RIS HALI- GUNMA'N IDENTIFIED

;J*qi#ior

n"

T";;;;, Fi;;;;;

both

- -,. .^:. ,^r,, i.r^nrir' .hr Seung-Hui identify Cho "At this time, the evidence does not corrclusively r"t"tt"t,' said Colonol W' Steven Flaherty' as tne gun;". police. "\vith this newfound ballistics "ii"in superintendent of the virgri" si"r" to the rext level of this complex evidence, we are

shootings.

investigation ""*

;l';'i;;lceeo

^^^-+ the nighi collecting, srent +ha '.,inhr r:ollectir pro(lesslng state, local and federal investigators ffeif. fne decLased were recovered and anatyzing Norris Hall' "uiO"n""JiJ;*itnin ^6nis on'tr" seconolioor and a stairwell of from at least four by police in a classroom among "tur"iof-rr The gunman, wno took nil fiiu was discovertd ,n" u'"[Tt;, to the Medicar Examiner's the deceased have been transp.rted identi:ication' Office in Roanoke for examination and once studerrts and faculty will be releasetd o"""ased The names "i next o: kin notified' all victims are positiveiy iJentified and Blacksburg Poilce Departmernt' The Virginia tecf' Police Department' rnultiple Virginia St"tu potii", FBl, ATF and Monigomery County i"n"iitf," Otfice, at both ]gJ;"i"r ;r" "tt lnu-otu"*in the ongoing investigatiorr state and other natt' 'ocat Norris Hall and West Ambler Johnston

ti"li

Ft

rac,gttl TuE,

We have new information to release concerning the

ongoing investigation into Mondayts fatal shootings. State, local and federal investigators worked through the night collectingr processing and anallzing evidence from within Norris Hall.
And, I would like to take a minute to recognize the

outstanding professionalism and efforts put fo*h by my

officers since that initial 91{ call came into our dispatch center Monday morning.
I also want to commend the response and

dedication of those officers and investigators with
Blacksburg Police, Montgomery GounQr Sheriffs Officet

State Police, FBI and ATF...
Based on their hard work, we have been able to

confirm the identity of the gunman at Norris Hall: Gho
Soong-Hwe.
He is a Z3-year-old Korean here in the U.S. as a

resident alien.
Gho was enrolled as an undergraduate student in

his senior year as an English major at Virginia Tech.

Gho was in the U,S. as a resident alien

with a

residence established in Genterville, Va...and was living
on campus in Harper Hall. A 9-milimeter handgun and 22'caliber handgun

were recovered from Norris Hall.
Ballistic tests on the evidence seized from the Norris Hall and the West Ambler Johnston Residence
Hall scenes were conducted at the U'S. Bureau of
Alcoholn Tobacco, Fireanms and Explosives (ATF) lab in

Maryland.
Lab results confirmed that one of the two weapons

seized in Norris Hall was used in both shootings.

All of the deceased have been transpofted to the
Medical Examiney's Office in Roanoke for examination and identification.
The names of the 32 deceased students and

faculty will be released once all victims are positively
identified and next of kin notified..,and Doctor Fierro,

the Ghief Medical Examiner of Virginia will go into more detail on that in a rninute.

.,

I also want to follow up on the discussion from yesterday about the r'person of interestt from the first

shooting at the residence hall. That individual was an acquaintance of the female

victim killed at West Ambler Johnston Hall.
He was stopped in his vehiele off campus and

detained for questioning.
As officers were interwiewing him, the shootings at

Norris Hall were reported
We are still looking to him for information as the
i

nvestigation continues,
We also have no information at this time to retate

the on-campus bomb threats made in the last two weeks to either of yesterdayts events.

Comments by Zenobia Lawrence Hikes, Ed.D. Vice President for Student Affairs to the Virginia Tech Review Panel May 21,2OO7 Report on Healing and Recovery Initiatives at Virginia Tech Post-April 16

l.

lntroduction

Chairman Massengill and members of the Review Panel, I am Zenobia Lawrence Hikes, Vice President for Student Affairs. The Virginia Tech community is one of exceptional resilience and compassion. Following the honific events of April 16, our community of faculty, staff and students mobilized in countless ways to provide support to grieving families, the injured and hospitalized, enrolled students and the university at large. On behalf of the Office of the President, the Ofiice of the Provost, the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, the Division of Student Affairs, the Graduate School, and Human Resources, I would like to share with you some of the collaborative initiatives, support seruices, programs, and activities we employed to begin the healing and recovery of our community.

Geremonies
In every culture, ceremonies play an important role in the process of healing and recovery. on Tuesday immediately following the tragedy the university came together in a convocation held in Cassell Coliseum. Featured speakers included president George Bush, Governor Tim Kaine, University President Charles Steger, noted author and University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni, and leaders representing four major religions. The convocation was televised world-wide and served to signalthe strength and unity of the Virginia Tech community in the wake of the tragic events of April 16. Approximately 10,000 were in attendance in the coliseum and an additional25,000 were accommodated in overflow seating in Lane Stadium.

on the same evening as the convocation, the students of Hokies
United organized a candlelight vigil on the Drirtfierd. This event was

UU

,1 r\."r..

{ i.U;

attended by thousands of students, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends who came together to mourn and pay their respects. lt was for this vigil that Hokie Stones were first placed in a semicircle in front of the reviewing stand to honor the deceased victims. Also initiated at the vigilwere message boards on which mourners could write condolences and expressions of grief. As the number of boards grew over several days, tents were erected on the Drillfield to protect them from the elements. Together with the Hokie Stones, the message boards have come to serve as the focal point for the collective grief of the university community and as the repos[tory for flowers and other mementos symbolizing the loss of students and faculty who vyere our dear friends and

colleagues.

:

Throughout the days following the tragedy, the Memorial Chapel served as a place of quiet refuge where members of the university community could go for a moment of reflection. Representatives from religious and faith-based organizations made themselves available at the chapel to those who desired pastoralcounseling.

Family Support A number of initiatives were directed specifically at meeting the needs of the families of Mrqinia Tech students. arid I would like to hiqhliqht Mrginia students, highlight just a few of these. In an effort to respond to the high volume of calls from families of Virginia Tech students concemed about their safety and welfare, the university established a 24 hour call center that was staffed by university volunteers as well as representatives from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM). As the volume of calls diminished, the Dean of Students ffice assumed the
call center responsibilities. To support the grieving families who had lost students and faculty, individual family liaisons were assigned, the majority of whom were from the Division of Student Affairs, the Graduate School, and the Provost ffice. These individuals provided personalized services and information to assist families with processeg such as the retrieval of student effects; removal of student vehicles: access to benefits available from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Fund, the Red Cross, and other community agencies; resolution of student accounts; and family participation in commencement ceremonies. Individual liaisons were also assigned to injured sfudents and their families to assist them with the recovery process and reintegration to

{uas
$OO A.M. PRESS GONFERENCE

Dr. Charles Steger

Presidentr Virginia Tech
Ghief W.R, Flinchum

Virginia Tech Police Department
Golonef Steve Flaherty , Virsinia State Potlce- UU

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The Honorable John Marshall Virginia Secretary of Public Safety

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States. FERPA also provides a quirky privacy provision that places a wall between the

educational records at an institution and the law enforcement records maintained by the campus

police department. To put this in concrete terms, educational records cannot be freely disclosed
by the administrative offtces with the police department. To give an example, a student is charged in the University's disciplinary system with a violation ofthe acceptable use policy that prohibits sending harassing e-mails to a fellow student. The University's hearing officer is precluded from sharing the outcome of the hearing with the campus police. Another example is that police are not

informed when students are treated for psychiatric problems. In the same vein, the police are not
given health information when a patient is released from a hospital. This latter example actually
relates to the privacy protections contained in HIPAA.

In addition to the federal statutes, state law also restricts the University's ability to disseminate
student records. The General Assembly has articulated the privacy concems in the Virginia Freedom of Information Act by exempting from mandatory disclosure a student's scholastic records. While the Freedom of lnformation Act permits limited disclosure of records at the

University's discretion, FERPA and other state laws preclude disclosure. ln particular, I would
draw your attention to the Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Section 2.2-3800 Code of Virginia, as amended. Specifically, that statute authorizes the University to

collect, maintain and share information with third parties only to the extent necessary to
accomplish the University's mission of educating the student. It does not provide for unlimited disclosure in the law enforcement context to third parties.

The protections afforded by federal and state laws to the individual are most absolute in the medical context. For example, a medical screening is not part of the University's admissions
process. The Code of Virginia, Section 23-7.5, requires that each prospective student provide a

health history, but this history is not all encompassing. The health history is really a listing

of

diseases against which the student has been immunized. The purpose of this code requirement is

to guard against the potential outbreak of controlled diseases in the close confines ofa residence hall. Even this modest requirement is not absolute
as the General

Assembly has waived the

immunization requirement on a student's religious grounds.

Given the legal framework, let me tell you what I can about Mr. Cho based on police records. There was a narrow window in late 2005 to early 2006 that his behavior was called into question. The Virginia Tech Police made a referral to the University's disciplinary system for an incident in

which he sent an unwelcomed e-mail to a female student in late 2005, or approximately sixteen
(16) months before

April 16,2007 . The disciplinary

system contacted the e-mail recipient to

determine whether she wanted to pursue the matter. She declined to do so. Therefore, there was
no cause for action on the part of the University. Since Mr. Cho's enrollment in Fall 2003, he had

no other interaction with the disciplinary system.

As has been reported publicly, the Virginia Tech Police Department also received an inquiry

during the 2005-2006 academic year from the Chair of the English Department conceming Mr. Cho's classroom behavior based on the content of some of his writings and the fact that Mr. Cho took pictures of other students with his cell phone camera. The Chair of the Department did not
share the specific writings

with the Police, nor did she file a formal police report. As determined

by an informal review conducted by the Police Department, the behavior was not criminal in
nature. The Police offered to provide any necessary assistance. Instead of further Police

involvement, the Chair talked to M-r. Cho and the Chair and he agreed that he would attend
private tutoring sessions that would allow him to complete the class assignments without the necessity of his retuming to the class. Records show no further class based complaints related to inappropriate behavior. Further, no referral was made to the student disciplinary system about this
event.

An additional contact on December 13,2005, between Mr. Cho and the Virginia Tech Police has
been documented. According to public records maintained by the Montgomery County General

District Court, the Virginia iech Police brought Mr. Cho to the attention of the Department of
Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse Services as a result of a concem raised by
a

fellow student who knew Mr. Cho. In tum, Mr. Cho was brought before the General District

Court Special Justice, who ordered Mr. Cho to undergo evaluation at the Carilion St. Albans Behavioral Facility. On December 14,2005, the Special Justice for the General District Court
ordered Mr. Cho to follow-up out-patient treatment because of the danger he presented to himself
as a result

of mental illness. No follow-up report was made to the Virginia Tech Police.

In summary, the impact of these laws that I have outlined is to limit what can be shared about
students publicly or with third parties, within the organization, and even with the police

department. Given the constraints imposed by the law, there are restrictions on what Virginia Tech can share about Mr. Cho publicly. This was the reason why Virginia Tech did not release

Mr. Cho's academic records to the F.B.I. until the F.B.I. had obtained a subooena. It is also

Remarks to the Virginia Tech Review Panel

By Kay Heidbreder, University Legal Counsel
May 21,2007

Colonel Massengill and Members of the Review Panel, if I may......

My name is Kay Heidbreder. I serve

as the

University Legal Counsel and Assistant Attomey

General assigned to Virginia Tech. In this capacity, I provide legal advice under the direction

of

the Attomey General to the University. Given my position, Dr. Steger has asked me to provide an

overview ofthe legal mandates under which Virginia Tech operates with respect to the protection

of student information. This overview is not meant to be legal advice to this panel. Rather, Dr.
Steger believes that it is crucial for this Panel to have some context

ofthe legal landscape for

institutions ofhigher education. In addition, he has asked that my remarks center on the interplay
between the Counseling Center, the student disciplinary system, faculty interaction with students
and the police department. He has also asked me to share the constraints that the University faces

in providing student records to the public at large.

At any institution of higher education in Virgini4 there are a number of laws protecting the
privacy of students and student records. These laws include The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. A. 312329, HIPAA 42 U.S.C. Section 1320, the Virginia Freedom

of

Information Act, Section 2.2-3700, Code of Virginia, as amended, and the Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Section 32.2-3800, Code of Virginia, as amended. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (aka FERPA or Buckley Amendment) sets forth criteria for the dissemination of information to protect a student's rights ofprivacy.

The University is restricted in its ability to share a student's educational records with third parties, extemal to the University, absent a properly executed release or a court order. While it is debatable whether the FERPA protections end at the student's death, the other laws contain no
such limitation. Exceptions to these non-disclosure requirements include sharing records with

employees within the University who need the information to do their job. For example, an

instructor can share grade information with the Registrar. However, there is never permitted a
disclosure for medical or counseling records. This absolute prohibition tracks the restrictions

covering disclosure of medical records as provided in HIPAA or the federal legislation that
protects health information for every individual treated by a medical professional in the United

.1

,

.

important to stress tlrat it is not just Mr. Cho's records that are protected by these laws. Virginia Tech would be precluded from releasing similar information about any of the victims ofthe
events of

April

16. Furthermore, any complaints filed by third party students about Mr. Cho could

not be shared publicly, notjust to protect Mr. Cho, but also to protect the identity of those third

party complainants as well.

Thank you for your time today. Next David Ford, Vice President for Academic Affairs,
speak with you about the events

will

of April

16, 2007

.

Comments by Charles W. Steger, President of Virginia Tech, to the Virginie Tech Review Panel

llfiay 21,2007

Introductory Remorks and Overview of Virginia Tech's Presentation

Colonel Massengill and distinguished members of the panel. I am pleased to have this opportunity to welcome you to the campus of Virginia Tech. During the past week, we have been working with representatives of Tri Data Corporation. to develop our portion of the agend4 which I hope

will

be

helpful to you as you pursue this most difficult task. I might note that your visit to our campus coincides

with our first day of summer school. Although our student population over the summer is only about onefourth of what it is during the regular year and our teaching faculty who are on g-month appointments are
not here, you can get some sense ofthe vehicular and pedestrian traffic flow on a typical Monday

moming at Virginia Tech-as April

l6

was before the shootings began.

To begin, I would like to introduce to the Panel Mr. Lenwood McCoy, who has agreed to serve as the

liaison between the university and the Review Panel to ensure that the Panel receives

a

thorough response

to all requests for information. Mr. McCoy retired several years ago after more than 35 years with the

university, during which he served in a variety of roles, including Director of lntemal Audit and University Controller. He will ensure that all your requests are met.

As you

will

hear during the presentation, we have devoted our energies over the past month primarily to
as

helping those families who lost their sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, husbands and wives,

well as the victims who survived. Let me note here that out of respect for these families, the university
has denied requests by the media and others to enter Norris Hall. We made an exception to enable the Panel to tour the building this morning because of its relevance to your work. We
access

will continue to restrict

until the families who indicate a desire to do so have had an opportunity visit the building. At the

appropriate time, access

will

be provided to the media and other members of the public.

Our presentation to the Panel today is in four parts:

1.

Existing systems for emergency waming and building security.

2.

What the university knew about Mr. Cho prior to the event. What steps were taken prior to the

incident.

Let me take a moment here to explain that disclosure of certain information is complicated by the laws that relate to what information can and cannot be shared with the public, as well as what can be shared
between various units within the university.

As many of you know, the Attomey General's Office serves as the university's legal counsel. Ms. Heidbreder is our University Legal Counsel and a Special Assistant Attomey General. As such, she is
charged with providing me legal advice on behalf of the Attomey General. We

will provide all

information we can within the law.

3.

What transpired in the Emergancy Policy Group when advised of the first shootings in West Ambler

Johnston Hall and immediately thereafter.

4.

What is being done for support and healing of the families as well as the broader university

community.

In addition to the Emergency Policy Group, there is also an Emergency Response Resource Group, which works in parallel to ensure necessary resources are deployed to whatever group or part ofthe university is
in need. They were able to respond in hours, and in some cases minutes, to provide counseling, meals for the 500 increased security personnel, etc. We

will provide

some detail as to what has been done later this

moming. I have also appointed

a task force to

provide to me by the end of this month a recommendation
a proposal

for an interim memorial that can be put in place in a short time. Subsequently, memorial will be developed.

for a permanent

As we work to recover from the events of April 16, we also want to leam from them. Two After-Incident
Reports are being developed for each ofthe shooting incidents. And as noted in my comments to you in

Richmond last Thursday, we have established three working groups that will focus on: 1)
telecommunications; 2) security infrastructure- locking systems, alarms, etc.; and 3) the interface between counseling services, judicial affairs, academic affairs, and the legal system.

This is being said to note that what we will sharc with you today is what we know to the best of our
knowledge at this point in time, but as our own intemal review and examination continues, other facts

.i

z

may come to light. Therefore, what we offer today is preliminary in nature and might be revised based on the emergence of additional information. We
becomes available.

will certainly

keep you apprised as additional information

That concludes my introductory remarks, and I would be pleased to answer any questions the Panel might
have.

If there are no (further) questions, I would like to call upon Mr. Iim McCoy, from our Office of Capital
Design and Construction, to provide an overview of the systems in place.

The Virginia Tech Emergency/Weather Line recordings were also transmitted and a broadcast telephone message was made to campus phones, The Policy Group remained in session in order to receive additional updates about the West Ambler Johnston case and to consider further actions

ifappropriate.

At approximately 9:45 a.m., the Policy Group received word from the Virginia Tech Police of a
shooting in Norris Hall. Within five minutes a notification was issued by the Policy Group and transmitted to the university communiry which read:

"A gunman is loose on campus.
windows."

Stay in buildings untit further notice. Stay away from all

Also activated was the campus Emergency Alert system. The voice message capability ofthat
system was used to convey an emergency message throughout the campus. Given the factual

information available to the Policy Group, the reasonable action was to ask people to stay in
place. The Policy Group did not have evidence to ensure that a gunman was or was not on the loose, so every precaution had to be taken. The Virginia Tech campus contains 153 major

buildings, l9 miles ofpublic roads, is located on 2,600 acres ofland, and as many as 35,000 individuals might be found on its grounds at any one time on
a

typical day. Virginia Tech is very

much like a small city. One does not entirely close down a small city or a university campus.

Additionally, the Policy Group considered that the university schedule has a class change
between 9:55 and 10:10 a.m. on a MWF schedule. To ensure some sense of safety in an open campus environment, the Policy Group decided that keeping people inside existing buildings

if

they were on campus and away from campus if they had not yet arrived was the right decision.

Again, we made the best decision we could based on tlte information available. So at approximately l0:15 a.m. another message was transmitted which read:

"Virginia Tech has cancelled all classes. Those on campus are asked to remain where they are,
lock their doors, and stay away from windows. Persons off campus are asked not to come to
campus."

At approximately l0:50 a.m., Virginia Tech Police Chief Flinchum and Blacksburg Police Chief
Crannis arrived to inform the Policy Group about what they had witnessed in the aftermath of the shootings in Nonis Hall.

ChiefFlinchum reported that the scene was bad; very bad. Virginia State Police was handling the
crime scene. Police had one shooter in custody and there was no evidence at the time to confirm
or negate a second shooter, nor was there evidence at the time to link the shootings in West

Ambler Johnston to those in Norris Hall. The police informed the Policy Group that these initial
observations were ongoing investigations.

Comments by David

R Ford, Vice Provost for
lN{ay 21,2007

Academic Affairs

to the Virginia Tech Review Panel

Topic: Emergency Policy Group Process/Action for April 16,2007

Chairman Massengill and Members of the Review Panel,

I am David Ford, and I serve the university as Vice hovost for Academic Affairs. One of the
responsibilities I have by virtue of my position is to be a member of the university's Emergency Policy Group. It is in that capacity that I share with you today my account of the processes used
and actions taken by the Policy Group related to the shooting incidents in West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall and in Norris Hall on the moming of Monday,

April

16' 2007.

Shortly after 8:00 a.m. on Monday, April 16, I was informed that there had been a shooting in
West Ambler Johnston Hall and that President Steger was assembling the Policy Group

immediately. By approximately 8:30 a.m., I and the other members of the group had arrived at the
Bumrss Hall Board Room and Dr. Steger convened the meeting. I leamed subsequently that as he awaited the arrival ofother group members, President Steger had been in regular communication

with the police, had given direction to have the Govemor's office notified of the shooting, and
had called the head of University Relations to his office to begin plaruring to activate the emergency communication systems.

When he convened the meeting, President Steger informed the Poticy Group that Virginia Tech

"Virginia Tech

has closed today Monday,

April 16, 2007 . OnTuesday, April

17, classes

will

be

cancelled. The university

will remain open for administrative operations. There will

be an

additional university statement presented today at noon.

All

students, faculty and staff are required to stay where they are until police execute a planned

evacuation. A phased closing

will

be in effect today; further information

will

be forthcoming as

soon as police secure the campus.

Tomonow there will be a university convocation/ceremony at noon at Cassell Coliseum. The Inn
at Virginia Tech has been designated as the site for parents to gather and obtain information."

A press conference was held shortly after noon on April 16, 2007, andPresident Charles W.
Steger issued a statement citing are available on request.

"A tragedy of monumental proportions." Copies of that statement

The Policy Group continued to meet and strategically plan for the events to follow. A cnmpus
update on the shootings was issued at another press conference at approximately 5 p.m.

University employees began immediately to provide counsel and care for the families of the
deceased and injured victims. Before Dr. Zenobia Lawrence Hikes, Vice President

for Student

Affairs, briefs you on those ongoing activities, do you have any questions?

Comments By: Jim McCoy,, Capital Design and Construction Department
Prepared For: Virginia Tech Review Panel

Date: May 21,2007

Building Security, Mass Notification and Emergency Procedures

Good moming. My name is Jim McCoy and, as hesident Steger indicated, my presentation this

moming will focus on the university's building security infrastructure, mass notification systems
and emergency procedures that were in place prior to speak in detail later this morning about the events of

April

16, 2007. While other presenters

will

April l6s, this presentation

is intended to

provide Panel members with a brief overview of the pre-existing framework and operational
procedures that relate to those events.

Building perimeter security for campus facilities is primarily confined to lockable exterior doors. With minor exceptions, building access is controlled by electronic card readers or conventional
locks and keys. Access to interior spaces is controlled in a similar fashion. For discussion purposes, it is useful to categorize campus buildings into two groups, Student Housing facilities and Academic/Administrative/Support facilities.

There are forly-four Student Housing facilities on campus which house 9000 students. For these

facilities, perimeter building access is controlled by electronic card readers which are managed
and maintained by the Hokie Passport Office. The Hokie Passport, which serves as a student's

identification card, is a magnetic stripe card that can be used for multiple purposes such

as

to

purchase meals and services, to gain access to recreational sports activities and to obtain tickets to

athletic events. With respect to building security, the card allows

a

building resident to access

only their particular building during such times that the exterior doors may be locked. The electronic system can iock exterior doors on a scheduled or an
as needed basis.

Typically, Student

Housing facilities are locked between the hours of 10:00 pm and l0:00 am each day. During all
other times, the buildings are unlocked and fully accessible. It should be noted that entry doors to Student Housing facilities are not monitored at any time. As such, even during times when the doors are locked, non-residents can gain access by "tailgating" when an actual resident enters or
leaves the buildine.

Access through interior doors within Student Housing facilities, including doors to resident

rooms, is typically controlled by institutional locks and keys. Key issuance and control is
managed by the Offrce of Student Programs.

With a few exceptions, perimeter access to Academic/Administrative/Support facilities is
controlled by institutional locks and keys. These buildings are typically unlocked between the
hours 5:30 and 6:00 each weekday moming by custodial personnel, and remain unlocked and

fully accessible throughout the day. Based on

a locking schedule that begins at 5:00 pm and

continues through I l:00 pm to accommodate evening classes, a university security crew locks the

exterior doors of these buildings. Most buildings remain locked throughout the weekend.

Building occupants, who may need to access the building during such times that the exterior
doors are locked, may be issued exterior door keys from the Key Control Office within the Physical Plant Department.

Depending upon the function of the space, interior doors may or may not be lockable. Many classrooms and public areas have doors that can be locked, but only from the public/corridor side using an appropriate key. Typically, these doors remain unlocked because of the constant use
these types of spaces. Classrooms, for example, also serve as meeting rooms for a multitude

of

of

student organizations during

"off'hours. Continuous

use by multiple parties for a variety

of

functions makes controlling access to classrooms impractical. Private offices, building support
spaces (Mech,/Elect Rooms, Telecommunications Rooms, etc.) and laboratory spaces are also

lockable. Conventional locks and keys are typically used to secure and access these spaces. In
some buildings, certain interior spaces are secured with electronic card readers or biometric

devices. These particular spaces have a heightened level ofsecurity which reflects the need to

control access more tightly.

There are currently two systems on campus which provide for mass notification. The Emergency

Alert System consists ofpole and roof mounted speakers at six locations throughout the campus.
This system allows for an audible message, either voice or tone, to be broadcast from the controller which is located in the Virginia Tech Police Department. When activated, this systern allows for emergency messages to be conveyed to individuals who are on campus, but not within
a

building. On April 16ft, four ofthe locations were operable and the other two locations were in

the process ofbeing installed.

Depending upon which building they are in, building occupants may receive an emergency
message through the building's fire alarm system. There are currently over one hundred buildings

on the Virginia Tech campus, including all Student Housing facilities, that are equipped with a

fire alarm system. The systems serving forty-one ofthese buildings also provide voice alarm
capabilities if delivered from the building's fire alarm panel. While enhancements are needed to
centralize this function which

will make it a more viable altemative for mass notifications, much noti$
a significant

of the infrastructure is already in place to in the event ofan emergency.

ponion of the university community

For many years, the university has maintained an Emergency Response Plan. The current plan, which has been in place since May 2002, provides a set of protocols for dealing with campus
emergencies of varying degrees. The priorities of the plan are 1) to protect life safety, 2) to secure

critical infrastructure and facilities and 3) to resume teaching and research programs. This plan
provided the framework by which university officials mitigated, responded to and began recoverins from the events of Aoril l6th.

At the cnrx ofthe plan are the actions and interactions ofthe two pre-established functional
groups. The Policy Group, made up of senior administration, creates the policies and procedures
needed to support emergency operations. The Emergency Response Resource Group, comprised

ofthe leaders ofvarious university departments whose services are responsive to the event,
implements the procedures set forth by the Policy Group.

Once activated, the plan encompasses many activities. including the timely dissemination

of

accurate information. As it becomes available, information about an event is gathered by the appropriate plan participants and channeled back to a command center where the Policy Group establishes a plan ofaction based on the information being provided. At the appropriate time or times, other plan participants communicate applicable information about the event to the campus

community and beyond. As prescribed by the plan, these communications can take many forms including broadcast email, broadcast voicemail to campus phones and updates to the university
homepage. Where appropriate, communications through the Emergency Alert System and

available building fire alarm systems may also be enacted.

As the events of April 16tr are detailed in a later presentation, I am confident that the Panel
see the correlation between the actions

will

ofuniversity officials that day and the Emergency

Response Plan that was in place at the time.

With that,

I'll

conclude the presentation. If, however, there are questions from Panel members

regarding the university's security systems or emergency procedures prior to happy to try and answer them for you at this time,

April I 6s, I'll

be

,";.

..-

.

Vireinia Tech Review Pannel: DOCUMENTS

Page

I of2

DOCUMENTS TOP

DOCUITIENTS:

The Virginia Tech Review Panel Comments by Charles W. Steger President, Virginia Tech May 1O, 2OO7
Governor Kaine. Colonel Massengill, and members of the commission. Normally, I would address a commission by saying that I am happy to have the opportuniiy to appear before you. We know that is not true. Each of us appears here today with heavy heart, a most profound sense of sorrow...and yes, still to this day...disbelief.
A

terribly deranged young man....one of our own students...visited unimaginable horror upon our university, our brlght young minds, our rising stars, and our caring and learned faculty.

ln the process, he seriously injured an entire nation. As we have noted many times throughout this terrible ordeal, the families of those who lost their lives and the injured have remained our highest priority, followed by the needs of our greater university community. We will do everything possible to assist with their recoverv.
He took 32 precious lives and then his own. He wounded 25 more.

have said time and agaln, that Virginia Tech, our commonwealth, all of hlgher education, and indeed, the world must leam from this tragedy. I personally asked the governor for your work.

I

we have been and will continue to cooperate fully with your review and findings. I have appointed a lead individual, a retired

university executive with experience in many sectors including audit, to assist you with your data gathering and be your liaison with any office on campus.
Each one of us and each sector of our society that has been touched by this tragedy must welcome the inspection, introspection, and the scrutiny of a thorough analysis.

In our own case we have underway after-action reviews, which can inform your data gathering. In addition to understanding the incidents, we will be looking at three broad areas: telecommunications infrastructure, the Physical infrastructure as it relates to safety and security, and most importantly, the internal protocols for information exchange. I am particularly interested in those intersections between the academic enterprise, counseling, our disciplinary system, the legal system, and the police'
Our preliminary schedule calls for those reviews to be complete by late August, which frame to be of use to you.

I understand

is within your study time-

In addition to our incident response, I know that you will be looking at the broad spectrum of issues including policies, protocols, and the law.

I have read and heard other university presidents and pundits say that this tragedy could have happened on any campus in
America. We draw no solace from such observations.
My hope is that we - and every campus throughout the nation - can learn in the months ahead what happened and why'.'to the extent that rational conclusions can be drawn from irrational violence. We will learn and the world will learn from this. There already is a vigorous national discourse underway on many issues - mental health, the interplay between the rights of individuals and the rights of societies and communities, the interaction between gun laws and privacy, campus security and the underlying physical infrastructure, and much more. We need to know how weli our mental health system is performing. Is this country devoting the time, resources, and energy to helping those ln need?

http://www.vtreviewpanel.or

p/ docsl2007 I mayipresident

notes.hhl

611312007

Virsinia Tech Review Pannel: DOCUMENTS
We need to know if privacy laws can or should change so that school administrators, court officials, or the mental health Drofession itself, has the information it needs to treat and handle those wlth mental illnesses on college campuses.

Page2 of2

Certainly, you will bump into the nexus of individual rights and privacy laws versus the rights of a society, a communlty, or university to protect itself against possible harm from the mentally ill...or anyone else, for that matter.

a

We need to know if the university reacted in accordance with accepted procedure in its response to the murders withln our residence hall. Our university police and rescue squad responded within three minutes of a report that someone fell from a bed within a residence hall. Within minutes thereafter, the police, then knowing of a gunshot fatality and injury, secured the residence hall. began investigating, and within one hour had a "person of interest." Your analysis of this and the terrible events following is of crucial importance.
My campus has 19 miles of public roads on its 2,600 acrus and 153 mostly accessible buildings. On any given day, we have about

35,OOO people coming and going. How does an organization secure a university campus during an emergency? Or for that matter, what levels of security are appropriate for normal operations?

We need to know about the preparedness - to the degree that any instltutlon can prepare for horrible and irrational mass violence - of my university and other schools like ours for violence or other mass events that require an institutional response to protect the health, safety, and welfare of a campus community. We have multiple methods of emergency communications and have In the works implementation plans for more. We all need to know whether universities such as our can do more to protect and inform its populations and multiple audiences In emergencles.

Tomorrow, Virginia Tech will celebrate its annual spring commencement. This is our time for celebration. Commencement, of course, means "the beginning." For our graduates, it is and will be the beginning of the next phases of their lives. We know that they wlll carry with them not only those treasured memories unique to the college experience, but also the searing memory of the tragic events of April 16.
We owe it to them, we owe it to the injured. y/e owe it the families of the fallen... indeed, we owe it to all other schools and campuses in this country to examine all these issues in their totality....and find ways of preventing anything like this ever again.

Virginia Tech Review Panel . Col. Gerald Massengill, Chair Virginia lech Review Panel, P.O. Box 12337, Arlington, VA 222L9-2337 Researci and Staff support provided by the lriDat! divirion of Syrtem Planning Corporation, Arllngton, VA

HOiIE

.

CITIZEN COMMENTS

.

PANEL INFO

.

NEWS

.

PUBLIC MEETINGS

.

NOTES

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Virfinia Tech Rescue Squad

.

Established 1!}69 by four

April t6,2A07
EMS Response

.

w

students

.
.

.

Oldest collegiate Rescue Squad nationwide
Recelved the EMS Service of the year, 1988 Received Governor's Award for Outstandlng
EMS Agencly, 2000

Recognized by American Ambulance Associatlon with Stars of Life Award, May 2007

tr Cdh Wtinmltc,
Ort. M.ttLv, t

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Virginia Tech Rescue Squad

Training & Preparedness

.

Wlunteer Student-Run Organizatlon

.
. . .

Probationary M€mbec attend semester-long

. Two Advanced . One Advanced

-

38 members

Lift Support Ambulances
Life Support Response Vehicle

. Mass Casualty Trailer capable of 30 patients . Biqrcle Team . Gator MedBed

Actirre Members attend EMT-Baslc caurse Acttve Membe6 precept numberof calls Adminiiler€d a set of drills - Medlctl

lntrodudory course - Intmduccd to Ind&rt Comm.od $Atcm

-

ltau|n|

-

Crrdlrc Atreit Motor vbhld! Accld€m
Tablctop MasJ Cislalty Drlll

nesfficur

nesfficue

Tnining & Preparedness

Training & Preparedness

'

Organize annual Mass Gsualty Drill with Ufe Member Assoclation

.
.

Determined need for revised Incident Action Plan for Large Scale Incidents

-

October 2006 March 2007

Approved revised Incldent Action Plan

.

-

Process

of lmplementing
\,\ras

IAP in progress on

April 16
Annual MCI Drill scheduled for early May

nesWue

s/2ol2oa7

Triage Baslcs

Triage Basics

.

In Mass Casualty Incident patients are treated
in a

different mannerthan day-to-day
patlrrts with one of fuur
lMS uses th€
START Triage

. .

Green: walking rwunded [ambulatory] Yellow: delayed transport wounded
ASAP

operatlons

-

EMs providec tag all colors
The Virglnia Office of

System [simple triage and rapld transport] WRS employs SrART Triage on Mass Casualty

lnddents

. I critical patients, transpofted Red: .I patlent
Black dead on arrival,

is not viable

nesffiue

nrsWcue

7:ZLam
virglnla Tech Rescue Squad [VTRSI dlspatched by Virglnla Tech Police Department [vtPDl
4040 Ambler Johnston West for a female subject who had frllen from her loft bed. Resident Advisor made 911 call.

nesfficue

7:24am

7:26am

.

WRS Rescue 3 Responding

.

Rescue 3 arrives on-scene at wAJ

-

AIS Crew whh 3 on-board

nesffiue

sl20/2aa7

7:29am

7:3lam

.

Rescue 3 crew begins

treatint the patients

.

Rescue 3 requests Second Ambulance for second oatient

nesWcue

nrs\ftFcue

7:32am

7:35am

.

Rescue 3 requests All Available Vlrglnia Tech Rescue personnel

.

Rescue 2 Responding

to Ambler Johnston

to respond to WAJ

-

Baslc ufu Support

with 2 on board

EMT-Enhanced

on-'ene

Virginia Tech Rescue Lieutenant on{cene

nes\Wcue

nerffi*t

7:36am

7:43am

.

Virglnla Tech Rescue Squad Captain contacts - MontSomery Regional Hospital IMRHI wlth 1 traumatlc cardlac arrest and 1 crltl{al trauma alert
patient

. .

Rescue 3 en-route

to

M RH

with first patient

Rescue 3 staffed by

-WPD to request addltlonal Ad\ranced uft Support
from BlackbuB Rescue Squad

-

EMT-Prrsmedic EMT-lntermediate
EMT-Enhanced EMT-8aslc

-

nrs\ffi*e

nesfficue

7:48am

7:49arn

.

Rescue 2 requests Carilion Lifeguard medevac

hellcopter

. .

Rescue Z en-rcute to MRH with second patient Rescue 2 staf&d by

-

WPD advises 40 minute ETA from Rural Retreat

.

WPO addsad to send LifuBuard to Montgomery Regional Hospital

. -

EMl-lntermedlrte
EMT-lntermedlate
EMT-Enhrnced EMT-Enhanced

VirtinL Tech Rercue lleutenant contacts Carilion
dispatch
Ufeguard hellcoptrB rru not flyinS du€ lo

lr€ethlr

nesWue

nes\ffiue

9:02am

Approximately 9:40am

.

Rescue 3 returns to service

.
.

Rescue 3 in quarters

Approximately 6 personnel in station Overhear call for active shooter in Nonis Hall over VTPD radio frequency

.

Rescue 2 rernains at Montgomery R€tlonal

Hospital for restoddng

.

nesVffiue

Approximately 9:42am

Approxim ately 9:42am [cont.]

.
.

lmplement WRS Incident Action Plan

.

-

Virginla Tech Rescue Squad Lieutenant assumes EMS Command

Virginia Tech Rescue Squad Lieutenant contacts Montgomery County Emergency Services Coordinator

Rescue 3 staffed

with Advanced Life Support

- Requests all county squads be placed on standby - Requests Emergencl Services Coordinator
respond to VTRS Station

Crew

-

Standing by at wRS Station per EMS Command

nesffius

nesffiue

s/20/2ao7

9:46am
Virginia Tech Reso.re Squad [WRSI dispatched by Mrginia Tech Police Department [VTPD] Second Floor Norris Hall for multiple subjects

9:46am

.

Vlrginia Tech Rescue Squad Lieutenant establishes EMS Command with WPD

-

Unit$ are standlng by

- Wll not proceed

until cleared by wPD

wounded.

.

WPD acknowledges
Rescue 2 is responding

.

from Montgomery

Regional Hospltal

nesffiue

nesffiue

9:48am

9:54am

. .

lnitial Staging Area establlshed at Blacksbu€
Statisn 1
Emergency Servkes Crordinator is advlsed change in Staging location

.

VTPD advises they

will have multiple patients

of

lnformatlon ls transmitted to Emergency Services

coordlnstor
Emecency SeNices Coordinator resets pages fur county unlts and ldentifies MCI situation with Montgomery County Dispat€h

-

-

ls aslced to supply All Av"llable county units

Blacksburg Statlon

I

to

nesffiue

nesfficue

9:56am

9:55am
of Norris

.

First patients begin movlng out

.
.

-

Tactical medics from VTRS and BVN ha\€ been inside the buitdln6
Triage has begun inside Norris Hall by Tactical Medics as rooms are deemed safe

staging Area placed at old Turner and Stanger Streets once VTPD hes cleared EMS to enter Treatment Area establlshed at BaBer and Stanger Street

-

-

Mass Casualty Traller is deployed to Treatment Area

nesWcue

nes\ffiue

5/20/2OO7

9:57am

9:57am

.

EMS Command advises all unlts operatlng on the scene to swikh to Primarv Tactical frequency VrAC1

.

to Old Turner and Stanger to pick up wounded patients that are being extricated from Nonls Hall by Police Officers
Rescue 3 sent

-

Transported to the Treatment Area

.

WPD has not cleared the scene for EMS entry

-

No unlts have entered the scene otherthan Tactlcal Medi6

REswcuE

nesWcue

10:08am

.
.

Primary Triage is taking place in Norris Hall -Tactical Medics Seondary Triage is planned at the entEnce to Norris Hall

.

Multiple EMTs, Al5 personnel, and Nurses have arrived from surrounding areas

-

Staffing Treatment A'ea

REswcuE

10:09am

Approximately 10:20am

.

WPD advises that the shooter is down and PD has cleared the building for EMS entry lnitial Triage Team enters the area on Rescue 3 and proceeds lnto Norris Hall with Police escort
Secondary Triage established on Norris Lawn

.

Surounding hospitals have been contacted and capacity numbers are in the Command
Post

.

. .

Triaged Red(criticaU patients are being

$ansported directly from secondary triage
Triaged Green and Yellow(non-critical) Patients are being re-triaged at the Treatment

.

Area

nesfficue

REsWcuE

Approximately 10:20am

1.0:38am

.

Ambulances are transporting patients to surrounding hospitals per the capac'rty numbers provided by the hospitals.

.

Rescue 2 moves from the Treatment Area

to

Norris Hall with equipment and additional
Triage teams.

RESWUE

nes\fficuE

10:47am .
Triage Teams have cleared the second f,oor

10:58am
of

.

.

.
.

Nonis Hall of all viable patients. Transport of cltical patients ls complete. FinalTriaged Elack Patient count ls 31.
Triage Teams begin to find patients who had jumped from second floor windows with injuries,

EMs operations is notified of a thlrd shootlng incident in the tennis court area on

Washington Street.

.

Triage Teams are staged in ambulances to respond to the tennis court area once VTPD clears the scene

nss\,ffcue

11:13am

11:18am

.

WPD advises EMS Operations there ls no additional incident at the tennis court area (the call is unfounded).

.

The Ambulance Staging Area ls relocated to
Perry Street.

nesffcue

nesfficus

s/2a12007

L2:22pm

3:47pm
the

.

EMS Command stages six ambulances at

.

top of Barger Street in case of another

Units are staged to begin transporting the deceased to the Medical Examiner in Roanoke.

incident

.

Secondary Staging is at Blacksburg Statlon 1.

nesWcue

nesWue

8:00Pm

8:01Pm
to

.

Afl ofthe deceased have been transported the Mediczl Examiner in Roanoke.

.

EMS Command is terminated and the Virginia Tech Rescue Squad returns to normal

ooerations,

nesVZcue

nrsffiue

EMS Response

EMS Response

.
. .

14 Agencles

27 ALS Ambulances

Over 120 EMS Personnel were on*cene

REsWcuE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

-

14 assisting agencies

MontSom€ry County Emeryenql scrviccs Coordlnator Blacksbur8 Rclcue squad Chrl$ltrl3burt Re5cue 5qu8d shsw'vllle Rcscue Souad Lon$hop+lccoy Re.cue Squod

Crrlllon Pltlcnt Transponation Scryic.t
Sslem Rescue Squad Glks R€strle squad Ncwport Rescue Squad Lllcllnr Ambulaoce Servlce Roanoke City tlre and Rescue Vinton tlrst Ald Crcw Radturd Unlvc6lty EMS CIW of Radford EMS

nesWcue

s/20/?.007

Summary

Summary

.

The EMS response was outstanding
All patients were transported within an hour Crltlcal patients were transported lmmediately Triage system was executed without fault

.

The Virglnla Tech Rescue Squad Incident Action Plan was executed with great success

.

.

.
.

Volunteer Rescue Squads exceptional working relationship

*rrfficu=

nesffiue

nesfficue

*rsffiut

SUMMARY OF KDY FINDINGS

SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS
n April L6,2007, seung Hui cho, an angry and disturbed student, shot to death 32 students ancl faculty of virginia Tech, wounded 17 more, and then killed himself. The incident horrified not only Virginians, but people across the United States and throughout the world. Tim Kaine, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, immeiliately appointeal a panel -to review the events leading up to this trageal.y; the handling ofthe incidents by public safety ofEprovided cials, emergency servi"es'providers, andthe university; and the sewices subsequently to families, survivors, care-givers, and the community'

The Virgiinia Tech Review Panel reviewed several separate but related issues in assessing events leading to the mass shootings and their aftermath: r The Life and mental health history of Seung Hui Cho, from early childhood until the
weeks before
a

April

16.

a
a

Feiteral and state laws concerning the privacy of health and education records. Cho's purchase of guns and related gun control issues' The clouble homicide at West Ambler Johnston (WA.I) resitlence hall and the mass shootings at Norris Hall, including the responses of Virginia Tech leailership and the actions oflaw enforcement ofhcers and emergency responders'
Emergency medical care immediately following the shootings, both onsite at Virginia Tech and in cooperating hospitals'

a a

The work of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of Virginia'

The services provided for surviving victims of the shootings and others injured, the families and loved ones of those killed and injured, members of the university community, and caregivers. The panel conducted over 200 interviews and reviewed thousands of pages of records, and reports the following major findings: 1. Cho exhibited signs of mental health problems during his childhooil. His middle and high schools responded well to these signs and, with his parents' involvement, provided ,"t ri"ua to address his issues. He also received private psychiatric treatment and counseling for selective mutism and depression. In 1g99, after the Columbine shootings, Cho's middle school teachers observed suicidal and homicidal ideations in his writings and recommended psychiatric counseling, which he received. It was at this point that he received medication for a short time. Although Cho's parents were aware that he was troubled at this time, they state they dirl not specificaliv know that he thought about homicide shortly after the 1999 Columbine school
shootings.

SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS

2. Durhg

junior year at Virginia Tech, numerous incidents occurred that were clear of mental instability. Although various individuals and departments within warnings the university knew about each of these incidents, the university did not intervene effectively. No one knew all the information and no one connected all the dots. 3, University of&cials in the offrce of Judicial Affairs, Cook Counseling Center, campus police, the Dean of Students, and others explained their failures to communicate with one another or with Cho's parents by noting their belief that such communications are prohibited by the federal laws governing the privacy of health and education records. In reality, fedeial laws and their state counterparts afford ample leeway to share information in potentially dangerous situations. 4. The Cook Counseling Center and the university's Care Team failed to provide needed support and services to Cho during a period in late 2005 and early 2006. The system taitea tor lack of resources, incorrect interpretation of privacy laws, and passivity. Records of Cho's minimal treatment at Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center are missirg. b. Virginia's mental health laws are flawed and services for mental health users are inailequate. Lack of suf6cient resources results in gaps in the mental health system incluiling short term crisis stabilization and comprehensive outpatient services. The involuntary commitment process is challenged by unrealistic time constraints, lack of critical psychiatric data and collateral information, and barriers (perceived or real) to
Cho's

open communications among key professionals.

6.

There is widespread confusion about what federal and state privacy laws allow. Also, the federal laws governing records of health care provided in educational settings are not entirely compatible with those governing other health records' ?. Cho purchased two guns in violation offederal law. The fact that in 2005 Cho had been judged to be a danger to himself and orclered to outpatient treatment made him ineligible to purchase a gun under federal law. 8. Virginia is one of only 22 states that report any information about mental health to a federal database used to conduct backgrountl checks on would-be gun purchasers. But Virginia law did not clearly require that persons such as Cho-who had been ordered into out-patient treatment but not committed to an institution-be reported to the database. Governor Kaine's executive order to report all persons involuntarily committed for outpatient treatment has temporarily addressed this ambiguity in state law' But a change is needed in the Code of Virginia as well. 9. Some Virginia colleges and universities are uncertain about what they are permitted to do regarding the possession of firearms on campus. 10. on April '16, 2007, the virg:inia Tech and Blacksburg police departments responded quickiy to the report of shootings at West Ambler Johnston residence hall, as did the Vi"gt*" Tech and Blacksburg rescue squads. Their responses were well coordinated. that their initial 11. The Virginia Tech police may have erred in prematurely concluding that impression to lead in the double homicide was a good one, or at least in conveying university officials while continuing their investigation. They did not take suffrcient action to deal with what might happen if the initial lead proved erroneous. The police

STIMMARY OF KEY NINDINGS

reported to the university emergency Policy Group that the "person of interest" probably was no longer on campus. 12. The VTPD erred in not requesting that the Policy Group issue a campus-wide notification that bwo persons had been killed and that all students and staff should be cautious and alert. 18. Senior university administrators, acting as the emergency Policy Group, failed to issue an all-campus notification about the WAJ killings until almost 2 hours had elapsed. University practice may have conflicted with written policies'
14. The presence of

large numbers of police at WAJ led to a rapid response to the first 9-1-1 shooting had begun at Norris Hall, call that lb. Cho's motives for the WAJ or Norris HalI shootings are unknown to the police or the panel. Cho's writings and videotaped pronouncements do not explain why he struck when and where he did. 16. The police response at Norris Hall was prompt and effective, as was triage and evacuation of the wound.eil. Evacuation of others in the building could have been implemented with more care.
12. Emergency

medical care im mediately following the shootings was provided very effec' tively and timely both onsite and at the hospitals, although providers from different had some difficulty communicating with one another. Communication of accu' "g"o"i"r rate information to hospitals standing by to receive the wounded and injured was somewhat deficient early on. An emergency operations center at Virginia Tech could have improved communications. The Office of the Chief MerLical Examiner properly discharged the technical aspects of its responsibility (primarily autopsies and identification of the deceased). Communication with families was poorly handled.

18.

trained professional staff to help families get information, crisis intervention, and referrals to a wide range of resources did not work. 20. The university established a family assistance center at The Inn at Virginia Tech, but it fell short in helping families and others for two reasons: lack of leadership and lack of coordination among service providers. University volunteers stepped in but were not trained or able to answer many questions and guide families to the resources they
19. State systems for rapid.ly deploying needed.

Virginia's colleges and universities need to work together as a coordinated system of state-supported institutions' As reflected in the botly of the report, the panel has made more than 70 recommendations directed to colleges, universities, mental health providers, law enforcement officials, emergency service providers, Iaw makers, and other public of6cials in Virginia and elsewhere'
21.

In order to advance public safety and meet public

needs,

\ :M84S/OM^

flt't4t-Comments Charles W. Steger August 22,2001

Good afternoon and thank you for coming. As you know, it's been a bittersweet week for us at Virginia Tech: First, the very moving dedication of a memorial, which will forever remind us of our profound loss and of lhe 32 souls who will always be a part of this university... In the midst of that, a frightening off-campus incident that sent more than 20 ofour students to hospitals - although I'm happy and relieved to say no lives were lost [need to update].

But at the same time, we've seen the return of ogr students to campus, and all of the enthusiasm, joy, and promise that comes with each new school year. I challenge anyone to spend a day on this campus and not come out an optimist

-

The reports that we have released today are also grounds for optimism - because they reconfirm the ability of this institution to examine itself, to leam and to evolve.

As you may recall, after April review processes.
One is an external review

l6 I called for

the creation of two different, but concurrent

essentially an investigative analysis ofthe hagedy from its genesis to its management and response. From the beginning, I felt this needed to be done by an objective, outside panel, backed by significant resources and expertise. I was very pleased that Govemor Kaine was of the same mind, and we look forward to seeing the results of his independent Virginia Tech Review Panel in the coming week.

-

The other review is internal in structure and focus. This review is not intended to be an investigation or a forensic analysis, but rather a close look at the university's existing policies, processes, systems and resources through the new prism ofthe 4/16 ttagedy.

In fact, many colleges and universities around the country are commencing similar intemal reviews, a recognition that this type of senseless tragedy can happen anywhere. But it didn't happen just anywhere, and it is certainly incumbent on us to extract any lessons that could make Virginia Tech stronger, safer, better equipped to fulfill our mission.
We established three committees to undertake our review, and today you will hear brief presentations by each of the three committee chairs. As you've seen, the reports and their appendices are rather voluminous, so we felt these presentations would be helpful in distilling the findings. I thank all three of the committee chairs for their diligence and leadership.

-

Jim Hyatt, executive vice president iurd chiefoperating officer, led the review committee looking at campus security; Erv Blyhe, vice president for information technology, led the committee on communications infrastructure ; Jeny Niles former dean of the college of liberal arts and human sciences, led the committee reviewing the interface and exchange of information across departments, including the intersections between the academic enterprise' counseling, our disciplinary system, the legal system, and the police.

/i

We have also provided the report to the Govemor's panel this week, although I would add that virnratty all of the information contained in them had already been discussed with the panel during the course of its review.
The reports you received today are the same documents that were hansmitted to me by the committee heads, but with some very limited redactions. These include proprietary business information that was given to us by vendors, and a few redactions that were necessary for safety and security reasons. For example, it would be inesponsible for us to publicly discuss the locations of critical communications infrastructure, or operation and placement of certain security systems. The redactions are indicated by X's, so it will be very clear to you where they occur. Let me emphasize that none of the redacted language had any significant impact on the findings or recoulmendations that are made in these reports.

Before our committee chairs make their presentatrot r, t", me take the liberfy of making some overall observations.

public expectations of the entire higher in procedures, policies and resources that are education community. The adjustnents proposed in these reports reflect Virginia Tech's commitment to meet those expectations.
There is little doubt that

April

I 6 has changed

The recommendations for change can be divided into three primary categories that correspond to the three review areas: The first part might be called physical security -- changes in facilities and procedures that are designed to protect the physical safety of everyone in our campus community.

For example, we have all heard about the concept of "lockdown" - the suggestion that a campus can be buttoned up instantaneously in an emergency. Our review reflects the consensui of law-enforcement experts such as the Virginia Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators that such a "lockdown" is simply not feasible on a campus the size of a small city. However, it is certainly feasible to secure or'oharden" individual buildings and other facilities, and the review addresses that approach The second part relates to improving emergency communications - the in-frastructure that facilitates communication into and out of tle c€rmpus, directly to students and faculty, and among emergency responders. For example, the new WAlerts system, which was already being developed before April 16, is now fully operational.

You will also hear discussion of a new, state-of-the-art'oinformation architecture" that has great promise if implemented in coming years. This type of integrated, intemetprotocol system was envisioned initially as a way to enhance the leaming environment, but in fact it can enhance campus security as well. Of course, these communication tools must be coupled with protocols that guide their use, while allowing enough flexibility to respond to each situation. The experts remind us that each emergency is unique and careful judgment must be applied in determining when and how campus alerts are issued.
2

The third category involves the flow of inforrration across departments with regard to students. Simply put, we must have a more coordinated system for managing the needs of students at risk. This includes better interdepartmental communication and more

consistent interpretation and application of privacy laws.
The next steps

will be for the university to conduct

a comprehensive evaluation

of the

recommenditions, including a cost-benefit analysis, to determine which recommendations will be adopted and whether there are other worthy recommendations that have not been identified; prioritized the recommendations; identify funding sources; and develop a timeline for implementation. Those we felt were immediate imperatives are alreadybeing implemented. We will be considering the others based on a variety of factors. Every good idea involves a tradeoff of some type - whether that's practicability, cost, or some type of unintended impact - so we have to look at each on its own merits.
What the intemal reviews do not allempt to do - and I urge you to bear this in mind - is to draw any conclusions about potential relationships between the actions taken or systems in place on April 16 and the cause or outcome of the tragedy itself. Again, this process was not designed for that purpose' We at Virginia Tech have been forever changed by the crimes of one severely disturbed yolmg man. He was determined to commit murder, planned his crime meticulously, and managed to conceal his homicidal urges from all of the law-enforcement authorities and the mental health experts who tried to help him and presumably even from his family.
The reviews before you propose a credible framework to help us meet the demands and expectations of our new reality. We will take whatever steps are needed to maintain the safety, confidence and peace ofmind ofour students, faculty and the entire Hokie

community. As I invite our committee chairs to make their presentations, let me ask that you please hold your questions until all three presentations are complete. I realize this will mean a lot of information up front, but we feel it is the best way to lay out the key hndings.
Jim Hyatt begins. ####

Jantes

A.Hyatt

Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer Atrgust 22,2007

SECUR.ITY INFRASTRUCTUR'E
SPEAKING POINTS PROCESS

GROUP

. r

.

'

o-n Virginia Tech campul Y"19.?yl to the tragic events on the ln resPonse the securiiy lnfrastructure Ao;il-'-16, 2007, the President Working GrouP' exisiing security with examining the university's the' universitv's The Group was charged ;nhance safeiy of systems uno '""o#"u'niiil etfe-ctivety -itt'tt"t where the q''ii"riv'"""J ability to respono jeopardized' the campus commr-tnity is that might,decrease the arso directed to identlfy-straiegies to conside'r not only The Group was ottu"ing ;nO probability of suc-h situations nut arsJtrl- Jehavior of individuals with L"u", technotogicar aspects oitn" regard to camPus securitY' the and t in tum appointed as Chairman of the Group I was appointed following core members' TechnolooY L. Blvthe, Vice Preside"ll"l{::1*ion of Police Earvins Campus Security and Chief 'vi"* Fiesident for Universiiy R. Flinchum' ii'""to' of Wendell

liJritn"a

;;;;#td"i;;i; *

Lawrence

G. nin'rJ''""n"*tJ"i"tt

Relations

Man-ag"l^-u"o iX"i"t v. McCoy, Capital ProjeciCounsel ser "H"iout"o"t, as an advisor to the University

. -!f,/,^-^^ar

ffi; *
GrouP

F

Director of Administraiive was staffed by Heidi McCoy' The Group

operations""d;;;;;iiotneE*"tiii'LVcepresioentandchief
OPerating Officer'

. . .

units Prwide: Staff from several campus representatrves th; ctoup, including and Residential Programs'

;;

?rTiT3"'i*tL,]?i3:ffi%fi::

to review current campus retained exiemal experts The Group also

;;;ttliy

siie visits to two maior its adviso-rs^conducted sector corPorations ln addition, the Group and "a,il' ih"-"" r pu s.9s 9f two p rivate with other national research un ive rs itieJ se'"u'ity infrastructure to benchma* trre irnjvJrsiiy's leaders.

Policies and Procedures'

.

While the commissions and panels established by President Bush and Governor Kaine were fornred to consider security issues from a State and National policy perspective, this Group's focus was to examine security issues from the perspective of a large research university'

.

The Group evaluated the strengths and weaknesses of the university's existing security systems and related infrastructure' and developed recommendations for how existi ng systemsiinf rastructure can be improved
and enhanced. The Group also looked at how to address emergency situations that might arise in the future.

ft is important to note that in order to meet the August 17, 2OO7 report deadline to the President, the group focused its analysis on the main
Blacksburg campus.
a

The Group, therefore, recommends that a follow-up study be conducted of security issues at the university's other campus sites, including Abingdon' Hampton Roads, Northern Virginia, Richmond, and Roanoke, as well as at all Agricultural Research and Experiment stations (ARECs) and 4-H offices.

STRENGTHS ASSOCIA.TED WITH THE UNIVERSITY'S CURRENT SECURITY PROCESSES:

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-

Mutual aid agreements with local, regional and state law enforcement agencies and rescue squads enable the campus to respond in a prompt and coordinated manner to emergency situations.
response to the events of April 16, 2007 over 30 police and law enforcement agencies and 20 rescue units came to the aide of our campus police and rescue squad.

ln

r .

Ongoing joint training exercises with other law enforcement and emergency units allow the campus to prepare for possible emergencies,

The campus employs
multiple formats.

number of mass emergency communication systems including e-mail, an emergency web page, audible sirens, and telephone trees that enables it to get emergency information out in

a

On July 2, 2007 a new mass communication system, W Alerts, was implemented that in the case of an emergency provides instant and text
messaging to individual cell phones. As of last week approximately { 2'500 subscribers had signed up forthis service.

The campus also employs a robust communication infrastructure that in the event of an emergency allows for pre-established call centers and the ability to respond to increased cell phone and other telecommunication
demands.

All student
basis.)

residential facilities and some academic buildings are accessible through an electronic card key access system. (Note: All residence halls are now on card key access on a 7 day and 24 hour
The campus has a nationally accredited.campus police department-

It also has a documented campus emergency preparedness response plan that includes a process for establishing an incident commander, emergency response coordinator and emergency response team to
coordinate and deploy appropriate resources and support services.

. .

The campus benefits from the engagement of the president and key campus administrators in addressing campus emergencies (e.g' Policy
Committee).
ln the event of an emetgency the campus benefits frcm the strcng support of faculty, staff and students and the sunounding community'

FIVE AREAS TARGETED FOR ENHANCEMENT OR IMPROVEMENTS: PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

' . .

Removal and replacement of the hardware on all perimeter doors to mitigate the risk of doors being chained.
Installation of interior locks on all general assignment classrooms and evaluating installation of locks on non-general assignment classroomsExploring the installation of a centrally controlled electronic card key access system for all key academic and administrative facilities. This system will be used to secure buildings during non working hours. ln the event of an emergency such a system would allow individual and'groups of buildings to be locked remotely by the police department.

r '

Constructing a state of the art Public Safety Building that will enhance Virginia Tech Police and Virginia Tech Rescue Squad services by
physically consolidating these units in a single facility.

Exploring the feasibility of deploying a centrally monitored closed circuit television (CCTV) system using video surveillance cameras at key locations on the campus.

COMMUNICATION

provide mass notification in classrooms and other where other systems may not provide adeguate notifi cation environments it is recommended that a simple electronic banner textual displays with audible alarms be installed in all classrooms.

ln order to

Exploring the installation of LCD message boards within the entrances to key campus buildings, as well as outdoor illuminated message boards at major campus entrances. These displays would alert the campus to emergency situations and provide instructions on the appropriate actions to be taken.

,

Creating an electronic "people locator system" that members of the campus population could log on to after an emergency to post their status
so that concemed relatives, friends and colleagues could receive updated information.

.

Developing pre-written "templates"

to help communicators

craft

emergency messages more expeditiously. EMERGENCY PREPAREDN ESS

.

Updating the campus emergency preparedness response plan annualbasis.

on

an

Preparing for potential emergencies by increasing the use of annual 'table top" or simulaiion exercises by key campus units'(e.9. police, rescue squad, physical plant, building coordinators, etc). Where appropriate these exercises should involve faculty, students and staff as well as law enforcement and public safety units from sunounding jurisdictions.

a building coordinator program whereby a person in each the responsible party in the event of an emergency. All coordinators will be trained in appropriate emergency
building is
lmplementing

identified as

response and security processes and procedures. Central coordination and training will be the responsibility of the campus police department.

Formally identifying backups to key Policy Committee members who are unable to physically respond to campus ernergencles. Also enhancing communications with key Policy Committee members who are off camous when an emergency occurs.
PROTOCOLS

Enhancing security protocols that will explicitly highlight what to do in the event of an emergency. This will include posted signs in all classrooms and student services facilities, as well as inclusion of such material as part of new employee and student orientations.

.

Creating a security master plan for the campus and establishing a campus security planning committee.

IMPLEMENTATION

. .

implement the recommendations outlined in this report the university should immediately initiate a program to fully cost and identify the funding sources necessary to implement the program.

ln order to

Possible fund sources could include increased state support as well as a possible mandatory life/safety fee.

FINAL WORDS

. . .

Security planning must be an integral part of
preparedness plan.

a campus'

ernergency

Annual simulation or table top exercises involving multiple campus units and community agencies maintain a state of readiness to respond to
emergency situations.

Security Planning needs the support and participation
leadership from the president to all levels of the University'

of

executive

Ongoing training of faculty, students and staff on how variety of emergencies situations is critical.

to respond to

a

Communication must be multi-layered and involve several different means of communicaiing with diverse populations.

Finally, it is important to note that this overview only highlights 15 of the.27 recommendations listed in the Group's report.

f

trrtQL-

Overview of the Findings and Recommendations of the April 16 Tragedy Internal Review Committees

BLACKSBURG, Aug. 22,2007 - on May 9,2007 President charles Steger directed Tech campus' three internal reviews in the wake of the April l6 tragedy on the virginia ofour existing He directed the chairs "to look at strengths and weaknesses systems/infrastructure and how they may be improved or augmented to address ernergency situations that might arise in the future'" in These reviews are internal in structure and focus and not intended to be forensic nature. Says Steger, "I asked for the creation oftwo different, but concurrent review processes. The external review commissioned by Govemor Kaine is essentially
investigatory in nature, while ours is a forward looking review of university policy, resources, and infrastructure through the prism ofApril 16'"
The Security

Infrastructure Group was charged with examining the university's existing security ,yrt"-r and recommending changes that would enhance the university's ability to respond quickly and effectively in situations where the safety of the campus .o*-rrnityir jeopardized. This group was also directed to identify strategies that might and decrease ttr" pioUaUitity of such situations occurring, looking at both technological
behavioral aspects.

communication infrastructure and information systems used during the crisis period, evaluated their performance, and identifies tactics and strategies for improvements'
The Interfoce

inventoried the The Information and Communications Infrastructure Group analyzed and

Group evaluated the relationships between the university's student counseling services, academic affairs, judicial affairs, and the legal system. It was charged w-ith examining the existing systems and the interface between them and deteinining what constraints, legal or otherwise, hamper effective interactions in order to respond to and support at-risk students.
Securitv Infrastructure GrouP

Among its findings the security infrastructure group found good cooperation and sound agreerients betwJen Virginia Tech and local police, fire, and EMS jurisdictions including oigoing training exercises; sound emergency communications; robust communications iniastricture; a sound emergency preparedness plan; engagement of the leadership in campus emergencies; and a nationally accredited campus police department.
The security group recommends enhancements in physical infrastructure' emergency communications, emergency preparedness, and selected protocols'

Infrastructure recommendations include modification of building door hardware, installation of locks on general assignment classrooms, evaluating the utility of centrally controlled electronic key card access to key academic and administrative facilities (such

tlle system currently in place on all residence halls), constructing a public safety building combining the university police and rescue squad, and evaluating installation of centrally monitored video surveillance cameras.
as

Communications recommendations include mass notification techniques within classrooms and other locations, message board in key or high profile public areas and along major vehicular thoroughfares, a people locator system, and further articulation the recently adopted VT Alerts notification system.

of

Emergency preparedness recommendations include updating the emergency preparedness plan, inore fiequent emergency exercises or drills, creation ofbuilding coordinators for em"rgencies, and identification of backups for the policy committee (university leadership with oversight of an emergency). Protocols include increased education ofthe university community about appropriate emergency response actions and creation of a comprehensive security master plan and campus security committee,

Information and Communications Infrastructure Group Broadly defined, telecommunications comprises the university's data network, telephone systems (university and/or vendor owned), cable TV, educational systems. and iertralizedinformation services. They were dramatically stressed but performed adequately during the crisis. The university on-campus phone system was not degraded but was aifected by external problems. External cellular telephone systems and the Public Switched Telephone Network (hardwire telephone systems off campus) experienced huge demand increases and experienced some blocking of calls during the initial periods of the
crisis on April 16.
Other university systems experienced some loading, which were quickly identified and rectified, and performed well with no significant problems. For example, the university website *'w*.ot.edn saw a 3,000 percent increase in traffic on April 16, VTPD dispatch experienced 450 percent increase, and the university switchboard experienced a 300 percent increase in calls'

Emergency Responder Radio Communication continues to suffer nationally and locally from;interoperability" issues because they use a variety ofradio systems and frequencies. Radio systems typically do not support mobile data, encryption, GIS, or othir advanced capabilities. Indicative of relatively common signal penetration problems in large buildings, emergency responders reported that radios did not work in some areas of Norris Hall.

This group provides a series of strategic and tactical recommendations. (See ***.ntn"*r.vt.edu a detailed report of more than 120 tactical recommendations.) Two major strategies emerge:

telecommunications functions based on Internet Protocol (IP). The new system, based on a diverse optical core and including wirelesses and wired access, would fully integrate all telecommunications functions including voice, video, data, entertainment, and educational systems. This system could remediate every problem and enable every innovation identified by the study committee'
2) Make selected research and administrative IT capabilities available to local

l) Installation of a new fully integrated digital

campus archilecnre

for all

first

responders to improve radio communications capabilities.In addition to improving interoperability problems, the new systems would be integrated with IP based information architecture allowing new applications such as GIS, identity management, sensor networks, location awareness, high-speed links to criminal information databases.

Interface Group
The Interface Group looked at policies, procedures, capabilities and interdepartmental relationships and communications for the selected areas related to identifying and supporting at-risk students. By its nature the system was found to be logically cormected andresponsive. The Division of Student Affairs (SA) is at the core and supported by and interacting with law enforcement, the academic enterprise, and other university resoluces

offices.
Consistent with the national findings of the federal report commissioned by President Bush, the Interface Group found some confusion about applicability and interpretation of privacy laws among some offices or faculty. To some extent, this created internal silos and feedback problems preventing some offices from having salient information on students at risk. The "system may not be robust enough to provide the kind ofanalysis that is warranted by more complex, high risk cases... with need for significant mental

health services."
The committee makes a series of recommendations under three broad themes:

Expanding Capacity in the SYstem
Refinins and expanding the CaIe Team, a key SA group that identifies and responds to students at risk (among other responsibilities), including addition of VTPD to standing membership and connecting academic personnel to deliberations where appropriate.
Creating a Threat Assessment Team charged with examining the most complex aases distressed students and empowering it to act quickly, when necessary.

of

Expandine Case Manasement Capacitv by adding case managers to the Dean of Students office and Cook Counseling Center to improve follow-up with students and to improve information flow through appropriate units about students at risk.

Improving Communications in the System
on privacy law Improve communications in the Systems with particular emphasis policies for communications with external tht""gh""tA" u"i*ttibr, "lutifying a clear picture of distressed agencies, establishing a central university contact with

ffi*tt*

students.

to the connecting strategies for Identiffing and supporting at Risk students Broader University Plan for Campus Safety

.*"gtrt"*g

in Violence of all university employees to some extent' the campus tufety it the province

to integrate the numerous university-wide efforts to enhance campus safety'

Virginia Tech

h^ rtt""g, *pp".iirr",
goal.

" policies and with very good "orn-noity suppgrt systems' However',it,is, "u*put ""ii.orilent more sysieiratic-approach be instituted with campus well-being recommended that a
The fulI reports can be found at www.vtnews'vt'edu

il-Lvib.-*t

which is essential in creating a safe

as a

###

News Conference Statement Presidential Internal Review Committee Interface of Student Systems Working Group
8l22l07
Jerry Niles, Chalr

ln response to the tragic events of April 16, 2007, Virginia Tech President Charles Steger requested an internal review conducted by a working group to examine the interface between the university's student counseling services, academic affairs, judicial aflairs and the legal system. The Group was charged with examining "...the existing systems and the interface between them and determining what constraints legal and otherwise hamper effective interaction among these areas," The Working Group focused its

attention on examining Virginia Tech's capacity and efficacl in identifying, responding to and supporting at-risk students. The Group was comprised of 17 key personnel from the units in the overall system and conducted its work through five methods: (1) full working group discussions (2) one-on-one interviews between the Group Chair and individual personnel (3) participation in a symposium with six national
experts (4) analysis and review of relevant educational policies and procedures at Virginia Tech and other educational institutions, and (5) analysis and review of relevant state and federal documents.
Findings and Recommendatlons
In general the Working Group found that Virginia Tech has a sound, responsive, student centered

system that it is designed to identifo and assist students in need in a variety of ways and to hold all students accountable for their behavior withirr in the university community. In addition, a network of structures is in place to identifo and respond to students who are more acutely distressed, which could

include at risk fior violent behavior. The Working Group also found that number of actions could strengthen the existing system. The recommendations r€presenting these actions are clustered around three themes, expanding capacity in the system, enhancing communication and connecting strategies for identifuing and responding to at-risk students to broader, on-going efforts in the university to promote a safe campus environment.
Expanding Capacw in the SYstem

There are three recommendations for expanding Virginia Tech's capacity for identifying responding to and supporting at-risk students. These include modification of an existing structure, the creation of a new structure and the hiring of additional personnel.

.

Bg1xne-U.g_@,lga!0.,- The Care Team is a central structure in identifiTing and responding to students at risk as it incorporates members from all key student affairs units and involves other units of the university when appropriate. The Care Team meets weekly to discuss cases that are brought to their attention. The functioning of the Care Team is sound and should be kept in

place and in fact enhanced. lt is recommended that the Care Team be a more formally recognized and visible structure in the university system and that its Protocol be updated to

reflect impending changes. Effectiveness of the operation of the Care Team could be enhanced by adding a Virginia Tech law enforcement officer and the director forThe Office of Services for Students with Disabilities as permanent team members. The functioning of the Care Team could
also be enhanced by connecting academic affairs personnel more directly to the dellberations

when appropriate.

Create a Threat Assessment Team. A new structure is needed to complement the work of the Care Team for students who may pose a threat to others, lt is recommended that a structure, a team, be created that has specific responsibility for threat assessment to strengthen the overall system for the consideration of the most complex cases. The Team would be charged with conducting a comprehensive fact-based description of a distressed student and empowered with the authority to act in a timely manner, if necessary consistent with university policy and
applicable law.
Expand Case Manaee{nent

CapaciW. Increased capacity for follow

up on students who have

been considered by the Care Team or seen by Cook Counseling Center will stfengthen services to students in need. lt is recommended that two additional case managers be added to the staffs of the Dean of Students Office and C.ook Counseling Center to improve follow up sewices to students, as well as facilitate the information flow regarding the case aooss units. The case manager will maintain a comprehensfue picture of the student and focus on the implementation of interventions, coordination of services and the monitoring of the effectiveness of the

interventions.

lmproving Communication in the System.
Effective communication among units regarding at-risk students is essential. Effective responses to atrisk students are dependent on accurate and comprehensive assessments of their status. There are a

number of recommendations intended to enhance communication in the system including:

r

Establish a designated university contact person who has a comprehensive picture of distressed students who have been assessed by the system. The role of this person should be widely

known both internally and extemally by personnel who work with students at risk. The individual should be available 24/7 .ln addition further clarification is needed and a protocol developed regarding policies for cornmunicating with external agencies who may request

information about acutely distressed students, Conduct on-going training for all personnel on the application of the Family Educational Privacy Act (FERPA) in the discussion of cases. lmplement a new policy for emergency notification information for students. This policy would require studefts to update emergency contact information at the time of registration for each
semester.

Connectlng Strategies for ldentifying and Supporting at Risk-Students to the Broader Unive]'lsfi Plan for Campus safety.
An important feature of any comprehensive approach and plan for campus safety is that the pieces or key elements form an integrated whole. The Working Group offers a set of three primary

recommendations that link strategies for students to other domains of the university.

Prevention. The effort to raise the level of awareness regarding the considerable resources that are available to members of the university community in seeking assistance with distressed students is vital' lt is recommended that additional training programs be directed to all administrators, with special attention given to newly appointed ones, as they are key participants for bringing others in their unit up-to-date information related to campus safety. lt is funher recommended that new strategies be developed to raise the awaren€ss of faculty and staff regarding the availability of resources for dealing with at-risk students and employees, again paying special attention to
Exoand Training of Administrators, Facultv, and Staff in Violence

newly hired personnel
Extend the Universiw-wide Violence Prevention

Policv.

A structure is needed that

will help

integrate the numerous university-wide efforts to enhance campus safetythat have been in existence prior to 4176 and that will be added as a result of the three internal reviews as well as other efforts. lt is recommended that a university level committee be formed that ensures that programs are in place to support the Campus and Workplace Violence Prevention Policl. The Committee would bring oversight from all precincts of the university, including student affairs, academic affairs, human resources, facilities and administrative services with regard to policy, operations and resources that aie intended to create a coherent approach to ensuring a safe campus environment. This is a structure that is similarto the one Mr. Hyatt mentioned earlier
These two structures could well be one in the same.

r

Continue to Build Communitv Solidaritv to Promote Individual and CommqniW Well Beine. A strong vibrant and supportive community is essential in ensuring a safe campus environment. An environment that promotes civility, works toward the acceptance of others' differences, strives to include rather than exclude and prcvides assistance to those in need is fundamental to a safe campus, Virginia Tech has instituted a number of efforts to provide such an environment continually adding others. lt is recommended that a more systematic approach be instituted that specifies campus-well being as a goal and ensures that the various efforts are connected. The coordination of this effort could be situated with the Committee for Campus and Workplace Violence Frevention that was recommended elsewhere in this report or some and
is

other appropriate body.
Many of the recommendations made in this report are systemic in nature and will involve deliberation by those offices directly affucted by them in their day-to-day work to decide how best to incorporate the
3

ideas. Moreover, the Working Group is aware that the recommendations in this report are only a piece of the larger picture of campus safety and must be linked directly to other efforts that are underuvay to enhance campus safety. fhe careful coordination and integration of all efforts to promote campus safety is essential to ensure a comprehensive approach. Finally, the Interface Working Group is aware that any system needs to be dynamic in nature to adjust to the changes that continually emerge from the needs of the unive6ity community and new lessons learned from ongoing evaluation of the system and best practices of our Peers.

President Stegerts remarks Memorial Dedication Aug. 19,2007
Thank you, Tom. And I welcome every one here today as we come together still shaken, still deeply saddened by the collective nightmare ofApril l6th, a day that scarred our hearts and left us with searing memories of loved ones lost aad wounded. We come together still seeking answers to the incomprehensible. We come to remember that which we cannot forget -- for the love of those lost and the pain of losing them are much too great. we also come together to remember wonderful, caring teachers and young lives with great promise, all of whom sought only better lives for themselves and a better

world for others. We come in the hope that this Memorial to the victims of April 16th will help each of us as we deal with our heartache and as we continue to tread -- each at his or her own pace-- upon the slow and difficult path ofrecovery and healing. As you have heard, this spot and these stones were spontaneously selected and created by Virginia Tech students, out of their care, comp€rssion and love for tlose lost and injured that tenible day. It is most fitting that this tribute is of Hokie Stones -- stones that have been strengthened by the pressure they have withstood for eons. These simple limestone rocks, forurd only in the Appalachian Mountains, have been part of symbol of Virginia Tech for more than a cenflrry. These Hokie Stones represent a foundation and a link from one generation of Hokies to another. We come together here at this Hokie Stone memorial to share the cherished memories of those who the world lost in a rampage of violence. We come to offer our thoughts, prayers and support to their families, who continue to suffer. We join together to pay tribute to the young, beautiful minds that crossed this Drill Field in search of knowledge and their place in the world, and to the wisdom of their teachers, who devoted years and careers to nurturing generations of knowledge-seeking
students.

They came from small towns here in Virginia and from states across this country and from the far-flung comers of the globe. They came from diverse backgrounds and cultures, each seeking, through Virginia Tech, a different path to tomorrow. But they shared much in common. They shared a love of learning and a love for this university. They were earnest in their academic pursuits, yet loving and joyful. Friends and colleagues have described how each was special and how they wanted to make a difference and to give something back to the world. Each was gifted and talented and unique. They will be greatly missed . . . they shall not be forgotten. We remember them with great sadness, but let us also remember the joy, the love, and the devotion they brought to this world. we embrace their loved ones from around Virginia, the nation, and the globe as cherished members of the Virginia Tech community. And those injured that cold morning, who, even now in the heat of summer, are still recovering from wounds, physical and emotional, and the families who continue to

2
worry and struggle - they will forever occupy a special place within the Virginia Tech family. Some of those injured have graduated and moved on, while others are retuming to Virginia Tech to complete their education. But to all, we extend our hands and our arms to you with a desire to help and support you. This memorial also is dedicated to you -- we want it to be a momrment to your courage and determination. You have endured an ordeal that most will never face. May your wounds heal quickly and completely. May you, in time, grow stronger and live your lives to the frrllest and in the greatest service to others. Every day since April 16ft people from throughout this community and from around the world have offered and provided tremendous care and support, in many, many
forms. We are forever humbled by their care and concem for us-for we were all victims. And, we are eternally thankful for the overwhelming support. There is no way we can ever adequately recognize, much less repay, the wonderful outpouring of support that has honored and bolstered our university community. I also want to take a moment to express my most sincere and personal thanks to the faculty and staffof the university. While stqnned and grieving yourselves, you somehow have mustered the will to keep going. Driven by a depth of compassion and a personal commitment to humanitarian service that this university had never before seen, you have worked together, and by serving others added a new dimension to the meaning of Ut Prosim, That I MaY Serve. You have worked harder than ever to meet the unique needs of retuming students, still traumatized but ready to begin anew, and to welcome a new class of students who are full of enthusiasm and eager to experience all that it means to be a part of the Hokie

Family.

I am honored to work and live among such wonderful people, and I will always remember your devotion to each other, to this university, and to these families. You have
my highest respect and deepest appreciation. I hope that each day, the good that you've done and the healing that you've helped to bring about will, in turn, bring you a measure of peace and some increment of renewal. I also recall the words of one of the notes added to the makeshift boards here on the Drill Field in April. It said, simply, "You have broken our hearts, but you have not broken our spirits." lndeed the spirit and the resiliency of the Virginia Tech community have amazed the world. Our Govemor, Tim Kaine, spoke at our Convocation about how he was amazed and proud of what he called, "the incredible community spirit and sense of unity" on this campus. "It is not just you that needs to maintain the spirit, the world needs you to," he said. "In the darkest moment in the history of this university, the world saw you and saw you respond in a way that built community."

3
He also said that that shong spirit of optimism. ' ' of community. . . of hope, ' ' and of wanting to be together "taught something good to people all around the world, and the world needs that example put forward." As the new academic year begins, we must maintain that optimism, that hope and that sense of coming together. We are reminded that the classroom and the laboratory are their own special domains and mark that special bond between teacher and student. Despite our heavy hearts, these must remain sanctuaries of enlightenment, a domain to overcome intolerance, hatred and ignorance. Virginia Tech is and shall remain committed to its core missions. Certainly, the events of April 16 have added many new challenges. Yet, I feel and I sense among many of you -- a renewed comrnitrnent to our leaming, to our discovery, and to how we reach out to others. This university is a place for growing and leaming. And as we grow and move into the future, we must have a vision -- not just a set of specific programs, but a set of shared commitments -- the duty we owe to ourselves, to one^anothei, toour nation, and increasingly, to our fellow citizens across the globe. As we close these ceremonies, allow me to direct your thoughts again to these Hokie Stones behind me. Today, these Hokie Stones are being dedicated here on the Drill Field - another Virginia Tech landmark - to remember the past' to memorialize those slain and injured i1l the tragedy ofApril l6h, and to help all ofus dedicate ourselves to each other and to the future. These stones come from the earth in many colors - muted shades of pink, red, gray, brown and black. May that represent our diverse individuality. And when connected, as they are in the buildings all around us, they are incredibly strong and enduring, standing up to stress and storm throughout the years. And so shall it be with the Virginia Tech Family' .Though severely battered by the events of April, we must be strong. . . We must

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havefaith...Wemustlead...Wemustdowhatwebelieveisright...Andwemustnot
be afraid. . . We are

Virginia Tech. In a few moments, the bell will toll 32 times for the precious lives we lost, and we will close this ceremony with the symbolic presentation of Hokie Stones to the families of those whose names are forever etched into ow hearts and into the Stones of this Memorial. We will reflect silently on those lives and how they have forever changed our own. And to those families, our honored suests, it is ow most sincere hope that you will become more and more like family. You are forever a part of the Virginia Tech community, and I hope you will embrace us as we seek to embrace you' Now, this Memorial is officially dedicated. When we depart, let us do so as we have come together - in remembrance and with renewed resolve. May peace be with
you'

Gomments by Gharles W. Steger, Prcsldent of Virginia Tech, to the Virginia Tech Review Panel May 21,2007

Introductory Remarks and Overuiew of Virginia Tech's Presentation
Colonel Massengill and distinguished members of the panel. I am pleased to have this opportunity to welcome you to the campus of Virginia Tech, During the past week, we have been working with representatives of Tri Data Corporation. to develop our portion of the agenda, which I hope will be helpful to you as you pursue this most difficult task. I might note that your visit to our campus coincides with our first day of summer school. Although our student population over the summer is only about one-fourth of what it is during the regular year and our teaching faculty who are on 9-month appointments are not here, you can get some sense of the vehicular and pedestrian traffic flow on a typical Monday morning at Virginia Tech-as April 16 was before the shootings began. To begin, I would like to introduce to the Panel Mr. Lenwood McCoy, who has agreed to serve as the liaison between the university and the Review Panel to ensure that the Panel receives a thorough responsd to all requests for information. Mr. McCoy retired several years ago after more than 35 years with the university, during which he served in a variety of roles, including Director of IntemalAudit and University Controller. He will ensure that all your requests are met. As you will hear during the presentation, we have devoted our energies over the past month primarily to helping those families who lost their sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, husbands and wives, as well as the victims who survived. Let me note here that out of respect for these families, the university has denied requests by the media and others to enter Norris Hall. We made an exception to enable the Panelto tour the building this morning because of its relevance to your work. We will continue to restrict access until the families who indicate a desire to do so have had an opportunity visit the building. At the appropriate time, access will be provided to the media and other members of the public. Our presentation to the Panel today is in four parts:

1. 2.

Existing systems for emergency warning and building security. What the university knew about Mr. Cho prior to the event. What steps were taken prior to the incident. Let me take a moment here to explain that disclosure of certain information is complicated by the laws that relate to what information can and cannot be shared with the public, as well as what can be shared between various units within the university.

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As many of you know, the Attomey General's Office serves as the university's legal counsel. Ms. Heidbreder is our University Legal Gounsel and a SpecialAssistant Attorney General. As such, she is charged with providing me legaladvice on behalf of the Attorney General. We will provide all information we can within the law.

3.

What transpired in the Emergency Policy Group when advised of the first shootings in West Ambler Johnston Hall and immediately thereafter. What is being done for support and healing of the families as well as the broader university community. In addition to the Emergency Policy Group, there is also an Emergency Response Resource Group, which works in parallelto ensure necessary resources are deployed to whatever group or part of the university is in need. They were able to respond in hours, and in some cases minutes, to provide counseling, meals for the 500 increased security personnel, etc. We will provide some detail as to what has been done later this morning. I have also appointed a task force to provide to me by the end of this month a recommendation for an interim memorial that can be put in place in a short time. Subsequently, a proposal for a permanent memorialwill be developed.

4.

As we work to recoverfrom the events of April 16, we also want to learn from them. Two After-lncident Reports are being developed for each of the shooting incidents. And as noted in my comments to you in Richmond last Thursday, we have established three working groups that will focus on: 1) telecommunications; 2) security infrastructurelocking systems, alarms, etc.; and 3) the interface between counseling services, judicial affairs, academic affairs, and the legalsystem.

This is being said to note that what we will share with you today is what we know to the best of our knowledge at this point in time, but as our own internal review and examination continues, other facts may come to light. Therefore, what we offer today is preliminary in nature and might be revised based on the emergence of additional information. We will certainly keep you apprised as additional information becomes available.
That concludes my introductory remarks, and I would be pleased to answer any questions the Panel might have.
lf there are no (further) questions, I would like to call upon Mr. Jim McCoy, from our Office of Capital Design and Construction, to provide an overview of the systems in place.

Kim's Notes:

lmmediately after being briefed by the police regarding what transpired in Norris Hall, President Steger directed that planning begin immediately for a university convocation to occur the next day in order to help the entire university community to find some comfort in gathering together.

ln those early days, in addition to addressing the university community at the convocation, President Steger attended the candlelight vigil, met with families of deceased victims at The Inn several times, and visited injured students in the various hospitals. In parallel, he and Chief Flinchum also provided updated information to the campus community and their families and the general public through numerous press conferences.

Within days after April 16, President Steger appointed a separate Emergency Response Resource Group to take care of the myriad issues that arose-ranging from the provision of counseling to students and employees, to caring foi thousands of tributes and letters aniving daily, and much more. President Steger ananged for at least one university representative to attend all funerals or memorial services (about which the university could obtain information) in the U.S. that he was unable to attend personally. I and other Board members also attended many of the funerals. The President and Provost worked with the Deans to come up with a plan to provide options to students for finishing the spring 2007 semester.

President Steger consented to the creation of the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund and Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund to receive unrestricted gifts and gifts designated for scholarships, respectively, that were aniving to aid the university community-long before it could be known how much money would be received. President Steger appointed a liaison to the Governor's Panel to ensure that the Panel would receive complete cooperation and thorough responses to all of their requests for information from the university. President Steger has also met publicly and privately with the Panel several times. Under the President's direction, his staff re-worked the plans for commencement to include a President's address to the university community and a special recognition of the deceased students and faculty and their families, and enlisted the assistance of family liaisons and a
7

multitude of units across the university to implement the plan. He also made the decision to grant posthumous degrees to all students who lost their lives on April 16.
On the subject of family liaisons, this group of liaisons did not previously exist. This group was established and mobilized by the senior administration, who recognized that it was not

humanly possible for any one individual to address personally the needs of the many who directly suffered losses as well as the rest of the university community.

President Steger appointed a committee to develop a proposal for an intermediate memorial by May 31; construction of the new memorial was dedicated on August 19.

After meeting with the Dean of Engineering and the faculty of the Engineering Science and Mechanics Department as well as considering the input of many who sent letters, President Steger directed that a plan be developed by June 1 to reoccupy Norris Hall. The plan, which included refurbishing the affected wing plus the first and third floors and the replacement of the crash bars on exterior doors with flat bars, was implemented immediately. The plan also calls for increased security and the availability of counseling through part of the fall semester.
President Steger subsequently directed that a feasibility study be conduc{ed for the affected Norris wing over the summer and in parallel appointed the Provost to chair a committee to look at the future programmatic use of the space.

In June, President Steger sent emissaries out to meet with a number of families, including

yours, to assess their needs.
He subsequently held meetings around the state with injured students and their parents and with deceased victims'families, one of which you and your wife attended.

At those meetings, President Steger reported that he had appointed three internal working groups to look into and provide recommendations to him about the university's telecommunications infrastructure; the university's physical security infrastructure; and the interface between and among Counseling Services, Academic Affairs, Judicial Affairs, and the Legal System. Those reports were completed in August. A plan has been developed to evaluate and implement the resulting recommendations. He sent individual e-mail notes to all students who were scheduled to be present in a class or lab in Norris Hall on the morning of April 16 asking them to provide a phone number so they could be contacted by a representative from the university on July 5 or 6 to discuss how they were, share any thoughts, and provide input on what services would be helpful to

them at the beginning of the new academic year. About 75 percent of the students were able to be reached by the initial phone calls, and attempts continue to be made to contact the remainder.

He accepted Mr. Feinberg's draft protocol for distribution of the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund

(HSMF). At least six town hall meetings plus numerous private meetings have since been held in Mrginia and New Jersey by Mr. Feinberg to solicit input from you and others eligible (according to the draft protocol) to receive a distribution from the HSMF. All of this has been made possible by President Steger.
He agreed to hold a healing concert early in the school year to benefit the entire university community. (This occurred September 6.)

He established an Office of Recovery and Support (about which you received an e-mail note on July 26) and hired a Director, Jay Poole.

President Steger has attempted to make contact with all physically injured- students or families of deceased students and faculty whom he had not had a chance to meet or speak with since those first weeks, when he had met many in the hospitals or at The lnn or at memorial and funeral services.

He directed that planning for the memorial dedication be started and decided to hold a brunch at The Grove for physically injured students and their families and for families of deceased victims. (occurred August 19)

He began planning a series of events to occur after the school year begins to recognize numerous units within the university that provided invaluable service to the university community. He began planning a recognition event to be held in September to thank the 150 extemal organizations that came to the aid of the university on April 16 and in the weeks that followed. (occurred Sept. 10 and Oct. 23)

Statement by Charles Steger, President

430PM
With me today is the Secretary of Public Safety for the Commonwealth of Virginia, John Marshall and the Superintendent of Virginia State Police, Steve Flaherity. Also present if the Mayor of Blacksburg, Ron Rordham; the chief of Blacksburg PD, Kim Crannis; the chief of Virginia Tech Police, Wendell Flinchum.

I want to repeat my horror, disbelief, and profound solrow at the events oftoday. People from around the world have expressed their shock and extraordinary and endless sadness that has transpired today. I am at a loss for words to explain or understand the camage that visited our campus. I know no other way to speak about this than to tell you what we know' It is now confirmed that we have 31 deaths fromNorris Hall, including the gunman. 15 other victims are being teated at local hospitals in the Roanoke and New River Valleys. There are two confirmed deaths from the shooting in Ambler Johnston Dormitory in addition to the 3l in Norris.
We have not confirmed his identity of the gunman because he canied no papers. We are in the process of attempting identification.

Nonis Hall is a tragic and sonowfiI crime scene. We are in the process of identifying victims and in the process of notifuing next of kin. This may take a while. We will not release any names until we are positive of this notification. We anticipate being able to release a list sometime tomorrow.
We are asking students to contact their parents to let them know their status.

Our investigation continues into whether there is a corurection between the frrst and second incidents.
We know that parents will want to embrace their children. We are not suggesting that you come to campus. However, if parents feel that they must come to calnpus' we are locating counselors at the The Inn and Skelton Conference Center.

As you can imagine, security, investigation, operational, and counseling resources are very taxed at the moment. However, we are getting assistance from the state police, the FBI, ATF, local jurisdictions, and the Red Cross. And we understand the desire, indeed the compelling need to get information on the part of family, students, and loved ones, but unfortunately this is all the information we have at the time.
We are posting information to our website as we leam it. Our communications systems are taxed also and we are also posting information, www.vsp.virginia.gov.

Jeny Niles Deon-Liberol Arts & Humon Sciences ond Commitiee Choir Avgvst 22,2@7

News Conference Slqtemeni Presidenliql Inlernol Review Commitlee
io the irogic events of April 16,2007 , Virginio Tech President Chorles Steger requesied on iniernol review conducied by o working group to exomine the interfoce between the university's siudent counseling services, ocodemic offoirs. judiciol offoirs
ln response

ond the legol system. The Commitiee wos chorged with exomining "...the exisiing systems ond the in'ierfoce between them; determining whot constroints legol ond otherwise homper effective interociion omong these oreos"' The Working Group focused its ottention on exomining Virginio Tech's copociiy ond efficocy in identifying, responding to ond supporling ot-risk siudents. The Group wos comprised of l7 key personnel from ihe units in the overoll system ond conducted iis work through five melhods: [ ) full committee discussions (2) one-on-one interviews between the Commitiee Choir ond individuol personnel (3) pqrticipqtion in o symposium with six noiionol experts (4) onolysis ond review of relevont educoiionol policies ond procedures ot Virginio Tech ond other educotionol insiitulions, ond (5) onolysis ond review of relevonl stote ond federol documents.
Findings ond Recommendofions
In generol ihe Working group found thot Virginio Tech hos o responsive, student centered system thot it is designed to ideniify ond ossist students in need in o voriety of woys ond to hold oll siudenis occountoble for their behovior within in the university communiiy. In oddition, o neiwork of siruciures is in ploce to identify ond respond to siudents who ore more ocutely distressed. The Working Group olso found thoi number of octions could sirengthen the existing sysiem. The recommendotions representing these octions ore clustered oround three ihemes, exponding copocity in the sysiem,

enhoncing communicotion ond connecting the opprooches to identifying ond responding to ot-risk siudent s to the brooder efforts in ihe university to promote o sofe compus environment
Exponding Copocily in lhe SYstem

.

Refinino ihe Core Teom The Core Teom is o centrol struciure in ideniifying ond responding to siudents of risk os ii incorporotes members from oll key siudent offoirs uniis ond other units of the university when opproprioie. li is recommenoed thot it be o more formolly recognized ond visible structure in the university system ond thot its Protocol be updoied to reflect impending chonges. Effectiveness of the operotion of the Core Teom could be enhonced by odding o Virginio Tech low enforcement officer ond the director for The Office of Services forStudenis with Disobiiities os permonent teom members ond

Poge 1 of

4

I
Jerry Niles

Deon-Liberol Arts & Humon Sciences ond Commitiee Choir August 22,2007

conneciing ocodemic offoirs personnel more directly io the dellberoiions. In oddition, steps need io be ioken to ensure thot of leost one person on the Teom hos o comprehensive picture of the coses being considered ond is outhorized if there is need to shore informotion with othen internolly ond exiemolly when
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Creqtino o Threot Assessmeni Teom - A new siructure is needed to complement the work of the Cqre Teom for studenis who moy pose o threot io others. ll is recommended thot o structure, q teom, be creoted thot hos specific responsibiliiy for threot ossessment to strengthen the overoll syslem for the considerotion of the most complex coses. The Teom would be chorged with conducting o comprehensive foct-bosed description of o distressed student ond empowered with the outhority to oct in o timely monner, consisient wiih university policy ond opplicoble low, if necessory.
Expondinq Cose Monooement Copocity - Increosed copocity for follow up on students who hove been considered by the Core Teom or seen by Cook Counseling Center will sirengthen services io students in need' ll is recommended thot two oddiiionol cose monogers be odded to the sioffs of the Deon of Studenis Office ond Cook Counseling Center to improve follow up services to students, os well os focilitoie the informotion flow regording the cose ocross units. The cose monoger will moiniqin o comprehensive picture of the studeni ond focus on the implementotion of interventions, coordinqiion of seryices ond the monitoring of the effectiveness of ihe interventions.

.

lmproving Communlcqlion In lhe Sysfem
Effective communicotion omong uniis regording ot-risk studenls is essentiol. There ore o number of recommendotions intended to enhonce communicotion in ihe system including

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estoblishing o centrol university conioct who hos o comprehensive piciure of distressed students who hove been ossessed by the system, clodfying policies for communicoting with externol ogencies regording ocutely disiressed studenis, conducting on-going hoining for penonnel on the opplicotion of the Fomily Educotionol Privocy Act TFERPA) in the discussion of coses, clorifying public sloiements in university policy on how FERPA is opplied, ond lmplementing o new policy for emergency notificoiion informolion for students.

Connecling Slrofegies for ldenllfylng ond Supportlng of Rlsk-Sludenls lo lhe Brooder Universlty Plon for Compus sofetY
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Jeny Niles Deon-Liberol Arts & Humon Sciences ond Commitiee Choir Avgust 22,2007

An imporiont feoture of ony comprehensive opprooch ond plon for compus sofeiy is thot the pieces or key elements form on integroied whole. The Working group offers o set of three moin recommendoiions thot link sirotegies for studenis to other domoins of the university.

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Expondino Troinino of Administroion, Foculiv. ond Sioff in Violence Prevenlion The effort to roise the level of oworeness regording the consideroble resources thot ore ovoiloble to mernbers of the university community in seeking ossistonce with distressed students is vitol. li is recommended thot oddiiionol troining progroms be directed to odminisiroiors, especiolly newly oppointed ones, os they ore key porl'iciponis for bringing others in their unit up-to-dote informotion reloted to compus sofety. lt is further recommended thot new strotegies be developed to roise the oworeness of foculty ond stoff regording the ovoilobility of resources for deoling with ot-risk studenis ond employees. Exlendino the Universitv-wide Violence Prevention Policv - A struciure is needed thot will help integroie the numerous university-wide efforts to enhonce compus sofety. lt is recommended thot o university level commiftee be formed thot ensures thot progroms ore in ploce to support the Compus ond Workploce Violence Preveniion Policy. The Committee would bring ovenight from oll precincis of the univenity, including student offoirs, ocodemic offoirs, humon resources, focilities ond odminislroiive services with regord to policy, operotions ond resources thot ore intended to creote o coherent opprooch io ensuring o sofe compus environmenl.
Building Community to Promote Individuol ond Community Well Beino - A sirong, vibront ond supportive community is essentiol in ensuring o sofe compus environmenl. An environment thot promoies civilitv, worK toword the occeptonce of others' differences, sirives to include rother thon exclude ond provides ossistonce io those in need is fundomentol to o sofe compus. Virginio Tech hos instituted o nurnber of etforts to provide such on environment. lt is recommended thot o more systemotic opprooch be insiituted ihot specifies compus-well being os o gool ond ensures thot the vorious efforts qre connected. The coordinotion of this effort could be situoted with the Commiltee for Compus ond Workploce Violence Prevenlion thot wos recommended elsewhere in this report.

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Mony of the recommendotions mode in this report ore systemic in noture ond will involve deliberotion by those offices directly offected by them in their doy-to-doy work to decide how besl to incorporote the ideos, Moreover, the Working Group is owore thot ihe recommendotions in ihis report ore only o piece of the lorger picture of compus sofeiy ond must be linked directly to oiher efforl's thot ore underwoy lo enhonce compus sofety. The coreful coordinotion ond integroiion of oll eiforts to promote compus sofeiy is essentiol io ensure o comprehensive opprooch. Finolly, the
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lnterfoce Working Group is owore ihot ony system needs to be dynomic in noture to odjust to the chonges thct continuolly emerge from the needs of ihe uni"'ersity communiiy ond new lessons leorned from on-going evoluotion of ihe system ond best proctices of our Peers.

Poge 4 of 4

Dear Colleagues,

lVhen we reassembie on Monday, April 23d, rjiscussions penaining io iast week's iragic errenis are sure to take piace
between and among students and faculty. lt is our hope that these convenations will facilitate

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healing process

when classes resume. At the same time, we also expect the media to again be on campus, and many of you have

asked how to respond to them. So that everyone feels comfortable participating in the conversations they choose to have, here are some general guidelines about the media, and information on our own communications policies.

Fint, conceming the continuing media presence on our campus:
Media are never allowed in the classrooms without faculty permission. Academic buildings, normally open to the public, will be offlimits to ihe media. Notices have been posted on all academic buildings stating this rule. In addition, the big satellite trucks we saw last week will no longer be allowed. However, ours is an open campus and the press will still be present. Reporters on campus may ask to interview you. lf you are approached, it is entirely up to you if you want to speak them. Feel free to say, 'Thanks, but no thanks." But, keep in mind that the majority of the media are genuinely concerned about the Virginia Tech communiiy and

want to let our many supporters know how we are coping with last week's events. Next, I want to share with you the messages we think are important to convey. These messages are part of Virginia Tech's continuing efforts to support one another as our community regroups to grieve, heal and move forward;

1. We will not be defined by this event.
First, as an academic family we will endeavor to analyze, leam and, ultimately, come to some understanding of the event. Our Principles of Community remain our values.
b.

Virginia Tech

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our traditions, communi$, history and promising future-will prevail. Our motto Ut
I May Serve underscores our spirit.

Prosim-That

Finally, everything we do as move forward will commemorate, honor and respect the numerous individuals affected by this traqic event. lnvent the Future.

'lnvent the Future" captures our role and spirit as a world+enowned research institution. Nothing in the events of last week will alter who we are and what we reoresent. When classes resume, our academic
excellence, the commitment and talent of our students, and our clear role in shaping a positive future for the world will again be apparent, Hokies are, and always will, embody learning, discovery and engagement. Embrace the Virginia Tech Family.

a.
b.

We are a unique, special community.

famlly-

more enduring and closerto one another than a typical university

Assisting the families and friends of those injured and bereaved is our focus. We are also committed to

the assistance and support of one another.

c.

family will We will nurture the legacy of the 32 Virginia Tech family members we lost. The Virginia Tech private, will reflect celebrate their lives and accomplishments. Our memorials to them, both public and

those sentiments.
process within our community. We consider our It is also our intention to do whatever we can to promote the healing Virginia Tech reputation and communications to be a critical element of that process. We are regaining control of the

legacy, and believe these messages are crucial to accomplishing that goal'
you to have everything you need to Please contact us with any questions or concems you may have. We want promote constructive, healing conversations among all the constituencies of our community'

Lawrence G. Hincker Associate Vice President, University Relations

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My name is Kay Heidbreder. I serve as the University Legal Counsel and Assistant Attorney General assigned to Virginia Tech. In this capacity, I provide legal advice under the direction of the Attorney General to the University. Given my position, Dr. Steger has asked me to provide an overview of the legal mandates under which Virginia Tech operates with respect to the protection of student information. This overview is not meant to be legal advice to this panel. Rather, Dr. Steger believes that it is crucial for this Panel to have some context of the legal landscape for institutions of higher education. In addition, he has asked that my remarks center on the interplay between the Counseling Center, the student disciplinary system, faculg interaction with students and the police department. He has also asked me to share the constraints that the University faces in providing student records to the public at large.

At any institution of higher education in Virginia, there are a number of laws protecting the privacy of students and student records. These laws include The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C.A. 312329, HIPAA 42 U.S.C. Section 1320, the Virginia Freedom of Information Act, Section2.2-3700, Code of Virginia, as amended, and the Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Section 32.2-3800, Code of Virginia, as amended. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (aka FERPA or Buckley Amendment) sets forth criteria for the dissemination of information to protect a student's rights of privacy. The University is restricted in its ability to share a student's educational records with third parties, external to the University, absent a properly executed release or a court order. While it is debatable whether the FERPA protections end at the student's death, the other laws contain no such limitation. Exceptions to these non-disclosure requirements include sharing records with employees within the University who need the information to do their job. For example, an instructor can share grade information with the Registrar. However, there is never permitted a disclosure for medical or counseling records. This absolute prohibition tracks the restrictions covering disclosure of medical records as provided in HIPAA or the federal legislation that protects health information for every individualtreated by a medicalprofessional in the United States. FERPA also provides a quirky privacy provision that places a wall between the educational records at an institution and the law enforcement records maintained by the campus police department. To put this in concrete terms, educational records cannot be freely disclosed by the administrative offices with the police

department. To give an example, a student is charged in the University's disciplinary system with a violation of the acceptable use policy that prohibits sending harassing e-mails to a fellow student. The University's hearing officer is precluded from sharing the outcome of the hearing with the campus police. Another example is that police are not informed when students are treated for psychiatric problems. In the same vein, the police are not given health information when a patient is released from a hospital. This latter example actually relates to the privacy protections contained in HIPAA.
In addition to the federal statutes, state law also restricts the University's ability to disseminate student records. The GeneralAssembly has articulated the privacy concerns in the Virginia Freedom of lnformation Act by exempting from mandatory disclosure a student's scholastic records. While the Freedom of Information Act permits limited disclosure of records at the University's discretion, FERPA and other state laws preclude disclosure. In particular, I would draw your attention to the Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Section 2.2-3800 Code of Virginia, as amended. Specifically, that statute authorizes the University to collect, maintain and share information with third parties only to the extent necessary to accomplish the University's mission of educating the student. lt does not provide for unlimited disclosure in the law enforcement context to third parties. The protections afforded by federal and state laws to the individual are most absolute in the medical context. For example, a medical screening is not part of the University's admissions process. The Code of Virginia, Section 23-7.5, requires that each prospective student provide a health history, but this history is not all encompassing. The health history is really a listing of diseases against which the student has been immunized. The purpose of this code requirement is to guard against the potential outbreak of controlled diseases in the close confines of a residence hall. Even this modest requirement is not absolute as the General Assembly has waived the immunization requirement on a student's religious grounds. Given the legalframework, let me tell you what I can about Mr. Cho based on police records. There was a narrow window in late 2005 to early 2006 that his behavior was called into question. The Virginia Tech Police made a referral to the University's disciplinary system for an incident in which he sent an unwelcomed e-mail to a female student in late 2005, or approximately sixteen (16) months before April 16, 2007. The disciplinary system contacted the e-mail recipient to determine whether she wanted to pursue the matter. She declined to do so. Therefore, there was no cause for action on the part of the University. Since Mr. Cho's enrollment in Fall 2003, he had no other interaction with the disciplinary system.

As has been reported publicly, the Virginia Tech Police Department also received an inquiry during the 2005-2006 academic year from the Chair of the English

Department concerning Mr. Cho's classroom behavior based on the content of some of his writings and the fact that Mr. Cho took pictures of other students with his cellphone camera. The Chair of the Department did not share the specific writings with the Police, nor did she file a formal police report. As determined by an informal review conducted by the Police Department, the behavior was not criminal in nature. The Police offered to provide any necessary assistance. lnstead of further Police involvement, the Chair talked to Mr. Cho and the Chair and he agreed that he would attend private tutoring sessions that would allow him to complete the class assignments without the necessity of his returning to the class. Records show no further class based complaints related to inappropriate behavior. Further, no referral was made to the student disciplinary system about this event. An additional contact on December 13, 2005, between Mr. Cho and the Virginia Tech Police has been documented. According to public records maintained by the Montgomery County General District Court, the Virginia Tech Police brought Mr. Cho to the aftention of the Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse Services as a result of a concern raised by a fellow student who knew Mr. Cho. ln turn, Mr. Cho was brought beforq the General District Court Special Justice, who ordered Mr. Cho to undergo evaluation at the Garilion St. Albans Behavioral Facility. On December 14,2005, the Special Justice for the General District Court ordered Mr. Cho to follow-up out-patient treatment because of the danger he presented to himself as a result of mental illness. No follow-up report was made to the Virginia Tech Police.
In summary, the impact of these laws that I have outlined is to limit what can be shared about students publicly or with third parties, within the organization, and even with the police department. Given the constraints imposed by the law, there are restrictions on what Virginia Tech can share about Mr. Cho publicly. This was the reason why Virginia Tech did not release Mr. Cho's academic records to the F.B.l. until the F.B.l. had obtained a subpoena. lt is also important to stress that it is not just Mr. Cho's records that are protected by these laws. Virginia Tech would be precluded from releasing similar information about any of the victims of the events of April 16. Furthermore, any complaints filed by third party students about Mr. Cho could not be shared publicly, not just to protect Mr. Cho, but also to protect the identity of those third pafi complainants as well.

Thank you for your time today. Next David Ford, Vice President for Academic Affairs, will speak with you about the events of April 16,2007.

M:ay 21,2007

Topic: Emergency Policy Group Process/Action for April 16, 2007

Chairman Massengilland Members of the Review Panel,

I am David Ford,

and I serve the university as Mce Provost for

Academic Affairs. One of the responsibilities I have by virtue of my position is to be a member of the university's Emergency Policy

Group. lt is in that capacity that I share with you today my account of
the processes used and actions taken by the Policy Group related to the shooting incidents in West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall and
in Norris Hall on the morning of Monday, April 16,2007.

Shortly after 8:00 a.m. on Monday, April 16, I was informed that there had been a shooting in West Ambler Johnston Hall and that President Steger was assembling the Policy Group immediately. By approximately 8:30 a.m., I and the other members of the group had

arrived at the Bunuss Hall Board Room and Dr. Steger convened the

meeting. I learned subsequently that as he awaited the anival of
other group members, President Steger had been in regular

communication with the police, had given direction to have the Governor's office notified of the shooting, and had called the head of University Relations to his office to begin planning to activate the emergency communication systems.

When he convened the meeting, President Steger informed the
Policy Group that Virginia Tech Police had received a call at approximately 7:20 a.m. on April 16, 2007, to investigate an incident
in a residence hall room in West Ambler Johnston. Within minutes of

the call, Virginia Tech Police and Virginia Tech Rescue SQuad members responded to find two gunshot victims, a male and a female, inside a room in the residence hall.

Information continued to be received through frequent telephone conversations with Virginia Tech Police on the scene. The Policy Group was informed that the residence hallwas being secured by

Mrginia Tech Police, and students within the hallwere notified and

asked to remain in their rooms for their safe$. We were further informed that the room containing the gunshot victims was immediately secured for evidence collection and Virginia Tech Police began questioning hall residents and identifying potential witnesses.
In the preliminary stages of the investigation, it appeared to be an

isolated incident, possibly domestic in nature. The Policy Group leamed that Blacksburg Police and Virginia State Police had been notified and were also on the scene.

The Policy Group was further informed by the police that they were following up on leads concerning a person of interest in relation to the

shootings. During this 30 minute period of time between 8:30 and 9
a.m., the Policy Group processed the factual information it had in the

context of many questions we asked ourselves. For instance, what information do we release without causing a panic? We learned from the Morva incident last August that speculation and misinformation spread by individuals who do not have the facts causes panic? Do we confine the information to students in West Ambler Johnston since the information we had focused on a single incident in that building? Beyond the two gunshot victims found by

3

police, was there a possibility that another percon might be involved (i.e. a shooter), and if so, where is that person, what does that person look like and is that person armed? At that time of the morning, when thousands are in transit, what is the most effective and efficient way

to convey the information to all faculty, staff and students? lf we
decided to close the campus at that point, what would be the most

effective process given the openness of a campus the size of Virginia

Tech? How much time do we have untilthe next class change?

And so with the information the Policy Group had, at approximately 9 a.m. we drafted and edited a communication to be released to the university community via email and to be placed on the university

website. We made the best decision we could based upon the
information we had at the time. Shortly before 9:30 a.m., the Virginia Tech community
as follows:

- faculty, staff and students - were notified by email

"A shooting incident occurred at West Ambler Johnston earlier

this morning. Police are on the scene and are investigating.

The university community is urged to be cautious and are
asked to contact Virginia Tech Police if you observe anything suspicious or with information on the case. Contact Virginia

Tech Police at231$411.

Stay tuned to the www.vt.edu. We will post as soon as we have more information."

The Virginia Tech EmergencyMeather Line recordings were also

transmitted and a broadcast telephone message was made to
campus phones. The Policy Group remained in session in order to receive additional updates about the West Ambler Johnston case and

to consider further actions if appropriate,

At approximately 9:45 a.m., the Policy Group received word from the
Virginia Tech Police of a shooting in Norris Hall. Within five minutes

a notification was issued by the Policy Group and transmitted to the
university community which read:

"A gunman is loose on campus. Stay in buildings untilfurther

notice. Stay away from all windows."

Also activated was the campus Emergency Alert system. The voice
message capability of that system was used to convey an emergency message throughout the campus. Given the factual information available to the Policy Group, the reasonable ac'tion was to ask people to stay in place. The Policy Group did not have evidence to ensure that a gunman was or was not on the loose, so every precaution had to be taken. The Virginia Tech campus contains 153 major buildings, 19 miles of public roads, is located on 2,600 acres of land, and as many as 35,000 individuals might be found on its grounds at any one time on a typical day. Virginia Tech is very much
like a small city. One does not entirely close down a small city or a

university campus.

Additionally, the Policy Group considered that the university schedule
has a class change between 9:55 and 10:10 a.m. on a MWF

schedule. To ensure some sense of safety in an open campus
environment, the Policy Group decided that keeping people inside

existing buildings if they were on campus and away from campus if

they had not yet arrived was the right decision. Again, we made the
best decision we could based on the information available. So at approximately 10:15 a.m. another message was transmitted which
read:

"Virginia Tech has cancelled all classes. Those on campus are asked to remain where they are, lock their doors, and stay away from windows. Persons off campus are asked not to come to campus."

At approximately 10:50 a.m., Virginia Tech Police Chief Flinchum and
Blacksburg Police Chief Crannis arrived to inform the Policy Group about what they had witnessed in the aftermath of the shootings in Norris Hall.

Chief Flinchum reported that the scene was bad; very bad. Virginia

State Police was handling the crime scene. Police had one shooter
in custody and there was no evidence at the time to confirm or negate

a second shooter, nor was there evidence at the time to link the

shootings in west Ambler Johnston to those in Norris Hall. The police informed the Policy Group that these initial observations were
ongoi ng investigations.

Based upon this information and acting upon the advice of the police,

the Policy Group immediately issued a fourth transmittalwhich read:

"ln addition to an earlier shooting today in West Ambler
Johnston, there has been a multiple shooting with multiple

victims in Norris Hall. Police and EMS are on the scene.
Police have one shooter in custody and as part of routine police procedure, they continue to search for a second shooter.

All people in university buildings are required to stay inside until
further notice. All entrances to campus are closed."

Information about the Norris Hall shootings continued to come to the Policy Group from the scene. At approximately 11:30, the Policy

Group issued a planned faculty/staff evacuation via the Virginia Tech
website which read:

I

"Faculty and staff located on the Burruss Hall side of the Drillfield are asked to leave their office and go home

immediately. Faculty and staff located on the War
Memorial/Eggleston Hall side of the Drillfield are asked to leave

their offices and go home at 12:30 p.m."

At approximately 12:15 p.m.the Policy Group released yet another
communication via the Virginia Tech website which further'informed people as follows:

"Virginia Tech has closed today Monday, April 16, 2007. On Tuesday, April 17, classes will be cancelled. The university will remain open for administrative operations. There will be an additional university statement presented today at noon.

All students, faculty and staff are required to stay where they are until police execute a planned evacuation. A phased
closing will be in effect today; further information will be forthcoming as soon as police secure the campus.

I

Tomorrow there will be a university convocation/ceremony at noon at cassell coliseum. The Inn at Virginia Tech has been designated as the site for parents to gather and obtain information."

A press conference was held shortly after noon on April 16,2007,
and President Charles W. Steger issued a statement citing "A tragedy of monumental proportions." Copies of that statement are available on request.

The Policy Group continued to meet and strategically plan for the
events to follow. ,A campus update on the shootings was issued at

another press conference at approximately 5 p.m. University employees began immediately to provide counsel and care for the families of the deceased and injured victims. Before Dr. Zenobia
Lawrence Hikes, Vice President for Student Affairs, briefs you on

those ongoing activities, do you have any questions?

10

6ry% fr^

Q/'^'

"'-'L( P Zt:t-

Comments by Virginia Tech Chief of Police Wendell Flinchum on May 21,2007 Io+he Virginia Tech Review Panel conceming the Police resoonse at WAJ on 4-16-07

Coi Massengill and members of the panel. My name is Wendell Flinchum and I am the Chief of Police for the Virginia Tech Police Department. I am pleased to have the opportunity to speak to you about the Virginia Tech Police Department response to the events at West Ambler Johnston Hall on April 16, 2007.

I would like to point out that the police investigation is still on-going and some of the information could change as the investigation progresses'

I would like to first tell you about the Virginia Tech Poiice Department. Our department
was formed around 1945 and has grown into a professional organization. The department is currently nationaily accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcemint Agencies (CALEA). CALEA is an independent organization established to develop a set of law enforcement standards that would improve the delivery of police servicei around the country. CALEA accredits police departments throughout the

country if those departments can meet CALEA standards. The Blacksburg Police Department and the Virginia State Police are also accredited by CALEA. Our department is one of only a few University police departments in the country that are naiionally accredited and is one of three University police departments in Virginia' We received our third re-accreditation in November 2006. Our department is a full service law enforcement agency. We currently have 40 sworn officeri which are assisted by security guards, communication officers and administrative staff. The officers are highly trained and attend the same police academy as our local police and sheriff s departments. We formed an Emergency Response Team (ERT) in tSSt *a this team trains regularly with the Blacksburg Police department's ERT. This team and our entire department have a close working relationship with the Blacksburg Police department which was demonstrated on Apil 1 6, 2001 .

I will now go into the police response

at West Ambler Johnston on

April

16' 2007 based

on the information we knew and obtained that moming.

West Ambler Johnston Ha ll

Police Respanse on

April 16,2007

CluWira Fhdrth
\4ryltit
T€cb Polico

D€pl

wvi'qg1##
WAJ . THE

*flmor

r.

trcordad by wPD Dlapatch

IilMAL CALL*

F 7:20 AM - Aptil 16,2007 - Initial call is received on a WPD
ad

ministrative telephone li ne.
Caller advises dispatcher that a female student in Room 4040

)
)

WestAmblerJohnston (WAJ) Hall had possiblyfallen from herloft
bed.
Caller was provided information by another WAI resident who was

"near" Room 4040 and heard what sounded like someone falling out of a loft.

Chlef Wand€ll Flimhum Vlrglnia T6ch Police Dopt.

..1.

..

,-...rirl

uvq#**
Y 7 :2lAM
-

'Times as recorded bYVTPD DisPatch

WAI - Follee/Rescue ResPonse*
VIPD Dispatcher notllles W Rescue Squad of female student possiblyfallen from her loft bed In WAJ.

Y 7z21.AM - WPD officer

4040 WAf accompanyW Rescue Squad (per WPD prctocol')
ls dlspatched to

b

Chi.l WdddlF lnchm
MOt J! T.dr Po|lc.

o€9t

UVirglnqTeclt lnyQnl lne Fulute I

*Times as tpcorded by WPD Dispatdl

WAJ - Pollcq/Rescue Response*
I

) 7:24AItl VTPD officeranlvesatWAJ.
>
After aniving at 4040 WAJ, WPD offcet finds that two people have been shot Insldethe toom; lmmedlately requests addltional WPD resources.

D 7:30 AM - AddlUonal VIPD officen begln aniving at Room 4040.

Chlofw.ndd Flnolrum VIE{nla To<rr Pol6 D€pt

WAJ -

Follct/Rmcue RwPnm

> WPD officens securlng cdme scene;stafting preliminary
nvestigation.

>
D

Preliminary resident interviews unable to provide a suspect description.
No one on floor or in WAJ saw anvone leave Room

4040 after the initial

noise was heard.

Clid WsrdC

Frdrrn

Virgidr To.*r Polica Dept

WvfuginiaTe& |
lnrenl lhe Future
I

*Estimated Time; No Dispatch Entry.

WAJ - Pollce Responee

) 7:40 AM - WPD Chief Flinchum notified by phone of WAJ
shootings.**

F 7:51AM

- Chlef Fllnchum contasts

BlaclsburgPollce

Depaftment(BPD) F Requests BPD Evidence Technician respond to WAJ.

)

Requests BPD Detective to assist with investigation.

Chisf

M{id€

Wg'd Flndim T6ch Polie Dqt

*Estimated Time; No Dispatch Entry.

WAJ - Follce Response
F 7:57 A.M. - Ghief Fllndum
Vice President.** at scene ) 8:00 A.M. - Chlef Fllnchum alrlves WAJ) In WAJ. girre as
rscod€d by Chief Flinchum's card $Nips at

notifles the Offie of tlte Becutive

F

By this time, WPD Detectives and BPD Detectives already on scene

at

WAJ; investigation underway.

D Local State Police Special Agent contac{ed; responded to scene.

Cfiavltoda Fh|nl Vl|!h. Ldr Pol6 O.9t

flWginiafecn I lnl'na |UWB
me

1

WAJ D 8:11 AM

Polle Rsponse

-

Blacksburg Police Chief Kim Grannls anives on

SOgng. (nme as recoded by BPD Dispatch)

) 8:13 A"M. - Chlef Flinchum requesb additionalVIPD & BPD
officen on scene to assist with securing WAI entanoes and assist in investigation. (Time as rccord€d by wPD Dlspatch)

Ci|cw'nd

F|Indlurr

vkginl. T.dr Polioa D.9l

UVirginiaTbctr? I nwnl nd mlt

*Times as recorded by WPD Dispatch

WAJ - Follce Response

) 8:t5A.M. - Chief Fllnchum rcquestsWPD Emergency
ResponseTeam (ERT- WPD equivalentof a SWATTeam) respond in anticipation of search wanants and/or arest

wanantseruice.

Chhrwt

d

Fhdtun

VlOh! T..i Pol6 D.pt

$vkglni*dt
lnwnt

tho Future

WAJ - Follce Responso
F 8:19 AM - Chief Grannis rcquests
same rcason.
BPD ERT rcspond

furfte

D 9:15 AM - Both ERTteams arc staged atthe Blaclsbug Police Departmentin anticipaUon of search wanantsand/or anest wanant service.

Chl€f

w'nd

Fhdu.m

VlElnlr T.dr Poloo

Oat

,

;4]F:ni;!sElt

!

WVirginiaTedr tnvant nc tB
Fuat

WAJ - Pollce Response
F Wtness tells VIPD investigatorc about acquaintance of
Emily Hilsche6 Individual may have been with her earlier

that same momlng.

)

Individual not a Wstudent; Individual does not live on campus. 0fficers searchingfor info on acquaintance. F Investigators search for acquaintance's vehicle In campus parking lots; become more confident individual has left campus. > WPD & BPD officers sentto acquaintance's residence; indlvidual is not home; surueillance initiated.

Ctlof Werdg] Flinchu.

vk!ffll. T.dr Pola. D.9(

uvq$#?sl'
lnwnt

the Futurc

i

D

BOL (Be 0n the Lookout report) to Blacksburg Pollce Departnentand ce for indMdual's vehicle. Monttomery County Shedffs

ffi

F All of the previous actions including the B0L, occured between
8:16 AM and 9:24 AM.

Cnbf W.nd€ll FllndrLrn

vlQinb To.h Polic. D€f,!

t-

UViginiafecn - lnvent ttvFuturs |

I I

WAJ - Pollce Response
F Meanwhile...on campus:

Ffficers

canvassing WN for possible witnesses.

>VTPD, BPD, & VSP processing Room 4040 cdme scene and gathering evidence.

)Officerc searching intedor and exterior waste contalnerc
and sunounding areas nearWAJ for evidence.

C J$r.rdd

Fhrrtl

Vlrdrfi T.dr Pol6 O.!t

U\tuginiaTectt lnwnt the Fulun

WAJ - Pollce Responso
F Meanwhlle...on Gampus:
F Investigaton securing identification of victims.

)Following up with rcscue squad personnel for any additional evidence/informatlon. }'Allocating & asslgning additional rcsponding law
enforcement.
DTrying to locate the first residentwho told the Resident Advisor about the noise in 4040 WAJ
chi€{ \iv€id€! Fllndxm ViQlnir T6ci Pollc.

S.

UVirginiaTectr - lnwnt lho Fllura

WAr - Pollce Response
F Note...

)
)

W midence halls were already locked befiore, during, & following the WAJ double-shooting. (Exterior residence hall doorc are locked from 10:00 P.M. to 10:00 A.MJ
All evidence recovered fmm WAJ cdme scene and witness information gathered atWAJ indicated the WAJ scene was an isolated, singular evenS never any indication of additional killings to follow.

)

Noris Hall investif,ations, stillno infomation from theWAJ crime scenethatwould indicate that the Nonis llall shootings would later occur.
Even after a month into theWAJ &

CllJtvdia fldrrn
Vltlhr T..i
ttolico Dept

WAJ - Pollce Response
F Flom 8:10 AM to 9:25 AM - Chief Flinchum pnlides updated infomation via phone to W Policy Group
regarding progrcss made in WAJ investigation...as becomes available.

lt

F9:25 AM - VIPD Police Captain joins W Policy Group
and provides updates as information becomes

available.

ChlC W€rd€ll Flinchum

Vlrlinb T€dr Polic. O6d.

WAJ - Pollce ResPonse

) 9:24 A.M. - Montgomery Coun$ Deputy Sherlff alefts on
acq ualntance's veh i cl e an d
in

iUates traffi c stop off campus.

D Detectives en-route to assist with questioning acquaintance.

F 9:31A.M. - VSPTroopermads on'scene to assist Montgomery County Depu$ Sheriff with tnffic stop. (Time as recorded bv VSP Salem Division
Dispatch)

D 9:30 - 9:42A.M. -

Questloningof acquaintanceongolng,

OldfNd.l ni|.hnt
vlEldr T.dr Po{6 o.pl

*Times as recorded by WPD Dispatc{t

Nonb Hall

- Polleey'Rescuo Rcponse

) 9:42A"M. - FirstcallmadebWPD Dispatch about
shootlngat Norls Hall. D 9:45 A.M. -VIPD and BPD ofrces arc fiFtto arlve at Nonls Hall.

F 9:50AM - Flstteam

of officercon Second Floorlnslde Norris Hall; last shot fired as they rcach second floor landing trlage and rcscue of victims begins

lmmedlately.
Clid wr.rddl Flndrm Vl€ld! L.h PoN6 O.pt.

Comments by Zenobia Lawrence Hikes' Ed.D. Vice President for Student Affairs to the Virginia Tech Review Panel May 21,2007 Report on Healing and Recovery Initiatives at Virginia Tech Post-APril 16

Chairman Massengill and members of the Review Panel, I am Zenobia Lawrence Hikes, Vice President for Student Affairs.
The Virginia Tech community is one of exceptional resilience and compassion. Following the horrific events of April 16, our community of faculty, staff and students

l.

lntroduction

mobilized in countless ways to provide support to grieving families, the injured and hospitalized, enrolled students and the university at large. On behalf of the Office of the president, the Office of the Provost, the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, the Division of Student Affairs, the Graduate School, and Human Resources, I would like to share with you some of the collaborative initiatives, support services, programs, and activities we employed to begin the healing and recovery of our community.

Ceremonies ln every culture, ceremonies play an important role in the process of healing and recovery. On Tuesday immediately following the tragedy the university came together in a convocation held in'Cassell Coliseum. Featured speakers included President George Bush, Governor Tim Kaine, University President charles Steger, noted author and University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni, and leaders representing four major religions. The convocation was televised world-wide and served to signal the strength and unity of the Virginia Tech community in the wake of the tragic events of April 16' Approximately 10,000 were in attendance in the coliseum and an additional 25,000 were accommodated in overflow seating in Lane Stadium'
candlelight vigil on the Drillfield. This event was attended by thousands of students, alumni, iaculty, staff, and friends who came together to mourn and pay their respects. lt was for this vigil that Hokie Stones were first placed in a semicircle in front of the reviewing stand to honor the deceased victims. Also initiated at the vigil were message boards on which mourners could write condolences and expressions of grief. As the number of boards grew over several days, tents were erected on the Drillfield to protect them from the elements. Together with the Hokie Stones, the message boards have come to serve as the focal point for the collective grief of the university community and as the repository for flowers and other mementos symbolizing the loss of students and faculty who were our dear friends and colleagues. Throughout the days following the tragedy, the Memorial Chapel served as a place of quiet refuge where members of the university community could go for a moment of reflection. Representatives from religious and faith-based organizations made themselves available at the chapel to those who desired pastoral counseling.
On the same evening as the convocation, the students of Hokies United organized a

Comments by Zenobia Lawrence Hikes, Ed.DVice President for Student Affairs to the Virginia Tech Review Panel MaY 21,2007 Report on Healing and Recovery lnitiatives at Virginia Tech Post-APril 16

Chairman Massengill and members of the Review Panel, I am Zenobia Lawrence Vice President for Student Affairs. The Virginia Tech community is one of exceptional resilience and compassion. Following the horrific events of April 16, our community of faculty, staff and students mobilized in countless ways to provide support to grieving families, the injured and hospitalized, enrolled students and the university at large. On behalf of the Office of the president, the Office of the Provost, the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, the Division of Student Affairs, the Graduate School, and Human Resources, I would like to share with you some of the collaborative initiatives, support services, programs, and activities we employed to begin the healing and recovery of our community.

l.

Introduction

Geremonies In every culture, ceremonies play an important role in the process of healing and recovery. On Tuesday immediately following the tragedy the university came together in a convocation held in Cassell Coliseum. Featured speakers included President George Bush, Governor Tim Kaine, University President Charles Steger, noted author and University Distinguished Professor Nikki Giovanni, and leaders representing four major religions. The convocation was televised world-wide and served to signal the strength and unity of the Virginia Tech community in the wake of the tragic events of April 16' Approximately 10,000 were in attendance in the coliseum and an additional 25,000 were accommodated in overflow seating in Lane Stadium.
On the same evening as the convocation, the students of Hokies United organized a

candlelight vigil on the Drillfield. This event was attended by thousands of students, alumni, iaculty, staff, and friends who came together to mourn and pay their respects, lt was for this vigil that Hokie Stones were first placed in a semicircle in front of the reviewing stand to honor the deceased victims. Also initiated at the vigil were message boards on which mourners could write condolences and expressions of grief. As the number of boards grew over several days, tents were erected on the Drillfield to protect them from the elements. Together with the Hokie Stones, the message boards have come to serve as the focal point for the collective grief of the university community and as the repository for flowers and other mementos symbolizing the loss of students and faculty who were our dear friends and colleagues. Throughout the days following the tragedy, the Memorial Chapel served as a place of quiet refuge where members of the university community could go for a moment of reflection. Representatives from religious and faith-based organizations made themselves available at the chapel to those who desired pastoral counseling.

Family Support A number of initiatives were directed specifically at meeting the needs of the families of Virginia Tech students, and I would like to highlight just a few of these. In an effort to respond to the high volume of calls from families of Virginia Tech students concerned about their safety and welfare, the university established a 24 hour call center that was staffed by university volunteers as well as representatives from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM). As the volume of calls diminished, the Dean of Students Office assumed the call center responsibilities.
To support the grieving families who had lost students and faculty, individual family liaisons were assigned, the majority of whom were from the Division of Student Affairs, the Graduate School, and the Provost Office. These individuals provided personalized services and information to assist families with processes such as the retrieval of student effects; removal of student vehicles; access to benefits available from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Fund, the Red Cross, and other community agencies; resolution of student accounts; and family participation in commencement ceremonies. Individual liaisons were also assigned to injured students and their families to assist them with the recovery process and reintegration to the academic community for those who were not graduating. President Steger, joined at times by Governor Kaine and Attorney General McDonnell, visited injured students in area hospitals to check on their welfare and let them know that the university was concerned about them. Deceased students were honored at the 2007 spring commencement by the awarding of posthumous degrees. Their families were invited as guests of the university to attend commencement to be recognized and accept their son's or daughter's diploma and class ring.

To remember and honor the victims of the tragic events of April 16, the Virginia Tech Foundation established the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund to aid in the healing process. The fund will be used to cover expenses including but not limited to: assistance to victims and their families, grief counseling, memorials, communication expenses, and comfort expenses. In addition, a general Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund as well as specific memorial funds in the name of each of the decedents have been established. Additional attention is being focused on the school-age children of deceased faculty members.

ll.

Student Health and Wellness

Gook Counseling Center In the days following the April 16 tragedy many events and support activities were taking place to facilitate the healing process. In the area of student health and wellness, the university's Gook Counseling Center took the lead in terms of providing psychological assistance to students on campus. To meet anticipated demand for Increased services, Cook Counseling Center extended its hours of operation and offered services both in the evenings and on the weekends, Counselors worked closely with groups of students with special needs, such as residents of West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall, surviving students who were in Norris Hall at the time of the incident, members of various student organizations and programs that had lost members, and roommates of deceased students. To date approximately 60 outreach presentations have been made to faculty, staff, and student groups, and the volume of appointments in the counseling center has increased at least 50o/o over this time last year. Knowing that commencement would be

an especially difficult time for students and their families, Cook Counseling Center enlisted 50 mental health professionals as volunteers to assist the regular staff. Counselors were present at each commencement exercise throughout the weekend. Anticipating an increased need for psychological counseling in the upcoming months and years, the center staff completed several grant applications in an effort to help finance expanded services. The center is providing counseling for the students who will remain in Blacksburg during the summer. For students outside of Blacksburg during the summer, the center is also facilitating counseling referrals.

Schiffert Health Center
The university's Schiffert Health Center also played an important role in the healing and recovery process. Medical personnel from the center visited hospitals where injured victims were treated and then provided special follow-up wound care to a student who had suffered gun shot wounds. To be sensitive to the psychological needs of students who may have experienoed trauma, medical personnel incorporated psychological screening questions into their conversations with students who presented for physical injuries.

Services for Students with Disabilities The Services for Student with Disabilities Office has taken the lead in providing accommodations for any injured students who may need assistance in the classroom and anticipates that there will be an increased need to provide accommodations for students with psychological disabilities. Recreational Sports Recreational Sports provided a valuable service to the university community by keeping its fitness facilities open during the week of authorized closing so that students and faculty could exercise and engage in stress relieving activities. In addition, they opened fitness classes to all students and families of the victims.

lll. Faculty and Staff Health and Wellness
Concern for the health and wellness of the campus was not focused solely on student needs. Human Resources took the lead in addressing the needs of faculty and staff. lmmediately upon learning of the shootings on campus, Human Resources (HR) contacted ValueOptions, our employee assistance provider, to request assistance and crisis counselors were on campus by mid-afternoon. Both small and large group employee sessions were scheduled to provide information related to common reactions to trauma and stress, as well as tips for self-care and recovery support. Squires Student Center was designated as the location for individual meetings with employees, with several counselors assigned to that location throughout the day. lnformation was provided to employees who are parents to assist them in communicating with their chifdren. To date, 127 group information sessions, reaching 2,980 participants, have been held with colleges, departments, and workgroups and over 800 individual sessions have been held as of May 15,2OO7. Numerous support resources were developed by ValueOptions and made available through group sessions as well as one-on-one sessions including self-care tips and coping with trauma. This material was disseminated to employees through University Relations and the universitv websites.

Training programs are being developed, with the assistance of experts in the field, to help supervisors effectively manage employee issues that may emerge from the events. Additional resource information focused on resilience and rebounding from trauma has been developed and is being shared in hard copy and on the internet.

lV. Student Affairs and Academic Affairs Collaboration
To meet our students' needs and to provide a less stressful end to the semester, a number of measures were taken that involved collaboration between Student Affairs and Academic Affairs.

Flexible Options for Gompleting the Semester On April 18, the Office of the University Provost in collaboration with the college deans, provided three options for students to complete the semester. These options took into account the education of our students, as well as their physical and mental well-being realizing that various students would react differently in the aftermath.
Classes resumed on Monday, April 23, and students had the option of designating, on a course by course basis, how they wished the semester grade to be assigned by the faculty. Grades could be based on the following: The materials which had already been submitted The material already submitted plus any other assigned material which the student chose to submit All the material which otherwise would have been submitted

. r .

In support of the flexible options and to encourage students to continue their educational experience, the Division of Student Affairs supported students who decided to remain in their residence halls. Housing and dining options were continued despite the student's choice of completing the semester. The college deans and the faculty were very helpful in advising students and in facilitating a successful end to the semester.

Deferred Academic Suspensions To support our students further, the Office of the University Provost decided that there would be no academic suspensions in the spring of 2QQ7. Students in academic difficulty were allowed an additional probationary term without requiring academic appeals. This change will impact the number of available residence hall rooms for the fall semester; however, the Division of Student Affairs is in full support of this decision.

Classroom Support When students returned to classes, the university activated the largest known deployment of mental health practitioners in U.S. history. The schedules of the victims and injured were researched through the registrar's office and approximately 305 counselors attended these classes to provide support for the faculty and students. Counselors were identifiable by purple arm bands. Others who were available to provide general assistance and support were identifiable by yellow arm bands.
The Center for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (CEUT) held a number of workshops through the period of Wednesday, April 18, to Friday, April 20, to help faculty prepare for resumption of classes on Monday, April 23. Among the workshop topics were: engaging the students in conversation surrounding the tragic events, responding to students who experience difficulty with the discussions, and describing the grading options the faculty made available to students for completing their individual courses.
4
_,Ail

Deferred Judicial Cases During the days following the tragedy, Judicial Affairs also provided options for students with pending judicial hearings. The office's most immediate focus for judicial hearings was graduating seniors and students with serious offenses. Other students were given the option of resolving their cases before the end of the semester or in the fall.

V. Student Support Services
Dean of Students Office The Dean of Students Office played a key role in coordinating the campus response to the tragedy. In collaboration with others, the office coordinated the work of the family liaisons and served as the central clearing house for information related to the victims of the tragedy. They worked closely with the State Police to facilitate the return of students' personal property from Norris Hall, provided an information hotline for students and parents, and processed a staggering volume of letters, cards, and remembrances for the victims.

Cranwell International Center Cranwell International Center responded to the special needs of international students that resulted from the incidents of April 16. Complimentary international telephone cards were distributed to students who needed to contact their families abroad to assure them that they were safe. To address the unique concems of Korean students, staff made telephone contact with each undergraduate and many graduate students from Korea to offer assistance. In addition, the center responded to departments that requested presentations on responding to the special needs of international students.

Multicultural Programs and Services
Multicultural Programs and Services worked closely with the leadership of the Asian American Student Union and other campus leaders to address concerns about potential retaliation and requests from the press. The students were assured of the universitv's concern for their safety.

Residence Life
Residence Life has played a key role in the efforts to promote healing and recovery on campus. lmmediately following the events of April 16, resident advisors were deployed to personally speak with each resident student on campus by Tuesday afternoon and offer counseling resources. As reports from concerned faculty and families were received, the professional staff followed up appropriately with individual students and met with student groups to facilitate their discussions about lost friends or roommates. As residents returned to campus, counselors toured through the buildings and were on call for staff to contact for residents. Exterior doors to all residence halls remained locked to help ensure a sense of safety and well being among residents.

Housing and Dining Services Housing and Dining Services provided complimentary on-campus housing and meals for victim's families and friends during commencement weekend. To be sensitive to the special needs of these guests, the housing arrangements included access to counseling services, security coverage, and24 hour a day guest services.

The Graduate School While the Division of Student Affairs provided support services to the general student population, the Graduate School focused its efforts on the specific needs of graduate students. lnitiatives included providing support to those who lost friends and faculty members, attending to the unique academic needs of graduate students, and assisting graduate assistants to carry out their teaching and research responsibilities. The Graduate School maintained regular communication with all graduate students and opened the multipurpose room in the Graduate Life Center as a place for graduate students to gather and to take advantage of on-site counseling services. Specific outreach efforts were directed at supporting Korean graduate students as well as those from other Asian countries.

Vl. Student Activities and Programs
Gorps of Cadets The Corps of Cadets participated in a number of ceremonial events related to the April 16 tragedy. The cadet regiment provided the band, color guard, and ushers for the convocation and then provided buglers for Echo Taps during the candlelight vigil. ln addition, the cadet regiment served as honor guard for the memorial wreath at War Memorial Chapel and then at the cenotaph.

University Unions and Student Activities University Unions and Student Activities served as a central gathering place and repository for memorials during the weeks following the April 16 incident. Also, the student centers have displayed memorial tributes from around the world. Squires Student Center and the Graduate Life Center remained open throughout the entire week following the incident to provide counselors and community support to assist those in distress. In addition, the various union facilities were used as venues for memorial services and commemorative events. Plans are currently underway for a fall healing concert that will bring the campus community together to remember the victims. Hokies United We are especially proud of the work of Hokies United, a student-driven volunteer effort organized to help respond to local, national, and international tragedies. As mentioned previously, Hokies United banded together immediately after the tragedy occuned and was able to pull together a candlelight vigil held on the Drillfield the evening of April 17. In addition, they organized a series of unifying activities intended to bring the community together. These included a casino night in War Memorial Gym and a picnic on the Drillfield that was aftended by an estimated 15,000 people. And on the first day back to classes, Hokies United organized once again to hold a campus-wide moment of silence.

Vll. Conclusion
Finally, the Virginia Tech campus community remains committed to the process of healing and recovery as evidenced by the combined efforts of our students and employees from across the university in such departments as Physical Plant, Athletics, Human Resources, Student Affairs, the Graduate School, the Provost Office, and academic departments, to name just a few.

CONTACT:
Larry Hincker (s40) 231-s396
hincker@l't.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY: Virginia Tech to release llndings and recommendations of April
review committees

16

BLACKSBIIRG, Va., August 21,2007 -Yitginia Tech will release the findings and recommendations of tlree post-April 16 review committees at a press conference Wednesday,
August 22 at 2:30 p.m. at the Holtzman Alumni Center Assembly Hall. The press conference
last approximately one hour.

will

The press event

will

be led by Larry Hincker, associate vice president for university relations.

Other speakers include Virginia Tech President Charles Steger; James Hyatt, executive vice
president and chief operating officer; Earving Blythe, vice president for information tecbnologli;
and Jerome A. Niles, retired dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences.

On May g,2007,President Steger called for three separate intemal reviews in the wake of the

April

16 tragedy. He asked each group to examine "strengths and weaknesses

of our existing

systems/infrastructure and how they may be improved or augmented to address emelgency

situation that might arise in the future."

==> The Security Infrastructure Group was charged with examining the university's existing

secwity systems and recommending changes that would enhance the university's ability to
respond quickly and effectively in situations where the safety of the campus community is

jeopardized. This group was also directed to identi$ stategies that might decrease the probability

of such a situation occurring looking at both technologicial and behavioral aspects. James Hyatt
chaired this group and will present
its

findings.

:>

The Information and Communications fnfrastructure Group analyzed and inventoried

the communication infrastructure and information systems used during the crisis period, evaluated their perfomance, and identifies tactics and strategies for improvemetts.

Earting

Blythe chairedthis group andwill present itsfndings.

=:> The Interface Group

evaluated the relationships between the university's student

counseling services, academic affairs, judicial affairs, and the legal system. It was charged with

examining the existing systems and the interface between them and determining what constraints legal or otherwise hamper effective interactions in order to respond and support at-risk students.
Jerome

A. Niles chaired this group and will present

its findings.

Copies of each report Wednesday only

will be available to members of the working

press beginning at noon on

if

a 2:30 p.m. embargo on its contents is honored. Hard copies may be picked

up in the lobby of the Holtzrnan Alumni Center outside adjacent to Assembly Hall. Only hard copies

will be available at this time.

Parking is available in the parking lot in front of the Inn at Virginia Tech. No parking is available
adiacent to the Holtzman Alumni Center.

LElry
Comments August 30, 2007 Charles W. Steger Response to Virginia Tech Review Panel

Let me begin by saying that this university, notwithstanding the joy and exhilaration that comes from the start of the new s€,mester and acadernic year, is still traumatized to an extent and continues to gneve over the tagedy ofApril 16. On our calnpus, 32 people were murdered and at least 27 injured by a profoundly sick young man. Moreover, he was a member of our own community, which magnifies the violation we all feel. For virtually all of us within the Virginia Tech family, our hearts will never lose the ache we've felt since that honible day. We are trying hard to support those most in need. Nineteen injured students have retumed to the Virginia Tech campus to continue their education here and we are doing everything possible to make that transition back to the classroom as easy as it can be.

In addition, the office of Recovery and Support was created to facilitate more effective and on-going two-way communication between the university and the families of the victims.
I believe that wonderful opportunities exist for Virginia Tech to collaborate with these families in some incredibly meaningful programming to commemorate the spirit and generosity of our fallen Hokies.

I am here to speak today to the findings and recommendations of the Virginia Tech Review Panel that was ably led by Colonel Massengill. I want to thank Governor Kaine,
Col. Massengill, and all the mernbers of the panel who gave so much time and thought to this difficult topic. They have provided a valuable and necessary public service. Govemor Kaine's leadership from the early moments of April 16 and his encouragement and support ever since have been inspirational to our university, to the cornmonwealth, and beyond.

I would also like to acknowledge the work of hundreds of people within the university who worked on our own reviews and/or worked with the panel in sharing information... and the thousands faculty, staffand students who stepped up on April 16 and in the weeks that followed. And finally, I once again want to thank the thousands of people who flocked to our aid on April 16 or expressed their support.
We asked for this review. We asked that it be direct and objective. It is extraordinarily comprehensive.

It is painful to hear the blunt an4 in some cases, critical findings. Yet, it was necessary. . ...Necessary for those who have lost something more precious than anything in the world - their loved ones. ...Necessary for those of us who interacted with the deeply

disturbed student. ....And necessary for those of us with the responsibility for finding ways to implement actions to seek to prevent any such tragedy happening ever again.

We are just now begiruring to digest the findings and recommendations. We are distributing the report to campus leadership and the board ofvisitors. It is already clear that many of its recommendations for future actions are consistent with ow own released last week.
We must evaluate which actions we can implement immediately, which might have secondary implications that require further study, which are the province and responsibility of groups outside the university, which require changes in law, and which will require additional resources.

I can't review everything in the report, but let me

note

just a few key points.

As noted in our own reports on the "interface" between units, as we move forward we need to be more aggressive in identifying and assisting students at risk. The Panel report indicates the same.
Whether Cho should have ever been in a large college - or any college is a legitimate question. When people did reach out and try to help, he rebuffed the system' He hid his homicidal tendencies from mental health professionals throughout his life.

-

Althougtr, hindsight now provides us with the sigrrs or indications within the university, he clearly kept from the university the exte,lrt of his troubles and prior mental health history. Ours is a system that asks for students to help us help them. Mental health colleagues work tirelessly to help individuals with ailments cope with college, but it is a cooperative effort.
Some say the 'system' ...the continuum of support from childhood through college... failed this student. Some aspects "the system" worked...broadly speaking. It simply wasn't asked to do enough. We didn't ask it do to enough and for some aspects outside Virginia Tech the same is true. For example, the report notes that "professional participants and family stakeholders are uniformly frustrated with almost every aspect of the civil commitment process in Virginia."

We believe that actions that we announced last week that we refer to as "Expanding Capacity in the System" will greatly improve our ability to identify problems.

I refer to the three major recommendations. If lift them up now because they are key to much of what we have heard from the panel. Refining and expanding the Care Team, a key student affairs group that identifies and responds to students at risk (among other responsibilities). Creating a Threat Assessment Team charged with examining the most complex cases of distressed students and empowering it to act quickly, when necessary.

.

Expanding case Management capacityby adding case managers to the Dean of Students office and Cook Counseling Center to improve follow-up with students and to improve information flow through appropriate units about students at risk'

adults. Over the past 30 years, in-loco-parentis has been challenged, largely dismantled, and almost legislated out of existence. Yet, we afe seeing in this report and other public discussion a growing recognition that families do not and should not surrender responsibility for a student's ongoing well-being. There are many recommendations in this report relative to communication and privacy laws that will bolster involvement of support groups, including farnilies.

Virtually all college students

are legal

In Cho's case, no one at this university had any foreknowledge of his mental health problems that seemed dominant throughout his life before college. Colleges need feedback loops in order to identiff, assess, and help students at risk. We need some way ofunderstanding a student's life before college, ifthere are aspects that would prevent that student from success or, in the extreme, could create problems for others.
Indeed, the information about his earlier mental health problems and special education programs would have been invaluable not only in a general sense in assisting him as a student, but whe,n he had his one encounter with the public mental health system in 2005.

We agree that we need to break down the perceived barriers to privacy within our own organization and with organizations with which we interact. It is still a grey area and some of the recommendations will require a better understanding of existing laws, clarifrcation of existing laws, and changes in laws...which will engender much discussion. In the end, we acknowledge the 'connecting the do{ scenarios and will do everl'thing in onr power to end potentialvroblemy^

I can assure you that Virginia Tech will not Ue will be forceful advocates for bridging the legislative gap between individual privacy rights and the good oflarger society.

rd*"'fr' rrfu rytfie pdlltical process.L/-/*r'We tsaystander in

The Panel report says the police agencies and rescue groups did an outstandingjob on this day of the hagedy. I agree. Their heroic work in Norris undoubtedly saved lives.
Based on feedback given to me by other law enforcement leaders and in the report itself, our police followed standard protocols for a homicide investigation and securing the campus on the morning when the first fwo shootings were discovered. They immediately secured the crime scene and notified residents in the immediate area. With the information gleaned in only minutes, they developed legitimate leads and quickly followed them. Based on the crime scene evidence, they did just what they should have done.

The report notes that "The notion that there was a 2-hour gap...is a misconce'ption' There was continuous action and deliberations from the first event until the second and they made a material difference in the results of the second event'"

I

am not aware of anything they leamed that would have indicated a mass murder was imminent. Indeed, the report notes that there was no similar event in U'S. history' The report notes, "Based on pist history, the probability of more shootings following a dormitory slaying was very low. The panel researched reports of multiple shootings on for the past 40 years, and no scenario was found in which the first mr.uder was "u*pur.iby a second elsewhere on campus" followed

This crime was unprecedented in its cunning and murderous result. Yet, it happened here. We now own it forever.
We respect and commend the panel for the 'what might have happened scenarios.' They are iltuitrative and useful for future actions. Nobody can say for certain what would have happened if different decisions were made. However, to say that something could have bein prevented is not to say it would have been. Moroever, it is entirely possible that this tragedy, horrific as it is, could have been worse.

Yet, their recommendations are sound and will be helpful. As the Panel report notes, Cho is ultimately responsible for the curmage on our campus. Irrespective of suggested changes in action, we recognize as does the panel, that no plausible scenario was made for how this horror could have been prevented once he began that morning.-@ we recognize that actions leading back several years could lead us to numerous "what-if' scenarios.

All of these recommendations will

be valuable to higher education.

We believe that our people acted quickly and to the best of their abilities in the early hours of April 16 based on what we knew at the time. Still, we acknowledge the findings and recommendations of the panel. The distance in time and extraordinarily thorough work ofthe panel provides the hindsight and necessary clarity to objectively review our actions that were not available to us in thsheat of the moment. And the report also reinforces the bravery, selflessness, and integrity with which the community faced this horrific challenge.

It is my belief that our new notification systems will facilitate the speed by which we can employ university notifications in emergency situations. But there are pitfalls and possibly unanticipated consequences by the community if in receipt of sketchy information or lacking a recommended course of action. Still, we recognize there is now an expectation for rapid communication of some information, even if not explicit. In some instances, this may be better than no

information. Indeed, this may be the new protocol for American municipalities and cities as well.
Nothing we can do now will bring back those precious lives lost. My heart goes out the families who lost families members. We will make changes throughout our university and related systems and changes in attitudes to ensure their memories are honored and remembered. As one panel membel said, this report is a beginning of the path to reduce the risk of future tragedies.
Our university is shong. We have tremendous pride in who we are. There is an indomitable Aokie Spirit. And each day we cope better and better. But, I know that speak for my colleagues when I say'.. I will hurt forever.

I

-end-

A./""L,.i*rd

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6 re

A6/23/2007 11:01

FAX

540 23t 4Zg5
H482312149

VT PRESIDENII'S OFFICE
AD:OFFTCE

85/ZVZAA7 a9:2L

IfnCI"-L

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On behalf of everyorne associated with Virginia Tecb" inctuding the farnilies of the victims of our tecent Uagedy, I would like to convey oul sincere gratitude to the New York Yankees' organization for this wonderful contibutisn to the Hokie Spirit Mernorial Fund-

REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE UNIVERSIW IN RESPONSE TO THE TR.AGEDY OF APRIL '16,2007
|/i.ay

4,2007

Overview Statement
Virginia Tech's Emergency Response Plan partitions emergency decision-makers into funttional groups to maximize efficiency. The main two groups are the Policy Group and the Emergency Response Resource Group (ERRG). The Policy Group coordinates policy and procedure issues specific to response and recovery activities necessitated by ihe nature of the event. This group was convened immediately on April 16, 2007 when the tragedies occuned. The Policy Group members include the university's executive leadership including the President, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Associate Vice President for University Relations, University Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, Vice President for Student Affairs and General Counsel. As required by the Emergency Response Plan, a Vice President in Charge was named as well as an Emergency Response Coordinator' The Emergency Response Coordinator chaired the ERRG, and reported information back to the Vice President in Charge. The ERRG provides support for emergency operations, addresses the safety and welfare of students, employees and visitors, and assures the continuity and timely resumption of university operations. The ERRG consists of directors and lead administration in the academic and administrative areas involved in responding to the emergency. Since the recent tragedy, the focus of the ERRG has been to both restore university operations and plan for major activities through the beginning of the Summer Session. The entire university community has worked closely with state agencies and volunteer groups to respond to the tragic events of April 16. The following highlights just a few of the critical activities and future plans of the university in response to the tragedy of April 16.

Gounseling Services
The Cook Counseling Center has provided and coordinated counseling services for students since the day of the tragedy. The Center immediately established extended night and weekend hours, and ensured counselors were located in high traffic student areas such as Squires Student Center and G. Burke Johnston Student Center. The Center also provided training to professors for how to assist students when classes resumed on April 23. On the day classes resumed, the Center coordinated the activities of over 280 mental health volunteers on campus and ensured that counselors were available in each academic building and in all classes affected by the loss of a student or faculty member. The Center worked to enlist the services of the Wellness Corporation, which is providing 24 hour counseling services as necessary. The Center is also working to develop a response to a grant request that the Commonwealth will submit to the Federal Govemment for emergency support to the Community SeMce Boards across the state. The grant would empower each of the community service
Page 1 of8

ORIGINAL
'/L/
,
:

boards in the five regions of the Commonwealth to provide mental health services for each student at the comrnunity agency in their region. These services would either be pro bono or at a reduced rate to students and their families. The grant would be submitted to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) in the Department of Health and Human Services as an emergency response grant (sometimes known as a'surge'grant). Finally, the Center is also working with Human Resources staff to develop plans for the level of counseling services needed during Commencement, through the summer session, and for orientation activities. Human Resources coordinated counseling services for faculty and staff. Faculty and staff enrolled in COVA Care, the Commonwealth of Virginia's health insurance program, receive employee assistance benefits through a contract with ValueOptions. While services are typically accessed individually by phone, the events of April 16 wananted a quick response and immediate availability. On Monday, April 16, at 9:39 a'm., Human Resources contacted ValueOptions to request assistance and an immediate presence on campus. Counselors were on campus by Monday afternoon. By Tuesday' ValueOptions sent additional resources and an incident commander to coordinate with Human Resources and Employee Assistance Program (EAP) counselors. ValueOptions and Human Resources worked closely with state, university and community resources to identify needs and available resources, and coordinate services. The coordination efforts will continue, and include planning for services during commencement, and in the weeks following.

Human Resources implemented a communication plan to immediately inform colleges and depafiments about the EAP resources, including group information sessions that could be provided at the college, department, or unit level, as well as individual sessions. Email messages or personal phone calls were made to most senior management areas and larger departments including those directly impacted by the tragedy. lnformation sessions with these groups began the moming of Wednesday, April18.

Squires Student Center was designated as the location for individual meetings with employees, with several counselors assigned throughout the day. Counselors were assigned to provide access to services on the weekends of April 21 and 29 on a walk-in basis. Although the EAP was specifically focused on faculty and staff, it was decided that students who requested assistance would also be served. Employees were also able to make direct contact with the EAP to schedule individual appointments, which made the EAP fully accessible to employees in our off-campus offices. Daily briefings, occurring at the beginning and end of each work day, enable Human Resources and the EAP coordinators to respond quickly to all requests for group meetings, and immediately to all requests for individual meetings. Several programs were provided in coordination between the EAP and the university's Work/Life Resources Office to Virginia Tech parents to assist them in communicating with their children.

Page 2 of 8

lnformation was immediately developed, in coordination with Cook Counseling Center, and disseminated to employees about ongoing supporl resources through University website, Relations and the University and Human Resources websites. "Coping with Tragedy''was http://virqiniatech.healthandperformancesolutions.net, titled devefoped with access via the Human Resources website. As of May 2, 2007, approximately 100 information sessions (2,600 participants) with colleges and departments had been held or scheduled, as well as approximately 635 individual sessions.

A

Following Commencement, new training programs will be developed, with the assistance of experts in the field, to help supervisors be effective in managing employee issues that may emerge from the events. Support for employees will continue to be offered in a variety of formats and methods, using internal and external resources.
Human Resources is currently developing a plan for these next phases.

Security
In addition to being the first responders to the tragic events, the Virginia Tech Police Department coordinated the presence of all the state, regional, and local police departments that came to campus to provide assistance. Officers from other state universities including George Mason University, Hampton-Sydney College, James Madison University, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Liberty University, Longwood University, Old Dominion University, Radford University, University of Richmond and the University of Virginia also provided much needed support' ln addition to providing generalcampus security as usual, the Police Department provided ongoing security for both crime scenes while maintaining order on campus with the excessive media and visitor presence. The Police Department also provided security for the Convocation on April 17, which entailed accommodations for both the Governor of Virginia and the President of the United States. In addition to securing Norris Hall, the Police Department has also assisted the Virginia State Police with the retum of items from Norris Hall to victims and families

The Police Department is working closely with staff from Athletics and the Commencement Committee to develop a plan for security coverage at Commencement. Commencement ceremonies in the larger venues, including the Graduate Life Center, Cassell Coliseum, Lane Stadium and Bumrss Hallwill be covered by representatives from RMC Events, the company that handles security checks at athletic events. All other ceremonies, including the Corps of Cadets commissioning will be covered by Virginia Tech police officers. Security for the National Capital Region ceremony has also been arranged, Security standards for the National Capital Region will be the same as the main events on the Blacksburg campus.
Beyond Commencement, the Police Department is looking at how to prepare campus for the summer and fall semesters. This will involve a strong presence at orientation activities to ensure parents and students are aware of the university's efforts to provide
Page 3 of 8

a safe and secure environment. The university is going to contract a firm to perform a campus security review, and the Police Department will be a critical part of the review. All of the Virginia Tech Police Department officers exhibited genuine concem for the students, faculty, staff and community during the tragic events. Chief Flinchum represented the university with great integrity during press conferences while under a tremendous amount of stress. The entire Police Depadment has very much embodied the university's motto, Ut Prosim: "That I May Serve".

Student Affairs and Services
Units in Student Affairs have had the challenging task of providing assistance to the victims and the victim families, while ensuring that student services and activities oncampus were provided in the same manner as before the tragedy, One of the first actions by Student Affairs after the tragedy was to assign a family liaison to each victim family. The liaisons have coordinated the interactions and communications between the families and the university. This arrangement has ensured that the needs of the families are met, and provided the families a method to request assistance as issues and needs arise. In many cases, the family liaisons attended memorial and funeral services with the families. Housing and Dining Services assisted families with packing and moving belongings for both on and off-campus residents. When classes resumed on April23, approximately 80 to 90% of students had retumed to the residence halls, and lunch counts in the dining halls were the same as before the tragedy. Student Affairs' staff are now preparing for Commen@ment, including coordinating lodging at Commencement for families of the victims, in addition to planning accommodations for the approximately 1,000 families who were already scheduled to be lodged on-campus during Commencement. Victim's families will be provided special accommodations and will be housed in Peddrew-Yates. There are also rooms available at the Hotel Roanoke for overflow if necessary. Counselors will be onsite to provide support to the families. University Unions has worked closely with Hokies United, the student group who worked to place the white board memorials on the Drill Field. Staff assisted the students with moving the boards into Squires Student Center when the weather was poor, and then assisted in renting a more stable tent to house the boards so they could be retumed to the Drill Field. Moving and Hauling assisted the students with the relocation of the boards to Squires Student Center, and then the return back to the Drill Field. The boards will remain on the Drill Field through Commencement. The Corps of Cadets is standing guard at the tent housing the boards from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Staff are working to develop a long-term plan for the boards.

Page 4 of 8

The Office of the University Registrar has worked to order posthumous degrees and rings for the deceased, and was successful in working to have frames for the diplomas donated. Duplicate ciegrees and rings were ordered for blended families. Staff also worked to modify the Commencement program so that victims of the tragedy will be honored.

lnfrastructure
Units that support campus infrastructure including Physical Plant, Parking and Transpoftation and Information Technology have worked together to coordinate the clean-up of both Ambler Johnston and Nonis Halls, manage traffic and parking oncampus, as well as assist with the relocation of equipment and other items from Norris Hall.

Legal Counsel negotiated contracts for the clean-up of both Ambler Johnston and Norris Halls with WEL, a Virginia firm. In Ambler Johnston, Physical Plant installed gypsum wallboard partitions that fully enclosed and isolated the two affected rooms from the rest of the fourth floor. Upon completion of the clean-up work, the university had the work accepted by a third party certified industrial hygienist. The residence hall was ready for the retum of students on April 23. ln Norris Hall, the clean-up work commenced with WEL covering the windows of the significantly affected classrooms. Physical Plant erected a temporary chain link, screened fence that encircled the entire Nonis Hall building. The chain link fence stopped traffic flow between Bumrss Hall and Nonis Hall and prevented access to the building during clean-up. Although the screening will be removed from the fence once clean-up is complete, the plan is to leave the fence in place through Commencement. The clean-up work in Nonis Hall consisted of two phases: (Phase 1) bioremediation and (Phase 2) removal of contaminated asbestos floor tiles, ceiling tiles and lights. The Virginia Tech Police Department provided continuous security for the building throughout the entire clean-up period. Once all work in Norris Hall is complete, the doors to the hallway and classrooms on the second floor willremain closed and locked. Moving and Hauling assisted with the move out of furniture, equipment and other items from Norris Hall to the buildings engineering staff now occupy, including Whittemore, McBryde, Hancock, Torgersen, Durham and the Gateway Building. The Police Department assisted with the move by providing security in the stainruells to restrict access to the affected space while staff retrieved personal belongings. Both Physical Plant and the Police Department also assisted with the removal of personal effects from the building. The Key Shop provided new locks and keys for the new faculty and staff offices very quickly. Communication Network Services (CNS) also provided critical support. CNS immediately activated the emergency call center and managed the enormous call volume. At the same time, CNS worked to provide instant tumaround for telephone and internet connections to the new engineering locations. When the ERRG was notified
Page 5 of 8

that the engineering departments would not have adequate computers when classes resumed on April 23, CNS immediately provided 28 computers to the departments, as well as 7 additional laptops. CNS worked to have cellar providers bring portable units to campus to increase capacity during times of heavy calling volumes and has aranged for these providers to retum for Commencement. In addition to providing additional voice capacity, CNS removed wireless access restrictions so that visitors to campus had adequate intemet access. The department is now assisting with plans for Commencement, and working with the Police Depaftment to retain data from all equipment involved in the investigation. Parking and Transportation has managed parking and the high volume of traffic on campus since the tragedy. A media parking plan was developed to ensure traffic flow on-campus when classes resumed on April 23. Staff worked with the Blacksburg Transit to ensure services would be on schedule. Through coordination with the Blacksburg Transit, staff also ensured that services were provided for an extended period the Sunday before classes resumed so that students arriving in the commuter parking lots would have transportation to the residence halls. Fleet Services provided buses to support on-campus memorial events during that week as well' The department is now coordinating arrangements for Commencement, including special parking for families of the victims.

Financial Services
As the university has done in the past during emergency events, a fund was established for the Office of Risk Management to be able to accumulate costs for potential reimbursement from insurance and other sources. The Office of Risk Management has been working diligently on cost recovery. Human Resources' staff submitted all necessary workers compensation claims, and provided salary information to administration so a policy decision could be made on whether or not to payout the contracts for the faculty and graduate students who were killed in Norris Hall. The payout of the contracts for the deceased was approved, and all service areas were instructed to waive outstanding charges for deceased and/or injured students during the Spring semester. Purchasing has expedited emergency purchases and contracts, and worked to established a temporary procedure for the approval of emergency contracts so that requests in support of April 16 activities could be rapidly processed.

University Development and Relations
To remember and honor the victims of the tragic events, University Development worked to establish the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund, the Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund and individual scholarships for the 32 deceased. As of April 30, over $1.25 million had been received, and over 9,500 gifts had been logged. A website was developed to provide information on the funds and how to give to the university. The Virginia Tech Foundation officers are considering the allocation of funds, usage of funds, and how the fund can be used to assist the children of the deceased faculty.
Page 6 of 8

University Development provided much needed event planning expertise to the entire campus communi$. Staff worked with departments and colleges to provide event planning for the numerous memorials and ceremonies. University policy requires that departments work through University Unions to reserve space on campus (except academic and/or athletic space). In the emergency situation, a temporary process was established so that departments could contact one office to utilize all university space, including academic and athletic controlled space. University Relations has been the first point of contact for a wide range of groups trying to communicate with the universifi, from students and parents, to the to numerous companies and individuals offering assistance or requesting information. University Relation's staff worked with Information Technology to qqickly add servers to our production environment to support vt.edu. Email blasts to the university community, and information on the tragedy was immediately posted to the university's website as soon as the tragedy occurred. Staff also developed the "ln Memoriam" website at http://www.vt.edu/traqedv to honor and remember those lost, as well as to provide information on news and notices related to the tragedy such as information on memorial services. University Relation's staff worked to prepare for, and actively participated in, the numerous press eonferences that were held the day of the tragedy and in the weeks following April 16. Staff managed a media presence that was excessive; at the peak there were approximately 350 media groups on campus. Staff also worked to assist the executives with sending out university-wide communications in the days after the tragedy. University Relations has also provided guidance for departments on how to respond to allthe communications that are being received campus-wide.

lssues
As discussed briefly in the previous paragraphs, the ERRG facilitated and submitted a number of issues to the Policy Group and university executives for consideration, including:

tuition and fee reimbursement (see Attachment A); outstanding bills for deceased and/or injured students; planning for faculty children; post Commencement coverage for faculty and staff; payroll for deceased faculty; and preservation of memorials
Less administrative policy decisions have also been fonrvarded for consideration, such as a request for a Hokie stone grave marker by the family of Cadet Matthew La Porte who was killed on April 16. The universi$ typically does not approve such requests, but made an exception in this case.
Page 7 of 8

University Libraries is working to archive the impromptu and formal memorial displays, including all the letters, banners and other items mailed to the university after the tragedy. These activities are being coordinated with the Library of Congress and other groups who have experience archiving events of this magnitude. Likewise, memorial committee has been established to make recommendations on a permanent memorial. University staff continues to facilitate necessary policy decisions and develop long-term plans to address student, faculty and staff needs for the upcoming months. A main focus is to address and provide for special staffing needs to ensure that employees are not ovenrvorked. The identification of alternate space for the activities of f.lorris Hall will be a subject that requires a great deal of careful consideration and planning.

The entire university community has pulled together to protect life safety, secure the university's critical infrastructure and facilities, and resume teaching and research programs after the tragic events of April 16. A considerable amount of work has been accomplished in response to the emergency. However, the university also has significant work and planning ahead in order to fully respond and react to the emergency. Therefore, the ERRG will be released following commencement, and the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer will form a working committee drawing from university administrators responsible for various administrative and academic operations to assist in addressing special areas that need attention. The focus will be to place the responsibilities for addressing and implementing changes in the hands of those who are charged with the ongoing operations of the university.

Page 8 of 8

Talking Points - Updated
:

4llgl|i

1:3(l p.m.

1.

Web site lbr donations ar.rd fraudulent site warnings a. Vilginia Tecli lias set up the Hokie Sp irit Memorial Fund, the official lrlace for donatiotls. Other websites soliciting c.<rnations for victims of the shoot.ilgs at Virginia Tech April i 6 may be fi.aLrdu I :nt. b. Separately, the united way of New Ri rer Valley has established an accounr ro provide assistance to victim's fumilier lor funeral and burial costs, tra.rrsportatiorl costs, 01' other imr.nediate costs. Donalirns rnay also help with uncove,red medical costs for wourded victins and for cor:r:rrurity agencies that may incur unusual costs associated witli r-esponding to th,: event. contributions rlay be nrade via www.unitedwaylrv.org or by rrailing g.ifts to UWMRF, p.O. Box 62()2, Christiansburg, VA 24068. Please ind (ate that your donation go specilicaliy to this fund. For trore infomration: 5401.1i1-2066 or stephanie@unitedu,a.ynrr..or.g. c. As an altenlative, donations can also te made to the American Red Cl.c,ss or the Salvation Amry, who irave been onsit(: n Blacksburg aiding with relir:f'effor1s.

L.

Infotmation fol students on how the sernester v'ill be compieted iras been Doste)d on the Web si te al. www.vt.edu. Situation in hospitals as of Wedrresday, April I 3 at 7:33 p.rn. a. Eric Earnhart Carillion NRU Medical ,Janter, two patients still in hospital in good condition. One patient was released th:s evening b' carillion RoA Memorial - one patient in serious conditio'and one palient was transfened to another hospital (not na rr:d).

J.

4.

NBC leceives package lrorn Nor.ris shooter a. NBS News leceived a package with pL otos, video, and writings alleged.ly from Clio Seung-Hui, the gunntan responsibk fol the fatal shootings at Norriri Hall. NBC tunred .rigi'als of tbis potentiall I crucial evidence over to the FBL
l0 enttl

).

ylltg vrctlll'ls
Face identil-rcations of victims is some irnes unreliable; it is not uncorrrnron for loved orles under great duress to nrisidr:r tify victims. The first means of makilg definite identifications is by fingerprinr s Wren docurnented fingerprirrtr; are l'rot available, dental recolds can be nsed tc tr,o5i1iu.1t identify victims. Obtaining documented fingetprints aud dental reco'ds can be a tinie-consuning taslk. When these ider.rtificatious are rnade, the first trr be notified are the next of kin to the victir.n. It is after and only after these p,rsitive identifications and fan.rily notificatior.rs are made, that law enforcr:nrent is prepared to release the identitv of a victin.i to tlie public.

a.

o.
: .

Gatliering place fol Glad students a. Tlie GLC Multipurpose Room will be r.villable forthe rest of the weel.: liom 7:30arn to 10:30 pm as a gathering plac e for the graduate community. 'izisit the Multipurpose room to offer reflections lpoems, photos, statements, or other), conlments to help us prepare actiou steps for a positive future, seek answers to

questious you lnight have, or have a q riet moment. Dean Karen Depauw will be available on wednesday and rhursdal'10:00arn-12:00 noon to talk with graduare students. Graduate School staffwill alsr be available to answer questions and address concems as tliey arise. Refreslr:nents wiil be provided throughout the tlilee days.

7.

Cards, letters and othel condolences

a.

The virginia Tech community has beer: literally overwhelmed by exp:rr:ssiols of suppoft and condolences fronr alound the world and we are so grateful. At this point, instead of sending flowers, may \ve suggest donations be made to the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund. Details can fou:rJ at www.vt.edu. We've l.rad several questions, parliculaly fronr schoolchiidren, about lvhere to nrail cards. Tirey can be sent to the De;nr of Students office, 201 w. Rr,anoke Street, Blacksbulg, VA 24061. ;i I
.

x

Funeral Arrangenrcnts a. Families of the victims are makirrg the r own individual funeral aransements, none of which are available to the unive rsity at this point.

9.

Crisis connseling avaiiable a. Sevelal orgattizations are providing cris s counseling services for studr:uts, faculty, and staff. Faculty and staff tluorrghout the state are accessing r:ounseling: services through the state employee sy:;lem program, which has about a dozen staff menrbers working in Blacksburg iurd more throughout the state. lhe Thomas E. Cooli Counseling Center is working rrith the Red Cross, New River Community Seruices, and others to prcvide counseling services for students. cou'selors are meeting with individua.s, as weil as groups as reqr.rested.

10.

Judicialsysten

a.

students who allegedly violate the uni r,:r'sity policies for student Life are requiled to attend a judicial hearing to ,1:scuss the violation(s) iir questic,l. The Office of Judicial Affails receives referrrls fi'om local police, residencr: hall staff; dining hall staff, Conimunication Network Services, faculty, a:rd students. After a judicial referral is received, a cliarge le t:r is se't to the student(s) or orgalrizati on(s) invo lved. wwwj udicial.vt.edu <lrttD ://www.i Lrclic !rl.vl. edu/>

11. Coritact the Virginia Tech Police has had

(sooNG-wHE).

with

the

Nonis Hall gurlman, CHO lieung-Hui

a.

Potential stallring i. Orrce his identification was con:i rled, records were reviewed eLrd it was deterr.nined that there was contall with Clio in the fall of 2005. ii' In Noven.rber, Cho had made con:act tluough phone calls and irLlrerson with a female student. There was never any direct thr-eat made to the student. The str.rdent notified Vi:'ginia Tech Police Depaftment and officers responded. Tlie str-rdent declinei 1o press charges and referred to Cl1o's contact as "annovins."
,

)

1ll.

However, the investigating offic'::'referred Cho to the Universit'" disciplinary systen, which is the r)ffice of Judicial Affairs. The outcome

ofthatr.eferralislrandledwitlrintaeurriversityarrdotttsidethescopeof
no iv. In December, cho instant messaged a second femaie student. A13lrin, to Virginia tlrreal. was made against that stu<k:nt. She rr.rade a complaint Tech Police and asked that cho r lve no furlher contact with her. officels follorved up the next morning ar:c spoke with Cho conceming tliis matter'
the police dePartment.

b.

Mental llealth Concen.rs fol Cho

ii.

i.Laterthatdaypoliceleceiveda,:Irllfl.omanacquaintanceofClto'swho with was collcemed that cho might haue been suicidal. officets again met Cho and tall<cd with him at lengJt'
Out of concern for Cho, officers z.sked him to speak to a counselor' He weut voluntarily to the police de partnrent' order Based otr that interaction with tl.e counselot, a telrlporary detenl:i'rn was obtained and Cho was taketr :o a mental health facility'

iii. c.

Contact witli English professor i. It was also in tlie fall of 2005 tlt 11 the Chair of the Englisir Deparhnent, Dr.. Lucirrda Roy, expressed conc:ms r.egarding Clro ar-rd his course writing assignments. Her concerls were urade to the previous chief and a d etective. ii. These course assiErments were firr a creative writing course an'J the students were ellcouraged to be ilnaginative and artistic' iii. The writings did not expl'ess an / tl.rreatening inter.rtions or allude to any criurir.ral activity. No criminal vlclation had taken place' Dr. Roy chose to leach out to thil student, ottt ofconcem for hinr and his

iv.

nrental wellbeing.

d.

Othel incidents

i.

yeal'ago"'we are Since tlrose colltacts iu Decembe:: of 2005...more than a made to the Vir:ginia Tecll 1ot aware of a1y additional incid:nts or leporls
Police DePartmet-rt for Cho'

12. Burress

Hall incident a. At 7:53 a.nr. tl.re Univelsity operator rt:ceived a threat against President Steger' of the Officers responded to his office in But:'uss Hall to make him aware potential th'eat. b. Police preseuce in and aroutrd Bltruss F all was increased' which led to malry rulorsand false assumptions about wlrat was going on. Tirat led to an unwarrauted reporl of suspicious person within the hall' c. Officers in-rmediately responded and errt,:red the building. The building'was LllrJ rvP\Jrr of 4 oL'oHrvtvsu Ul9z:lltr(l.lllll cleared and the reporl \Jr a sr'rspicious ['e:son was unfounded' taken uncomnron d. These kinds of reports are not lrncol]lrIro l'l in the wake of what has taken place in why we are the past 48 hour.s on the Virginia Tech c urpus...which is one reason maiiitaining 1iigh police visibility throrrghout the university'

NOTES/NEWS MEDIA QUESTIONS FROM PRESS CONFERENCE - 8/9/07 WYNDHAM HOTEL, ROANOKE

1.
2.

Regarding the Sat. appearance, do we know any more about what he did there? a. No confirmation it was Cho; male in hooded sweatshirt Was that handled correctly by the faculty member? What's the procedure at the University for finding a bomb threat note? a. Would have liked to know about it; something for the university to decide; can't tell you what was in this person's mind What's the W Police procedure if they'd called? What would you have done? Police there? lf we were called, we could have responded to the call

3.
4.

Was it Emily that was followed into WAJ? a. No it wa-s not Emily, an unsuspecting person; Emily entered from a different entrance
You said "digging" for cell phone and hard drive? a. Poor choice of words, we're exploring files

5.

What did you find at the Duck Pond? a. No findings
Made any cell phone calls? Did you get cho's cell phone records? a. Don't recall;no calls on 4.16 What was the content of the Eng. Dept. letter? a. rambling/no threats

6.

7.

8.

a.
9.

How many wounded and how many injured? 23 wounded bygunfire ls Cho's family cooperative a. Yes
ls the hard drive the most important piece of evidence you're looking

10.

fofl a. Yes, we'd love to have it
11.
Expect a flnal report?

a.
12.

Not for quite a while

Did you find info. on his computer that's missing a HD? a. ldon't know When was the NBC package filmed? a. Don't know, local hotel (photos) Where were the guns stored? a. No info.

13.

14.

15.

a.
16.

Follow-up on Cook Counseling Center? Multiple mental health agencies he visited/some in person/some not; some in Cook, some not;we've done interviews/subpoenas

What is AX lshmael? a. Don't know Any prescription drugs in his a. No answer Any motive from his family?

17.

bodf

18.

a.

No

19.

Purchase of first gun? a. 2007 Do you know what he was treated for? a. No Do you have a specific theory? a. No; not that we're pursuing b. ATF theory? That release of investigation was not authorized Blood evidence from Ryan Clark? The footprint? a. Yes b. lt was Cho's footprint c. At West AJ

20.

21.

22.

23.
24.

a.

How many dedicated to the investigation? 12 very active

When students return, do you have specific plans for anything further from them? a. No plans

25.

Suspicious male? How did you learn about it? a. From investigation; On 4114 one witness said door was chained; another said it wouldn't open

26.
27.

Why now? Why this location? a. Central location to us and to local media

a.
28. 29.
30.

How may students returned surveys? No info. ; not helpful

how long was door chained? a. I don't know What time was suspicious male spotted?

a.

1Oam

Deleted whole email account? a. Personal account. notVT account

Questions to Corrine after coverage:

o .

Additional questions after coverage were related to specific evidence Jay Warren continued to question Corrine on the bomb threat note found on morning of 4116

Remarks to the Virginia Tech Review Panel By Kay Heidbreder, University Legal Counsel May 21,2007

Colonel Massengill and Members of the Review Panel, if I may.

..

...

My name is Kay Heidbreder. I serve as the University LegalCounsel and Assistant Attorney General assigned to Virginia Tech. In this capacity, I provide

lega|adviceunderthedirectionoftheAttorneyGenera|totheUniversity.Given
my position, Dr. Steger has asked me to provide an overview of the legal mandates under which Virginia Tech operates with respect to the protection of student information. This overview is not meant to be legal advice to this panel Rather, Dr. Steger believes that it is crucial for this Panel to have some context of the legal landscape for institutions of higher education. In addition, he has asked

that my remarks center on the interplay between the Counseling Center, the
student disciplinary system, faculty interaction with students and the police

department. He has also asked me to share the constraints that the University
faces in providing student records to the public at large.

At any institution of higher education in Virginia, there are a number of laws
protecting the privacy of students and student records. These laws include The

.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C.A. 312329, H|PAA42 U.S.C. Section 1320, the Virginia Freedom of lnformation Act, Section2'2-3700, Code of Virginia, as amended, and the Government Data Collection and Dissemination Practices Act, Section 32.2-3800, Code of Virginia, as amended. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (aka FERPA or Buckley

Amendment) sets forth criteria for the dissemination of information to protect a student's rights of privacy.

The University is restricted in its ability to share a student's educational records
with third parties, external to the University, absent a properly executed release or a court order. While it is debatable whether the FERPA protections end at the

student's death, the other laws contain no such limitation. Exceptions to these non-disclosure requirements include sharing records with employees within the
University who need the information to do their

job. For example, an instructor

can share grade information with the Registrar. However, there is never permitted a disclosure for medical or counseling records. This absolute prohibition tracks the restrictions covering disclosure of medical records as provided in HIPAA or the federal legislation that protects health information for every individual treated by a medical professional in the United States. FERPA also provides a quirky privacy provision that places a wall between the

educational records at an institution and the law enforcement records maintained
by the campus police department. To put this in concrete terms, educational

records cannot be freely disclosed by the administrative offices with the police

t,:

:,1-

As has been reported publicly, the Virginia Tech Police Department also received
an inquiry during the 2005-2006 academic year from the Chair of the English

Department concerning Mr. Cho's classroom behavior based on the content of some of his writings and the fact that Mr. Cho took pictures of other students with
his cellphone camera. The Chair of the Department did not share the specific

writings with the Police, nor did she file a formal police report. As determined by an informal review conducted by the Police Department, the behavior was not criminal in nature. The Police offered to provide any necessary assistance. Instead of further Police involvement, the Chair talked to Mr. Cho and the Chair and he agreed that he would attend private tutoring sessions that would allow
him to complete the class assignments without the necessity of his returning to

the class. Records show no further class based complaints related to inappropriate behavior. Further, no referral was made to the student disciplinary system about this event.

An additional contact on December 13, 2005, between Mr. Cho and the Virginia Tech Police has been documented. According to public records maintained by the Montgomery County General District Court, the Virginia Tech Police brought
Mr. Cho to the attention of the Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation

and Substance Abuse Services as a result of a concern raised by a fellow student who knew Mr. Cho. In turn, Mr. Cho was brought before the General District Court Special Justice, who ordered Mr. Cho

to

undergo evaluation at the

Carilion St. Albans Behavioral Facility. On December 14,2005, the Special

The protections afforded by federal and state laws to the individual are most absolute in the medical context. For example, a medical screening is not part of

the University's admissions process. The Code of Virginia, Section 23-7 .5,
requires that each prospective student provide a health history, but this history is not all encompassing. The health history is really a listing of diseases against which the student has been immunized, The purpose of this code requirement is to guard against the potential outbreak of controlled diseases in the close confines of a residence hall. Even this modest requirement is not absolute as the General Assembly has waived the immunization requirement on a student's religious grounds.

Given the legalframework, let me tell you what I can about Mr. Cho based on police records. There was a narrow window in late 2005 to early 2006 that his behavior was called into question. The Virginia Tech Police made a referral to

the University's disciplinary system for an incident in which he sent an
unwelcomed e-mail to a female student in late 2005, or approximately sixteen (16) months before April 16, 2007. The disciplinary system contacted the e-mail recipient to determine whether she wanted to pursue the matter. She declined to do so. Therefore, there was no cause for action on the part of thq -U-niversity. Since Mr. Cho's enrollment in Fall2003, he had no other interaction with the disciplinary system.

As has been reported publicly, the Virginia Tech Police Department also received
an inquiry during the 2005-2006 academic year from the Chair of the English Department concerning Mr. Cho's classroom behavior based on the content of some of his writings and the fact that Mr. Cho took pictures of other students with
his cellphone camera. The Chair of the Department did not share the specific

writings with the Police, nor did she file a formal police report. As determined by an informal review conducted by the Police Department, the behavior was not criminal in nature. The Police offered to provide any necessary assistance. Instead of further Police involvement, the Ghair talked to Mr. Cho and the Chair and he agreed that he would attend private tutoring sessions that would allow
him to complete the class assignments without the necessity of his returning to

the class. Records show no further class based complaints related to inappropriate behavior. Further, no referral was made to the student disciplinary system about this event.

An additional contact on December 13, 2005, between Mr. Cho and the Virginia Tech Police has been documented. According to public records maintained by the Montgomery County General District Court, the Virginia Tech Police brought Mr. Cho to the attention of the Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse Services as a result of a concern raised by a fellow student who knew Mr. Cho. In turn, Mr. Cho was brought before the General District Court Special Justice, who ordered Mr. Cho

to

undergo evaluation at the

Carilion St. Albans BehavioralFacility. On December 14,2005, the Special

.r:

:-.

Justice for the General District Court ordered Mr. Cho to follow-up out-patient treatment because of the danger he presented to himself as a result of mental

illness. No follow-up report was made to the Virginia Tech Police.

In summary, the impact of these laws that I have outlined is to limit what can be

shared about students publicly or with third parties, within the organization, and even with the police department. Given the constraints imposed by the law,

there are restrictions on what Virginia Tech can share about Mr. Cho publicly.
This was the reason why Virginia Tech did not release Mr. Cho's academic records to the F.B.l. untilthe F.B.l. had obtained a subpoena. lt is also important

to stress that it is not just Mr. Cho's records that are protected by these laws.
Virginia Tech would be precluded from releasing similar information about any of

the victims of the events of April 16. Furthermore, any complaints filed by third
party students about Mr. Cho could not be shared publicly, not just to protect Mr. Cho, but also to protect the identity of those third party complainants as well.

Thank you for your time today. Next David Ford, Vice President for Academic Affairs, will speak with you about the events of April 16,2007.

FLrtrctlu*r 7ut99

We have new information to release concerning the

ongoing investigation into Monday's fatal shootings. State, local and federal investigators worked through the night collectingn processing and analyzing evidence from within Norris Hall.

Andrtwouldliketotakeaminutetorecognizethe
outstanding professionalism and efforts put forth by my officers since that initial 911 call Game into our dispatch center MondaY morning.
I also want to commend the response and

dedication of those officers and investigators with
Blacksburg Policen Montgomery Gounty sheriffs officet

State Police, FBI and ATF...
Based on their hard work, we have been able to

confirm the identitY of the gunman at Norris Hall: Gho
Soong-Hwe. He is a 23-year-old Korean here in the

asa

resident alien'
Gho was enrolled as an undergraduate student in

his senior year as an English major at Virginia Tech.

Gho was in the U'S. as a resident alien

with a

residence established in Genterwille, Va...and was living
on campus in HarPer Hall. A 9-milimeter handgun and 22-caliber handgun

were recovered from Norris Hall.

Ballistic tests on the evidence seized from the
Norris Hall and the West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall scenes were conducted at the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) lab ln
Maryland Lab results confirmed that one of the two weapons seized in Norris Hall was used in both shootings.

All of the deceased have been transported to the
Medical Examineds Office in Roanoke for examination
and identification. The names of the 32 deceased students and

faculty will be released once all victims are positively
identified and next of kin notified...and Doctor Fierrot the Ghief Medical Examiner of Virginia will go into more detail on that in a minute.

I also want to follow up on the discussion from yesterday about the eperson of interestt from the first

shooting at the residence hall. That individual was an acquaintance of the female

victim killed at West Ambler Johnston Hall.
He was stopped in hls vehicle off campus and

detained for questioning. As officers were interviewing him, the shootings at Norris Hall were reported
We are

still looking to him for information as the

investigation continues.
We also have no information at this time to relate

the on-campus bomb threats made in the last two weeks to either of yesterdayts events.

CLv9
'lnrA,
Good

morning-

We're here this morning to provide you with the latest information involving yesterday's horrible tragedy. Capt. Flinchum and State Police Col. Steve Flaherty will provide you

with the latest information on the investigation. As we work with iaw enforcement
agencies who continue to notify family members of the deceased,

I

ask that you keep in

vour heafts the families of the victims of this terrible event.

I have some additional information regarding how the Virginia Tech community will
move forward and begin recovery in the coming hours and days'

First of all, Virginia Tech will cancel all classes for the remainder of the week to allow
sfudents the time they need to grieve and seek assistance as needed. The university

will

re-open administrative operations beginning tomorrow, Wednesday, April 18 understanding that some faculty and staff may wish to take additional time off this week

to grieve the loss of fellow colleagues and friends. We ask individual employees

to

,

:

communicate with their suDervisors of their schedules for the balance of the week.

We will close Norris Hall for the remainder of the semester. Staff are currently working

to arrange alternative location for classrooms and faculty offices.

Counseling and other resources are available for students, faculty, and staff. Students may receive counseling at McComas Hall and counselors will be available for extended
hours. Employees may receive needed support by going to the Brush Mountain Room in

Squires Student Center throughout the day.

As you know, the university will be holding

a

convocation ceremony al 2 p.m.at Cassell

Coliseum. This will be the first time the Virginia Tech community
since the tragedy to share our collective solrow.

will come together

At that time, President George Bush,

First Lady Laura Bush, Gov. Timothy Kaine, Mrs. Kaine members of our Board of

Visitors, members of the clergy, our students, and poet Nikki Giovanni wiII share

messages of condolence to the family and friends of the victims and words of hope to all

of us as we move forward past this tragedy.

Again we encourage all members of the Virginia Tech community to attend. Should the
coliseum be full, the event, we hope, will be broadcast on campus cable stations.

I know the Virginia Tech community, and the world at large, continues to struggle with
these horrible events. We hope that some the steps we are taking today, and in the coming days,

will help in that healing

process.

Talking Points - Updated 4ll9l07 l:30 p.m.
1.
Web site for donations and fraudulent site wamines a. virginia Tech has set up the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund, the official place for donations. other websites soliciting <,onations for victims of the shootings at Virginia Tech April 16 maybe fraudulent. h Separately, the United way of New River valley has established an accounr to provide assistance to victim's families for funeral and burial costs. hansportation costs, or other immediate costs. Donalions may also hetp with uncovered medical costs for wounded victirns and for conmunity agencies that may incur unusual costs associated with responding to thr: event. contributions may be made via www.unitedwaynrv.org or by mailing gifts to UWMRF, p.O. Box 6202, Christiansburg, VA 24068. Piease ind:cate that your donation go specifi, specifically to this fund. For more information: 5401.'81-2066 or stephanie@unitedra,alnrv.org. As an alternative, donations can also Le made to the American Red closs or the Salvation Army, who have been onsitr' in Blacksburg aiding with relief efforts. Information for students on how the semester will be completed has been posted on the Web site at www.vt.edu. Situation in hospitals as of Wednesday, April 18 at 7:33 p.m. a. Eric Eamhart Carillion NRU Medical ,lenter, two patients still in hospital in good condition. One patient was released th:s evening b. Carillion ROA Memoriai - One patient in serious condition and one patient was transferred to another hospital (not nar:ted).
A -. NBC receives

2.

a.

package from Norris shooter NBS News received a package with photos, video, and writings allegedly from Cho Seung-Hui, the gunman responsible for the fatal shootings at Nor:ris Hall. NBC turned originals ofthis potentiall / crucial evidence over to the FBI.

5.

Identifying victims a. Face identifications of victims is some imes unreliable; it is not uncorrrmon for loved ones under great duress to misidr:ntify victims. The first means of making definite identifications is by fingerprinrs. When documented fingerprints are not available, dental records can be used tc positively identify victims. Obtaining documented fingerprints and dental records can be a time-consuming task. When these identifications are made, the first to be notified are the next of kin to the victim. It is after and only after these p,rsitive identifications and family notifications are made, that law enforcr,ment is prepared to release the identity of a victim to the public.
Gathering place for Grad students a. The GLC Multipurpose Room will be evailable for the rest of the week: from 7:30am to 10:30 pm as a gathering place for the graduate community. 'y'isit the Multipurpose room to offer reflections (poems, photos, statements, or other), comments to help us prepare action stells for a positive future, seek answers to

6.

questions you might have, or have a q'riet moment. Dean Karen DePauw will be available on Wednesday and Thursdal' l0:00am-12:00 noon to talk with graduate students. Graduate School staffwill also be available to answer questions and address concems as they arise. Refreslrments will be provided throughout the three days.
:

7.

Cards, letters and other a. The Virginia Tech community has been literally overwhelmed by expressions of support and condolences from around the world and we are so grateful. At this point, instead of sending flowers, may we suggest donations be made to the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund. Details can fourd at www.vt.edu.
,

condolences

We've had several questions, particulaly from schoolchildren, about rvhere to mail cards. They can be sent to the De:rr of Students Office, 201 W. Roanoke Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

8.

Funeral Arrangements a. Families of the victims are making the r own individual funeral arrangements, none of which are available to the unilersity at this point.

9.

Crisis counseling available a. Several organizations are providing cri sis counseling services for studr:nts, faculty, and staff. Faculty and staffthroughout the state are accessing counseling services through the state employee syritem program, which has about a dozen staff members working in Blacksburg itnd more throughout the state. the Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center is working with the Red Cross, New River Community Services, and others to prcvide counseling services for students. Counselors are meeting with individua.s, as well as groups as requested.
;

10. Judicial svstem Students who allegedly violate the Unirersity Policies for Student Life are required to attend ajudicial hearing to Lliscuss the violation(s) in question. The Office ofJudicial AJfairs receives referrals from local police, residence hall staff, dining hall staff, Communication Network Services, faculty, and students. After a judicial referral is received, a charge le:ter is sent to the student(s) or

a.

organization(s) involved. www j udicial.vt. edu <!!pJ qww. i-Udi! ial. vt. edu/>
11. Contact the Virginia Tech Police has had with the Norris Hall gunman, CHO tieung-Hui

(sooNG-wHE).

a.

Potential

i.

stalking

::

'

ii.

Once his identification was con.irmed, records were reviewed emd it was determined that there was contart with Cho in the fall of 2005. In November, Cho had made contact through phone calls and irL person with a female student. There was never any direct theat made to the student. The student notified Vi.'ginia Tech Police Department and officers responded. The student declinec to press charges and referred to Cho's

contact as "annoying."

,,

:

W"'f
Talking Points
1.

- Updated 4118/07

5 H

p.m.

NBC receives package from Norris shooter a. NBS News received a package with photos, video, and writings allegedly from Cho Seung-Hui, the gunman responsible for the fatal shootings at Nonis Hall. NBC tumed originals of this potentially crucial evidence over to the FBI.
Identifying victims a. Face identifications of victims is sometimes unreliablel it is not uncommon for loved ones under great duress to misidentify victims. The first means of making definite identifications is by fingerprints. When documented fingerprints are not available, dental records can be used to positively identify victims. Obtaining documented fingerprints and dental records can be a time-consuming task. When these identifications are made, the first to be notified are the next of kin to the victim. It is after and only after these positive identifications and family notifications are made, that law enforcement is prepared to release the identify of a victim to the public.
Gathering place for Grad students a. The GLC Multipurpose Room witl be available for the rest of the week from 7:30am to 10:30 pm as a gathering place for the graduate community. Visit the Multipurpose room to offer reflections (poems, photos, statements, or other), comments to help us prepare action steps for a positive future, seek answers to questions you might have, or have a quiet moment. Dean Karen DePauw will be available on Wednesday and Thursday l0:00am-12:00 noon to talk with graduate students. Graduate School staff will also be available to answer questions and address concerns as they arise. Refreshments will be provided throughout the three days.
Cards. letters and other condolences a. The Virginia Tech community has been literally overwhelmed by expressions of support and condolences from around the world and we are so grateful. At this point, instead of sending flowers, may we suggest donations be made to the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund. Details can found
at www.vt.edu.

2.

3.

4.

We've had several questions, particularly from schoolchildren, about where to mail cards. They can be sent to the Dean of Students Office, 201 W. Roanoke Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061'.

5.

Funeral Arranganents

a.

Families of the victims are making their own individual funeral arrangements, none of which are available to the university at this point'

6. Crisis counseling available a. Several organizations are providing crisis counseling services for students, faculty, and staff. Faculty and staffthroughout the state are accessing counseling services through the state employee system program, which has about a dozen staff members working in Blacksburg and more throughout the state. The Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center is working with the Red Cross, New River Community Services, and others to provide counseling services for students. Counselors are meeting with individuals, as well as groups as requested.
7. Judicial system

a.

Students who allegedly violate the University Policies for Student Life are required to attend ajudicial hearing to discuss the violation(s) in question.

The Office of Judicial Affairs receives referrals from local police, residence hall staff, dining hail staff, Communication Network Services, faculty, and students. Afterajudicial referral is received, a charge letteris sent to the studen(s) or organization(s) involved. www judicial.vt.edu <http :/hvrvw.iudicial.vt.ed#
8.

Contact the Virginia Tech Police has had with the Norris Hall gunman, CHO S eung-Hui (SOONG-WHE).

Potential stalking Once his identification was confimred, records were reviewed and it was determined that there was contact with Cho in the fall of 2005. In November, Cho had made contact through phone calls and in person with a female student. There was never any direct threat made to the student. The student notified Virginia Tech Police Department and officers responded. The student declined to press charges and referred to Cho's contact as "annoying." iii. However, the investigating officer referred Cho to the University disciplinary system, which is the Office of Judicial Affairs. The outcome of that referral is handled within the university and outside the scope of the police department. iv. In December, Cho instant messaged a second female student. Again, no threat was made against that student. She made a complaint to Virginia Tech Police and asked that Cho have no further contact with her. Officers followed up the next moming and spoke with Cho concerning this matter.

i.

ii.

b.

Mental Health Concerns for Cho

l. Later that day police received a call from an acquaintance of Cho's who was concemed that Cho might have been suicidal. Officers again met with Cho and talked with him at length. 11. Out ofconcern for Cho, officers asked him to speak to a counselor. He went voluntarily to the police department. 111. Based on that interaction with the counselor, a temporary detention order was obtained and Cho was taken to a mental health facility. Contact with English professor It was also in the fall of 2005 that the Chair of the English Department, Dr. Lucinda Roy, expressed concems regarding Cho and his course writing assignments. Her concems were made to the previous chiefand a detective. These course assignments were for a creative writing course and the students were encouraged to be imaginative and artistic. The writings did not express any threatening intentions or allude to any criminal activity. No criminal violation had taken place. iv. Dr. Roy chose to reach out to this student, out of concem for him and his mental wellbeine.

i.

ii.

iii.

d. Other incidents Since those contacts in December of 2005. . .more than a year ago...we are not aware of any additional incidents or reports made to the Virginia Tech Police Departrnent for Cho.

i.

9.

Burress Hall incident At7:53 a.m. the University Operator received a threat against President Steger. Officers responded to his office in Bumrss Hall to make him aware of the potential threat. b. Police presence in and around Bumrss Hall was increased, which led to many rumors and false assumptions about what was going on. That led to an unwarranted report of suspicious person within the ha1l. c. Officers immediately responded and entered the building. The building was cleared and the report ofa suspicious person was unfounded. d. These kinds of reports are not uncommon in the wake of what has taken place in the past 48 hours on the Virginia Tech campus...which is one reason why we are maintaining high police visibility throughout the universitv.

a.

Dear Friends,

Many of you have asked tre about when, if, and in what ways you cau interact with the meclia in light ofthe April l6 tragedy. Irrespective ofthe intense intereit in ald evcn before the event, ntany ofyou have engaged the ntedia, particularly professional association newslettcrs or,,tracle,, nted^ia focused on our respective disciplines. For exarnple, when attending prol.essional cotrferetrces, you Inay be even tlre informal subject because events are norrnally atlendecl by various forms of working journalists. I don't think it's feasible to crawl in a shell l-or the next several nronths and avoid normal disciplinary interactions.

still, there are solne caveats. Focus on what you know and what you do. speak about:
a
a a a

lJow we helped the cornmunity cope with our cxtraordinary losses, About the tremendous aid efforts frorn organizations arouncl the statc ancl countrv. About our l-lokie Spirit arrcl sense ol. l.arnily, About the ongoing rloral support li.orn alumni and the public,
AboLrt the trernendous poise and character of our students, a

a a

r .

About our institution's already strong acaclernic reputation, About existing policy and procedures aud the list goes on.

Here are some areas to avoid:
a a a o o
a

The shooter''s mental health recor.d The shooter's interaction with the nrental health systern Tlre shooter's inter.action with the faculty Shoulddt the university immediatety send a carnpus flash when a nrurcler tal<cs place on camous?

o r

Should universities do a better job of screening stuclents for mental health prgblems,i Should urriversity counseling centers take on larger roles? Should university counseling centers take on smaller roles? Should privacy laws be loosened..eg. FERPA and FIIpAA? Shotrld universities lrave instant communications systems that can reach students anywhere anytime?

Many of the issues both the rnedia and our colleagues are intelested in center ..lessons ar.ound learned." Since that topic is the subject olboth oul internal reviews apd the Massengill panel, you can easily deflect suclr questions by say, "That,s what we plan to snclerstancl lr.onr the ongoing reviews."
S

incerelv.

Larry l{incker
Associate Vice President University Relations

fol

....-,

Communications plan for 3N rollout
Draft: Thursday, May 31,2007
General notes
Information about the upcoming emergency alert system was included in a letter to parents in early May, so there is already awareness.

ldeas to consider
In our communications to faculty/staff/students/parents, should we include scenarios in

which the university may use the 3N system? Within the W-hosted 3N website, should we include information about the other communication tools W can use during an emergency - email, voicemail, weatherline, vt.edu website, siren system, PA system? Create an information piece for Admissions and Dean of Students,

Timeline for communications
By mid-June Press Release announcing the 3N contract and upcoming July rollout.

o .

. Send email to VT-wide Listserv with announcement, URL, and instructions on how to sign up . Post a campus notice with same infonlation 'i#Xi,-tlr''t>*zJzrp7 . Freshman Orientation (July 9-27): . lnclude information about 3N system in Orientation materials, . Set up a bank of computen for 3N signups (location TBD), . Coordinate with Rick Sparks, director of Orientation.
Mid-August (before first day of Fall classes) lssue a Press Release announcing the completion of a successful test of the system and number of subscribers to date. W lT & You (August 15-19) Set up a bank ofcomputers for 3N signups. Coordinate with Joyce Landreth. Early Fall (September/October) lssue a Press Release announcing subscriber rate (assuming it's good news).

July 2 (planned launch date): lssue a Press Release to coincide with the launch of the emergency alerts website and signup pages, so the university community can act as soon as the system is publicized. This creates "actionable" news.

'

. . .

I
Question from Commission:
As I was looking over W's emergency operations plan documents I wondered if we could obtain a

4il"

summary from VT (perhaps Mccoy to obtain) on what part of the EOC went into effect. lt would be good

to get a critique from them rather than us guessing about elements that they implemented. We heard the policy group met but did they establish a full EOC?

Response:

Upon receiving information from Virginia Tech Chief of Police regarding the first shooting (West Ambler

Johnston),thePresidentdirectedhisstafftoconvenethePolicyGroup. Thegroupwasconvenedand
discussing the WAJ events by 8:25 a.m. on April l-5th. lncluded in this meeting were all the members

named in the Emergency Plan, with the exception of the Vice President for Information Technology who was out of town on this day. The Policy Group was receiving a briefing by the Virginia Tech Police Captain of Operations when information regarding the Norris Hall incident was dispatched over the police radio. The Policy Group

remained intact much of the day April

1-5th

making all policy decisions. lmplementation of these

decisions was communicated through the Vice President attending the Policy Group meetingto the

appropriate leadership team within their respective unit (e.g., facilities
VP

-

EVP&COO; residential/dining

-

for Student Affairs; Registrar - VP for Academic Affairs). Given the horrific nature of this event and its impact of the university, the Policy Group acted as the Emergency Response Team for the first 48 hours. An Emergency Operations Center, as outlined in the plan, was not established.
On Wednesday, April

$'h, the university named the Emergency Response Resource Coordinator, former Virginia Tech EVP&COO, to lead the Emergency Response Resource Group. The Group met daily to
address critical issues and formulate recommendations for approval by the Policy Group. The Policy Group also continued to meet daily throughout the weeks leading to Commencement.

/.rOrt)o"7

Statement by Charles Steger, President

430PM
virginia, John me today is the secretary of Public Safety for the commonwealth of present Marshall and the Superintendent of Virginia State Police, Steve Flaherity. Also with

if

the the Mayor of Blacksburg, Ron Rordharn; the chief of Blacksburg PD, Kim Crannis; chief of Virginia Tech Police, Wendell Flinchum.

I want to repeat my horror, disbelief, and profound sorry at the events of today. People fro. *o*d *r" world have expressed their shock and sorry. I am at a loss for words to explain or understand the camage that visited our c.rmpus'
I know no other way to speak about this than to tell you what we know'

It is now confirmed that we have 3l deaths from Norris Hall, including the gunman' 15 other victims are being treated at local hospitals in the Roanoke and New River Valleys. There are two confirmed deaths from the shooting in Ambler Johnston Domritory in addition to the 3l inNonis.
We have not confirmed his identity of the gunman because he canied in the process of attempting identification.

to/"$rr.

We are

Nonis Hall is a tagic and sorrowfirl crime scene. We are in the process of identiffing victims and in the pto""tt of notiffing next of kin. This may take a while' We will not release any names until we are positive of this notification' We anticipate being able to release a list sometime tomorrow.
We are asking students to contact their parents to let them know their status. Our investigation continues into whether there is a connection between the hrst and second incidents. We believe the shootings are related. We know that parents will want to embrace their children. We are not suggesting that you come to campus. However, if parents feel that they must come to campus, we are iocating counselors at the The Inn and Skelton Conference Center'

As you can imagine, security, investigatior5 operational, and cotmseling resowces ilre 1r"ry tu*"d at thJ moment. And we understand the desire, indeed the compelling need to getinformation on the part of family, students, and loved ones, but unfodunately this is all the information we have at the time.
-No-w-a-stafernent

gf*"r-ryor. q--

'TUl3g.

€w,

Good

morning-

We're here this moming to provide you with the latest information invoiving yesterday's honible tragedy. Capt. Flinchum and State Poiice Coi. Steve Flaherty will provide you with the iatest information on the investigation. As we work with law enforcement
agencies who continue to notify fanrily members of the deceased,

I

ask that you keep

in

your hearts the families of the victims of this terrible event.

I

have some additional information regarding how the Virginia Tech community

will

move forward and begin recovery in the coming hours and days.

Fkst of all, Virginia Tech will cancel all classes for the remainder of the week to allow
students the time they need to grieve and seek assistance as needed. The university

will

re-open administrative operations beginning tomorow, Wednesday, April 18 understanding that some faculty and staff may wish to take additional time off this week

to grieve the ioss of fellow colleagues and friends. We ask individual employees to
communicate with their suDervisors of their schedules for the balance of the week.

We

will

close Norris Hall for the remainder of the semester. Staff are cunently working

to arange alternative location for classrooms and faculty offices.

Counseling and other resources are available for students, faculty, and staff. Students may receive counseling at McComas Hall and counselors will be available for extended hours. Employees may receive needed support by going to the Brush Mountain Room in Squires Student Center throughout the day.

As you know, the university will be holding

a

convocation ceremony at 2 p.m. at Cassell

Coliseum. This will be the fust time the Virgrnia Tech community will come together
since the tragedy to share our collective sorrow.

At that time, President George Bush,

First Lady Laura Bush, Gov. Timothy Kaine, Mrs. Kaine members of our Board of

Visitors, members of the clergy, our students, and poet Nikki Giovanni will share

messages of condolence to the
/\f rro oo f^-r,a-n

family and friends of the victims and words of hope to all

aao+ +Lir t-^n-n" PcrDL Lruo ucl6vLrJ.

Again we encourage all members of the Virginia Tech community to attend. Should the
coliseum be full, the event, we hope, will be broadcast on campus cable stations.

I know the Virginia Tech community, and the world at large, continues to struggle with
these horrible events. We hope that some the steps we are taking today, and in the coming days,

will heip in that heding process.

JIC Talking Points Document
April 17,2007-04-17
News today:

* U. S. President George Bush and Mrs. Bush, and Virgnia Govemor Tim Kaine and Mrs. Kaine are expected to join aimost 10,000 mourners during a memorial ceremony on the Virginia Tech campus today to remember the 32 faculty and students killed yesterday
by a gunman.

* The convocation is being heid at 2 p.m. today in Cassell Coliseum on the university's
campus.

* More information about this tragedy and the status of the investigation will be released to the media as soon as it is available. The next news conference is scheduled for 5 p.m. in Alumni Hall. which will be carried live on network teievision.
* Later today,
an evening candlelight

vigil will

be held on the university's

Drillfield at 8

Background:

* A gunman entered an acadernic building and a residence hall at Virginia Tech early Monday moming April 16, and shot and killed 32 faculty and students before turning the gun on himself. An accurate list of those wounded is not available at this time. * The Virginia Tech Police Deparfinent has confirmed the assailant as Cho Seung-Hui, 23. Cho was enrolled as an undergraduate student in his senior year as an English lnajor at Virginia Tech. Cho, a South Korean native, was living in the United States as a resident alien with a residence established in Centreville, Va. Cho was living on campus in Harper Residence Hall. * A 9-millimeter handgun and22-caliber handgun were recovered from the scene at Norris Hall. The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) lab in Maryland conducted ballistic tests on the evidence seized from the Norris Hall and the West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall crime scenes. Lab results confirmed that one of the two weapons seized in Norris Hall was used in both shootings. * An active police investigation involving the Virginia Tech Police Departmext, the Virginia State Police, the FBI, the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms and several
other law enforcement agencies is underwav.

* Police officials *, in tl,. pro""r, of notifying the victims' next of kin. "url"n,ty list of the victims will be available. Officials have not said when a

* The university

family members, students for students is available between 9 and employeesin ciealing with their grief. Counseling a.m. -b 9 p.m. today at the Cook Counseling Center. For information call 540-231'6557 or visit the Web site at www.ucc.vt.edu
has assembled a group of cormselors to assist

assistance for faculty and staff will be heid in Squires Student Center, Brush Moutain, Room A, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today. For more infonnation call 540443-36}6.More detailed information on the counseling is available on the Virginia Tech

* Counseling

web site.

* President Chades Steger has announced that the university is ciosed for the remainder of the week. Nonis Hall, the scene of the mass murder, will be ciosed for the remainder
of the semeste

* More information about this tragedy and the status of the investigation wiil bL made available for the media as soon as it is available.

* Anyone with information relating to the incidents is asked to contact the Blacksburg
Police Department at 540-23I -6411.
ll'':rft
J+.4+.1+

.

.,.,,.t..,

As of 516/07

Questions and Answers

What memorials are being considered to honor the victims of this tragedy?
President Steger has publicly committed to the construction of a permanent memorial to the victims of the tragedy. A committee has been appointed to consider the elements of this memorial and it is anticipated that a design competition will be conducted to aid the committee's deliberations. The committee will be recommending the construction of a temporary memorial sometime dwing the fall semester.

Virginia Tech has established 32 individual memorial funds in the name of each of the victims. These funds may be used for scholarships, to endow Chairs and other similar pulposes, with the final disposition to be determined in cooperation with the families.

What language will be used to reference the incident itself? Will there be some
reference to 4116? As we go forward, University Relations will be referring to this with some variant of "AJ-Norris EvenUTragedy/Shootings". We will not be using any reference to the numbers "4" or "16'" as we do not want the date itself to become convenient shorthand for others to characterize the tragedy.

What is the status of the acceptances of offers for admission to Virginia Tech for Fall Semester 2007?
are very pleased that acceptances are slightly ahead of last year's record pace of acceptance of offers of admission and we expect to have a final tally within the next few days. In addition, it appears that acceptance rates among African-American, Hispanic and Asian-American students has increased from last year.
'We

Do you have any

plus

to honor those shooting victims who were wounded but not

killed?
We certainly want our memorial observances to embrace the surviving victims as well. Beyond that, many of those who were wounded are still recovering from their injuries, and as a University, we are very respectfrrl of their need for privacy in this time of healing.

What is being done to assist the families of the victims?
The University is providing financial assistance to the deceased victim's families for memorial expenses, grief counseling, communications expenses, comfort expenses and other costs directly related to this tragedy. Some disbursements have already been made to the families and we are coordinatine ow efforts with those of other charities and

As of 516/07

relief agencies to insure this aid has the maximum impact for the families. Future financial assistance will be made in keeping with the needs of the families and we cannot predict how great these needs will be or for how long they will be needed. The Virginia lech community will be there to help for as long as the families need/want us to be.

What is the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund? How much money has been raised? What are some of the larger contributions which have been received to this point? Where does the money go?
The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund was established within the Virginia Tech Foundation as a vehicle for donors to make monetary contributions which will assist the families of the victims. So far, over $2.5 million has been received and/or pledged. As a matter of policy, we do not divulge the names of individual contributors, but it can said that the outpouring of support has been almost overwhelming.

In addition to the Hokie Spilit Fund, 32 individual memorial funds will be created in the names of the victims of the tragedy and one individual university-wide scholarship - The Hokie Spirit Scholarship - will be awarded. The specific elements of each memorial and the criteria for the scholarship are currently under development. How is the University policing the unauthorized use of Virginia Tech logos as it relates to the Norris-AJ Event? Virginia Tech has literally been bombarded with requests to license items which memorialize the tragedy. To date, only the student group Hokies United has received permission to use the University's logo for this purpose. In addition, we are constantly policing e-Bay and other websites to prevent the unauthorized use of any of Virginia Tech's logos. It is a very laborious but necessary undertaking.

How can I reassure prospective faculty membens that Virginia Tech is still a great place to teach and do research?
The Norris-AJ Event has not and will not prevent us from fulfilling our mission as a place of learning, discovery and engagement. Virginia Tech is a warm, caring community which boasts an intangible attribute defined as "Hokie Spirif'that has become almost palpable around here. The pride and passion that many external to the University associate with Virginia Tech's exploits on the athletic fields are just as evident to those of us on campus when it comes to academic rigor in the classrooms and research in the laboratories. The spirit embodied in the University's new slogan - Invent the Future - is as strons as ever.

2

As of 5/6/07

How will the University pay for the many unexpected expenses that will arise as a result of the Norris-AJ Event?
The specific answer to this question will be determined more fully in the coming weeks and mtnths. This much can be said: we know the Governor and key members of the Virginia General Assembly are very much aware of the enormity of the challenges we face going forward in managing "the business" of the University.
receives a media call, not just now but over the coming months' and is asked to describe how his/her body ofwork has changed because ofthe Norris-AJ Event, (or any media request related to the Norris-AJ Event for that matter) what should we do?

If a faculty member

member is comfortable and knowledgeable with the subject matter being discussed, feel free to participate in the interview. But if there any concerns whatioever, the Faculty member should not hesitate to call or e-mail Larry Hincker or Mark Owczarski and let them know you've received a media call. Generally, a brief discussion with Mark or Larry will provide direction as to how any particular call should be handled. We believe that there should be minimal discussion about the shooter, the events, and pundit analysis until at least after completion of the Governor's Commission and the gnivlrsity's after action-review. It is perfectly acceptable when a faculty member is talking to the media to defer any particular question not within one's purview and ask them to call Larry's offtce.

If a faculty

How will Virginia Tech be cooperating with the Govemor's Commission?
The University has designated Linwood McCoy as its liaison with the Governor's Commission. In discussing this tragedy with Govemor Kaine in the immediate hours after the shootings, President Steger requested that the Govemor conduct an independent investigation of t}re events and Virginia Tech will assist the Commission in every way possible. All requests for information from the Commission will come only through Mr. McCoy. Any requests should be forwarded to Mr. McCoy.

When we call upon prospective research or cor?orat€ partners end they say, "Oh, isn't Virginia Tech where that guy killed all those people", how should we respond?
There is no cookie cutter response to this kind of tragedy' Something like, '!es, Virginia Tech has had a very difficult time of it lately, but we will not permit a single act of violence to define the University. That is exactly why we are here to talk to you today about..." would suffice. Most people you meet are likely to express their own thoughts of remorse and condolence and the response is pretty much the same'

While this might seem like common sense, we do not want to leave any impression whatsoever that Virginia Tech (and the New River Valley, by extension) is anything other than a great place to live, work and do business.

J
; .

.

Ls of 516/0?

Is Nikki Giovanni's poem-ending University slogan?

-'tve

are Virginia Tech, we

will prevail' - a new

The words to that poem have become a symbol for the resolve of the entire University Community to recover from this tenible ordeal and are crucial to ow healing process. While the words themselves will not be apart of any formal long-running campaign, the spirit embodied in the words will be with us for a long, long time. Feel free to use them.

What do I do if a member of the news media sticks a microphone or a TV camera in my face at a Virginia Tech event?
You are never REQUIRED to speak to the media. Most times, politely telling a reporter "no thank you" will suffice. If a reporter is particularly troublesome, just walk away and do not feel guilty about doing so.

There has been a tremendous outpouring of support for the entire Virginia Tech Community. Are there procedures in place for handling requests by entertainers' authors, etc. who wish to donate proceeds from events/sales to the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund?
Steve Clark and Mary Grace Theodore in the University's Development office are managing all such offers of assistance. We are receiving reports of additional, larger and more organized efforts that are being planned and scheduled throughout the coming months. We have been providing direct links to the University's Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund to those who wish to assist and will continue to do so. We are moved by extraordinary generosity of so many groups and individuals and are grateful for their

thoughtfulness dwing this difficult time for The Hokie Nation.

A.s

of

516/07

Spokesperson's Q&A
While you may be asked something like the following questions in your capacity as a university administrator, we recommend deflecting and forwarding questions to University Relations. We suggest that these topics be the province of designated spokespersons or individuals with direct responsibility for the topic (e.9. chair of a committee or task force reviewing the topic.).

What is Virginia Tech doing to insure the safety of its students?
The health and safety of university community is paramount. Let's take a look at a number of campus security instruments which already exist. Residence halls are normally locked 12 hours per day and secured with key-card access. They have been locked24/7 since April 16 and will remain so indefinitely. The campus has 5l blue light emergency phones connected to the campus 9l l center. The Virginia Tech Police Department is a nationally accredited, full-service 60 person law enforcement agency with 40 uniformed officers and a2417 dispatcher. Alerts are posted as needed on the widely-used campus website. We have campus sirens and loudspeakers and we use broadcast e-mail and voicemail to hardline c€rmpus phones. A text messaging system will be in place by this slrnmer. Beyond that, we want to be thoughtful in our approach to the creation of additional security measures. We do not want to do things which might make us feel good while having little effect on the security of the campus. That having been said, we are fully cooperating with Governor Kaine's independent commission - a review tlrat President Steger personally requested shortly after the tragic events - and we welcome this analysis. Simultaneous to those deliberations, we are currently conducting our orvrl intemal security audit to see what changes might be made prior to the issuance of the Commission's report.

There were several bomb threats prior to the Norris-AJ Event. Since thenr there have been additional bomb threats. IIow does the University respond to these threats, and has that changed since the Norris-AJ Event?
The Virginia Tech website provides specific information as to Virginia Tech's response to these types of threats which were made prior to the Norris-AJ event. Each was thoroughly investigated and cleared. A number of additional threats were made in the days following the Norris-AJ Event. It is an unfortunate commentary on our cont€mporary society that such tlueats are quite common after a tragedy of this magnitude, but each threat was taken seriously, investigated appropriately, and found to be a hoar. We teat all such thLreats seriously and will continue to do so.

As of 5/6/07

Do you have confidence that your policies regarding the mental health of Virginia Tech students is sufficient to track individuals in the future who may be prone to violence?

Mental Health statutes and regulations have been created to, understandably, protect the privacy of anyone who seeks treaunent or is required to seek treatment for mental health issues. We will comply with the letter and spirit of those laws. The Governor's commission will examine this issue more broadly and we will await the results of that examination to determine what new steps, if any, might be taken.

What will happen to Norris Hall?

A Committee is examining that very question. Initially, we said all options were on the table, specifically implying the demolition of Norris Hall. Upon reflection, the gravity ofthe situation from an academic and research profile leads us to conclude that additional consideration of the future of Norris Hall is necessary. Nonis is one of the larger buildings on campus with over 70,000 square feet of offices, laboratories and classrooms. Norris classrooms alone represent about 5% of campus capacity. Still, at this point, it is our belief that second floor classrooms will never be used again in that manner. We will present proposals and options to ow University community in early
sunmer.

IIow will we, as ! University, position itself in the gun debate which will ensue as i result of the Norris-AJ Event?
Our position has not changed. We believe that law enforcement officials ought to be the only ones on campus carrying weapons - concealed or otherwise.

Speculation - on and off campus - has suggested that some loss of life might have been averted if we'd closed the campus. How should we respond to that?
The Virginia Tech Campus contains 153 major buildings, 19 miles of public roads, is located on 2600 acres of land and as many as 37,000 individuals might be found on its grounds at any one time on atypical day. Virginia Tech is very much like a small city. How does one close a city? Virginia Tech is a University, not a prison. Be that as it may, the Governor's commission will investigate all aspects of the Norris-AJ Event including this one. We will receive the commission's recommendations and make changes, if any and as needed, to protect the safety of students, faculty, staff and visitors on campus.

,iirt

.

KSR

05t03t2007

Commencement Spring 2002

- Media Guidelines

At colleges and universities across the nation, commencement is a joyous time to celebrate and acknowledge the hard work, dedication, and accomplishments of those students (along with their family and friends who supported them along the way) who have completed their academic course of study.
This year, Vrginia Tech's commencement ceremonies come just four weeks after the tragic events at West Amber Johnson and Norris halls. This year's joy and celebration will be tempered with grief following the loss of 32 members of our community.

As you report on these ceremonies, we ask that you be respectful of both the accomplishments and pride of the approximately 5,000 graduates and their families as well as the sorrow felt by the families of the 32 deceased and the entire Virginia Tech community.

on Friday, May 1 1 and saturday , May 12, we anticipate some 30,000 to 40,000 students and guests on our campus. We hope you understand that the needs our students and their families are our highest priority this weekend.
In addition, we have worked to accommodate the needs of the press. These guidelines, we hope, will help you accomplish you job while ensuring the dignity and respect that must be afforded to all the students, families, and guest who will participate in the ceremonies.

General lnformation

.

All media representatives will be required to obtain media credentials and prominently display them at all times while you are on campus. Credentials may be obtained Thursday, May 10 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and again from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the lobby of the Holtzman Alumni Center. Credentialing will continue at 5 p.m. in the lobby of the South Tower (facing Spring Road) at Lane Stadium. All commencement and convocation events will be staffed by Vrginia Tech public information officers (PlOs) who will be credentialed with large white badges. There are here to assist you during the weekend.
Seating at all commencement and convocation venues is prioritized for graduates and their families and guests. We ask you to stay in the areas designated for media and to respect the decorum afforded to the ceremonies. Questions related to press seating and use of cameras may be directed to the PlOs

. .

. .

At all commencement and convocation ceremonies, members of the press are not allowed on the floor (where graduates are seated) or on or near the stage were the ceremony takes place.
To ensure that our graduates and their guests can fully focus on and participate in the commencement ceremonies, we ask you to refrain from interviewing students and families during the ceremonies and avoid up-close contact with them. Any interviews graduates or their guests may wish to participate in must take place outside the commencement or convocation venue

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05to3t2007

Due to space restrictions at the various commencement venues, tripods can be accommodated only in the specified areas in Lane Stadium (for more detail, please

see below). Use of broadcast cameras and flash photography at university convocations will be directed by university PlOs stationed at all events. Pool still photography is available for the Graduate Commencement Ceremony (Friday, May 11, 3 p.m., Cassell Coliseum) and the University Commencement Ceremony (Friday, May 11, 7;30 p.m., Lane Stadium) through the Roanoke Times and the AP wire. Contact: TBA Pool broadcast coverage (three cameras) will be available for the Graduate and University commencement ceremonies and for the College of Engineering convocation (Saturday, May 12,8 a.m., Cassell Coliseum) courtesy of Virginia Tech Athletics broadcast media unit. Contact is Kevin Hicks (cell: 540-998-5921). Coordinates are: 1. TBA General questions on Friday, May 11 may be directed to Mark Owczarski (cell: 540357-0126)

Driving / Parking Information

. .

Spring Road, which runs along the west side of Lane Stadium and Cassell Coliseum, will be closed to thru traffic beginning Friday, May 11 beginning at 8 a.m. Media satellite trucks must be parked at the Environmental Health and Safety Parking Lot (located off Tech Center Drive) and the Litton Reaves Parking Lot accessible off Washington Street (next to Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Phase 1) or Duck Pond Drive (next to Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Phase 2)

. . . . .

All other press vehicles may park in the Litton Reaves Parking Lot
Please note: NO press vehicles or satellite trucks my be parked on the Drillfield or other major campus roadways the week of May 7 - 13.

All media vehicles must display a media parking pass made available when you check in during credentialing.
DO NOT park in any handicap or metered spaces.

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Thursday, May 10
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Media sign in and credentialing at the main entrance of the Holtzman Alumni Center.

Friday, May

11

8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Media sign in and credentialing at the main entrance of the Holtzman Alumni Center. 5 p.m.: Media sign in and credentialing continues in the lobby of South Tower lobby, Lane Stadium. 2 to 2:30 p.m. Media Availability: Gen. Philip Abizaid, U.S. Army (Ret.), former Commander of the United States Central Command . Fifth Floor, media dining room, Lane Stadium (enter via elevator in South Tower) . Media credentials must be worn to be admitted Press conference format; introductory remarks followed by questions and answers

3 p.m. Graduate Commencement Ceremony - Cassell Coliseum: Media credentials are required to be worn at all times. 10 posthumous diplomas awarded Assigned media space in section 15 a Mult box will be available in section 15 Pooled still photography provided by the Roanoke Times. Ceremony will be broadcast via satellite feed on coordinates

.

o Satellire: Galaxy 26 (G-26) satellite formerly known as IA-6 o Located at 93 degrees West, Transponder: 1-D
5 p.m. Lane Staduim Press Box Available to Working Press Media credentials must be worn at all times. Mult box available for radio media outlets Broadcast outlets may use platform outside press box to shoot ceremony. Use of tripod acceptable only on this platform. PlOs will escort interested press to platforms Commencement broadcast and sound available in press box. lnternet access

. .

7:30 p.m. University Commencement Ceremony - Lane Stadium: Pooled still photography from stadium floor provided by the Roanoke Times. Ceremony will be broadcast via satellite feed on coordinates

o SateLlice: Galaxy 26
.\ T.^.:f a,,t :t Q? r'lonroae

(G-26) cafel I i re forne-l v known as 14-6
I^7aef
Tr:ncnnnder. I -fl

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Saturday, May

11

Approximately 30 college and departmental convocations will be held on this day. Virginia Tech public information officers (PlOs) will be present at all ceremonies to assist reporters if needed.
Media credentials must be worn at all times to attend these ceremonies. Please do not enter the venue floor, where our graduates will be seated and do not block families' and graduates' views. Ushers and PlOs will be available to assist you; please follow their guidance.

To ensure that our graduates and their guests can fully focus on and participate in the commencement ceremonies, we ask you to refrain from interviewing students and families during the ceremonies and avoid up-close contact with them. Any interviews may occur outside the venue
Because of intimate nature of convocations and the venues, no broadcast cameras will be allowed in Saturday convocations. Guidelines to assist in major venues:

Cassell Coliseum

. .

Wll host Engineering (8 a.m.) Agriculture and Life Sciences (11 a.m.) and the
Pamplin College of Business (2 p.m.) Engineering will be broadcast via satellite feed o Digital KU-band

-

College ceremonies (Engineering, Ag & Life Sciences, Business)

. . . . '

o Sateflite: Galaxy 26 lG-26) satelfite formerly known as IA-6 o Located at 93 degrees West, Transponder: 1-D
Assigned media space in section 15 Moat box will be available in section 15 Please do not enter the venue floor, where our graduates will be seated and do not block families' and graduates' views. Ushers and PlOs will be available to assist you; please follow their guidance. To ensure that our graduates and their guests can fully focus on and participate in the commencement ceremonies, we ask you to refrain from interviewing students and families during the ceremonies and avoid up-close contact with them.

Othercolleges'/departments' ceremonies(variouslocations):

.

University Relations will provide a distribution amp with TV signal and sound outside the following venues: 11:30 a.m.: Communications in Commonwealth Ballroom, Squires Student Center 2 p.m.: Political Science and International Studies in Commonwealth Ballroom, Squires Student Center

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Virginia Tech As We Move Folverd Themes or Key Messages
Virginia Tech will not be defined by these events. . A terrible tragedy happened here of honific proportions, and while we must live with this memory and knowledge, we will persevere. We will prevail. It , does not change who we are, what we do, or our very special place within the higher education community.
We are determined to

learnfrom the tragedy to help us and every university We are conducting internal investigations to fully review not only the incident but also the protocols, policies, infrastructure, and operating practices that ensure campus safety. In the immediate aftermath of the tragedy President Steger personally requested that the State ofVirginia undertake an independent investigation, and we are cooperating fully the resulting commission that was appointed by Governor Kaine and is chaired by retired Virginia State Police Superintendent Gerald Massensill.

Il'e are inventing the future. We are defined by our mission of learning, discovery, and engagement. We will continue to teach, learn, and serve our community, just as we have always done. It is a future that now must accommodate and reconcile our loss, but one that is no less promising. "Invent the Future," expresses the school's beliefthat higher education can change futures and make the world a better place. Our position as a major research institution with a special bent for teaching and learning has not

.

changed.

"Invent the Future" also reflects our commitment to helping students and the entire Virginia Tech community to define their own futures and achieve their highest potential.
We share a

spirit of community. We are dffirentfrom other large universities. We will celebrate and embrace the Hokie Spiri! the special bond that we share and that has sustained us and will continue to do so. We have a sense of family and togetherness here that is virtually unheard of
on other large campuses. Students, faculty, stafi and alumni maintain a special affection for Virginia Tech precisely because ofthis sense ofcaring. Hokie Spirit will enable us to prevail in the face of tragedy and grow stronger as we move forward together.

II/e are doing all we can to support the families of those who were lost, and those who were injured and their families. The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund is a vehicle for donors to offer assistance to the families. It is already providing funds for grief counseling, memorial expenses and other costs. The Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund is a single university-wide scholarstrip that will be awarded to a student (criteria yet to be established). We are establishing 32 individual memorial funds in the name of each of the victims. These may be used for scholarships and other similar purposes, with the fural disposition to be determined in cooperation with the families. Family liaisons continue to do their work. President Steger is committed to leaving a legacy for those we have lost.

. . .

We are thanl{ul

the outpouring of support. been touched and sustained by the outpouring of support from all We have over Virgini4 the nation and the world. The world is one in its support of the

for

Hokie Nation.

-end-

.t*.er..:

--,)tF

Dear Parents and Family Members,
I appreciate the responses that some of you sent to the letter I sent earlier this month and the various points of view expressed. One point of consensus is that

everyone wants more communication, so I will endeavor to write more freguently.

Family Advocafes - In most cases, I have heard overwhelming praise from you for the work of our family liaisons. Each of them has been extraordinarily dedicated to assisting you. But, as you can understand, many are exhausted both physically and emotionally. An expert in this aspect of crisis response recently pointed out that we are victims trying to care for victims, and that should not be. Therefore, over the next month or so, we will gradually be transitioning from your current family liaisons to family advocates. These are professionals who work for Virginia Tech and whose sole function it will be to work with you and with the injured students. We will share more information as it becomes available.
Most of you are aware of and have availed yourselves of the services of the Criminal lnjuries Compensation Fund (CICF). However, you may not be aware of another service that office provides. In collaboration with the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services, CICF can arrange for you to be assigned a victim witness officer (i.e., victim advocate), who can help you find resources in your local community to assist with a number of issues, from counseling, to financial planning, to immigration issues, and much more. This service is available to families in states other than Virginia as well. Whether you live in Virginia or elsewhere, I encourage you to call Mary Vail Ware, Director of CICF, and she can arrange for a victim advocate to work with you. You may contact Ms. Ware by calling 1-800-552-4007 or 804-367-1018, or by sending an e-mail note to mary.ware@vwc.state.va. us.

Victim Advocates

-

Norris Hall Tours - As you know, families were invited to tour the classrooms before they were refurbished and the media was allowed in. Until that wing of the building is renovated (the feasibility study is under way), the classrooms will remain locked and access will not be permifted. In fact, for at least several months, access to the entire building will be restricted to those with Virginia Tech lD cards. However, you may still request a tour of those classrooms by contacting Police Chief Wendell Flinchum atilO-231-6411.
Intermediate Memorial - Work is already under way on the intermediate memorial, which, as you know, will be on the site of the original memorial created by the Hokies United students. The original 32 stones will remain in place until the intermediate memorial is completed. At that time, the original 32 stones will be individually packaged so they can be given to the families. Again, I will share more information as it becomes available.

Govemofs Wrginia Tech Review Panel-As you may be aware, because of the various privacy laws, primarily HIPAA, neither I nor the Virginia Tech Review Panelcould have access to Mr. Cho's medical records. As I result, I sought and received about 10 days ago from Mr. Cho's father a release of his Virginia Tech medical records, which includes counseling records. The release also permitted me to share these records with the Virginia Tech Review Panel, which I have done. We are in the process of reviewing these records.

- Even before some of the families released a statement last week, we had been in contact with officials from Columbine and an expert involved with the September 11 fund to obtain their counsel as we seek to administer the funds that were donated to the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund in an equitable and responsible manner consistent with the stated purpose of the fund, which includes, but is not limited to: assistance to victims and their families, grief counseling, memorials, communication expenses, and comfort expenses. We are continuing to refine our plans and processes for the use of those funds, taking into account the input we have received.
Communication - Your input is always welcome. E-mail is the quickest means to communicate. lf you will send your notes to President.Steqer@vt.edu, they will not be mixed in with the other e-mail that I receive, which continues to arrive in high volume. Also, I know that Governor lGine invited you to meet with him in person in Richmond next week. He and I are both interested in your views, but I don't want to burden you with another trip to Blacksburg at this time. Rather, we are making plans for university officials to visit with you. lf they have not already done so, members of my staff will be contacting you in the near future to arrange a time to visit with you to hear your views in person. Although it may not be possible to visit in person with families who are outside the U.S., we will seek their input by phone or letter.
Thank you for your time. Again, let me say that movrng on is not the same as forgetting. We will never forget. Wishing you peace, Sincerely,

Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund

Charles W. Steger President

Dear colleagues, The last few weeks have been quite tumultuous, and rvhile things may seem to be returning to normal, it's likely that we'll need to continue to discuss the events of April 16 for some time. We'll need to gauge where our donors are in relation -o these events, and offer them t.he appropriate reassurance. We'll need to address the ner:essary changes to the campaign and our curent fundraising efforts. We'll need to be both refl()ctive and optimistic. With these aims in mind, I'm offering up some talking points to give you some guidance as you begin working through the days ahead.

If

we can all be patient during this time, we can get through this together and help oui: donors, as well. If you need help writing any pieces over the next few months, especially for college/university program publications, let me and rr y staff know. If you have any publications pending, please let us know right away.

University Relations messaging You mav be feeling a little anxious about how to mak: the transition between discussine the events oi Apdl 16tr and the campaign and other, happ er, topics. Since this evdrit nas afieiteii every aspect of the university, we will rely on central :ommunications from oui colle;lgues'in University Relations to take the lead in making that tr;rnsition. It is critical that develc,pment, communications be synchronized with messages that irre being formulated and distributed by bur
colleagues in University Relations. The next issue of the Virginia Teclt Magazine, originally scheduled to be all about the campaign, is being rewritten to mark the events of April 16. This issue will be our first opportunity to talk in broad terms about the need for us to both mourn, and ;ecognize when it is timb 1o prer;s ahedd. Other central communications, most often in the form of letters to many of our main constituencies from senior leadership, will carry the sz me overall message. Current plans call for a letter from President Steger to'be sent to donors within the next two weeks. That letter will not only carry the message abo,re but will also explain what thr:se events have meant-and will continue to mean-for the camllaign. This means that your next _ , , communication with your donors need not carry this s rme message, but it is importanr that it be appropriately respectful and in keeping with the unive::sity's main messages.

As you talk to your donors, keep in mind the followinll university messages:
We are strong.

We will NOT be defined by these events. This is something that happened to while it was clearly catastrophic, it does not ch lnse what we are all about.
We are

uLs,

and

still inventing the future. We will continue to teach. learn. and serve our community, just as we have alvrays done. We will continue to invent the future. It is a fut ule that now must accommodate our loss. but one that is no less nlomisins

We share a

spirit of community. We will celebrate and embrace the Hokie Spirit, the special bond that we share and that has sustained us and will continue to do so. Tt e whole world has now seen what we aiready knew: that the Hokie Spirit is strong tlrroughout our community-incJuding students, faculty, staff, alumni, donors, and fri :nds.

University Development messaging Here are a few key messages you can share with your donor constituent groups:

r

The response to the April events on our campLs has been both gratifying and overwhelming. Supporl is coming in from neu friends and old, individuals an,J coryorations, and we are carefuily processing r:ach gift. We are not actively soliciting or raising funds for any of these initiatives. Ratlrer, we are focused on ensuring that offers for support are appropriately and expeditiously handled.

o o

,

Those who wish to make a gift through the university have 34 ways in which they can do so: the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund, the Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund, and memorial funds in the names of each of those we have lost.

Specific fund messages The Hokie Spirit Memorial Futtd The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund was established immediately following the events April 16 in order to provide the university with a means to offer assistance to the familiesl of those affected by these events. That assistance includes, but is not limjted to: r Grief counseling r Memorials o Communicationexpenses . Comfort expenses

of

:

Some of this money has already been disburserl for these purposes. Such disbursement is being made in keeping with the timetables of tlre families and in conjunction urith a mrmber of other agencies-federal and state vi :tim assistance programs, as well as local charities, are all rushing in to aid these familier and we want to be sure that our efforts are coordinated so they can have maximum im:act.

We cannot predict how great these needs will te; no1'can we predict how much money will be raised. We're getting reports of larger, rnore organized efforts that are being planned and scheduled throughout the coming rnonths. As from the outset, our first priority will continue to be meeting the needs and honoring the wishes of the frlmilies. Plans bevond that have vet to be formulated.
The Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund

The Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund is a single r niversity-wide scholarship that will be awarded to a student based on criteria vet to be established.

i Named Memorial Ftutds We have established 32 memorial funds in the names of each of the victims. Final determination of how those funds will be used (memorial awards, scholarships, professorships, faculty suppolt etc.) will be mirde in cooperation with the fam:ilies. Some ofthese funds have already been designated.

Other questions
University Development is happy to accept donations from groups who have conducted their own fundraising efforls. However, we cannot enter inro any partnerships with these independent fundraising efforls. We cannot allow external groups 1o use our logo or otherwise give the impression that the university is endorsing them. Whi e it is not our place to steer donors away from private fundraising efforts, it is our place to explain to them how they can best supporl the victims' families and the university community: by gi ving to the 34 funds described above.
Stay tuned for further updates to these messages as ne:ded (particularly as regards campaign planning.). If you have any questions or require further cladfication, please contact me or one of my staff. We are eager to help everyone get through tlris hard time and move into a brighter future.

Notes from July 18, 2007 Meeting VT Review Panel

Massengill: all records needed have now been received; Over 2,000 hits on website. Closed meeting on July '1gth to talk with attorneys; not enough emphasis on families early on in the Panel's work but wants to do more in the future.
Casteen: welcome and emphasized difiiculty in securing (locking down) a large campus. Phil Schaenman (IriData) the Panel and TriData staff activities:

Allhigh schooland W records and most medical records received.
Some records destroyed or never completed. Interviews conducted with high school and W staff. Lots of police contact everywhere and continuing with state police. Met with NYPD on Friday and talked about police decisions. Met with survivors and medical examiner's staff; reviewed autopsies. Spoke with 20 other colleges on security plans. Reviewed materials sent to NBC news. Expect activities to drop off after this week and concentrate on writing report. Outline of the Report:
Scope. Detailed time line. University setting and security Cho's mental health issues. General access to camous. lncident in West AJ. lncident in Norris Hall. EMS, hospital, and ME's Office. Aftermath (recovery and healing process).

Report will criticize and will include recommendations. Will try to be fair and balanced.

Good presentation by Don Challis, President of VALEA and Chief of Police and W&M; gave good marks to Wendell for his swift action to have Emergency Response Team on the scene which probably saved lives in Norris. Suggested it is a good idea to have a Threat Assessment Team for campus to look out for potential weird students, etc. but a bad idea to arm the students.

Things to consider: Where police reports; need to be high in organization (no lower than 1 step below president). Avoid lockdowns. Allow police to notify campus community of emergencies without going through administration hierarchy. Establish close relationship with local EMS, fire, and police; joint training and drills. Complete threat assessments on the front end. lmproved funding for security. Conduct crime prevention assessment-cameras, locks, etc. Training on FERPA and HIPM laws and regulations. MOU's between state and local police agencies. Retirement benefits for campus police should be same as other law enforcement officers. High turnover rates need to be addressed through more competitive salaries. (Some of the same things mentioned by VP of International Association of Chiefs of Police from Smithfield, Virginia. The IACP is also going to issue a report with recommendations. IACP says areas that need further study include resources, fire arms restrictions, mental health issues.) Judge Strickland asked how the university could "lockdown" campus during the Morva incident and not lockdown the campus during the Cho incident. Chief Challis said he could not speak to the differences but discussed once again the differences between and public school (K-12) and a large open college campus.

Chief Challis also asked about what efforts were now being made to improve security on campuses? Any recommendations to screen students for imminent danger? He noted that everyone he talks with is reviewing policies and procedures; he also noted that the "response" to an incident was the Police & EMS responsibility; the "response to the response" was an administration issue. Tom Ridge discussed Pre-incident Threat Assessments-who does it, can it be done better, should an outside person (town) be included, etc. Gov. Ridge also noted good job by Wendell to not delay getting ERT on campus. Ms. Ellis asked if there was a need for a "victim's services specialist" within the Police departments; any recommendations? \l/ho has one? Chief Challis did not know if anyone had such a position, Ms. Ellis referred them to look at Fairfax Police Deoartment for model.

Dr. Depue asked about funding status for police and Challis responded: Campus police normally below municipalities and state. Retirement benefits are less. Often have to be creative to obtain needed training. Police departments are not the primary mission of the university. Retention of good officers is a problem. *Massengill observed how everyone bristles at the word "lockdown" and suggested something has to be done. Perhaps better training of the university community; students need to be told (trained) what do to in emergency situations, etc.

Professor Bonnie gave presentation of Va. Mental Health Laws and Practices and discussed review being conducted by the Commission on Mental Health Law; expect preliminary report in winter of 2007-08 with a full report/plan by the fall 2008.
Dr. James Madero from Calif. School of Prof. Psychology gave presentation on handling seriously troubled students; stressed the need for a Violence Prevention Program that includes a Violence Prevention Team on campus. The team would: Conduct violence audit. Review polices & procedures. Review training. Est. Incident Response Teams (one for students, one for faculty/staff). This team needs to include a threat assessment specialist. Recommend prevention procedu res. Evaluate program.

Emphasized that some sharing of information is possible even under FERPA and suggested going to Dept. of Ed's website for clarification that has been posted there. Dr. Richard Federman, Director of UVA's Counseling & Psychological Services Cente(CAPS) reported organization at UVA and how work closely with the hospital. Pointed out that UVA's environment was different than Tech's because they had a hospital and worked more closely with the doctors. He said Cho would have been picked up as a potential problem at UVA from hospital records. Dr. Federman report how CAPS works and the meetings it has with every dean once each month; no budget problems because funded from student fees but emphasized need for a stable budget to support student counseling.

Dr. Sood gave presentation about mental health issues. She discussed: Cho's background and predictability of behavior problems. FERPA and HIPAA interpretations. Discussed Chos' withdrawal behavior. Need to explore family issues, Signs (flags) at Tech before the incident. University's and Police response to the flags. Discussed safeguards to ensure follow through on troubled students. Need to ask what are the capabilities of the university to handle problems. How does the university track troubled students. Are parents contacted? Should they be? Evaluate core mission of the university v, counseling resources. Examine W's philosophy on dealing with students (remedial or punitive). Look at the culture of Blacksburg and W. Early identification of mental health issues. Philosophy of higher education toward mental health issues. Dr, Sood then shared information about who was interviewed at Tech.

Comments from family members and others: Lori Haas mother of Emily-urged Panelto not rush work to meet the deadline; discussed frustration with FERPA and HIPAA; can't get information from the university; has requested mental health assistance for daughter but university would not do it ??? (l'm not sure if this was in reference to FERPA or a lack of response by the university.); in the aftermath, the university should have communicated to all students, faculty, and staff but this has not happened; there should be one state agency that deals with all services for victims so it would not be such a maze to go through; there should be ONE advocate for each victim who has full knowledge of all the things available. Dr. Novak signed up to speak but left the meeting. Mrs. Granata signed up to speak but declined when called. Mr, McCain, Lauren's father, just wanted to say thank you for your efforts and to report that his family prays for them daily. Catherine Reed stepmother of Mary Reed-very emotional comments about all the things they continue to worry about. More of a "sharing" presentation than recommendations. Kara Gonecker-mother of a child lost to a gun incident but not at W; very emotional appealon gun control.

:

.ii.:...-':r

:r.:::r.,

Dennis Bluhm father of Brian-reported the top administration at W had been very cruelto "us" and W liked to hide behind laws. VT and state needs to take responsibility and needs to take care of families. Erickson ? deferred to not speak. Joseph Samatha father of Reema-someone needs to be responsible and apologize; W not doing a good job with the use of the funds; should not close Hokie Spirit Fund on August '1"'; wants the Governor's panelto hold up closing the fund; appealed to everyone to pause to listen, include everyone, and then
act.

Sally Norris-victim of poor mental health care; apparent allergy to Kozar which lead to serious problems. After several minutes she was interrupted and asked to let parents speak and then return if there was time remaining. Mr. Erickson decided to speak; talked about incident of stalking his daughter at W; stalker has been dealt with by the judicial system with a year in jail suspended, but he is still at W taking classes; they have a protective order against him but worry about their daughter; does not believe the university has ever talked to stalker's parents because of FERPA and HIPM; had praise for the Women's Center at W and the Police Dept. but worries that not enough attention is paid to this incident. Patrick Strollo-father of Hillary who was injured; Hillary doing well but wanted to make sure he asked "why did the university not send an email after the WAJ incident?" He is very much against FERPA and HIPPA and for parents right to know about their child. Roger O'Dell-father of Derek; read Derek's note to the panel; relayed comments from his wife, a friend, and himself; urged quality work rather than fast work by the panel; need answers, someone needs to take the heat. (This guy appeared a bit strange to me.) Several others spoke in favor of carrying guns on campus. One even suggested that carry a gun was a God-given right guaranteed by the Declaration of Independence (certain unalienable rights....). Another spoke about mental health doctors causing deaths because of the drugs they prescribe-suggested nondrug alternatives be used. Oh, by the way, Sally Norris declined to continue her talk when her turn came around again. Because she had at least 20 more minutes of material to present to the Panel. Col. Massgengill suggested she meet with Dr. Sood afterthe meeting to share her thoughts.

A long meeting for everyone!

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Updated June 18, 2007
[This information is intended to help you, should you have to discuss these items. lt is not intended to make you become a 'spokesperson' for the university. Do not guess or discuss any issue either in a private setting, with a group, or in a public setting if you feel at all uncomfortable or not completely knowledgeable. l

Memorials/Assistance

What is being done to help the families of the deceased?
Through the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund, we have provided financial assistance to the deceased victims' families for memorial expenses, grief counseling, communications expenses, comfort expenses and other costs directly related to this tragedy. We are coordinating our efforts with those of other charities and state relief agencies to insure this aid has the maximum impact for the families. In addition, almost since the day of the shootings, a Virginia Tech employee has been designated as a liaison between the University and the families of the deceased as a way to determine the on-going needs of each family. Our liaisons advised that some families sought more frequent communication from the University, and just last week, a weekly communication direct from Preside,lrt Steger to the families was created as a mechanism to more effectively maintain dialogue with affected families. Many of the monetary needs of the families may not be clear for several months and the intent of the Hokie Spirit Mernorial Fund is to provide assistance for some time to come. The University intends to use the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund to provide such things as health insurance for the families of the faculty, undergraduate education expenses for children of deceased faculty, and financial and mental health services for victims' families. [More info on www.r'tnews.vt.edu]

Who administers the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund?
The University and The Virginia Tech Foundation.

How much money has been raised so far? Donations to the Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund now total over $7 million and the outpouring of support has been almost overwhelming. Little children have literally brought their piggy banks to the University to contribute. A homeless Louisiana resident displaced by Hurricane Katrina made a contribution to the fund. The New York Yankees donated $ 1 million to the fund and many other corporation and foundations have made very significant gifts to honor the victims of the tragedy. None of this money was actively solicited by Virginia Tech, but instead was donated by hundreds of individuals and corporations who just wanted to do something to try to ease the pain of the Virginia Tech community.

I

How long will you keep providing financial aid?
That is still to be determined, but we are confident that the Virginia Tech community be there to help for as long as needed.

will

What is being done to help the injured and their families?
The Hokie Spirit Monorial Fund will pay tuition and fees for injured students ttrough Spring 2008, as well as to pay for medical costs not forgiven or otherwise covered by insurance. Funds had previously been disbursed to provide assistance for travel costs, communications costs and on-going counseling.

What kind of memorial is being considered to honor the victims of this tragedy? Thirty-two (32) separate named endowed funds have been created in honor of each victim lost. Each of, the named funds is fully endowed allowing each fund to memorialize a victim in perpetuity. The final determination of how each of the mernorial funds will be directed is being developed in close conjunction with the wishes of each family. An intermediate memorial to replace the temporary version placed by the student group Hokies United immediately after April 16 is planned for the same location on the Drillfield across from Bumrss Hall. The intermediate msmorial will mimic the ad hoc version with 32 substantial engraved Hokies Stones in a semi-circle in front of the Drillfield viewing stand. The Hokie Stones from the original mernorial will be offered to the victims' families.

A future committee will be created which will, with broad input from many stakeholders, advise the University on design and construction of a permanent memorial several years
in the future. fMore info on www.vtnews.vt.edu]

Who is on the committee which established the memorials? Were the families
represented?

The families will be directly involved in the development of the individually named endowed funds. A committee chaired by Vice-President of Alumni Relations which included a member of the Board of Visitors, four students, an alumnus and two staff
members was responsible for the recommendation of the intermediate memorial.

WiII the memorials also honor the wounded, or only those who were killed?
The physical memorials will honor those precious lives lost on April 16.

Is the University licensing the use of VT
incident?

logos

:for merchandise relating to the

Virginia Tech has been bombarded with requests to license items that mernorialize the tragedy. To date, only the student group Hokies United has received permission to sue the University's logo for this purpose. The Univsrsity is currently researching appropriate vehicles to expand additional commernorative licensing, but nothing is
finalized.

There has been a tremendous outpouring of support for the entire Virginia Tech community from all kinds of sources. Are there procedures in place for handling requests by entertainers, authors, artists, etc. who wish to donate proceeds from
events/sales?
are managing all such offers of assistance. We are receiving reports of additional, larger and

Mary Grace Theodore and Steve Clark in the University's Development office

more organized efforts that are being planned and scheduled - the event in Yankee stadium with Dr. Steger throwing out the first pitch, for example - throughout the coming weeks and months. We are moved by the extraordinary generosity of so many groups and individuals and are grateful for their thoughtfulness during this difficult time for The Hokie Nation. Impact on School

What will happen to Norris Hall?

A

prior to April 16. Because of the trauma experienced by the University community, there will be no general assignment classrooms in Norris and a plan is being developed to convert these classrooms to other uses. Since the building will no longer be multi-use and will be devoted solely to departmental activities, the ESM department will, over the long term, consolidate offices and labs which currently reside in three other buildings. [More info on www.vtnews.r4.edu]

phased re-use of Norris Hall begins June 18. The building will be dedicated to office and laboratories for the Departnent of Engineering Science and Mechanics and Civil and Environmental Engineering departments which had been the primary building tenants

What is the University's expectation of students who say they just cannot go into Norris for any reason, when certain aCademic disciplines Qaboratory research activities within a certain major, for example) might require it?
The University, the College of Engineering and the ESM Departrnent leadership fully understand the anxiety some individuals may feel when faced with the reality of reentering Norris Hall. To the extent possible, accommodations will be made by the College and Department on a case by case basis and the University has made arrangcments for continued counseling at any desired level for incoming - and retuming - students, faculty, or staff.

..2.,

Virginia Tech already faced a shortage of classroom space prior to the decision to suspend traditional classroom activity in Norris Hall. How will this situation be
addressed? The University is working on a short term plan to be implemented by the beginning of the Fall Semester to manage the classroom crowding situation. Yes, we are tight, but we will find a way. In the intermediate term, additionat classroom space is currently under construction in multiple campus locations which will be available for classroom instruction over the next couple of years. Beyond that, the Board of Visitors recently approved capital activities which we hope will accelerate the construction of additional classroom AND laboratory space when the projects are completed in the 2010-2011 time frame.

What will happen to the AJ Residence lfall?
Both the East and West wings of Ambler-Johnston will continue to be used as residence halls. As AJ contains the second largest number of dormitory rooms of any campus residence hall, this facility is a critical component of the University's on-campus housing system. The area of rooms in West AJ where the shootings occurred on April 15 will not be occupied by students and will be sealed offfrom the rest of the rooms in West Ambler Johnston. Various options for that space are still being considered, and the entire building is due for scheduled renovation in 2010.

How has acceptance of offers for admission to prospective Freshmen been? We're gratified to say that acceptances are up compared to last year. As of May 17, we had received deposits for 5215 freshmen students for the Fall 2O07 semester, slightly more than the enrollment target goal of 5000 and higher than the 5185 deposits we'd received at the same time last year. We've also received many wonderful, heartwarming letters from accepting Freslune,n and their families about wanting to be part of the Hokie Nation. These incoming Tech Freshmen are really excited to be Hokies and we're even
more excited to have them.

Did you receive any rejections specifically because of the shootings? Literally, no more than a handful.

IIow long will you provide counseling for students?
We will provide counseling services for students trying to cope with this tragedy for as long as it is necessary.

We keep hearing about this "Hokie
means?

Spirit". IIow would you describe what

that

(Everyone who interacts with various externql "stakpholders" will have to answer this in his or her own way and in his or her own words. Here's one answer but it won't work for everybody).

Hokie Spirit is that intangible passion which binds us all as Hokies. It is a spirit which allows us to be confident that Virginia Tech will not be defined by thehorrible events of April 16, but instead will be defined by how we reacted to those events. We're inventive, practical people, whether we're in a NASA laboratory, in an office in Tysons Comer, on a farm in Southside Virginia or in a classroom in Derring Hall. We say hello and we shake hands. And we mean it. Oh, and we Hokies play a little football, too.

Campu s Safetv/Securitv

What security measures did Virginia Tech have in place before the incident?
Each Freshman and his or her parents received a letter from Dr. Steger and Dean Hikes which outlined the safety and security measures which exist on campus to protect the safety of Virginia Tech's student, faculty and stafl, We hope that you had a chance to read it, because it provides an excellent sunmary of the many tools campus authorities have at their disposal to protect the University Community. fFact sheet available]

,

For example, the Virginia Tech Police Department is a nationally accredited, full service 60 person law enforcernent agency with 40 uniformed officers and a 24/7 dispatcher. The campus has 51 blue light emergencyphones connected to the campus 911 center. We have campus sirens and loudspeakers. In addition, effective for the Fall sernester, all residence halls are now on 24/7 key-cud ageess, a text messaging service will be in place and an integrated emergency communications system is the works. We also are looking toward our own intemal review and the findings of the Governor's panel for guidance as to what additional steps might be taken to enhance c€Impus security.

We heard there were several bomb threats prior to the shootings. In the days immediately after the inciden$ there were additional bomb threats. How does the university respond to these types of threats and has that changed since the
shootings?
Each bomb threat was thoroughly investigated and found to be baseless. A number of threats were made in the days following the shootings - which, unfortunately, are quite common after a tragedy of this type. Nevertheless, each tbreat was taken seriously, investigated appropriately by law enforcerne,nt authorities and found to be a hoax. We treat all such threats seriously and will continue to do so.

Some have said that faculty should be armed so they can protect themselves and their students in such cases. How do you respond to

that?

.

: , :l

Our position has not changed and will not change. We believe law enforcement officials ought to be the only ones on campus carrying weapons - concealed or otherwise.

Who is conducting your internal review and when will the results be available?

We are looking at three broad areas: telecommunications infrastructure, the physical infrastructure as it relates to safety and security, and, most importantly, the intemal protocols for information exchange. Our preliminary schedule calls for the reviews to be complete by late August. That timing should also be helpful to the Govemor's panel,
which is simultaneously undertaking its own review.

Youtve said you are cooperating with the Governorts panel. Does that mean you will abide by any recommendations it makes?

,

:

is still too early in the Panel's deliberations to speculate as to what, specific recommendations might be made. At the same time, though, we don't want an incident like this to ever happen again anywhere including at Virginia Tech and we will certainly take very seriously any specific recommendations the Panel would make which might lead to a safer campus.

It

-

-

llental Ilealth
Ifow do we know there are not more troubled students on campus?
Predicting human behavior is difficult under the best of circumstances. Typically, there is a pattem ofbehaviors which is often exhibited by students in the classroom that can be predictors ofsfudents in distress and our faculty is the first line ofhelp for these students. When a student exhibits behaviors like missing classes, disrupting class, inappropriate displays of anger and hostility, faculty members have a variety of options which are available to address the behavioral issues in the most appropriate manner for the students. These actions can range from personal counseling by the instructor to a refelral to the Head of the Departnent and the Dean of Students.

Isn't it the school's responsibilify to look for those behavioral signs and deal with
them.appropriately so the student body can be protected?

ln the overwhelming majority of situations with students, our system for faculty response to students in distress has been very effective. At its best, the system provides for a comprehensive, accessible and responsive approach to students' issues. It is in everyone's interest - an individual student, as well as, the university community at large - that we work aggressively to improve our system. We must work to insure that all faculty members understand how the systsrn works and what resources exist to assist

them. In addition, we need to improve the integration of information for

making interve'ntion decisions and find ways to include faculty in the response where appropriate.

What do privacy laws say about what a school can and can't do with information
about a studentts mental health?
Federal law specifically prohibits the sharing of a student's mental health records wirft anyone (including the parents of a student) unless the student specifically authorizes such sharing. The statutes goveming mental health privacy and the regulations which have been written to implement those stafutes, are being examined by a number of state and federal bodies including a Cabinet Level commission appointed by President Bush. It is too early to speculate if, or when, changes will be made in privacy law or the interpretation of such laws.

What is the school's policy about sharing information between departments or with the police when a student is having psychological problems?
When a faculty member identifies a student who is showing some of the waming signs noted earlier, that faculty member has several avenues within which inappropriate student behaviors can be addressed. The Faculty member may raise the issue with the the warning sign is Department Head and/or, the Dean of Student Life and/or, grave, with the Virginia Tech police departnent (please note this step is very sufficiently rarely necessary or taken). Often, when a student in distress has been identified, a CareTeam, composed of representatives of several campus disciplines, will monitor the activities of students who have been identified as exhibiting behaviors consistent with students who might be in distress. Sharing of information specifically related to mental health counseling is prohibited by federal law.

if

What is the school's policy about alerting police when a student is suspected to be
dangerous? Faculty, staff and students are urged to contact the Virginia Tech Police immediately if dangerous and inappropriate student behaviors are openly exhibited. Virginia Tech police protocol has established very specific guidelines for police officials to follow in the event there is an intervention ofany type.

Overvierv and Talking Points Hokie Spirit Memorial Funds Hokie Spirit ScholarshiP Funds Named Memorial Funds for Victims

OVERVIEW
The response to the

April events on our campus

has been both

gratiffing and

ovenrhilming. Support is coming in from new friends and old, individuals and corporations, and we are carefirlly processing each gift.
We are not actively soliciting or raising funds for any of these initiatives. Rather, we are focused on ensuring that offers for support are appropriately and expeditiously handled'
Those who wish to make a gift through the university have, in fact,34 ways in which they can do so. The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund, the Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund, and memorial funds in the each of the 32 lost.

The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund was established immediately following the events April 166 inbrder to provide the university with a means to offer assistance to the families of those lost. That assistance includes, but is not limited to: Grief counseling Memorials Communicationexpenses Comfort expenses

of

r o . .

Some

ofthis money has already been disbursed for these purposes.

Such disbursement is being made in keeping with the timetables of the families, and in conjunction with a number of other agencies - federal and state victim assistance progru-r, as well as local charities are all rushing in to aid these-families and we want to t" rut" that our efflorts are coordinated so they can have the maximum impact.

We cannot predict how great these needs will be; nor can we predict how much will be raised. Weie getting reports of larger, more organized efforts that are being planned and scheduled throughout the coming months. As from the outset, our first priority will be to meet the needs and honor the wishes of the families. Plans beyond that have yet to be formulated.

The Hokie Spirit ScholarshiP Fund The Hokie Spirit Scholarship Fund is a single university-wide scholarship that will be awarded to a student based on criteria yet to be established.

Named Memorial Funds We have established 32 memorial funds in the name of each of the victims. Final determination of how those funds will be used (memorial awards, scholarships' professorships, faculty support etc.) will be made in cooperation with the families. Some ofthese funds have already been designated.

Attachment PP

Remarks made durins the BOV Meetins
Kerrry J. Redican President. tr'aculfv Senate of Virsinia Tech

June 4.2007

Thankyou Mr. Rector, members of the Board of Visitors, Ladies and Gentlemen
Once again, I'd like to emphasize that faculfy appreciate the opportunify to participate in this level ofthe governance process and your responsiveness to faculty
issues.

track in August, that faculty feel they work in a partnership with administration , Board of Visitors, staff, and students, The evidence of how successful this partncrship can be was our collective response to the tragic events of April 16tr'. Concurrent with dealing with the shock and dismay of April 16"', faculty, students, and administration had to test the strength ofthe partnership and work closely together in a way that had never been done before in order to complete the seinester. It was incredibly difficult and challenging but we did it - we pulled together and made it happen.

I mentioned in my first report

Shorlly after April 16th, a special closed session ofthe faculty senate was held and a stateme nt of support for administration was approved:

Statement in Support of President Charles W. Steger and Police Chief Wendell Flinchum We, the members of the Faculty Senate of Virginia Tech ofter our full support to President Charles W. Steger as he continues to lead the university through these difficult times. We thank President Charles W. Steger and Chief Wendell Flinchum for their leadership and outstanding dedication to the Virginia Tech community in response to the tragic evenfs of Aprit 16th.

- The Faculty Senafe of Virginia Tech

In my August,2006 remarks, I reported that the issues ofconcern ofthe 2006-2007 Faculfy Scnate were continuing efforts to reach the 60tr' salary percentile ofour pcer institutions and a faculty club. We apprcciate the both the administration and BOV making both of those issues high priority on your agendas and we are pleased on the progress Yve are making.

Attachment PP
L

It has been a vcry productivc year. Thc 2006-2007 Commission on Faculty Affairs was very active and in consultation with the Faculty Senate was successful in gaining University Council approval for policies on composition of committees for promotion and tenure evaluation; annual and pre-tenure evaluation; part'time
appointments for tenure-track and tenured faculfy; and career track for instructors and general employment policies for non-tenure track and tenured faculty. We believe that the implernentation of these policies will strengthen the academic culture, provide for more opportunities for recruitment and retention and have a positive impact in our diversity efforts.
Since my last report, Faculty Scnators also began a dialogue on how to take the Principles of Community to the next level, that is, incorporating them into their work. The ftrst stcp in this process was to communicate to the university community that faculty are serious about the Principles of Community. The Faculty Senate passed a motion that faculfy should be encouraged to include a statement in their syllabus reflecting support for the Principles of Community - a statenrent similar to the current Honor Code statement in syllabi. It is anticipated that more discussion will take place regarding other ways to demonstrate that faculfy support for the Principles of Community.

At our May, 2007 meeting,,the

2007-2008 Faculty Senate oflicers were elected. They

are Valerie Hardcastle (President) and Hardus Odendaal (Vice President). Valerie is both a Professor ofPhilosophy and Science and Technology Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. She has been at Virginia Tech since I992. Valerie received her Bachelor of Arts from University of California, Berkeley; Master of Arts from University of Houston and Ph.D. from University of California, San Diego.

Hardus Odcndaal is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Hardus has been at Virginia Tech since 2001 and received his Bachelor of Scicnce, Master of Science, and Ph.D. from Rand Afrikaans,

f I I

am certain you

will enjoy working with Valerie and Ilardus.

I have enjoyed working with Jean, Ennis, and Greg and belicve they all did an outstanding job representing their constitucncics.
also want to mention that

I'd also like to thank President Stcger and Provost McNamee for their efforts on supporting a healthy climate for shared governance and for taking time out of their schedules for regular meetings with Faculty Senatc leadership.
Finally, I lrave thoroughly cnjoyed working with all you on thc Board of Visitors this past year. Your friendliness, responsiveness, and willingness not only to hear faculty concerns but to take action is most appreciated. On behalf of the faculty, we thankvou.

I

Larry will open with ground rules. Expect to take about 20 minutes. You will be avaiiable for Q&A during conference but not after. You are leaving for'another meeting.'
Comments for CWS

To say that we are still dealing with the after affects of April 16 is an understatement.
Every day my heart is pained when I think of the families of those who lost their lives
and those injured by an insane and senseless act

ofviolence. Every day there is another

concem or problem or pain that must be attended to.

However, one heartwarming aspect of this tragedy has been sharing of love and support

from people around the globe. Following the April 16 tragedy, there was tremendous
outpouring of support for the university community here in Blacksburg, our extended

Hokie family around the nations, and for the victims and their families. Some of this
support was manifested in spontaneous contributions to what was later to become the

Hokie Soirit Memorial Funds.

During those early hours, we identified possible uses of the funds, for the short term and
the long term. We attempted to respond as best we could as we always do when we

receive memorial contributions....not an unusual event. This was all taking place amidst
the endless sorrow, incredible tension, and wide range of emotions during an

indescribably busy time.

Later ltbecame apparent that the Virginia Tech Foundation, because of its mission and
incorporation as an educational foundation and not a benevolent foundation, was limited
in how the monies could be used. Moreover, we now realize that we are not in a position to pre-suppose what is best for victims or their families. With no experience in dealing

with crime victims, we felt it best to seek expert advice in disbursements of these monies.

These monies were given to the university by more than 20,000 donors to administer and

apply as best we can to help the healing process. Still, it is very important for us to seek input from families of victims and the surviving victims about distribution of the funds.

while we are very concerned about future and ongoing needs of the university
community in Blacksburg, we believe it is best to focus the funds on the current needs and desires of families ofthe deceased and the injured students and faculty. They have
experienced extraordinary loss and emotional trauma and deserve the most support.

There is no script for a tragedy ofthis magnitude and depth ofpain. I am very pleased to have someone ofKen Feinberg's caliber, experience, and long cafeer to help guide us. Ken has been quite generous with his time helping us sort through how we can best use the funds so generously given - in small quantities and large companies, organizations, yes, even Sports teams often beyond our borders.

-

by caring people, schools,

-

from ever)'vvhere in this nation and

We will don't have an exact formula for proceeding and that's why we'll be seeking

input from families and those injured.

You have a copy of Mr. Feinberg's extensive credentials in the media packet' but by way of introduction, let me note a comment from our local congressman, Rick Boucher, who
was in Congress during the discussions about how to assist families and those injured in the September

1ls

attacks.

,,The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund was established through generous contributions from Southwest Virginians and thoughtful citizens from across the country.

I applaud the

selection of Ken Feinberg as Administrator of the Fund. He

will draw on his extensive

experience to ensure that the assets of the fund are applied in the most effective manner

to assist the victims of this tragedy and their families in their time of greatest need," said
U.S. Representative Rick Boucher.

Now, Mr. Feinberg.

/6/
Thank you all for joining me here today. This will be the last press conference that we hold. I have known many of you for years and I think you can appreciate that I have gone above and beyond to try and accommodate your requests. The last few days have taken a tremendous toll on the University, its leadership and me personally. I have tried to work with all of you to provide the information that the world wants and needs. There is nothing left for us to do, other then move forward. Wtrdrill down any more this Ci;+

,y

point.

It is now time to move tor*ard?U;rginia Tech is not
going to be defined by this event%\Me are going to -orr. forwald u"do^o? rfiffTumily, our students and our communi{fueare going to continue to establish a positive legacy. We are going to "invent our future" and learn from our past.

I want to thank you all for your coverage and for supporting the families of our students. If you have
any questions which like me to answer for you in the future, please do not hesitate to contact me

274tu+
April
16'h

Tribute 2008

The idea of the tribute on the anniversary of April 16th by the university is understandably a sensitive issue with a range of opinions. The expectations of the university to call upon itself to take the effort to make any presentation to the public would seem likely if it were for the students & staff but because of the global context of the tragedy the university shall always be scrutinized by the media and public for the continuing actions it takes.

It can be expected that in April 2008, Virginia Tech will be confronting
people coming from near and far to pay their respects on the anniversary as well as the media.

Office of Recovery should be ready to handle requests from other institutions or individuals also act as a liaison between the media and University Relations. Basically the Office of Recovery should be re-tooled to handle various matters towards April2008.
The display of items received from others to Virginia Tech show the wide range of how the world responded in support of the victims, our university and the institution of education and should be seen by the public, as many items were never seen last April. With this in mind any tribute should keep in mind the victims and the families, Hokie pride and the ideals of education and peace since the majority of the tributes center around the ffagic loss in education. Starting with the New York Yankee visit in March there will obviously have to be a delegation meeting/greeting them. Along with the permanent memorial there should be some display of the items received since April 16th for their viewing.
There should be a coordination of the departments that are choosing to do their own tributes as those of the university such as a candlelight vigil. Reserving the spaces needed to do any of the events is critical so as not to interfere with many of the daily operations of the university.

_\.,,:_

The Perspective Gallery in the Student Union is scheduled to do an exhibit of items received since April 16'n and I had suggested that more personal related items of the victims be displayed there. The Theater Department will be reading some of the poetry and letters that had been sent to the university, with possibility of having invited readers and are to be reviewed by the English Department and the Music Department has a concert planned. There should be a larger display of items perhaps in the Commonwealth Ballroom of the Student Union or the VT Armory Art Gallery and or in multiple locations around campus. There could be viewings of some of the tributes over institutions did on DVD and perhaps some of the audio recordinss sent. It can be asked of the familv victims if thev would like anything displayed during this period. It would be good if this display could be seen for a least a month as it may take time for people outside the area to come here to view it all. As seen with the earlier display in Schultz Dining Hall people came out of there way to see only a fraction of items.

As I have already experienced with the Student Union display there are more than enough people will gladly volunteer their time to helping in the efforts of a display and VT Engage could be useful at this time.
We need not use much of the universities manpower if carefully coordinated as the staff should not be taxed again instead we could honor the staff for having gone tbrough the those difficult months.

We can expect on the day of April 16ft various speeches by University offrcials. The victim families and injured victims should be invited to participate if they wish too.
There should be invitations to dignitaries including President George Bush, Governor Tim Kaine also an open invitation to all VT alumni and to colleges and schools in Virginia. It may be expected that other officials from colleges may show as they can contribute to the understanding of this tribute.

Again this show of support will be a great and moving representation for not only the victims and Virginia Tech but a positive statement for education and non violence on campuses and peace.

There could possibly be any number of conferences held either by Student Governments or Alumni or any other department that has a delegation coming. In the name of peace alone many people will want to come.

What is important is to seize the moment to make the statement for peace and understanding and to reflect back to all the good wishes sent here.

I know there is something I left out but as it
we went alone.

has been we have made

it up

as

At"/rd*
6-t/2t'r*nApril22'2007 From Gene Fife

- /"/

a'*--^o<

FZr ^*

/41/v /-{a/-7V"1+r)--

This past week has brought unthinkable tragedy to Virginia tech and to our entire nation. As with millions of others, my thoughts and prayers go out to all of those who have lost loved ones, certainly to the many distraught families that are suffering the most.
has am also thinking of the many outstanding students we have, each of whom reached out to one another (and perhaps unknowingly to each ofus) and have represented the university with compassion, dignity and a maturity far beyond apy reasonable expectation. These fine young students are our greatest,assets.

I

And finatly my thoughts and deep respect goes out to charles Steger for the remarkabie leadership he has provided along with that of his top officials and support personnel. They have all risen to the occasion and at our darkest hour, have represented Virginia Tech at its finest.
So

what do we do now?

In the hope that we not let the horrific events of last Monday deline who we are to from the world-. I submit these reflections to consider as a possible way to proceed here. My hope is to stimulate discussion with the objective being to develop concrete action plans to show that virginia Tech will rise above the horror that
exists today.

process This week's tragedy will forever be etched in our history and the heating perhaps needed to aid the will be a long one- and while many immediate actions are initial recovery, we need to think slrategicalty in terms of lasting actions that guide us fontrrrd. The following ideas suggest certain steps to consider:

1.

Academic Excellence. This is the foundation for all that we do. we should to excellence across all of the academic disciplines redouble o.r. "oil-it-ent our focus on graduate researchl recruitment of in which we engage and keep top faculty andldrdents; etc. In other words, stay the course in terms of the priorities outlined in our campaign case statement--but with greater emphasis. In tangible terms this means better communications' better exe-cution and stronger efforts to provide the financial support for these

priorities.Eachdean,departmentheadandothersinpositionsof iesponsibility should be brought together to listen and talk to one another buCako to renew their sense of responsibility to communicate with their constituencies about our core priorities. Including them will energize them

.tt td;t,-*;e-.-,sdAi;ir-;;;-:

well as sera'e as an added measure of support for our capital campalgn. The importance of the capital campaign is now greater than ever'
as

2.

Convene a National Svmnosium on Student Safetv. In the afternath of was established to both dissect the event and to " ""tt"*t ""--t.rt"r recommend actions steps for congress and the President to implement in order to reduce the chance of another such tragedy to occur. I suggest we do something similar-and do it quickly. Agenda topics, suggested participants and timing considerations could include:

9lll'

Mental Health--Invite top medical experts from around the country to participate in a wide ranging effort to discuss the current state of the art in mental heath and highlight research initiatives and other efforts to advance our knowledge and abitities. Discussion topics would include mental health in general, diagnosis' treatment alternatives and efforts to help people before they become destructive.
b. Legal Review-As in the above, invite leading legal experts toreview the myriad of state and federal laws to which university officials must adhere. This would cover such topics as anti-discrimination lawst privacy laws, and the restrictions regarding communicating between and among institqtions, with parents, and other such issues'

Participants-In addition to experts fron various fields, include

presidents from the nation's leading colleges and universities both iarge and smatl. Doing so will add credibitity to the initiative as well I""* in much oeed.esources such as Hanard Medical or Stanford "a Law, etc. If we invite these academic leaders it is an almost certainty they wiil come---because every academic institution in the country is hoirified that an event such as hit us will fall on then --and they simply do not know what to do about it.

d. organization---Recruit a top level penon to head the overall effort and appoint an Executive Director to do the heavy lifting of org"rriri.tg, planning and executing the initiative. create a business ptin along with a proposed budget and seek funding --which sho-uld Le easity iaised, qoicLty and efliciently. The cost could be $l-2million

or more.

Initial Timing-- we should move fast -certainly within the next 6 - _ weeks as our window of opportunity will fade quickly and along with it, our opportunity to differentiate Virginia Tech'

f.

Time Frame---I can envision hosting an initial conference in Blacksburg and perhaps hold hearings at various other universities to listen and gather diverse views. These would be followed by several distillation meetings conducted by the executive staff and then a final meeting in Blacksburg duringwhich final recommendations are made. It will probably takeg'L2 months for a completed proiect'

3.

In an e"tt""ty dtff.r"nt vein from the above topics--and at the risk of appearing crass at such a sensitive time, I suggest we consider innovative ways to use Internet technolory to supplement our fund raising efforts. In a presentation at wA's Miller center, I learned that a number of vT related blogs have been set to for persons to share their experiences ofthis tragic week. The presenter reported that 4 btogs registered over 300,000 persons within 2 days ottne event. The presenter, a w&M graduate, was Howard Dean's Internet
advisor during l)ean's brief presidential campaign. Dean failed in the primaries but raised over $30million via Internet solicitations. All of the major presidential candidates are now using the Internet as a major source of iunding and I recommend we invite this expert to our campus to discuss what, if any, of his ideas might be appropriate for us.

These are

but three ideas that will surface but in the spirit of moving from general conversation to specifrc actions, I submit them for consideration'

Comments bv David R. Ford. Vice Provost for Academic Affairs

to the Virginia Tech Review Panel

llay

21,2007

Topic: Emergency Policy Group Process/Action for April 16,2007

Chairman Massengill and Members of the Review Panel,

I am David Ford, and I

ser-ve the

university as Vice Provost for Academic Affairs. One of the

responsibilities I have by virtue of my position is to be a member of the university's Emergency Policy Group. It is in that capacity that I share with you today my account of tlre processes used and actions
taken by the Policy Group related to the shooting incidents in West Ambler Johnston Residence Hall and

in Norris Hall on the moming of Monday, April 16, 2007.

Shortly after 8:00 a.m. on Monday, April 16, I was informed that there had been a shooting in West

Ambler Johnston Hall and that President Steger was assembling the Policy Group immediately. By
approximately 8:30 a.m., I and the other members of the group had arrived at the Bumrss Hall Board
Room and Dr. Steger convened the meeting. I learned subsequently that as he awaited the arrival of other group members, hesident Steger had been in regular communication with the police, had given direction

to have the Governor's offrce notified of the shooting, and had called the head of University Relations to his office to begin planning to activate the emergency communication systems.

When he convened the meeting, President Steger informed the Policy Group that Virginia Tech Police
had received a call at approximately
7

:20 a.m. on

April L6,2007 , to investigate

an incident in a residence

hall room in West Ambler Johnston. Within minutes of the call, Virginia Tech Police and Virginia Tech
Rescue Squad members responded to frnd two gunshot victims, a male and a female, inside a room in the residence hall.

Information continued to be received through frequent telephone conversations with Virginia Tech Police
on the scene. The Policy Group was informed that the residence hall was being secured by Virginia Tech

Police, and students within the hall were notified and asked to remain in their rooms for their safety. We
were further informed that the room containing the gunshot victims was immediately secured for evidence

collection and Virginia Tech Police began questioning hall residents and identifying potential witnesses. In the preliminary stages of the investigation, it appeared to be an isolated incident, possibly domestic in

nature. The Policy Group leamed that Blacksburg Police and Virginia State Police had been notified and were also on the scene.

The Policy Group was fi.rther informed by the police that they were following up on leads concerning a person of interest in relation to the shootings. During this 30 minute period of time between 8:30 and 9 a.m., the Policy Group processed the factual information it had in the context of many questions we asked ourselves. For instance, what information do we release without causing a panic? We leamed from the

Morva incident last August that speculafion and misinformation spread by individuals who do not have
the facts causes panic? Do we confine the information to students in West Ambler Johnston since the

information we had focused on a single incident in that building? Beyond the two gunshot victims found
by police, was there
a

possibility that another person might be involved (i.e. a shooter), and if so, where is

that person, what does that person look like and is that person armed? At that time of the moming, when thousands are in transit, what is the most effective and efficient way to convey the information to all

faculty, staff and students? If we decided to close the campus at that point, what would be the most effective process given the openness of a campus the size of Virginia Tech? How much time do we have until the next class change? And so with the information the Policy Group had, at approximately 9 a.m. we drafted and edited a
communication to be released to the university community via email and to be placed on the university
website. We made the best decision we could based upon the information we had at the time. Shortly

before 9:30 a.m., the Virginia Tech community

-

faculty, staff and students

-

were notified by email as

follows:
,.A shooting incident occurred at West Ambler Johnston earlier this morning. Police are on the scene and
are investigating.

The university community is urged to be cautious and are asked to contact Virginia Tech Police

if you

observe anything suspicious or with information on the case. Contact Virginia Tech Police at23l-6411.

Stay tuned to the www.vt.edu. We

will post

as soon as we have more

information."

The Virginia Tech Emergency/TVeather Line recordings were also fransmitted and a broadcast telephone
message was made to campus phones. The Policy Group remained in session in order to receive

additional updates about the West Ambler Johnston case and to consider further actions

if

appropriate.

At approximately 9:45 a.m., the Policy Group received word from the Virginia Tech Police of a shooting
in Norris Hall. Within five minutes universify community which read: ,.A gunman is loose on campus. Stay in buildings until further notice. Stay away from all windows."
a

notification was issued by the Policy Group and transmitted to the

Also activated was the campus Emergency Alert system. The voice message capability of that system was
used to convey an emergency message throughout the campus. Given the factual information available to

the Policy Group, the reasonable action was to ask people to stay in p1ace. The Policy Group did not have evidence to ensure that a gunman was or was not on the loose, so every precaution had to be taken. The

Virginia Tech campus contains 153 major buildings, 19 miles of public roads, is located on 2,600 acres of
land, and
as many as 35,000

individuals might be found on its grounds at any one time on

a

typical day.

Virginia Tech is very much like a small city. One does not entirely close down a small city or a university
campus.

Additionally, the Policy Group considered that the turiversity schedule has a class change between 9:55
and 10:10 a.m. on a MW.F schedule. To ensure some sense of safety in an open campus environment, the Policy Group decided that keeping people inside existing buildings if they were on campus and away

from campus if they had not yet arrived was the right decision. Again, we made the best decision we
could based on the information available. So at approximately
transmitted which read
:

10: 15 a.m. another message was

.,Virginia Tech has cancelled all classes. Those on campus are asked to remain where they are, lock their
doors, and stay away from windows. Persons offcampus are asked not to come to campus."

At approximately 10:50 a.m., Virginia Tech Police Chief Flinchum and Blacksburg Police Chief Crannis arrived to inform the Policy Group about what they had witnessed in the aftermath of the shootings in
Norris Hall.

Chief Flinchum reported that the scene was bad; very bad. Virginia State Police was handling the crime
scene. Police had one shooter in custody and there was no evidence at the time to confirm or negate a

second shooter. nor was there evidence at the time to link the shootings in West Ambler Johnston to those

in Norris Hall. The police informed the Policy Group that these inifial observations were ongoing investigations.

Based upon this information and acting upon the advice of the police, the Policy Group immediately issued a fourth transmittal which read:

"In addition to an earlier shooting today in West Ambler Johnston, there has been

a

multiple shooting

with multiple victims in Norris Hall. Police and EMS are on the scene. Police have one shooter in custody
and as part of routine police procedure, they continue to search for a second shooter.

A11

people in university buildings are required to stay inside until firrther notice.

All

entrances to campus

are closed."

Information about the Norris Hall shootings continued to come to the Policy Group from the scene. approximately 11:30, the Policy Group issued
website which read:
a planned

At

faculty/staff evacuation via the Virginia Tech

"Faculty and staff located on the Bumrss Hall side of the Drillfield are asked to leave their o{fice and go
home immediately. Faculty and staff located on the War MemoriallEggleston Hall side of the
are asked to leave their ofhces and go home at 12:30 p.m."

Drillfield

At approximat ely 12:l5p.m. the Policy Group released yet another communication via the Virginia Tech
website which further informed people as follows:

"Virginia Tech has closed today Monday, April
cancelied. The university

16, 2007. On Tuesday,

April

17, classes

will be

will remain open for adminishative operations. There will be an additional

university statement presented today at noon.

All

students, faculty and staff are required to stay where they are until police execute a planned

evacuation. A phased closing

will

be in effect today; further information

wili be forthcoming

as soon as

police secure the campus.

Tomorrow there will be

a

university convocation/ceremony at noon at Cassell Coliseum. The Inn at

Virginia Tech has been designated as the site for parents to gather and obtain information."

,".

.

.r

A press conference was held shortly after noon on April 76,2007, and President Charles W. Steger issued
a statement citing

"A tragedy of monumental proportions." Copies of that statement are available on

request.

The Policy Group continued to meet and sfiategically plan for the events to follow. A campus update on the shootings was issued at another press conference at approximately 5 p.m. University employees began

immediately to provide counsel and care for the families of the deceased and injured victims. Before Dr.
Zenobia Lawrence Hikes, Vice President for Student Affairs, briefs you on those ongoing activities, do

you have any questions?

.{+t:r:;*s}*-:-.;

..!,q

a
I

President Steger's remarks Appreciation RecePtion Sept. 10,2007

Ladies and gentlemen, good evening. We are very pleased that you have again come to Virginia Tech, and we are honored by your presence.

while many days and many sleepless nights have passed since April 16th, our minds
continue to reel from the violence, and our hearts still ache for those slain and injured and their families and friends.
I

would now like to ask fior a moment of silence as we remember the 32 members of our

community who were lost that daY. IPAUSEI

Thank you. With the shock and grief we suffered on April 16th, it would have been nearly impossible for this university to have coped without your invaluable assistance' Many organizations and thousands of people responded immediately in our hour of greatest need and in the many days that have followed. Today, we want to recognize and honor you. I believe we have abotjt 400 people here tonight, representing themselves and more than 70 organizations.

while we are very happy to have so many of you with us, there are many more who were
unable to be represented this evening. You will find a full listing in the "Admiration and

that Appreciation" flyer. Looking at that gives you an idea of the size and scope of the support
was offered on behalf of our community.

we are indeed humbled and thankful.

.

..:,.

-.

2
As you can imagine, the events of April 16 continue to consume immense amounts of time, and we are still in active crisis recovery. Yet, we want to recognize your extraordinary

efforts. Please accept our apology that we have not been able to have this event sooner.
In the darkest days of our suffering, we saw the term "Hokie Spirit" take on greater and

deeper meaning.
It is one of a community coming

together- yes, to moum and pour out our collective

grief, but also coming together to help each other. Millions around the world have witnessed and been touched by the Hokie SPirit.
I am honored to work and live among such wonderful people, and I will always remember

your devotion to each other, to this universi$, and to these families. You have my highest respect and deepest appreciation.
I hope that each day, the good that you've done and the healing that you've helped to

bring about will, in turn, bring you a measure of peace and some increment of renewal. Grief counselors

-

some of whom are here this evening and bless them for all the work

they have done to help us heal

-

tell us that when we become overwhelmed with negative

feelings, we should remind ourselves of people and events that are meaningful and encouraging.

we have seen many such people and acts
forever thankful to all of You.

in the past weeks and months, and we are

As people around the globe watched this tragedy unfold, they were amazed as you
repeatedly demonstrated what strong bonds link this community together. Indeed, in their visits here, Governor Tim Kaine and President Bush both noted the incredible strength of the Virginia Tech community. We are truly the Virginia Tech Familv. We are eternally grateful that you voluntarily came to aid and protect us, to mend our wounds

-

emotional as well as physical

-

to provide food to sustain us, and most especially that

you cared enough a.bo.ul us to care for us.
It is truly amazing what willing hearts and hands can do. You are all heroes.

your selfless compassion and conscientious concern was a gift of pure light in the midst
of the dark days and continues to bolster our spirits and resolve.

3
And with your help, we are determined to find the will and the means to recover and begin moving along the long road of healing. As you know, moving on is not the same as

forgetting. We shall not forget. Yet, one horrible burst of violence cannot be allowed to turn us
from our essence.

We are determined to renew our commitment to this community and to rededicate
ourselves to being productive, caring and giving citizens of this great nation and the world. . 'and to show the world once again that We. . .are.

.

Virginia Tech!

It is our hope that you again will join with us, as a community, to seek the paths that lead

to recovery.

We can never adequately repay you for the care, concern and compassion that you have
so generously bestowed upon us. But, on behalf of Virginia Tech and all those touched by the calamities of that terrible day, we offer you our deepest and sincerest thanks and appreciation for your selfless supPort.

Now, we would like to take a few minutes to present to you Certificates of Appreciation. ask Larry Hincker to come forward to read the names of the recipients.

I

end {president Steger moves to right-rear of stage to make presentations. At the

of presentations, President Steger retums to the podium')
Ladies and gentlemen, again we are most honored by your attendance this evening, and
l, from the bottom of my heart, do thank each of you for your assistance and support.

This concludes our formal program but I hope you will stay a while longer, enjoy the refreshments and each other's company. Thank you.

;..,

Comments by Charles W' Steger, President of Virginla Techo

to the Virginia Tech Review Panel
N'4.ry 2L,2007

Introductory Remarks and Overview of Virginia Tech's Presentation

Colonel Massengill and distinguished members of the panel. I am pleased to have this opporhmity to welcome you to the campus of Virginia Tech. During the past week, we have been working with
representatives

ofTri

Data Corporation. to develop our portion of the agenda, which I hope

will be

helpful to you as you pursue this most difficult task. I might note that your visit to our campus coincides

with our first day of summer school. Although our student population over the summer is only about onefourth of what it is during the regular year and our teaching faculty who are on 9-month appointrnents are not here, you can get some sense of the vehicular and pedestrian haffic flow on a tlpical Monday morning at Virginia Tech-as April 16 was before the shootings began.

To begin, I would like to infioduce to the Panel Mr. Lenwood McCoy, who has agreed to serve as the liaison between the university and the Review Panel to ensure that the Panel receives a thorough response to all requests for information. Mr. McCoy retired several years ago after more than 35 years with the university, during which he served in a vaiety of roles, including Director of Intemal Audit and

University Controller. He will ensure that all your requests are met.

As you

will

hear during the presentation, we have devoted our energies over the past month primarily to
as

helping those families who lost their sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, husbands and wives,

well

as the victims who survived. Let me note here that out of respect for these families, the

university

has denied requests by the media and others to enter Norris Hall. We made an exception to enable the

Panel to tour the building this morning because of its relevance to your work. We

will continue to restrict

access until the families who indicate a desire to do so have had an opportunity visit the building. At the

appropriate time, access

will

be provided to the media and other mernbers of the public.

Our presentafion to the Panel today is in four pads:

1.

Existing systems for emergency waming and building security.

2.

What the university knew about Mr. Cho prior to the event. What steps were taken prior to the

incident.

Let me take

a moment here

to explain that disclosure of certain information is complicated by the laws

that relate to what information can and cannot be shared with the public, as weil as what can be shared between various rmits within the university.

As many of you know, the Attomey General's Office serves

as the

university's legal counsel. Ms.

Heidbreder is our University Legal Corlnsel and a Special Assistant Attomey General. As such, she is
charged with providing me legal advice on behalf of the Attomey General. We

will provide all

information we can within the law.

3.

What hanspired in the Emergency Policy Group when advised of the first shootings in West Ambler

Johnston Ha11 and immediately thereafter.

4.

lwhat is being done for support and healing of the families as well

as the broader

rmiversity

communltv.

In addition to the Emergorcy Policy Group, there is also an Emergency Response Resource Group' which
works in parallel to ensure necessary resources are deployed to whatever goup or part of the university is in need. They were able to respond in hours, and in some cases minutes, to provide counseling, meals for
the 500 increased security personnel, etc. We

will provide

some detail as to what has been done later this
a

morning. I have also appointed a task force to provide to me by the end of this month

recommendation

for an interim memorial that can be put in place in a short time. Subsequently,
memorial will be developed.

a proposal

for

a permanent

As we work to recover from the evants of

April

16, we also want to leam from them, Two After-Incident

Reports are being developed for each of the shooting incidents. And as noted in my comments to you in

Richmond last Thursday, we have established three working groups that will focus on: 1) telecommunications; 2) security infrastructure- locking systems, alarms, etc.; and 3) the interface between
counseling services, judicial affairs, academic affairs, and the legal system.

This is being said to note that what we will share with you today is what we know to the best of our knowledge at this point in time, but as our own intemal review and examination continues, other facts

may come to light. Therefore, what we offer today is preliminary in nature and might be revised based on
the emergence of additional information. We becomes available.

wiil certainly

keep you apprised as additional information

That concludes my introductory remarks, and I would be pleased to answer any questions the Panel might
have.

If there

are no (further) questions, I would

like to call upon Mr. Jim McCoy, from our Office of Capital

Design and Construction, to provide an overview of the systems in place.

.

__

il

drqL F4A

Virginia Tech Review Commission Meeting May 10,2007
Notes

Overview of SPC/TriData Support-Philip Schaennan
Process

will include face-to-face interviews, literature review,

and public comments

through the website, letters, and calls. Panel Members; Biographies and Initial Thoughts Expressed During Meeting

Dr. Marcus L. Martin Dr. Marcus L. Martin is the Assistant Dean for the School of Medicine at the University of Virginia. He is also a professor in the Depadment of Emergency Medicine. Martin previously served as the Chairman for the Health System at the University of Virginia, Departnent of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Martin is interested in the response time of emergency medical services as well as patient care on the scene, during transport, and in the hospitals. He mentioned that one student had died during transport to the hospital. He wants to know more about the psychological services available to CHO, students at Virginia Tech, as well as institutions statewide. He thinks the Commission may make recommendations on the involuntary commitment process. He wants to know what type of training we had in dealing with mass casualties and whether or not their was an incident command center established. He wants the EMS after action report and to know whether or not the scene was safe. In regards to gun laws, he is interested in learning about semi-automatic weapons and the access to so much ammunition. He questioned how you "lock down" an institutionmaybe with a siren to tell people there is an emergency and to look to communication soruces for more inforrnation. He thinks the Arlington County after action report after 9/l I might be useful for the Commission.
Dr. Aradhana A. "Bela" Sood Aradhana A. "Bela" Sood, M.D., FAACAP is Chair of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Virginia Treabnent Center for Children at VCU Medical Center.

Dr. Bela Sood believes she can bring neutality of opinion. She recognized that what happened could have occurred anywhere.. .i.e. Mall, sporting event, etc. She is interested in the tension between public safety and the mental health system, commitnent laws, and access to treatrnent.

Dr. Roger L. Depue
Roger L. Depue, Ph. D., has over 20 years experience at the FBI, most recently as Administrator at the FBI National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime. Depue is the founder, past president and CEO ofThe Academy Group, Inc., a forensic behavioral sciences services business for consultation, research, training, and investigation of aberrant and violent behavioral problems.

Dr. Depue does not want the Commission to rush to judgment because he thinks law enforcement responded the best way they could with the information they had. He suggested that training of students and faculty on how to handle these types of situations might be necessary. He also mentioned the need for early warning systems in order to better identiff people who have mental illness and provide ways to intervene. He wants to look at our crisis management plan.
Gordon Davies Gordon Davies served as Director for the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia

for20years (1977-1997).HepreviouslyservedasPresidentoftheKentuckyCouncilon Postsecondary Education (1998-2002), and recently directed a project to improve state higher education policy making. Mr. Davies reminded the Commission that the university is a free space and that this will be important to consider moving forward. Canoll Ann Ellis Canoll Ann Ellis is Director of the Fairfax County Police Department's Victim Services Division, and frequently provides communities with training and technical assistance on the impact of homicide on family members. Ellis serves as a faculty member at the FBI's National Academy, the National Victim Assistance Academy, and Northern Virginia Community College.
Ms. Ellis wants to know how the death notices were delivered and what type of training these individuals had in this area. She asked ifthe localjurisdictions were contacted to provide services to the families and what type of support in being planned for when students retum. She mentioned the need for local community support as well as the importance of continuity of services in the local communities providing support to the families of the victims. Even though there will not be a trial, justice will be important to the victim's families. Ms. Ellis wants to make sure they have a voice. She does not think people really understand tauma and its' impact. She also asked about the care and treatment of law enforcement offtcers.

The Honorable Diane

Stickland

The Honorable Diane M. Strickland served as a judge of the 23rd Judicial Circuit Court in Roanoke County and the cities ofRoanoke and Salem between 1989 and 2003. Prior to that, she served two years as a General District Court judge. After l5 years on the bench, Judge Strickland now works for The McGammon Group, a leading mediation and

arbitation firm. Recently, she co-chaired a two-year study by the Boyd-Graves Conference on issues surrounding involuntary mental commitrnent.
Judge Strickland is interested in the relationship and communication between the mental health system and the courts.

Govemor Tom Ridge

Tom Ridge served as the first U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security (2003-2005). He previously served as Govemor of Pennsylvania(1995-2001) and a member of the U.S. House ofRepresentatives (1983-1995). He currently consults on a variety ofnational and international issues.
Govemor Ridge wants to reduce the risk of this happening again. What other ways are there to detect problems with students?

Next Meetings: May 2l-Blacksburg June I l-Northem Virginia July I 8-Charlottesville

Major Kemmler from the State Police provided an extension overview of the process for purchasing a firearm in Virginia.
Public Comments:

A representative from the Virginia Center for Public Safety wants the Commission to look at the loopholes in Virginia's gun laws where guns can be purchased with no background checks. She believes that it is too easy to get a gun in the Commonwealth.
A woman who had been in New York during 9/l I told the Commission that they needed to think broadly about impact of trauma. She emphasized that campuses needed to be safe for students but also for faculty, visitors, continuing education students etc. She brought up the need to look at HIPPA which allowed parents to be involved in their children's healthcare. She also mentioned the need to include clergy in the discussion as well as youth. She asked for a public awareness campaign so more people could participate in the public hearings.

A man representing some PAC spoke about the effects of video games, in particular, Counterstrike. He mentioned a V/ashington Post article that appeared the day after the shootings which quoted some of Cho's high school acquaintances talking about his interest in this game which is very violent. He referenced work being done at Iowa State University and that these types of games should be banned.

A representative from the Virginia Citizens Defense League mentioned the guns on campus bill. He said the higher education community "laughed" at them saying that students felt safe on campus. He wanted the Commission to look into the matter of
allowing students and faculty to carry guns on campus'
The last person who spoke during the public comment period was a cameraman from PBS who said that kids don't have any choices. He wanted to know where was God and Iove.

April22,2007

Our University has suffered a tragic event of monumental, unforeseeable, and unimaginable proportions. Our sorrow is limitless. Our hearts ache for the families of those lost innocents. lndeed, they are our family. We reach out and pray for our students and colleagues still recovering and we pray for a speedy return to the campus. As we understand the depth of our losses and process our grief, there are also countless questions and the concerns of so many involved. lf we are not to be defined by this event, we musi, with the utmost sincerity, analyze; and then together with the world learn from our experiences understanding becomes wisdom, and from wisdom becomes again, a bright future. We fully expect the official commissions own intemal comprehensive review to yield answers to benefit Virginia Tech and society at large. These findings will begin the difficult endeavor to understand this tragic event.

At this point and time, it is too premature to draw conclusions. The quest for answers must come
from a thoughtful analysis of so many roles, communications, procedures, privacy issues. We ask that our colleagues in the university refrain from public discussion until we have all the facts. During this review process, our focus will be on our students, and the University community at large. We have a noble vocation and sacred trust for those we were responsible to serve. Our responsibilities are manifested in doing what we do best. We are Virginia Tech. We are immersed in a special sphere of leaming, discovery and engagement. This is what defines us. This is what drives our spirit. This is what drives our quest for knowledge, to understand ourselves and the world around us and to make this planet a befter place, Indeed, if there is one thing that sets us apart from other distinguished top research universities, it is our sense of family, Last week proved that. Call it a Hokie Spirit - call it a deep sense of caring- call it a love for one another'
It is important that we tell the world our

story,

We have seen the world respond to our spirit with countless expressions - large and small--a worldwide moment of silence at noon April 20ttt or an impromptu student memorial - Hokie Stones on the Drillfield. Donning the orange and maroon in all corners of the glove begins to memoralize the legacy of our lost Virginia Tech family members. Now is the time to being the healing process, Virginia Tech will not be defined by this event. As so eloquently delivered at the convocation, "we will prevail." With these and so many other expressions, we not only leave a legacy; we start fresh today, because we are Vtrginia Tech. Larrv Hincker

Post "POOL" Interview Svnopsis
At 3r00pm on Aprii 23,2AA7 we heid a "pooi" interview. This inciudeci a panei of 3 Faculty and 1 counselor from Virginia Tech as well as 4 Student leaders.
This panel was interviewed by 3 organizations:
L

Radio:NPR
Print media:AP

2. Television: NBC

The central theme of the event WaS, "The first day back to class, here We are". The team we selected to represent Virginia Tech was incredible. They followed the coaching session instructions beyond excellent. Time after time they refened back to our 3 major frames for this engagement:
1.

We will not be defined by this event. lt is something that happened to us' lt is not who we are. They said this numerous times, frequently in their own words and their own way, as instructed. They constantly talked about the history and tradition of Virginia Tech. They constantly and with awed reverence, honored and showed respect for those affected by this tragic event.

z. All showed respect to the history and tradition, spoke boldly of the future and understood who we really are what we really represent.

The most powerful message they sent was their commitment to the Virginia Tech family and community at every level.
lf we had scripted this entire event, we could not have done a better job than these folks did, spontaneously. One of the professors, who did not participate, made a comment that if we got our participants from central casting, we would not have had better players. Both from a style standpoint and a content standpoint, they were phenomenal.

'

f, lJ- ). VaaP | l/'lwr"
|

Discussion
1. whv
are we here?

Agenda

O/- trr I rr

.t/'" Y

l'HY L /

w,

*ffi

to help you understand the

nature of the relationship we will have with the media and how to best serve this situation.

2. WHAT ARE WE DOING ... 3. Approach and Tone a, Honest b. Inteqritv

c, Ernestness
d. 4.
a.
Real

3 Key Messaqes
We will not be defined by this event. This is something that happened to us, lt is not who we are

i, 0ur Principles
ii,
iii. b.
may serve

of Community remain our values

Tradition, community, history, the future, will prevail, Ut Prosim

-

That

I

Everything we do in the future will commemorate, honor and respect

those individuals most affected by this tragic event.
lnvent the Future WHO WE ARE!

-

WORLD RENOWNED RESEARCH INSTITUTE Hokies

do and always will embody learning, discovery and engagement, THAT lS

c. Embrace the Virginia Tech Family i. We are a unique, special family, more enduring and closer to another
than a typical community.

ii,

Assisting families and friends of those injured and bereaved is our focus.

5.

Potential lssues

a. b.

Family lssues

Time lines

c. Cho issues and questions d, Details on what happened
e.
Family issues/lawsuits, etc.

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