a rough guide to

door-knocking
on climate
JUNE 2010

a rough guide to

door-knocking
on climate

“The weekend before last, I door-knocked with others in Newtown. It was the best thing I have done on climate for ages… I started the day with a great deal of trepidation (my biggest fear was about not wanting align our movement with evangelical modes of building participation)… I walked away wanting to door-knock my whole suburb… and maybe I will.” — Jenny Curtis, Balmain–Rozelle Climate Action Group, June 2010

Why door-knock?
Door knocking is easy, fun and one of the most effective ways of getting our message into the community and having an impact.
Research by the union movements “your rights at work” campaign established that door-knocking was a key factor in shifting public opinion and was the best tool used by the campaign. It is important to understand the primary purpose of door-knocking. In one word, it is to change the “vibe” of the electorate.Getting someone’s email for climate action groups contact lists, or their involvement in a forthcoming event or forum is useful, but it is the icing on the cake. What do we mean by the “vibe”? We know from marketing research and other campaigns that the more we can get a single idea or meme circulating and repeated, the more it will shift or sway opinion. Recently the term “internet meme” has been termed to describe “a catchphrase or concept that spreads rapidly from person to person via the Internet, largely through Internet-based email, blogs, forums, social networking sites and instant messaging”. Door-knocking is another means of spreading the catchphrase. A recent example of a meme is the way the term “backflip”, which was first applied to Kevin Rudd’s decision to drop the CPRS, rapidly became a (derogatory) description of his general political mode. In the Replace Hazelwood campaign, two key ideas we wanted to get through were that: • “Kevin Rudd has backflipped on climate change” and • “the government needs to replace Hazelwood”.

about this guide

This rough guide was prepared by Damien Lawson and David Spratt for the Victorian Climate Action Centre. The case study example used in these notes is the Replace Hazelwood door-knocking campaign conducted by a number of climate action groups in association with the Climate Action Centre in Melbourne’s inner-north from May 2010 onwards, in the leadup to both State and federal elections in late 2010. The areas covered are now marginal Labor–Greens seats. The specific scripts and messages of course depend on the specific circumstances and locations. Our special thanks go to Climate Action Moreland and its members and volunteers who participated in and co-organised the first door-knocks in Brunswick during April and May 2010. The experience and feedback from the 40 volunteers was important in developing some of the methods discussed in this guide.

a rough guide to door-knocking for climate action

3

So in talking to people, these ideas were connected as: “In this election year we are talking to people about the need to replace Hazelwood Power station, Australia’s dirtiest power station, with clean energy. This is more important than ever because Kevin Rudd has backflipped on strong action on climate.” So just by knocking on people’s door and saying those key phrases and leaving a leaflet, the main job is already done. Understanding this should give people confidence that anyone can doorknock, because the main job is not to convince people of a complicated proposition, but to get the meme in their heads. Even if they disagree and leave the door and go back to the kitchen and say “some idiot about that power-station Hazlewood”, the door-knocking has been successful because the idea is circulating. So you don’t need to know everything about climate change or the specific issue or be an eloquent and convincing person to be an effective door-knocker, you just need to give it a go and you will have been sucessful..

so what’s the topic?
The purpose of door-knocking is NOT to give people a big, long download on an issue. Most won’t listen for that long, and won’t remember most of what you said. Generally they will leave the conversation with two or three phrases in their head. In the Replace Hazelwood campaign they were “dirty coal ... Hazelwood ... replace ... clean energy... government must act.. not backflip”. This can be backed-up by a flyer with some more information, an action people can take (make a phone call to a politician, join a facebook group, visit a website etc), details about the local climate action group and/or information about a forthcoming local climate event or forum. A petition (Appendix 1) is useful because it is simple action that residents can take on the spot (and some will sign thinking its the quickest way to finish the conversation), and it also provides an effective way for people to opt in and supply email or other contact details to build the local climate group’s communications circle. For door-knocking to be effective, it is important to highlight a specific action that people can understand and think is (probably) feasible. So it is better, for example, to talk about replacing Hazelwood than just say “close down all coal” because the latter has no specific target, and most people won’t believe that all coal can be closed down at once. If most people feel that what you are saying is not practical/possible, and you cannot in a straight-forward manner give them reasons to believe that it is, then the effort is wasted. Another way of thinking about are the so called SMART objectives used in strategic campaign planning and project management - SMART stands for Specfic, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-Bound. Similarly whilst a door-knocking campaign might wish to highlight the need, for example, for 100% renewable energy, it will get a better grip both on residents and on the local politicians if the specific message is about a particular policy action. The meme is less about an idea (information) than an outcome (action) for which sufficient community concern can be expressed or mobilised for the local political representatives to fear about their future if they ignore it. This is why we have also talked about Hazelwood being a “key election test”. It is also hard to talk about actions which are complicated in operation or terminology. That was one part of the problem with the CPRS. Establishing what is relevant to a local area depends on local knowledge and talking to local community activists and leaders, but can also be informed by: • recent polling • focus-group research, particularly on what language and images are most effective • research about communications and framing of ideas around climate.

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recruiting volunteers
It is good to advertise in advance two or three different days and times when door-knocking will happen. It helps recruit people who may be busy on one day, but not another. Explain that no previous experience is necessary, training will be provided, and that most people find it a rewarding and engaging experience. Ask people for a commitment of three hours (half an hour training, two hours door-knocking, and quick de-brief/ feedback afterwards). Tell people what to bring, depending on weather (hats, sunscreen etc). Water is a must because a lot of talking leaves throats parched and a snack to keep going such as a chocolate or museli bar. Clearly communicate the starting location, time and day, and confirm with an RSVP, text message or phone calls if necessary. If people enjoy the experience, see if they are willing to make a regular commitment for another couple of sessions, perhaps a month apart.

where and when to door-knock
If door-knocking in a pre-election period, try and do areas that others haven’t. If you are working an area where attitudes towards climate vary widely, it may be good to start with a more sympathetic area, so that people who haven’t previously door-knocked have a positive experience first up. Booth results from the last election are a useful guide. We recommend door-knocking in pairs, taking opposite sides of the same street or alternate houses if only doing one side. It provides support, encouragement and feedback. In pairs, an area of about 100 houses is about enough for two people for two hours. If half the people are home, that means about 25 conversations each.

vote ‘em where it hurts
It is easy to have an aversion to elections. They are stage managed, dominated by the big parties and often bring out the worst in our leaders and community. But they are also an opportunity to be heard, because peoples’ eyes and ears are more open in an election year. More importantly, they are an opportunity to exert our power as a movement by causing the government pain, especially if we are able to make climate the issue in knife-edge seats such that a Minister or backbencher could be turfed out because they failed to listen to what the climate movement was advocating. This would create a large number of parliamentarians very quickly becoming advocates for movement policies inside the government, because they fear this would happen to them. Doing this is not easy, but it is possible. It requires organisation, a commitment to prioritising certain seats, and identifying one or two election messages on which to campaign in the community. And it requires door-knocking. There is now a lot of discussion about community organising in the movement and this is a good thing. We have even started to do door-knocking in some of our communities. We need to grow this commitment, learn from each other and implement it in the election lead-up. We also need to commit to continuing it well past the election year. Let’s starting planning next year’s national climate door-knock day now. From: “10 lessons for the climate movement (redux)” by Damien Lawson, in Talk Climate, published for the second Australian Climate Action Summit, Canberra, March 2010.

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Check out the great video about doorknocking in Brunswick with Climate Action Moreland, made by The Vagabond. If doorknocking in pairs, exchange mobile numbers… just in case. And have a break half way through to give the feet and voice a rest. Google maps are a good way to prepare maps. Print maps in street view and clearly mark areas for each pair of door-knockers. Do not put boundaries down middle of streets, but include both sides of street to avoid confusion. If necessary leave a little space between areas — the worst thing that can happen is two different volunteers doorknocking the same house (Appendix 3). In Google maps, satellite view is an easy way to roughly count rooftops, and also to identify areas which are full of shops, industry or institutions such as schools and nursing homes. From our experience afternnoons are best and especially Saturdays and Sundays, but early during the week could work, especially during daylight saving. It is important to avoid: • dinner times • door-knocking in the dark • getting people out of bed on weekends

training/de-brief/feedback
Try and find a spot (community centre, house etc) for half-an-hour’s training in the middle of the area to be doorknocked, so that people then don’t have to walk too far to their block/s. We have also done training in playgrounds or a park for smaller groups, but it can be less comfortable. The training should briefly: • outline the purpose of establishing a “vibe” and that everyone can do it • go through the script and the materials being used such as flyers, petitions or questionnaires • briefly discuss likely questions (including privacy issues concerning petitions and personal contact details), and • “how to doorknock” (section below) • a brief role-play to familiarise people with the script is good. It may be useful, based on previous experience, to give people a written Frequently Asked Questions. After the door-knocking, arrange for everybody to assemble at one place (either training location or nearby cafe/

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6

pub, etc) to return materials, take five minutes to fill in a feedback form (see sample Appendix 4) and debrief. If time permits, talking through the afternoon’s events and what people have learned is rewarding. And celebrate your efforts!

the materials
Door knocking materials will generally include: • clipboard. Tie the pen to clipboard with string and supply a spare pen. Put a large sticker of the climate group’s name (and possibly a relevant photo of a dirty coal facility or a clean renewables image) on the back of the clipboard (see photo om page 9). Holding the clipboard to your chest so the back is visible to the householder as you knock is an effective way of describing who you are, and save time and words. • a flyer to hand over (Appendix 2). • a petition or questionnaire. • one copy of the script, the map, and a feedback form (Appendix 3) to be completed at the end of the session. It is important to try and record key elements of verbal feedback and analyse the written feedback, as both are very effective in improving the process for the next time.

the key message/flyer
It is important to understand that the general public is rarely aware of the detail and complexity of any issue. It is also important to recognise that words work emotionally as well as convening facts and information. In other words “it is not what you say, but what they hear” that is important. So using simple words that match with peoples values as well as conveying the problem and solution in factual terms will be the most effective. To use the “replace Hazelwood with clean energy” message as an example. The message is deceptively simple but communicating a lot. Firstly, “replace” communicates that we want Hazelwood to close, but also that we have a solution. It is positive and speaks to peoples values of progress and renewal. It also has a collateral advantage in that it helps counter some of the government’s negative messages around “loss of jobs” and “lights going out” if Hazelwood is to close. Secondly, “clean energy”. Again “clean” speaks to peoples values. Everyone wants things to be clean: clean house, clean room, clean bathroom, etc etc. It also implies safety and security from dangerous substances. By saying clean we are also labeling Hazelwood as dirty without even having to say the word. Energy is also important again it speaks to values. Energy is a postive word: “they are full of energy”, “I have a lot of energy at the moment” and so on. It is also a simpler word than “electricty”. Why not just say renewables? Renewables is a longer and complicated word and does not operate emotionally or speak to peoples values. When we say clean energy 99 out of 100 people think of solar, wind and other renewables any way. Try it. Ask a family member or friend what is the first thing that pops into their mind when you say the words “clean energy”? It will be something to do with renewables and we bet it won’t be “clean coal” either. The coal industry has dropped the phrase “clean coal” because it doesn’t work. People don’t believe it, it grates and it just comes across as spin. That is why they are talking about “newgen coal”, trying to tap into values of progress and renewal. So think hard about what words to use when constructing a message and remember a message is different to a position or policy, it is about trying to convey and communicate a policy with “words that work”.

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the script
Volunteers should be provided a script, and training should include role-play which allows them to practice and adapt the script to their needs. Whilst not formally in the script, some people find it helpful early on to say “I am not selling anything” (to distinguish from all the door-to-door utility salespeople) and that often produces a more friendly response. A sample script for Replace Hazelwood was: Hello, I’m..... , a volunteer from the local climate community group ...... Kevin Rudd has backflipped on climate change, so we are out campaigning before the election. We are talking to residents about our campaign to have Victoria’s dirtiest coal power station at Hazelwood closed down and replaced with clean renewable energy. We have some information on why Hazelwood should be replaced (hand over flyer), and wondered if you would be interested in signing our petition to replace dirty coal with clean energy in Victoria? We will also be meeting with the local candidates and can keep you up-to-date with our monthly email newsletter if you wish to provide your email address. Thank you for your time It is important that people understand they don’t have to stick exactly to the script, but rather communicate the essence of the script. So they should read it through a few times and then say it in their own words. It is important they try and speak to people directly, and not just read it out. If they have difficultly they can review the script between houses to remind themselves. Reinforce it is about the vibe and the meaning, not the specific words.

how to door-knock
Knock on the door then stand well back, a metre or so. You don’t want people opening the door with you right in their face. Standing back also invites them out, and ensures they can’t just speak through a crack in the door. It also helps to do a friendly knock, with a rhythm rather than an aggressive, bang-bang police at the door. If there is no answer, try once again, but no more: there are plenty more houses to do. Smile and perhaps stand to one side on the angle, with a friendly, open stance. If you have a clipboard with a sticker identifying the group, have that showing. Say hello, and start with your script. In some circumstances you can even start by saying “I am not selling anything”, particularly if people have an unhappy look. Don’t worry, you will never get anyone shouting at you or being aggressive when you doorknock. Not everyone will want to talk, but people will not tell you to go away; they will just say no thanks and shut the door. Here are five of the most likely situations that will occur when you knock. 1. Not a home. At about 40–50% of the doors you knock on there will be no one at home. Leave a leaflet under the door or letterbox. Make sure you push the leaflet all the way under, some people worry that a leaflet sticking out tells the world they are not at home.

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2. Answer, but busy. Up to 20% of people will be busy (kids, on phone, rushing to get ready etc.). That’s OK, there will still be time to get in the key message and give them a leaflet. Sometimes they will even sign the petition etc. just to get moving, but be gentle and don’t take up their time. 3. Interested and more time. Up to 15-20% of people will give you time to go through your script and want to know more and ask some questions. Some of these will be very interested and are potential recruits for further action. 4. Non-English speaking. Depending on your area there may be many people from CALD communities. This may prevent you from communicating your main messages, but always try and leave a flyer. A friend or family member will often translate for them later. 5. Lonely and up for a chat. Sadly many in our community have few social networks and avenues of support. Some people will use your visit as an opportunity for a chat, depending on your time you will need to try and minimise getting stuck. The critcial thing to remember is to try and balance between quantity and quality in your doorknocking. You want to maximise the number of houses you do, but have enough time for talking and building relationships with the

are they listening?
There is now a vast array of communications, messages and stories being told about climate change, often in contradictory and complicated ways. But the history of social movements, advertising and modern political communications teaches us that what gets through to the population at large is much more limited. We need some simple messages that correspond with our goals, and that we repeat ad nauseam, if we are to have an effect on public opinion. To paraphrase Frank Luntz, the conservative pollster who coined the phrase “climate change” as a way of countering the frame of “global warming”, it is about repetition, repetition, repetition. As a movement we are yet to agree on a common language that can win over the public, but we do know some of things that work and that could be adopted. So let’s start a conversation about how to have the climate conversation. We should listen to the eNGOs, Get Up and others that have done focus-group work and we should try and agree on some things to repeat over and over. My favourite mantra is “We can Repower Australia with clean, safe and reliable energy”. We know this language works because the polling and focus groups say so, and this is why the government uses some of the language. But we need to do more than just reinforce this framing by connecting it to messages/ actions that bite the government and forces them to do more. For example, “We can Repower Australia with clean, safe and reliable energy… That’s why the federal and State government should commit to replacing Hazelwood power station by 2012”. Regardless of the specific message, the point is we should agree on some language and try and repeat it movement-wide. One of our biggest communication and strategic failures as a movement has been to allow climate change to be seen as an environment issue. This has been reinforced by messages about saving beautiful places like the Great Barrier Reef. We need to change our communication strategy. The key is to talk about real, concrete impacts on people in Australia, like the Black Saturday bush fires. Sea level rises, floods and the drought are all key areas to explore because of their social and economic impacts and their tangible effects now and in the near future. From “10 lessons for the climate movement (redux)” by Damien Lawson, in Talk Climate, published for the second Australian Climate Action Summit, Canberra March 2010.

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9

Climate Action Moreland volunteers launch the 100% renewables campaign at the start of a door-knocking afternoon.

people who show a high level of interest. To do this effectively you need to minimise time with people who are not. Don’t spend time trying to convince someone who is a hard core climate sceptic: their views are not likely to be shifted anyway. Time spent with them means you are not finding the interested people.

doorknocking flats/apartments
Doorknocking flats or apartments can be difficult as they often have security doors downstairs. In large blocks it may be possible to get in and try. It will depend on the nature of the block, but some people may be concerned about your knocking on their door directly. Often you will need to just try, see how it goes and be prepared to move on. In small blocks you can buzz and explain what you are doing over the intercom.

surveying the electorate
Some climate groups have been experimenting with surveying their electorate using the survey from the 100% Renewables campaign. A survey can be a useful way to enage with the community and identify people for further enegagement and follow-up. However, unless a survey contains key questions about campaign asks it can fail to build a specific campaign and not help shift community opinion decisively. Surveying the electorate can also be a useful media strategy with the results being made made public “80% of

a rough guide to door-knocking for climate action Smithville residents think this” (Appendix 5). One participant in a survey door-knock described it this way:

10

I walked away from each house feeling a growing sense of satisfaction because through our survey we had helped people have a voice and engage with the issue. The survey that we asked them to participate in was all around transition to renewables and whether they thought the government was doing enough ... We recorded their own words on how they feel about this and let them know that these sentiments will be passed on to their Federal incumbent and candidates before the election... through us they had the opportunity to communicate how they feel to their MPs. It was fantastic. They have now sent the info gathered to Federal Member Anthony Albanese, who presumably is having to have a bit of a think about things… We know he’s getting a little alarmed. In the end whether we use surveys, petitions, leaflets or other information tools will depend on the strategy, goals and timeline of a campaign. In any case, there is a story about what you are doing which will often be of interest to local media (Appendix 6). The crucial factor is the direct community engagement through one-on-one community campaigning that can start to shift the public in favour on our issues.

feedback
This guide will be updated. Comments and suggestions welcome. Victorian Climate Action Centre email: info@climateactioncentre.org phone: +61 3 9639 3660 or 0419 253 342 web: http://www.climateactioncentre.org

Appendix 1

We call on John Brumby and Kevin Rudd to make an election commitment to replace Hazelwood power station - Australia’s dirtiest - with clean energy.
Optional contact information - not part of the petition form and will not be submitted as part of the petition.

PETITION
Stay in touch
(please print clearly) Contact phone number and email address:

First name Address

Surname Signature
email ph._ _

Sample petition

________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________
___ ___ _______

--------------------------------------________________________________________________________
_ ______ _______
We will only use this information to keep you informed about our campaigns. We will not give your details to a third party.

a rough guide to door-knocking for climate action

Return all completed petition forms to:

11

Appendix 2

Sample Flyer

a rough guide to door-knocking for climate action

12

IN THIS ELECTION YEAR

t T

lwood is sited. e Valley, where Haze in the La TrobBush fires, floods, sea-level rises and drought — climate change is already harming also keep jobs fe and reliable. to clean energy can now and is clean, sa us all and will get rapidly worse,and water, unless we take urgent action. nology is available The tech pollution and save mes to cut carbon far our governments have not done enough and carbon pollution is increasing. But so we can in our ho We are doing what ust do its part. tm deral for the State and fe now the governmen ps is campaigning power community grou replace Hazelwood A broad coalition of mitment this year to Victoria’s brown-coal emissions have increased 10% in the last 10 years. ake an election com governments to m Replacing coal with clean energy is the key to solving the climate problem. by 2012. ergy this year. station with clean en l political parties Hazelwood power station is an industrial dinosaur and the dirtiest coal-fired Victoria’s st for al be a key election te This will power station in Australia, producing almost 15% of Victoria’s carbon pollution and using a lot of water. y in the media and Hazelwood stor munity, telling the Hazelwood was due toin this in mpaign. instead the state Labor government extendg in the com can jo close ca2005, but We will be organisin ent. We hope you obtain this commitm ed its life past 2030. However r children of Hazelwood have recently said it could be s to ou the owners lobbying politician d a safer future for ore secure water an closed much sooneran the State and12”: if by 20 federal governments were willing to act. t cleaner air, m d with cle energy Together we can ge “Replace Hazelwoo Please join us to and grandchildren. ndidates where they

Together we can replace Australia’s dirtiest power station…
The problem

W n

A g s

T

I

W l

T a

B

1

2

a t s

It’s time

3

• o K

1

.

on 9328 4637 and Pike MP and most nThe best (Labor) effective first step towards reducing cutting Victoria’s carbon d test. Ring Bronwy pollution is to replace with them. with clean energy alternatives – such as oo et stand on the Hazelw aps organise to me Hazelwood 020 967, and perh (Greens) on 0411 investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy like solar and wind. A shift Brian Walters 3002 or john. e, East Melbourne by (Parliament Hous Brum nberra 2600) arliament House, Ca Write or email John and Kevin Rudd (P promises to nt.vic.gov.au) u don’t want empty brumby@parliame clean energy. Say yo th wer lace Hazelwood wi stralia’s dirtiest po and ask them to rep action to replace Au a real timetable for ing but ndred emails. tackle global warm letter is worth a hu mber a handwritten station. Reme st Climate

Asking your local

member of

The solution parliament and ca

2

…with clean energy
we

R s V F V

d

3 Change Commun

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inc3.info mmunity at: www. Climate Change Co rthwest nesday 2 June at • contact Inner No eeting 6:30pm, Wed inc3.info Next m gton. or email: contact@ cken Street, Kensin d House, 89 McCra ourhoo elwood-action Kensington Neighb ontent/replace-haz

North ts with INC3 (Inner or join coming even rth Melbourne, Flemington) Contact ity: Kensington, No

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ictoria.org.au/c : www.environmentv 9042414498 • sign online letter e-Hazelwood/10955 k.com/pages/Replac oo k page: www.faceb • join our faceboo gy by 2012 is d with clean ener Replace Hazelwoo Environment Climate Action Now, ted by INC3, Yarra suppor and Energy of the Earth, Morel eenpeace, Friends Victoria, Gr y Association and ernative Technolog Foundation Ltd, Alt tion Centre. Victorian Climate Ac

Appendix 3

Sample Map

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13

Colour in one area for each team so there is no confusion

Leave clear space between areas to avoid overlap or door-knocking twice

Show location for training and feedback/ debrief

Instruct volunteers to door-knock both sides of all streets in their area

Make sure the doorknocking co-ordinator’s mobile number is on the map

Appendix 4
Date Name Streets covered

Sample Feedback form

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14

CAM Doorknocking FEEDBACK FROM DOORKNOCKERS

What proportion/% of doors were answered What issues were commonly raised?

What were the issues/questions that you have difficulty answering?

Best/worst experiences

Your experience: Lessons for future doorknocking

Please return to David Spratt, 23 Willowbank Rd, North Fitzroy 3068. 0417070099

Appendix 5

MEDIA RELEASE 1

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15

Media Release: 85% of Newtown residents say government needs to do more on climate
June
7
2010
 Members
and
supporters
of
Climate
Action
Newtown
fanned
out
across
Newtown
on
world
environment
 day
last
Saturday
door‐knocking
the
community
to
put
climate
change
back
on
the
agenda
in
the
lead
up
to
 the
federal
election.
 Inner‐city
seats
like
Grayndler
are
now
marginal
Labor‐Green
and
the
sitting
members
and
candidates
know
 that
the
climate
vote
can
determine
the
outcome
on
election
day.
 
“The
Federal
government
has
walked
away
from
what
Rudd
himself
declared
as
the
greatest
moral
issue
of
 our
time
‐
climate
change
‐
recently
dumping
the
carbon
trading
scheme
and
offering
very
little
in
its
 place",
member
of
Climate
Action
Newtown
and
doorknocking
organiser,
Lydia
Andrews
said.
 The
doorknocking
team
of
15
visited
more
than
500
households
in
the
Grayndler
electorate.

Over
100
 residents
were
surveyed
about
renewable
energy
and
climate
change
and
asked
to
express
their
concerns
 to
their
local
candidates
on
camera
for
a
short
voxpop
youtube.com
piece.
 
“85%
of
residents,
without
hesitation,
said
that
the
Rudd
Government
is
not
doing
enough
to
tackle
 climate
change”
said
Lydia
“and
92%
of
people
believe
the
government
should
significantly
boost
 investment
and
create
clean
energy
jobs
by
developing
a
plan
to
move
to
100%
renewable
energy”.

 “Residents
overwhelmingly
said
they
would
support
candidates
in
the
election
who
were
committed
to
 strong
climate
action.
95%
of
voters
undecided
about
how
they
would
vote
said
they
were
more
or
much
 more
likely
to
vote
for
a
candidate
who
committed
to
a
price
on
carbon
and
investment
in
renewable
 energy”
said
Lydia.

 
“It
was
great
to
hear
such
community
support
for
strong
action”
said
Ingrid
Dernee,
first
time
doorknocker.
 “I
was
really
nervous
about
knocking
on
people’s
doors
but
this
is
such
an
important
issue
to
me
that
I
was
 willing
to
put
my
nerves
behind
me.
I
ended
up
really
enjoying
listening
to
what
people
in
my
community
 think.”
 “I
want
to
urge
other
residents
to
make
their
voices
heard
in
the
lead
up
to
the
federal
election,
by
 contacting
their
local
candidates
and
letting
them
know
we
want
real
climate
solutions”
said
Ingrid.
 
“An
urgent
transition
to
renewable
energy
is
possible.
All
we
need
now
is
our
leaders
to
share
the
 community’s
vision
for
a
clean
energy
future”.
 Door
knocking
and
letter‐boxing
will
take
place
in
other
suburbs
across
Grayndler
in
the
coming
weeks,
 starting
with
Ashfield
on
Sunday
4th
July.
 For
more
information





Moira
Williams



0420
504
411





Lydia
Andrews




0413
229
660
 Survey
results
(from
total
sample
of
110)
 • 85%
of
residents
said
that
the
Rudd
Government
is
not
doing
enough
to
tackle
climate
change
 • 93%
of
people
believe
the
government
should
significantly
boost
investment
in
renewable
energy
 and
create
clean
energy
jobs
 • 92%
of
people
believe
that
Australia
should
develop
a
plan
to
move
to
100%
renewable
energy
 • 75%
of
residents
believe
that
the
government
should
stick
to
its
2007
election
commitment
to
put
a
 price
on
carbon
and
make
polluters
pay
 • 75%
of
residents
were
more
likely
or
much
more
likely
to
vote
for
a
candidate
committing
to
a
price
 on
carbon
and
significant
investment
in
renewable
energy
 • 95%
of
swing
voters

said
they
were
more
or
much
more
likely
to
vote
for
a
candidate
if
they
were
 to
commit
to
a
price
on
carbon
and
significant
investment
in
renewable
energy
 
 


Appendix 6

MEDIA RELEASE 2

a rough guide to door-knocking for climate action

16

Media Release

Knock, knocking on Brunswick's door
Climate election campaigning begins
April 16 2010 For Immediate Release Members and supporters of the Climate Action Moreland will fan out across Brunswick this weekend door-knocking the community about the growing campaign to replace Hazelwood power station with clean energy. A commitment to replace the coal fired power station with clean energy is a key election ask of climate and environment groups ahead of the coming state and federal elections. Residents will be asked to sign a petition and contact the local candidates about the issue. “Over the coming months, we will be door-knocking and letter-boxing the whole of the electorate. We will also hold public forums and meetings with candidates to explain why Australia's dirtiest power station must be replaced in the term of the next government.” spokesperson for Climate Action Moreland, Merryn Redenbach said. “Hazelwood is the key climate test in this election.” “Inner-city seats like Brunswick are now marginal Labor-Green seats, and the sitting members and candidates know that the climate vote can determine the outcome on election day and perhaps even which party forms the next State government.” “Victoria’s brown-coal pollution has increased 10% in the last 10 years. Hazelwood is an industrial dinosaur. It produces almost 15% of Victoria’s carbon pollution,” spokesperson for Climate Action Moreland, Wayne Heywood said. “Replacing dirty coal with clean energy is the key to solving the climate problem. We can replace Hazelwood with clean energy alternatives, such as investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy like solar and wind.” Door knocking and letter-boxing in other inner-city electorates and areas will take place over the next two weeks. For more information Merryn Redenbach` Wayne Heywood 0407 825 046 0421 170 233

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